This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456 RAF Manual'.



AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
CHAPTER 1 - HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
Hydraulic power has unique characteristics which influence its selection to power aircraft systems 
instead of electrics and pneumatics, the other available secondary power systems.  The advantages of 
hydraulic power are that: 
a. 
It is capable of transmitting very high forces. 
b. 
It has rapid and precise response to input signals. 
c. 
It has good power to weight ratio. 
d. 
It is simple and reliable. 
e. 
It is not affected by electro-magnetic interference. 
Although it is less versatile than present generation electric/electronic systems, hydraulic power is the 
normal  secondary  power  source  used  in aircraft for operation of those aircraft systems which require 
large power inputs and precise and rapid movement.  These include flying controls, flaps, retractable 
undercarriages and wheel brakes. 
Principles 
2. 
Basic Power Transmission.  A simple practical application of hydraulic power is shown in Fig 1 
which  depicts  a  closed  system  typical  of  that  used  to  operate  light  aircraft  wheel  brakes.    When  the 
force on the master cylinder piston is increased slightly by light operation of the brake pedals, the slave 
piston  will  extend  until  the  brake  shoe  contacts  the  brake  drum.    This  restriction  will  prevent  further 
movement of the slave and the master cylinder.  However, any increase in force on the master cylinder 
will increase pressure in the fluid, and it will therefore increase the braking force acting on the shoes.  
When braking is complete, removal of the load from the master cylinder will reduce hydraulic pressure, 
and the brake shoe will retract under spring tension.  The system is limited both by the relatively small 
driving force which in practice can be applied to the master cylinder and the small distance which it can 
be moved. 
4-1 Fig 1 Simple Closed Hydraulic System 
Brake Pedal
Reservoir
Master Cylinder
Piston
Piston
Return
Spring
Brake
Shoes
Slave Cylinder
Brake Drum
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
3. 
Pump-powered Systems.  These limitations can be overcome by the introduction of a hydraulic 
pump.    Fig 2  shows  a  simplified  pump-powered  system  in  which  a  control  valve  transmits  pressure 
from the pump to the hydraulic jack. 
4-1 Fig 2 Simplified Pump-powered Hydraulic System 
Fluid Return To Reservoir
'DOWN'
Air Space
'UP'
Fluid Reservoir
Rotary Control
Pump
Valve
Control Surface
Fluid Pressure
From Pump
Servo Jack
A 'down' selection at the valve causes hydraulic pressure to be fed to the 'down' side of the jack and 
the  pump  will  work  to  maintain  system  pressure  during  and  after  jack  travel.    Fluid  from  the 
unpressurized side of the jack will be pushed through the return part of the system circuit back into a 
reservoir.  When 'up' is selected, hydraulic pressure is removed from the jack 'down' side and applied 
to  the  'up'  side;  fluid  displaced  by  the  subsequent  retraction  of  the  jack  is  returned  to  the  reservoir.  
Within the strength and size limitations of its components, the force transmitted by the system is now 
effectively limited only by the pressure which the pump can generate; the distance over which the jack 
can expand or contract is limited by the volume of the fluid. 
Typical System 
4. 
To  maintain  the  integrity  and  reliability  of  hydraulic  systems  which  power  ancillary  services 
fundamental  to  aircraft  airworthiness,  power sources for the primary flying controls are duplicated.  A 
typical  arrangement  is  for  one  of  the  sources  to  be  dedicated  to  the  primary  flying  controls  and  the 
other to a wider range of services.  In transport aircraft, a third hydraulic source is sometimes provided 
to  operate  those  systems  not  essential  to  flight  such  as  undercarriages,  brakes  and  doors.    The 
provision  of  a  fourth  power  source  for  emergency  use,  and  the  cross-coupling  between  sources, 
maintain power to essential services even in the event of two power sources failing.  Terminology for 
this arrangement of systems varies from aircraft type to type; however, the source dedicated solely to 
powering  the  flight  control  units  is  usually  termed  the  'Primary  System',  whilst  'Secondary  System'  is 
used  to  describe  the  system  providing  flight  control  back-up  and  powering  other  services.    'Utility'  or 
'Auxiliary'  is  applied  to  the  third  system  whilst  the  fourth  is  known  as  the  'Emergency'  or  'Back-up 
System'.  A schematic diagram for a transport aircraft hydraulic system is shown at Fig 3.  The function 
of components typical to most systems is described in the following paragraphs. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
4-1 Fig 3 Typical Hydraulic Power System 
Primary Supply
Main Services
Return
Accumulator
F
RV
Pressure
Elevators
SPS
Reservoir
Pump
F
Ailerons
Rudder
F
Pump
EPU
Spoilers
Emergency Supply
Air Brake
Flaps
Secondary Supply
Return
Pressure
F
Utility Services
Return
Hand Pump
Utility Supply
Loading
Pressure
Ramp
Steering
Brake
Undercarriage
Accumulator
Blow-down Bottle
F
Filter
Under-
Control Valve
Carriage
Non-Return Valve
Wheel
Brakes
RV
Relief Valve
Pressure Change/ Transmitters
System Components 
5. 
Pumps.    The  majority  of  engine  or  motor  driven  pumps are positive displacement, rotary swash 
plate  types,  having  up  to  10  axial  pistons  and  cylinders  contained  in  a  barrel  which  is  splined  to  the 
drive  shaft.    Each  piston  terminates  with  a  ball  and  slipper  (or  shoe).    The  slipper  bears  against  the 
swash  plate surface, the angle of which determines displacement and direction of the flow relative to 
rotation.    As  the  barrel  rotates,  the  distance  between  the  swash  plate  and  pump  body  increases  and 
decreases  throughout  each  revolution.   The pistons are driven in and out of the cylinders, drawing in 
fluid at low pressure at the open end of the stroke and expelling it at high pressure at the closed end, 
as shown in Fig 4. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
4-1 Fig 4 Principle of a Swash Plate Pump 
Direction of Pump
Barrel Rotation
Ports in Base
of Pump Body
"Slipper" between
 Swash Plate and Pistons
Fixed Swash 
Plate
Pistons rotate with
Barrel and are driven
In and Out by Angle
of Swash Plate 
Pump Barrel
containing
Multiple Cylinders
Displacement of 
Pistons during 
one Revolution
Pump Body
Inlet
Outlet
Drive Shaft
Two  basic  variations  of  this  type  of  pump  are  commonly  used  in  aircraft  systems;  one  produces  a 
constant  volume  output,  relying  upon  other  components  in  the  system  to  control  both  pressure  and 
volume, whilst the other is self-regulating, automatically varying its output to meet system demands. 
6. 
Fixed  Displacement  Pumps.    Fig  5  shows  a  fixed  displacement  pump  and  the  associated 
components needed to control system conditions.  Fixed displacement pumps absorb constant driving power 
whatever the output demand; when pressure in the system reaches an upper limit, a cut-out valve allows 
fluid  to  bypass  the  pressure  line  and  flow  back  to  the  reservoir.    Because  large  volumes  of  high-
pressure  hydraulic  fluid  are  therefore  constantly  being  circulated,  greater  attention  must  be  paid  in 
system design to cooling the fluid to maintain it within design temperature limitations. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
4-1 Fig 5 Fixed Displacement Pump and Control System 
System Return Line
Non-return Valve
Hydraulic
Reservoir
Fixed Swash Plate
Accumulator
Cut-out
Valve
Fixed
System Pressure Line
Displacement
Pump
Driving
Accumulator smooths out
Motor
pressure ripples caused by
Pump and Cut-out Valve operation
7. 
Variable  Displacement  Pumps.    Although  variable  displacement  pumps  are  more  expensive, 
and  cost  more  to  maintain,  they  allow  simplification  of  the  total  system  and  they  are  therefore  more 
usually chosen for Primary and Secondary systems.  Fig 6 shows such a pump. 
4-1 Fig 6 Variable Displacement Hydraulic Pump 
Fig 6a System Demand High 
Fig 6b System Demand Low 
Swash Plate at
Swash Plate at
Control Piston 
Large Angle
Small Angle
extended by
System Pressure
Control
Yoke
Reference
Spring
Control
Piston LOW
Input
Output Increases
Output Decreases
Drive
System Pressure
Shaft
System Pressure
LOW
HIGH
Its  operation  is  similar  to  that  of  the  fixed  displacement  pump,  but  the  angle  of  the  swash  plate  is 
variable and is changed automatically during operation by a device sensitive to system pressure.  As 
the  swash  plate  angle  varies,  so  does  the  stroke  of  the  pistons  and  the  output  of  the  pump.    Thus, 
when system pressure drops as power demands on the pump are increased, the output of the pump is 
increased to match the new demand.  When system pressure increases, as all demands are satisfied, 
the pump output is reduced, and the pump absorbs less power. 
8. 
Hand Pumps.  Some aircraft are fitted with a hand operated, positive displacement, linear pump 
for use on the ground.  Its operation is usually restricted to pressurizing systems sufficiently for opening 
and closing doors and canopies, and for lowering and raising ramps.  The aircraft Auxiliary Power Unit 
or  a  Ground  Power  Unit  is  used  if  more extensive use of the hydraulic system must be made on the 
ground. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
9. 
Accumulators.  As illustrated in Fig 5, hydraulic systems include an accumulator, the purpose of 
which is to absorb shocks and sudden changes in system pressure.  A typical nitrogen filled hydraulic 
accumulator is shown in Fig 7. 
4-1 Fig 7 Typical Hydraulic Accumulator 
Pressure Gauge
and Charging Point
Nitrogen
Fluid Separated
from Nitrogen
by Free Piston
Input from
Pump
Output to
System
NRV
Compressibility of the nitrogen allows the accumulator to absorb and smooth out the pressure ripples 
caused  by  pump  operation  and  also  the  sudden  changes  in  pressure  caused  by  operation  of 
components  such  as  jacks  and  valves.    It  also  acts  to  maintain  pressure,  to  the  limit  of  its  piston 
movement,  when  the  pump  ceases  to  operate.  This facility is used, for example, to maintain aircraft 
parking brake pressure for long periods.  When the hydraulic system is not pressurized by the pumps, 
the gas pressure is typically 70 Bar (1,000 psi). 
10.  Reservoir.    Hydraulic  systems  require  a  reservoir  in  which  the  fluid  displaced  when  the  servo 
jacks  are  retracted  is  stored  until  required  again.    Obviously,  the  capacity  must  be  designed  to 
accommodate  fluid  displaced  when  all  the  system  jacks  are  retracted  simultaneously.    The  reservoir 
performs  the  secondary  functions  of  cooling  the  fluid  and  allowing  any  air  absorbed  to  separate  out.  
The construction of a typical reservoir is shown at Fig 8. 
4-1 Fig 8 Construction of a Reservoir 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
Reservoirs  are  usually  pressurized  either  with nitrogen or by system hydraulic pressure acting on a 
piston.    This  pressure,  of  between  3  and  7  Bar,  prevents  the  fluid  foaming  and  provides  a  boost 
pressure at the pump inlet.  A relief valve is fitted to prevent excessive pressure build up due to heating 
or  system malfunction.  The body of the reservoir may contain horizontal baffles both to prevent fluid 
surging during aircraft manoeuvre and to promote de-aeration of returning fluid. 
11.  Heat  Exchangers  and  Temperature  Warning  Systems.    As  described  in  para  22,  hydraulic 
system performance is adversely affected by the presence of either air or vapour absorbed in or mixed 
with  the  fluid,  and  additional  heat  exchangers  are  usually  included  in  high  performance  systems  to 
keep  the  fluid  well  below  its  vaporization  point.    Such  systems also include temperature sensors and 
warning  systems  to  alert  the  crew  if  excessive  temperature  excursions  do  occur.    For  normal  fluids, 
such warning systems are activated at temperatures of about 100 ºC. 
12.  Filtration.    To  prevent  fluid  leakage  and  loss  of  pressure,  the  clearances  between  the  moving 
parts of a hydraulic component are minute, and the inclusion of even the smallest particles in the fluid 
would cause damage to its precise surfaces.  High levels of filtration are therefore applied to the fluid.  
Several  filters  are  included  in  most  systems,  so  that  each  major  component  can  be  protected  from 
debris generated upstream of it. 
13.  Pressure  and  Thermal  Relief  Valves.    The  use  of  a  cut-out  valve  to  regulate  the  output 
pressure  of  a  constant  displacement  hydraulic  pump  was  discussed  in  para  6.    Because  hydraulic 
fluid is incompressible and mechanical damage can be caused to components if over-pressurization 
occurs,  further  pressure  relief  valves  are  situated  at  critical  points  in  the  system.    They  are 
frequently  termed  'fuses'  because  of  this  protective  role,  and  they  operate  by  balancing  system 
pressure against an internal reference spring.  If system pressure rises above spring pressure, the 
valve opens allowing fluid to escape into the system return pipes thus reducing pressure.  The valve 
re-seals automatically once system pressure returns to below the reference level. 
14.  Non-return Valves.  There are areas in most hydraulic systems in which it is necessary to allow fluid 
to  flow  to  a  component  but  to  prevent  that  fluid  returning  along  the  same  pipe.    Non-return  valves  are 
used  for  this  purpose,  and  several  are  included  in  the  system  in  Fig  3.    Such  valves  are  similar  in 
construction  to  relief  valves,  and  the  principle  of  operation  is  shown at Fig 9.  The valve poppet is held 
closed by a weak internal reference spring.  Pressure of fluid flowing in the desired direction can readily 
overcome  spring  force,  and  fluid  can  therefore  flow  through  the valve almost without restriction.  If fluid 
pressure upstream of the valve is reduced, the poppet snaps closed to prevent a fluid flow reversal. 
4-1 Fig 9 Principle of a Non-return Valve 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
15.  Control Valves.  Both rotary and linear action control valves are used in hydraulic systems, and 
each  type  is  shown  diagrammatically  in  Fig  10.    Valve  movement  may  be  achieved  by  mechanical, 
hydraulic or electrical means depending upon the application.  The valves are invariably of an 'on/off' 
rather than a variable throttle type. 
4-1 Fig 10 Control Valves 
Fig 10a Linear Control Valve 
Fig 10b Rotary Control Valve 
'UP'
Control Input
'UP'
'DOWN'
Pressure
Control Input
Return
Inlet
Line
Valve
To 'Up' Jack
Spool
Pressure
Inlet
'DOWN'
Return Line
To 'Up' Side
To  D
' own  
' Side
of Jack
of Jack
To 'Down' Jack
16.  Jacks and Motors.  Jacks translate hydraulic fluid pressure into linear mechanical movement, as 
in the example illustrated in Fig 2.  Part rotary motion is often achieved by causing the jack to drive a 
connected  crank  in  an  arc;  however,  full  rotary  motion  is  achieved  by  using  a  hydraulic  motor.    This 
operates  on  the  reverse  principle  of  the  swashplate  pump  shown  in  Fig  4.    Hydraulic  pressure  is  fed 
sequentially  to  the  pistons  arranged  around  the  motor  body, and these react against the swash plate 
forcing it to rotate. 
17.  Instrumentation and Control.  Compared to electrical systems, the instrumentation and control 
of  hydraulic  systems  are  very  simple.    Cockpit  instrumentation  monitors  system  pressure,  and  the 
aircraft  central  warning  system  usually provides warning of system pressure failure and system over-
heating.  The crew are able to manually select an alternative system if one fails, although this reversion 
can  be  automatic  by  operation  of  cross-system  control  valves  sensitive  to  system  pressure.    Sight 
glasses and gauges are provided in most reservoirs and accumulators so that fluid levels and nitrogen 
pressures can be checked on the ground, whilst remote gauging systems are installed in cases where 
these components are not readily accessible. 
System Safety Features 
18.  Hydraulic  systems  and  their  components  reach  very  high  statistical  levels  of  reliability.  
Nevertheless, both military and civil aircraft design standards require that aircraft hydraulically powered 
primary flying control systems must have a back-up with the capacity to provide continued control for 
an indefinite period after failure of the primary system.  They also require that secondary systems, such 
as  undercarriages  and  brakes,  have  back-up  with  capacity  to  operate  them  for  one  landing.    The 
provision  of  alternative  power  sources,  system  redundancy  and  emergency  power  is  made  to  meet 
these requirements. 
19.  System Redundancy.  Alternative sources may include provision for the powered flying control units 
of a control system to revert to manual control, or for other hydraulic sources to be connected to the failed 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
power system.  For this purpose, hydraulically powered primary control systems are powered by at least 
two hydraulic systems.  The power systems are configured to be totally independent of each other so that 
the failure of one, for whatever reason, does not jeopardize operation of the other. 
20.  Emergency  Power.    Assurance  that  system  operation  can  be  continued  for  indefinite  periods, 
after  failure  of  one  hydraulic  pump,  requires  that  two  other  pumps’  sources  are  provided.    One  is 
usually  a  pump  driven  from  the  aircraft  normal  secondary  power  system.    The  other may be a pump 
powered  by  an  emergency  source  such  as  an  Emergency  Power  Unit  or  a  Ram  Air  Turbine  (see 
Volume  4,  Chapter  11).    For  systems  requiring  only  a  limited  duration  of  operation  under  emergency 
power,  such  as  wheel  brakes  and  undercarriages,  the  stored  energy  of  accumulators  or  'blow  down' 
nitrogen cylinders (see Volume 4, Chapter 2) situated in the system is used. 
Limiting Factors 
21.  Several  factors  influence  the  effectiveness  of hydraulic systems, and some of these are expanded 
upon below.  The adverse influence of such factors is minimized by careful design and maintenance of 
the systems and selection of the most appropriate fluids.  There is no ideal solution in these cases, and 
the chosen solution is invariably a compromise between performance and the other factors. 
22.  Temperature and Aeration.  As hydraulic fluid nears its boiling point, fluid vapour and absorbed air 
are given off and carried in the fluid.  The presence of gas from this or any other source introduces an 
unacceptable  degree  of  compressibility  into  the  columns  of  fluid  in  the  system,  causing  operation  to 
become  sluggish  and  erratic.    In  high  performance  systems,  preventive  design  features,  such  as 
reservoirs  to  prompt  and  contain  the  separation  of  gases  from  the  fluid,  and  the  provision  of  adequate 
cooling, are backed by careful system maintenance to minimize the likelihood of air entering the system. 
23.  Contamination.    As  discussed  in  para  12,  contamination  of  fluid  with  even  minute  particles  will 
damage  and  degrade  systems  performance.    Careful  systems  replenishment  avoids  this  problem,  and 
adequate system filtration ensures that particles introduced into or generated by the system are removed 
before  they  can  be  carried  through  the  system  into  components  where  they  will  cause  mechanical 
damage.    Many  hydraulic  fluids  are  also  hygroscopic  to  a  small  degree.    Again,  careful  system 
replenishment and routine monitoring of the fluid will minimize the possibility of water absorption. 
24.  Flammability.  Certain hydraulic fluids are highly flammable, and leaks or spillage present a significant 
fire  risk,  although  appropriate  husbandry  precautions  can  minimize  this.    Non-flammable  fluids  are  used 
almost universally in the systems of passenger-carrying aircraft, despite them being highly corrosive. 
25.  Hazardous Liquids.  All hydraulic fluids are active solvents and many are also corrosive.  They are 
therefore hazardous to both aircraft surfaces and materials and to human beings.  Non-flammable fluids 
are particularly hazardous.  Careful handling during maintenance is necessary to avoid this problem. 
System Health Monitoring and Maintenance 
26.  The  maintenance  activities  carried  out  on  hydraulic  systems  include  first  aid  action  to  disclose, 
contain  and  rectify  component  failure,  and  fluid  monitoring  used  to  observe  overall  system  health 
trends and to detect component degradation. 
27.  Filter Checks.  As shown in Fig 4, filters are strategically placed throughout an aircraft hydraulic 
system.  A component failure may not immediately manifest itself as a system malfunction, but routine 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-1- Hydraulic Systems 
inspection of the filter tell-tale devices will reveal that a failure has occurred.  The filter will also prevent 
debris  migrating  around  the  system  to  cause  secondary  failures.    Maintenance  action  can  then  be 
taken to restore and safeguard system integrity. 
28.  Fluid Monitoring.  A systematic sampling programme of fluid contamination is carried out on the 
majority  of  aircraft.    The  periodic  chemical  and  spectral  analysis  of  fluids  serves  to  indicate  failure 
trends  in  particular  components  and  the  contamination  and  degradation  of  system  fluid.    Based  on 
these  trends,  timely component replacement can be taken, thus preventing eventual failure occurring 
in the air, and reducing repair costs. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 – 4-2 - Pneumatic Systems 
 CHAPTER 2 - PNEUMATIC SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
The use of air as a medium to transmit energy and to do work offers many advantages to the aircraft 
designer.  Although some early applications of pneumatics have been superseded by hydraulics or electrics, 
as  technological  advance  has  overcome  the  initial  disadvantages  of  these  alternative  media,  the  inherent 
and unique advantages offered by the use of air and its main constituent gases ensure that pneumatics will 
remain  one  of  these  three  fundamental  power  transmission  media  for  aviation  use  into  the  foreseeable 
future.   Unlike hydraulics and electrics, pneumatic power is generated and stored in a number of different 
ways each relevant to the specific end use, and it is therefore not appropriate to consider pneumatic power 
generation as a specific topic.  Instead, the principle characteristics of the medium, and the techniques and 
equipment configurations used to exploit those characteristics for specific applications, are discussed in the 
following paragraphs. 
Unique Characteristics 
2. 
The ready availability of high temperature, high pressure air as a by product of the propulsion system, or 
even  of  aircraft  forward  motion,  provides  an  extremely  cost  effective  source  of  heat  or  pressure  energy.  
Systems  which  utilize  such energy sources include cabin and cockpit pressurization and heating, airframe 
and engine de-icing  and the augmentation of flying controls.  Similarly, air can be cycled through a system 
and  exhausted  overboard  after  use,  without  penalty.    Such  'total  loss'  systems  are  extremely  space  and 
weight  efficient,  and  this  factor  influences  the  choice  of  air  above  other  energy  transmission  media  which 
usually require to be contained in a closed circuit system for technical or environmental reasons.  Such 'total 
loss'  air  systems  include  engine  starting  and  cabin    and  equipment  conditioning.    Again,  although  air  will 
support combustion, its properties are not affected by temperature extremes, and it can therefore be used in 
power transmission applications where high temperatures, fire risks or chemical reaction rule out the use of 
normal hydraulic fluids.  Pneumatic systems are therefore often used in engine nozzle and thrust reverser 
operating systems. 
3. 
The ready compressibility of air offers both advantages and disadvantages for its use.  The advantages 
are  that  air  can  be  compressed  and  used  to  store  the  resultant  pressure  energy  either  long  term  for 
subsequent use or short term to absorb shocks or sudden changes in pressure levels.  However, because of 
this  same  compressibility,  pneumatics  are  not  suitable  for  use  in  control  systems  requiring  precise,  rapid 
response movements. 
Typical Applications 
4. 
The applications of pneumatics can be categorized under four main headings.  These are: 
a. 
Pressure energy storage. 
b. 
Compression. 
c. 
Pressure energy transfer. 
d. 
Heat energy transfer. 
Details  of  several  of  the  major  systems  which  utilize  pneumatics  in  these  ways  are  discussed  in  the 
relevant chapters of this Volume, whilst other specific examples are given below. 
Pressure Energy Storage 
5. 
Undercarriage Blow-down Systems.  Because hydraulic fluids cannot normally be compressed, 
energy  cannot  be  stored  within  simple  hydraulic  systems.    However,  this  disadvantage  can  be 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 4-2 - Pneumatic Systems 
overcome  by  the  integration  of  pneumatics  into  hydraulic  systems.    An  application  of  such  hydro-
pneumatics  is  the  undercarriage  emergency  blow-down  system.    A  schematic  diagram  of  such  a 
system is at Fig 1. In this particular example, release of high pressure air  (nitrogen is normally used to 
reduce  the  risk  of  a  hydraulic  oil  fire)  from  the  blow-down  bottle  enables    the  undercarriage  lowering 
system to be pressurized sufficiently to lower the undercarriage in the event of hydraulic malfunction or 
failure.    Other  similar  systems  feed  nitrogen  directly  into  the  hydraulic  fluid.    Although  such  an 
arrangement  avoids  the  disadvantage  of pressurizing only a set volume of fluid (that displaced within 
the  accumulator  by  the  gas),  it  does  impose  a  considerable  penalty  during  subsequent  fault 
rectification,  because  the  gas  is  absorbed  into  the  fluid  necessitating  replacement  of  all  of  the  fluid 
within the hydraulic system. 
4-2 Fig 1 Simplified Undercarriage Blow-down System 
Non-return Valve
Hydraulic
Hydraulic
Pressure
Return
Emergency
Undercarriage
Reservoir
Selector Valves
High Pressure Nitrogen
Fluid/Gas Separating Piston
Emergency Selector coupled
to 'Down' Hydraulic
Return Selector Valve
Operation of Emergency Selector
allows fluid under gas pressure to
'blow down' Jacks until Down Locks
engage. (No retraction is possible
after blow down.)
Undercarriage
Jacks
6. 
Fire  Extinguishers  and  Liferafts.    There  are  many  other  applications  in  which  compressed 
gases are stored for eventual use as an emergency or occasional energy source.  Amongst the most 
relevant  are  the  use  of  nitrogen  to  pressurize  engine  fire  extinguisher  bottles  for  eventual  use  in 
propelling extinguishant on to a fire, and the use of carbon dioxide stored with liferafts and life jackets 
for subsequent release to inflate these items when they are required. 
Compression 
7. 
Shock Absorbers.  Hydraulic systems are frequently configured to use the compressibility of air 
to  absorb  shocks  and  sudden  changes  in  system  pressure.    The  system  shown  in  Fig  1  includes  a 
nitrogen filled hydraulic accumulator.  The functions of the accumulator are to smooth out any sudden 
changes  in  systems  pressure  caused  by  operation  of  components  such  as  jacks  and  to  protect  the 
system from sudden peaks in pressure which occur when system valves close.  The graph at Fig 2a 
shows  the  typical  pressure  variation  in  a  system  without  an  accumulator,  whilst  Fig  2b  shows  the 
comparable  variation  when  an  accumulator  is  used.    Hydro-pneumatic  shock  absorbers,  based  on  a 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 4-2 - Pneumatic Systems 
similar  principle,  are  widely  used  in  many  undercarriages,  and  these  are  discussed  in  detail  in  the 
relevant chapter of this Volume. 
4-2 Fig 2 Hydraulic Accumulator Performance 
a  System Pressure Fluctuations
b  System Pressure Fluctuations
without Accumulator
with Accumulator
Ripple caused by
Safety Relief
operation of Pump
Valve Operates
Pressure Control
Maximum Safe
System
Pressure Level
Nominal SystemPressure
re
u
s
s
re
P
Minimum Acceptable
Ripple Dampened
Pressure Level
by Gas Pressure
in Accumulator
Sub-system selected
Valve opens
Time
Time
8. 
Seal  Inflation.    The  doors  and  canopies  of pressurized aircraft require to be sealed effectively, to 
maintain  pressurization  within  the  fuselage  and  to  prevent  the  escape  of  unacceptable  volumes  of 
conditioning  air.    The  sealing  of  the  irregular  gaps  between  such  doors  and  hatches  and  their  frames 
imposes  a  significant  problem,  and  seals  inflated  by  compressed  air  are  often  used  in  such  situations.  
The omni-directional force applied to such seals by low pressure air is ideal for such applications, and the 
air can readily be tapped from the aircraft pressurization system. 
Pressure Energy Transfer 
9. 
Augmented  (Blown)  Lift  Devices  and  Flying  Controls.    Within  the  restrictions  of  current 
aerodynamic  knowledge  and  technology,  all  VSTOL  aircraft  must  be  provided  with  devices  which 
impart  energy  to  the  surrounding  air  stream  to  provide  lift  and  control  forces  in  the  absence  of 
adequate forward air speed.  Purpose-designed VSTOL aircraft usually use vectored lift/thrust systems 
which  also  provide  flight  control  forces.    However,  the  use  of  conventional  aerodynamic  devices 
enhanced for STOL operation by ducting high energy air streams over them is an effective alternative 
solution.  Fig 3 shows such a system in schematic form. 
4-2 Fig 3 Augmented Lift Devices 
Fig 3a Wing in Normal Flight 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 4-2 - Pneumatic Systems 
Fig 3b Wing with Blown Flap Extended 
When selected, high energy air is
tapped from the engines and blows over
the upper surface of the flap preventing
air stream separation and increasing
the velocity of the air flow over the surface
10.  Starters.  The abundant availability of high pressure air from gas turbine engines and APUs allows 
its  use  for  engine  starting.    This  is  achieved  either  by  impinging  upon  the  turbine  directly,  and  thus 
spinning up the engine, or more usually by driving a small turbine which is connected to the main engine 
through  suitable  gearing.    Both  of  these  applications  are  dealt  with  in  the  appropriate  Chapter  of  this 
Volume (see Volume 4, Chapter 12). 
Heat Energy Transfer 
11.  Air  Conditioning  and  Ice Protection.  The compressors of most high performance gas turbine 
engines  are  designed  to  produce  volumes  of  air  in  excess  of  engine  requirements.    Such  air  at  high 
pressure  and  at  temperatures  up  to  300  ºC  is  available  through  engine  compressor  bleeds,  and,  as 
well as being used in cabin and cockpit pressurization systems, the air provides an effective source of 
heat  for  air  conditioning  and  for  the  ice  protection  of  aerofoils  and  engine  intakes.    Both  applications 
are dealt with in Volume 4, Chapter 5. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
CHAPTER 3 - ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
Early  aircraft  had  no  electrical  equipment  other  than  the  engine  ignition  system.    Power  for  this 
was  provided  by  an  engine  driven  magneto.    The  introduction  of  lighting  and  communications 
equipment necessitated this source to be augmented, first by a pre-charged battery, and subsequently 
by  on-board  generation  systems  using  wind  driven  direct  current  (DC)  generators  fitted  with  crude 
regulators  to  maintain  a  constant  12  volts  output  irrespective  of  the  flying  speed.    As  soon  as 
developments  in  engine  power  permitted,  these  systems  were  replaced  by  engine  driven  generators 
rotating  at  relatively  constant  speed  and  controlled  by  more  effective  regulators.   Ever-increasing on-
board electrical loads necessitated the use of bigger diameter, and therefore heavier, cables. 
2. 
The power output of an electrical generation system is a product of voltage and current.  However, 
electrical  cable  diameter  is  dictated  by  current  and  the  resistance  of  the  cable  material,  not  by  voltage.  
Therefore, within the practical limitations of cable insulation, the higher the system voltage the higher the 
power capacity for the same physical cable size.  The need to control weight led to the use of higher DC 
voltage  systems.    Although  DC  high  voltage  systems  have  been  tried,  the  problems  of  arcing  at 
altitude, and the size of batteries required, rendered such developments impractical.  All military aircraft 
systems  now  conform  to  the  present  24-volt  international  standard  for aircraft DC systems (note: DC 
generators  and  systems  are  normally  rated  at  28  V,  to  maintain  a  positive  charge  state  to  the  24  V 
batteries).    However,  alternating  current  (AC)  generation  systems  are  not  constrained  by  the  same 
disadvantages as DC systems; consequently, AC systems were introduced into aircraft to meet the higher 
on-board power requirements common in the 1960s.  The evolution of these systems has led to the 200 
V, three-phase, 400 Hz generator systems, now standard in both military and civil aircraft.  Components 
using  the  AC  output  include  three-phase  devices  (e.g.  motors),  single-phase  115  V  devices  (e.g.  radio 
equipment) and secondary supplies such as transformers. 
3. 
The  introduction  of  solid-state  technology  to  avionic  equipment  has  significantly  reduced  the 
power requirements in those aircraft not equipped with high-powered radars, and this has reversed the 
earlier  trend  towards  ever-larger  electrical  generation  systems.    Aircraft  now  tend  to  fall  into  two 
categories; those with low electrical demands, the electrical systems of which are primarily DC based, 
and those with high demands, which are primarily AC based. 
Sources of Electrical Power 
4. 
Fig 1 shows the primary sources of aircraft electrical power: 
a. 
Primary  electrical  power  is  provided  from  a  combination  of  batteries  providing  DC,  and 
generators providing AC or DC. 
b. 
Conversion  of  DC  to  AC  or  AC  to  DC,  at  similar  or  different  voltages,  is  achieved  by  the 
use  of  inverters,  converters,  rectifiers  and  transformer/rectifier  units.    These  equipments  are 
described in para 7. 
c. 
Auxiliary  electrical  power  may  be  provided  from  either  an  Auxiliary  Power  Unit  (APU)  or  a 
Ground Power Unit (GPU). 
d. 
Emergency electrical power is provided by the use of batteries, a Ram Air Turbine (RAT) Unit 
or a rapid response Emergency Power Unit (EPU). 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
4-3 Fig 1 Aircraft Electrical Power Source 
5. 
Batteries.  Batteries produce DC electrical power by chemical reaction.  Although certain types of 
battery generate electricity by an irreversible chemical action (these are termed primary cell batteries, 
typical of which is the dry cell battery), other types can be recharged (these are termed secondary cell 
batteries).  The process of recharging and discharging on demand can be repeated for many hundreds 
of cycles.  Both types of battery produce electricity at voltage values dependent upon their construction 
- most aircraft batteries are configured to produce 24 V.  Such batteries have a fixed capacity but can 
release their charge over a wide range of current flows.  They are thus able to provide short peaks of 
current  in  excess  of  100  A,  adequate  for  engine  starting,  whilst  also  being  able  to provide long-term, 
low current requirements of considerably less than 10 A.  Batteries are an essential part of the aircraft 
electrical  supply  system,  providing  power  before  and  during  engine  start,  being  recharged  when  the 
main  generators  come  on  line,  and  providing  power  again  during  emergencies  or  after  the  main 
engines  have  been  closed  down.    Small  individual  rechargeable  or  single  cycle  batteries  are  used  in 
instruments  and  avionic  equipment  to  provide  memory  retention,  and  in  lighting  systems  and  safety 
equipment to provide emergency lighting and communications. 
6. 
Generators.    Generators  convert  mechanical  energy derived from the aircraft engines into electrical 
energy by electro-magnetic induction.  Fig 2 shows the principle of operation of a brushless AC generator.  
Three windings are mounted on a common shaft which is driven through a suitable power take-off from a 
main  engine.    The  windings  rotate  within  three  associated  stator  windings  mounted  in  the  frame  of  the 
machine.  The permanent magnet induces a single-phase AC output in the pilot exciter coil, which is rectified 
and  controlled  before  being  fed  back  to  the  main  exciter  field  coil.    The  induced  output  is  rectified  by  the 
integral diodes and fed to the main field windings.  The main generator produces the output which is fed into 
the aircraft power distribution circuit.  The principle of brushless DC generators is similar, although the power 
is taken from the machine after the second phase of generation and rectification.  Most generators are of the 
brushless  variety  which  avoids  the  problems  of  wear  in  the  brushes  (DC)  or  slip  rings  (AC)  and  arcing 
inherent in these simple but less reliable machines.  The power rating for typical DC generators is 6 kW to 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 9 


AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
9 kW (about 200 A to 300 A at 28 V), whilst AC generators produce output levels up to 60 kVA (200 V and 
300 A at a 0.8 power factor = 48 kW) (for an explanation of the term, power factor. 
4-3 Fig 2 Principles of a Brushless AC Generator 
Output Voltage
Sampling
Voltage
Regulator
Single
Phase
AC
DC
N
Drive
S
Shaft
Pilot
Main
Main
Exciter
Exciter
Generator
7. 
Power  Conversion  Equipment.    Many  aircraft  electrical  systems  and  components  operate  at 
voltages  which  are  different  to  the  primary  generation  source.    For  example,  aircraft  having a 200 V, 
three-phase AC generation system usually require a 115 V AC supply to power instruments and a 28 V 
DC  supply  to  power  the  main  DC  components  and  to  charge  the  aircraft  batteries.    Similarly,  aircraft 
having  28  V  DC  generation  systems  require  an  AC  supply  to  power  certain  avionic  and  instrument 
systems.  The following types of power conversion equipment are available to achieve these tasks: 
a. 
Inverters.  Inverters change the primary DC supply to a secondary AC supply.  Inverters may 
be either rotary or solid state.  A rotary inverter consists of a DC motor driving an AC generator.  A 
solid-state  inverter  (also  known  as  a  static  inverter)  uses  a  transistorized  switching  unit  to  do  the 
same job but is often more efficient and more flexible in output. 
b. 
Converters.    Converters  change  the  frequency  of  the  primary  AC  supply  to  a  different 
secondary frequency.  They too may be solid state or rotary devices. 
c. 
Transformers.    In  the  main,  transformers  are  used  to  change  the  voltage  of  a  primary  AC 
supply to a higher or lower secondary AC voltage. 
d. 
Transformer/Rectifier  Units.    A  Transformer  Rectifier  Unit  (TRU)  is  a  combination  of  static 
transformer and rectifier, for converting an AC input of one voltage into DC outputs of other voltages. 
8. 
Ground, Auxiliary and Emergency Power Units
a.
Ground  Power  Units.    Because  of  the  finite  capacity  of  aircraft  batteries,  and  the  varying 
requirements for electrical power on the ground between flights, most permanent operating bases 
are  equipped with mobile or fixed AC and DC electrical supply units, called Ground Power Units 
(GPUs).  These can be connected directly into the aircraft electrical system, to provide power for 
aircraft servicing and for aircraft systems and engine starting.  During engine start procedures, as 
generators are brought on line, the GPU supply is normally isolated automatically. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
b. 
Auxiliary  Power  Units.    To  avoid  dependence  upon  availability  of  a  GPU,  many  aircraft  are 
fitted with an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) capable of providing both electrical and hydraulic power for 
aircraft  starting.    Such  units  each  consist  of  a  generator  powered  by  a  self  contained,  small  gas 
turbine 2, engine. 
c. 
Emergency  Power  Units.    APUs  which  can  operate  during  flight  are  called  Airborne 
Auxiliary Power Units (AAPUs).  In addition to their auxiliary uses, they can provide power during 
emergencies  to  augment  or  replace  the  aircraft  primary  power  generation  system.    Inherently 
unstable  aircraft,  the  safety  of  which  is  dependent  upon  the  continuous  operation  of  automatic 
flight control systems, require emergency power supplies which can be brought into full operation 
within  seconds  of  a  primary  system  failure  occurring.    Ram  Air  Turbines  (RAT)  (propeller-driven 
generators,  which  automatically  extend  into  the  airstream  in  the  event  of  a  system  failure)  or 
turbine  powered,  rapid  response  Emergency  Power  Units  (EPUs),  are  able  to  fulfil  this 
requirement. 
Voltage and Frequency Regulation, Power Output Balancing and Fault Protection 
9. 
Voltage  Regulation.    Aircraft  electrical  equipment  is  designed  to  operate  within  closely  defined 
voltage limits.  To ensure satisfactory operation, the aircraft system voltage must be maintained within 
a set tolerance over a wide range of engine speeds and electrical loads.  This requirement is achieved 
by  the  use  of  automatic  voltage  regulators,  such  as  that  included  in  Fig  2.    These  act  to  adjust  the 
current fed into the generator’s main exciter field coils in an inverse relationship to changes in system 
voltage.    Thus,  if  system  voltage  drops  because  of  an  increase  in  the  load,  the  generator  exciter 
current  is  automatically  increased,  and,  therefore,  the  generator  output  increases  until  the  balance  is 
restored.  Adjustment of the current in the exciter coil is achieved in modern generators either by pulse 
or  frequency  modulation  of  the  supply.    However,  older  machines  used  a  technique  which  controlled 
the current in the exciter coil by varying the resistance of a carbon pile placed in series with it. 
10.  Frequency Regulation.  The output frequencies of AC generators are dependent upon their speed 
of  rotation.    For  satisfactory equipment operation, it is imperative that the electrical system frequency is 
controlled  precisely.    As  the  initial  drive  will  originate  from  an  engine  auxiliary  gearbox,  it  must  remain 
steady irrespective of variations in engine power settings.  The drive shaft will, therefore, go through an 
intermediate  device  termed  a  Constant  Speed  Drive  Unit  (CSDU).    This  will  maintain  the  drive  to  the 
generator  at  a  constant  rpm  (a  CSDU  would  not  be  required  on  aircraft  fitted  with  constant  speed 
engines).  Fig 3 shows a schematic layout of a simple AC generator supply. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
4-3 Fig 3 Schematic of a Simple AC Generator Supply 
AC
Drive Shafts
Busbar
Generator Control
Relay
Engine 
AC
Auxiliary 
CSDU
Generator
Gearbox
Voltage
Frequency
Regulator
Controller
200 V
400 Hz
3-Phase
Field
Protection
Relay
Unit
Where a CSDU and generator are designed and built as a single unit, it is termed an Integrated Drive 
Generator  (IDG).    CSDU  and  IDG  systems  utilize  electro-mechanical  or  electro-hydraulic  couplings, 
which work on the principle of sensing variation in system frequency and adjusting generator speed to 
maintain  a  constant  output  irrespective  of  the  input  drive  speed  (within  system  parameters).    The 
CSDU and IDG systems are able to control frequency within 1%. 
11.  Balancing  of  DC  Generators.    In  systems  utilizing  two  or  more  generators,  it  is  essential  that 
each generator produces an equal output.  This is achieved by interconnecting their respective voltage 
regulators so that the output of each generator is adjusted to balance with those of the others. 
12.  Parallel Operation of AC Generators.  The balancing of AC generators requires not only that the 
load  should  be  shared,  but  also  that  voltage,  frequency  and  phase  angles  be  synchronized.    Load 
sharing  is  achieved  automatically  by  comparing  the  level  of  current  flowing  from  each  generator  and 
increasing  the  output  of  the  more  lightly  loaded  machine  until  a  balance  is  achieved.    Paralleling  of 
generators is achieved automatically by control circuits which sense the frequency and phase angle of 
each.    When  the  frequencies  and  phase  angles  of  two  generators  are  matched,  bus-tie  contactors 
between  them  close,  thus  inter-connecting  their  frequency  control  circuits.    The  control  devices  for 
each generator are usually located in dedicated Control and Protection Units (CPUs). 
13. Fault Protection.  The distribution circuits of both AC and DC generation systems require the addition 
of  protection  devices  to  prevent  generator  or  consumer  unit  malfunctions  from  damaging  equipment  and 
endangering the aircraft.  Typical examples of the malfunctions for which protection is provided include over 
and  under-voltage,  over  and  under-frequency,  short  circuits  (line  to  line  and  line  to  earth  faults),  phase 
sequence (three-phase AC only), and reverse current (DC only).  The protection devices act to disconnect 
the relevant generator from the distribution busbar and also to de-excite the generator. 
Power Distribution Systems 
14.  General.    In  order  to  enable  generated  power  to  be  made  available  at  the  power-consuming 
equipment, an organized form of distribution throughout the aircraft is essential.  The precise manner 
will  vary  dependent  upon  aircraft  type,  and  the  location  of  consumer  components.    Aircraft  power 
distribution  systems  are  configured  to  allow  the  maximum  flexibility  in  their  management  if  a 
component or systems failure occurs. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
15.  Busbars.  In most types of aircraft, the output from the generating sources is coupled to one or more 
low  impedance  conductors,  referred  to  as  busbars.    Busbars  are  usually  located  at  central  points  in  an 
aircraft, in junction boxes or distribution panels, and provide a convenient point from which supplies can be 
taken to the consumer unit.  Busbars vary in form.  In a simple system, a busbar may be a strip of interlinked 
terminals.  In a more complex system, main busbars might be thick metal strips (usually copper) to which 
input,  and  output  supply  connections  can  be  made;  subsidiary  busbars  might  be  flexible  copper  wire.  
Busbars are insulated from the main structure and provided with protective covering. 
16.  Split-busbar Systems.  The function of a distribution system is primarily a simple one, but it must also 
work  under  abnormal  conditions.    Power  to  equipment  should  be  maintained,  if  possible,  during  primary 
power  source  failures,  and  faults  on  the  distribution  system  should  have  minimum  effect  on  system 
functioning.    These  requirements  are  met  in  a  combined  manner  by  paralleling  generators,  where 
appropriate, by providing adequate circuit protection devices, and by arranging for faulty components to be 
isolated  from  the  distribution  system.    In  addition,  it  is  usual  to  split  busbars  and  distribution  circuits  into 
sections in order to power particular consumer components.  The principle of the split-busbar system (see 
Fig  4)  is  that  consumer  services  are  divided  into  three  categories  of  importance.    If  a  generation  system 
failure occurs, the distribution system can be progressively modified (manually or automatically) to maintain 
power  supplies  to  essential  consumer  loads  whilst  shedding  non-essential loads.  The three categories of 
load are defined as follows: 
a. 
Vital  Services.    Vital  services  are  those  services  which  are  needed  after  an  emergency 
landing  or  crash.    These  might  include  inertia  switch  operated  fire  extinguishers  and  emergency 
lighting.  These services are fed directly from the main and emergency batteries. 
b. 
Essential Services.  Essential services are those services which are required to ensure safe 
flight  during  in-flight  emergency  situations,  such  as  radio  and  instrument  supplies.    They  are 
connected  to  busbars  in  such  a  way  that  they  can  always  be  supplied  from  a  generator  or  from 
batteries. 
c. 
Non-essential  Services.    Non-essential  services  are those which are not essential to flight 
and may be isolated during an in-flight emergency, either by manual or automatic action. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
4-3 Fig 4 Split-busbar System (Primary DC Power Source) 
Essential
AC Services
Vital DC
Services
No 1 AC
Busbar
Non-essential
AC Services
No 3 (Static)
Inverter
No 2 AC
Busbar
Battery
Isolation
Busbar
Relay
No 1
No 2
Inverter
Inverter
Batteries
Non-essential
Non-essential
DC Services
DC Services
No 1
No 2
DC Busbar
DC Busbar
Bus-tie
Relay
No 1
No 2
DC Generators
System Control and Protection Devices 
17.  Control  Devices.    In  aircraft  electrical  installations,  the  function  of  initiating  and  subsequently 
controlling the operating sequences of the circuitry is performed principally by switches and relays.  A 
switch  is  a  device  designed  to  complete  or  interrupt  an  electrical  circuit  safely  and  efficiently  as  and 
whenever  required.    Switches  exist  to  meet  a  wide  range  of  applications.    They  may  be  operated 
manually or automatically by mechanical means or at predetermined values of pressure, temperature, 
time  or  force.    Relays  are  remotely  controlled  electrical  devices  capable  of  switching  one  or  more 
circuits.    Used  extensively  in  electrical  and  avionic  systems,  relays  are  available  in  a  wide  range  of 
physical configurations to meet an equally wide range of performance criteria. 
18.  Protection Devices.  An abnormal condition, or fault, may arise in an electrical circuit for a variety 
of reasons.  If allowed to persist, the fault may cause damage to equipment, failure of essential power 
supplies, fire, or loss of life.  It is, therefore, essential to include protection devices in electrical circuits 
to  minimize  damage,  and  safeguard  essential  supplies,  under  such  fault  conditions  as  over-voltage, 
over-current  or  reverse  current.    The  protection  devices  used  include  fuses,  circuit  breakers  and 
reverse  current  cut-outs  (RCCOs).    A  fuse  is  a  thermal  device,  designed  to  protect  cables  and 
components  against  short  circuits  and  overload  currents  by  providing  a  weak  link  in  the  circuit.  
Rupture of the fuse gives evidence of a system’s malfunction, and, after correction of the fault, the fuse 
can  be  replaced.    Circuit  breakers  isolate  faulty  circuits  by  means  of  a  mechanical  trip,  operated  by 
thermal or electro-mechanical means.  They can be readily reset in flight, if accessible, after clearance 
or  isolation  of  the  fault.    An  RCCO  senses  the  difference  in  voltage  between  the  generator  and  its 
busbar.  Its contacts remain closed whilst the voltage of the generator is higher than that of the busbar, 
but open if this situation is reversed. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
Typical Generating Systems 
19.  Single Channel DC System.  The simplified schematic diagram at Fig 5 shows a single channel 
system  typical  of  that  used  in  a  single-engine  training  aircraft.    It  is  a  simple  system,  with  many 
automatic features designed to reduce the workload of an inexperienced pilot.  The system comprises 
a  brushed  DC  generator  feeding  the  single  busbar  through  a  diode  rectifier.    The  generator  is 
controlled  by  a  carbon  pile  voltage  regulator  and  protected  by  high-current  and  over-volt relays.  The 
aircraft battery is connected to the busbar through a contactor operated by the battery master switch.  
This  is  a  two-way  feed,  allowing  the  battery  to  charge  when  the  busbar  is  energized  by  the  DC 
generator.    The  battery  contactor  is  deactivated  automatically  when  an  external  power  supply  is 
connected to the aircraft, or in the event of a crash. 
4-3 Fig 5 Single Channel DC System 
Non-essential
Essential
Services
Services
Single Busbar
Battery
High Current
Vital
Contactor
External
Cut-out
Services
Power
Contactor
Voltage
Rectifier
Vital
Regulator
Busbar
Over Volt
Battery
Cut-out
Master
Crash
Switch
External
Switch
Power
DC
Battery
Socket
Generator
20.  Twin  Channel,  Split-busbar  DC  System.    The  diagram  at  Fig  6  shows  a  twin  channel,  split-
busbar  system,  typical  of  that  used  in  a  twin-engine  aircraft  with  more  than  one  crew  member.    The 
diagram has been simplified by excluding the control and protection devices which are present in such 
a system.  The DC generators each feed a discrete busbar connecting non-essential consumer units.  
Both also feed the essential busbar, as do the batteries.  Thus, in the event of a malfunction, power to 
essential DC consumers can be maintained, in preference to non-essential services.  The generators 
also supply two inverters, which provide AC power to the non-essential AC services.  Power from the 
essential busbar is converted to AC by a third inverter, to feed essential AC consumers.  Vital services 
are powered direct from the battery busbar. 
4-3 Fig 6 DC Twin Channel Split-busbar System 
Essential
Essential
Vital DC
AC Services
DC Services
Services
Essential DC Busbar
Non-essential
AC Services
Non-essential
Non-essential
Battery Busbar
AC Busbar
No 3
DC Services
DC Services
Inverter
No 1 DC Busbar
No 2 DC Busbar
Batteries
No 1
No 2
Inverter
Inverter
External
Power
No 1 Generator
No 2 Generator
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-3 - Electrical Systems 
21.  AC Twin Channel, Split-busbar System.  The simplified diagram at Fig 7 shows a twin channel, 
split-busbar  system,  typical  of  that  used  in  a  twin-engine  combat  aircraft  with  more  than  one  crew 
member.  The two AC generators are regulated by separate, but cross-related, control units.  Each AC 
generator supplies power to an AC busbar.  The busbars can be interconnected (if the frequency and 
phase  of  each  supply  are  synchronized).    Each  AC  busbar  supplies  a  TRU,  which  then  feeds  its 
respective  DC  busbars.    These  can  be  interconnected,  if  necessary,  and  they  feed  the  non-essential 
services.  The TRUs also feed the essential DC busbar which can be interconnected with the battery 
busbar  if  necessary.    Thus,  all  similar  busbars  can  be  interconnected,  but  both  AC  and  DC  non-
essential  consumers  can  be  disconnected  if  a  system  malfunction  significantly  reduces  generator 
capacity.  Note that the battery charger is supplied from an AC busbar and, in effect, acts as a TRU. 
4-3 Fig 7 AC Twin Channel Split-busbar System 
Essential DC Bus
Vital DC Bus
Contactor
No 1 DC Bus
No 2 DC Bus
Battery
Charger
Battery
Crash
(TRU)
Relay
Bus-tie
Relay
No 3 AC Bus
TRU
TRU
No 1 AC Bus
No 2 AC Bus
Cut-out
External
Power
Contactor
Contactor
Contactor
GPU
(External)
AC
Control Unit
AC
Generator
Generator
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
CHAPTER 4 - POWERED FLYING CONTROLS 
Requirement 
1. 
Introduction.    The  level  of  aerodynamic  forces  needed  to  control  the  attitude  of  an  aircraft  is 
proportional to the inherent stability of that aircraft and to the square of its speed.  Thus, whilst the forces 
required to control a low-speed, well-balanced aircraft may well be within the physical capabilities of the 
pilot,  those  for  a  high-speed  or  high-stability  aircraft  will  certainly  not  be.    In  such  aircraft,  a  system  of 
assisted flying controls is required.  Where possible, the system merely augments the pilot’s control inputs 
by the use of aerodynamic devices or power-assisted controls, but more highly loaded aircraft must utilize 
fully powered systems in which the pilot provides the basic command signal and the system implements 
that command.  Fig 1 shows four levels of control, from a fully manual system, through aerodynamically 
assisted (servo-tab) and a power-assisted system, to a fully-powered control system.   
Inputs are shown thus:      Manual Input 
,   Power Input 

4-4 Fig 1 Stages of Control Power Augmentation 
Fig 1a – Simple Manual Control 
Fig 1b – Servo-tab Assisted Control 
Control
Key
Column
Manual Input
Flying Control
Movement
Power Input
Servo-tab
Movement
Cable
Hinged
Flying
Linkages
Point
Control
Fig 1c – Power-assisted Control 
Fig 1d – Fully-powered Control 
Servo
Servo
Power
Valve
Power
Valve
Cylinder
Cylinder
Power Flying
Power Flying
Control Unit
Control Unit
Flying
Flying
Control
Control
2. 
Application.  The cost and complexity of powered flying controls serve to ensure the retention of 
manual  or  assisted  control  systems  wherever  possible.  Thus, many current aircraft utilize manual or 
assisted systems for the more lightly-loaded controls such as ailerons and elevators, whilst assisted or 
fully-powered  systems  are  used  for  those  more  heavily-loaded  controls  such  as  rudders  and  roll 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
spoilers.  Fig 2 depicts a multi-engine transport aircraft, with high-speed cruise performance, but also 
with good low-speed handling, which has a mixture of assisted and fully-powered flying controls. 
4-4 Fig 2 Typical Mixture of Flying Controls 
Manual Elevators
Trim Tab
(Servo-tab Assisted
with 'Q' Feel and
'G' Feel)
Servo-tab
Aileron-coupled
Powered Spoilers
Powered Rudder
Powered Flaps
with 'Q' Feel
Powered Air
Brakes
Trim Tab
Servo-tab
Manual Ailerons
(Servo-tab Assisted)
3. 
Additional Features.  The introduction of many advanced flight control concepts and systems has 
been made possible by the use of powered flying controls in aircraft.  Whilst such features as stall warning 
(stick  shakers)  and  stall  prevention  (stick  pusher)  devices  can  be  integrated  into  manual  systems,  they 
are more effectively installed in aircraft which are fitted with powered systems.  The use of such systems 
as auto-pilot, auto-land, fly-by-wire and fly-by-light, and application of active control technology to neutrally 
stable, fixed and rotary wing aircraft, is totally dependent upon the use of powered flying control systems. 
Basic Requirements of Powered Flying Control Systems 
4. 
Performance.  A powered flying control system must perform to produce satisfactory handling 
characteristics  throughout  the  aircraft  flight  envelope.    The  system  must,  therefore,  have  the 
appropriate power, and range of movement, needed to perform that task, whilst also being designed 
to  achieve  a  good  power-to-weight  performance.    Powered  control  systems  occasionally  have 
inadequate power for the task in hand, and this causes a condition known as 'jack stall', in which the 
servo  jack  cannot  overcome  the  aerodynamic  forces  acting  against  it.    The  probability  of  such  a 
condition occurring on particular aircraft types is well known, and identification of the areas of their 
flight  envelopes  where  the  phenomenon  is  likely  to  occur  are  clearly  documented  in  the  relevant 
Aircrew Manuals. 
5. 
Feedback An essential feature of all powered flying control systems is that of a feedback loop, 
capable of comparing the response of the system to that demanded by the pilot.  In Fig 1, feedback to 
the pilot in the manual and servo-tab systems is accomplished automatically, because there is a direct, 
fixed  linkage  between  the  pilot  and  the  control  surface.    As  the  pilot  moves  his  control,  the 
corresponding control surface moves by a similar amount.  The pilot can then use visual or instrument 
references to check that the aircraft has responded in the required manner to his control input.  Thus, a 
complete feedback loop is established, and Fig 3a shows such a loop in diagrammatic form.  Power-
assisted  and  fully-powered  systems  require  a  similar  feedback  loop.    This  is  usually  achieved  by  a 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
mechanical  linkage  which  causes  the  powered  flying  control  unit  to  drive  until  it  reaches  a  position 
relative to the pilot’s input signal. 
4-4 Fig 3 Feedback 
Fig 3a Positional and Rate Feedback Loop 
Pilot senses attitude
position and rate change
and refines control input
Control movement causes
command accordingly
aerodynamic effect which
changes aircraft attitude
Control surface follows
pilot’s command
Fig 3b highlights the feedback linkage used in the simple powered unit shown in Fig 1.  Feedback in 
automatic flight control systems is discussed in Volume 4, Chapter 7. 
Fig 3b Mechanical Positional Feedback
Servo Valve
Power Cylinder moves
under control of Servo
Feedback Link
Feedback link
Valve
integrates opposing
in null position
effects of Pilot input
and Power Cylinder
positions
Power Cylinder
System at rest
(No inputs or outputs)
Movement continues until relative position of 
Power Cylinder is restored and Feedback Link
returns to null position
In addition to positional feedback, a pilot also requires to receive a degree of feedback of flight forces.  
Such forces are essential to provide the pilot with tactile cues of the performance of the aircraft during 
flight.    In  a  manually  controlled  aircraft,  stick  forces,  increasing  as  the  square  of  airspeed,  give 
essential references to the pilot.  Such references are not fed back to the pilot through a powered flying 
control, and methods of synthesizing feel are therefore incorporated. 
6. 
Accuracy.  The powered flying control system must respond accurately to both the amplitude and 
the rate of control input under all conditions of flight.  Otherwise, the aircraft may be endangered, either by 
divergent  oscillations  being  set  up  through  the  pilot  over-compensating  for  system  inaccuracies,  or  by 
overstressing caused through too rapid a response rate.  The accuracy of response is partly inherent in 
the power source used in the system, partly in the effectiveness of feedback in the system, and partly by 
the precision with which components of the system are manufactured and installed. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
7. 
Stability.  Not only must the system respond accurately to the control input, but also it must hold the 
control  position,  and  not  deviate  through  spurious  inputs  caused  by  system  errors.    The  stability  of  a 
system  is  largely  ensured  by  initially  designing  sufficient  tolerance  into  the  components,  although 
subsequent  component  maintenance  of  the  highest  order  is  required  to  ensure  adequate  margins  of 
continued stability.  Deterioration in the condition of both mechanical and electrical components, and the 
inclusion of air in hydraulic systems, are typical causes of degraded stability. 
8. 
Irreversibility.    The  main  objective  of  using  powered  flying  controls  is  to  off-load  aerodynamic 
forces  from  the  pilot’s  flying  controls.    Similarly,  it  is  essential  that  the  effects  of  buffeting,  flutter,  and 
turbulence  are  also  off-loaded.    The  inherent  irreversibility  of  hydraulic  and  electrical  powered  flying 
control units automatically ensures that this is accomplished.  The likelihood of control surface fluctuation 
must, of course, still be minimized by good design plus aerodynamic and dynamic control balancing. 
9. 
Safety  and  Reliability.  Obviously, the reliability of its powered flying controls is paramount to the 
safety  of  an  aircraft.    To  provide  the  necessary  real  and  statistical  degree  of  reliability  of  such  controls, 
they are normally duplicated.  In aircraft where flight loads would be within the physical capability of the 
pilot, reversion to manual control in the event of system failure may be permissible. 
Typical Installation 
10.  Fig  4  shows  the  essential  features  of  a  typical  powered  flying  control  installation,  in  schematic 
form.    Descriptions  of  its  main  components  are  included  in  the  following  paragraph.    The  system  is 
based  upon  that  used  for  the  longitudinal  control  of  a  medium-size  aircraft.    It  features  an  autopilot 
pitch  channel  servo  and  an  all-flying  tailplane  (used  for  trimming  out  the  pitching  moment  caused  by 
use of the large-span flaps, often fitted to such aircraft).  Elevator trim is provided conventionally by an 
aerodynamic  trim  tab,  although  both  this  component  and  alternative  integrated  trim  devices  are 
discussed in the following paragraph.  Lastly, the system utilizes conventional cables and push rods to 
transmit commands between the pilot’s controls and the servo units.  In aircraft equipped for fly-by-wire 
or fly-by-light control systems, these items would be replaced by electrical or fibre optic cables. 
4-4 Fig 4 Essential Features of a Powered Flying Control System 
All-flying Tailplane
Elevator
Trim Tab
Elevator Tandem
Power Flying
Flap Associated
Control Unit
Tailplane Trim Motor
Autopilot Input
Servo Motor
Elevator Trim Motor
and Cable Controls
Spring Feel
Unit
Pilot’s Control Input
Stall Warning
(Stick Pusher)
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
System Components 
11.  Powered  Flying  Control  Unit.    The  basic  features  and  operation  of  a  hydraulic  powered  flying 
control  unit  are  shown  at  Fig  5.    The  unit  is  shown  both  at  rest  and  in  mid-travel.    Movement  of  the 
servo  valve  away  from  its  mid-position  occurs  when  the  pilot  moves  the  controls.    The  servo  valve 
allows high-pressure fluid to enter and act upon the appropriate chamber of the unit.  The main piston 
remains stationary, and the whole body of the unit moves under the fluid pressure, and its movement is 
transferred  to  the  control  surface.    As  the  surface  reaches  its  desired  position,  the  movement  of  the 
body in relationship to the stationary servo valve restores the valve to its central position.  The flow of 
hydraulic oil then ceases, and the unit is locked in its new position by incompressible fluid trapped on 
both sides of the piston.  This situation remains until a further control signal, from either the pilot or the 
autopilot,  causes  the  cycle  to  be  repeated.    By  fixing  the  piston  to  the  aircraft  structure,  and  the  unit 
body  to  the  control  surface,  an  automatic  positional  feedback  is  achieved.    If  the  roles  of  the  two 
components were reversed, an additional linkage would be needed to act as a feedback.  Otherwise, 
the piston would travel to its extreme position whenever the servo valve was moved. 
4-4 Fig 5 Hydraulic Powered Flying Control 
Fig 5a – Unit at Rest 
Fig 5b – Unit Moving 
Hydraulic
Hydraulic
Return Fluid
Pressure Fluid
Hydraulic
Piston Assembly
Servo Valve
Servo Valve
Return Fluid
attached to
moved by Pilot
Assembly
Fuselage
control input
Hydraulic
Static Fluid
Pressure Fluid
(Trapped)
Piston remains
Movement of PFCU body
PFCU Attached
Piston locked by equal Pressure
stationary
transmitted to Control Surface
to Control Surface
on each side (Hydraulic Lock)
because Servo Valve is closed
12.  Artificial  Feel  Devices.    Typical  feel  devices  are  described  in  subsequent  paragraphs.    The 
essential features of an artificial feel system are as follows: 
a. 
Forces should increase as stick displacement is increased. 
b. 
The  forces  should  be  proportional  to  airspeed  but,  ideally,  should  reduce  at  high  subsonic 
speeds, where the effect of turbulence is to reduce control effectiveness. 
c. 
To prevent overstressing in the longitudinal plane, feel forces proportional to 'g' forces should 
be applied to the longitudinal controls. 
13.  Spring  Feel.    The  most  common  form  of  feel  device  is  a  spring  imposed  in  the  pilot’s  controls.  
The system in Fig 4 includes a spring feel device in the elevator control run. 
14.  'Q' Feel.  A major disadvantage of the simple spring feel is its inability to simulate the increase in 
force  caused  by  an  increase  in  speed.    The  'q'  feel  system,  which  incorporates  a  pitot-static,  speed-
sensing device, varies its synthesized feel load as the square of the speed.  A simple hydraulic 'q' feel 
unit is shown in Fig 6a. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
4-4 Fig 6 Speed Sensitive Feel Devices
Fig 6a Simple ‘Q’ Feel 
Load on Control Column increases as
Diaphram senses
Feel Cylinder Pressure increases
Airspeed
Pitot
Static
Hydraulic
Return
Vent
Hydraulic
To PFCU
Pressure
Pressure is an amplified 
Diaphram operated
value of Dynamic Pressure
Servo Valve
At  high  subsonic  speeds,  control  surfaces  tend  to  lose  power  because  of  compressibility  effects.    It  is, 
therefore, important to limit or reduce feel forces at these speeds.  This is achieved by using a refinement 
of the 'q' feel system, referred to as the 'Mach Number Corrected 'q' Feel Unit'.  This unit has the addition 
of  an  altitude  capsule  in  its  sensing  module.    The  feel  forces  generated  by  the  unit  are,  therefore, 
proportional to Mach number rather than simply to speed.  This arrangement is shown at Fig 6b. 
Fig 6b Mach Number Corrected 
Altitude Capsule
Pitot
Static
Mach No
Vent
Correction
Bar
15.  'G' FeelAircraft stress limitations often necessitate limitation of longitudinal control forces when 
the aircraft is flying at high 'g' loadings.  This is accomplished by fitment of a 'g' sensitive device which 
increases  feel  forces  in  proportion  to  the  longitudinal  'g'  forces  present.    The  device  is  usually  in  the 
form  of  a  bob-weight.    It  is  often  combined  with  a  normal  spring  feel  unit,  which  tends  to  reduce  the 
undesirable  effects  of  turbulence  and  inertia  acting  on  the  'g'  feel  unit.    Fig  7  shows  such  an 
arrangement. 
4-4 Fig 7 'G' Feel Unit 
Load on Control Column increases as
Calibrated Balance
'G' force on weight increases and as
Spring
Feel Spring is compressed
Hydraulic
Return
Vent
Hydraulic
Pressure
Simple Feel Spring integral
with Hydraulic Cylinder
Bob-weight
16.  Additional  Control  Inputs.    The  use  of  powered  flying  control  systems  allows  the  integration  of 
additional  control  inputs  such  as  trim  adjustment,  stall  warning  and  automatic  flight  control.    Automatic 
flight control systems are discussed in Volume 4, Chapter 7. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
17.  Trim Adjustment Manual control systems utilize fine adjustment of the main or ancillary control 
surfaces  to  trim  the  aircraft  flight  attitude.    This  compensates  for  centre  of  gravity  displacement,  or 
attitude variation, at particular speeds or flap settings.  The trim systems allow the main cockpit control 
forces  to  be  minimized  and  the  control  positions  to  be  centralized.    Although  some  applications  of 
powered flying control systems retain the use of ancillary control surfaces for trimming, many systems 
trim the aircraft by small adjustments of the main control system.  However, adjustments to reduce feel 
forces  on  the  cockpit  controls,  and  to  centralize  them,  remain  necessary  if  the  pilot  is  to  retain 
references  and  cues  during  flight.    A  typical  feel  trim  system  is  shown  at  Fig  8a.    Its  principle  of 
operation is to zero the synthesized feel forces when the aircraft is correctly trimmed.  A typical position 
(datum)  trim  system  is  at  Fig  8b.    Its  principle  is  to  apply  trim  adjustments  to  the  aircraft  controls 
without the pilot’s controls being moved away from their neutral position. 
4-4 Fig 8 Trim Systems 
Fig 8a - Feel Trim 
Control Run
Rudder Pedals
to Rudder PFCU
Rudder Cables
Torsion Bar
Feel Spring
Trim Motor
Trim Motor turns base of Torsion Bar
to zero feel force experienced by Pilot
Fig 8b – Datum Shift Trim
Position of Datum
Bar and Control Column
shifted by Jack
Screw Jack
Trim Motor
Datum Bar
To PFCU
18.  Non-linear Response.  Most manual control systems contain a degree of non-linearity in their 
operation.    Small  movements  of  the  cockpit  controls,  when  near  to  the  extremes  of  their  travel, 
produce  larger  control  surface  movements  than  will  occur  at  the  centre  of  their  travel.    This  is  a 
desirable situation, allowing small precise control movements to be made in the critical centre of the 
control span, and large coarser movements to be made at the extremes.  The use of powered flying 
controls  offers  the  opportunity  to  increase  this  non-linearity  and  thus  increase  the  effectiveness  of 
the  control  system.    The  use  of  non-linear  levers  and  cams,  not  acceptable  in  a  manual  system 
because  of  the  variation  in  control  loads  which  they  would  impose,  are  permissible  in  powered 
systems to which variation in control forces are less significant.  A typical non-linear control system 
is shown at Fig 9. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
4-4 Fig 9 Typical Non-linear Flying Control Mechanism 
Fig 9a – Differential Aileron Control 
Fig 9b – Differential Effect 
Control Column
Roll Right
Roll Left
Roll Right
Left 
Right Control
Control
Input
Input
Roll Left
Right Control
Input
Left 
Control
Input
19.  Stall Warning and Prevention.  The dangers inherent in stalling a high-performance aircraft have led 
to  stall  warning  systems  being  fitted  to  most  relevant  aircraft.    In  their  simplest  form,  they  consist  of  an 
electrical device which shakes the control column so that the pilot experiences cues similar to a stall buffet.  
The  pilot  is  thus  alerted  to  take  the  necessary  corrective  action.    However,  this  is  not  adequate  for  many 
transport aircraft, particularly those with a high tailplane configuration, and stall prevention systems are often 
fitted  to  these  aircraft.    Typical  systems,  such  as  that  in  Fig  4,  include  a  pneumatic  jack  which  gradually 
imparts a nose-down control input to the aircraft.  The pilot can then either accept and supplement the input, 
or consciously over-ride it, and take alternative measures to avoid the stall. 
20.  Manual Reversion.  As mentioned above, reversion to manual control in the event of failure of a 
powered  flying  control  system,  is  an  acceptable  option  for  lightly-loaded  aircraft.    The  system  of 
reversion is usually a very simple one and is often engineered to occur automatically in the event of a 
hydraulic failure.  Fig 10 shows a typical system. 
4-4 Fig 10 Hydraulic System with Manual Reversion 
Fig 10a – Normal Operation 
Fig 10b – Reversionary Mode 
Hydraulic Pressure
Manual Input moves
Hydraulic Failure
Manual Input moves
PFCU and Control
Servo Valve only
Piston Rod
Piston Rod
free to move
locked by Plunger
Spring
compressed
Spring forces
No Hydraulic
Plunger to disengage
Pressure
Hydraulic Pressure
21.  Multiplication.  A more normal arrangement for retaining adequate control, in the event of failure 
of a powered flying control system, is achieved by multiplication of critical components of that system.  
The  most  usual  methods  of  achieving  this  redundancy  of  critical  components  are  shown  at  Fig  11.  
These  include  split  control  surfaces  (typical  in  an  aircraft  of  the  type  depicted  at  Fig  2),  each  section 
having an independent powered control unit (Fig 11a), and use of tandem jacks (Fig 11b).  All of these 
systems  require  an  interlock  within  their  respective  hydraulic  jack  servo  valves to prevent a hydraulic 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-4- Powered Flying Controls 
lock occurring in the redundant jack, and, thus, locking the relevant control surface.  The use of parallel 
jacks is widespread in aircraft in which there is room to site such units adjacent to the control surfaces.  
However,  for  aircraft  in  which  this  is  not  possible,  particularly  combat  aircraft  and  helicopters,  the 
tandem jack arrangement is normally fitted. 
4-4 Fig 11 Redundant Flying Control Components 
Fig 11a – Parallel Units 
Fig 11b – Tandem Units 
Servo Yoke multiplies
Hydraulic
Hydraulic
Control Input to one
System 2
System 1
unit if other fails
Hydraulic
System 1
Control
Input
PFCU 1
Control
Cylinder
Input
Thrust
Common Piston Rod
PFCU 2
Piston
Thrust
In event of failure, one unit 
cycles freely leaving other to
Hydraulic
Divided Control
work normally
System 2
Surfaces
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-5 - Cabin Pressurization and Air Conditioning Systems 
CHAPTER 5- CABIN PRESSURIZATION AND AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
The adverse physiological effects of altitude, and the associated low temperatures, are discussed in 
Volume 6, Chapter 4.  The crew and passengers of aircraft operating at moderate and high altitudes are 
normally protected against these effects by pressurization of the cabin compartment.  Air is fed into the 
cabin  and  allowed  to  build  up  to  the  required  pressure.    An  escape  of  air,  through  discharge  valves,  is 
controlled such that the desired pressure difference is created between the interior of the cabin and the 
external  environment  of  the  aircraft.    An  air  conditioning  system  usually  forms  an  integral  part  of  the 
pressurization system, to control the cabin atmosphere in respect of temperature and humidity.  Although 
these two systems are closely interlinked, it is convenient to examine them separately. 
Pressurization Systems 
2. 
The  aim  of  a  cabin  pressurization  system  is  to  maintain  the  cabin  altitude  at  an  optimum  pressure, 
irrespective of the height at which the aircraft is flying.  The two major considerations when utilizing a cabin 
pressurization system are the selection of a suitable cabin altitude, and the rate of change of cabin altitude. 
3. 
Cabin Altitude The required cabin altitude depends upon the role of the aircraft: 
a. 
Passenger-carrying  Aircraft.    For  aircraft  with  passenger  cabins,  the  maximum  cabin 
altitude of an aircraft must be limited to between 6,000 and 8,000 ft (see Fig 1a).  At this altitude, 
the air will provide sufficient oxygen for normal use. 
b. 
Combat  Aircraft.    Combat  aircraft,  with  an  oxygen  supply  for  the  crew,  may  use  a  cabin 
altitude  up  to  a  maximum  of  25,000 ft,  without  the  need  for  pressure  suits.    However,  they    also 
frequently use 8,000 ft as a cabin altitude (see Fig 1b). 
4-5 Fig 1 Pressurization Profile 
Fig 1a Passenger-carrying Aircraft 
Fig 1b Combat Aircraft 
40
40
Pressure Altitude
30
30
Pressure Altitude
)
0
25
25
0
,0
1
(ft
e
d
Controlled
Cockpit Rate of Climb
ltitu
A
Cabin
Cockpit
Altitude
8
8
Altitude
Cabin Rate of Climb
Max 500 ft/min
Time
Time
4. 
Rate of Change of Cabin Altitude.  The permissible rate of change of cabin altitude is dependent 
upon  the  general  fitness  and  health  of  the  passengers/crew.    The  normal  limit  for  passenger-carrying 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 4-5 - Cabin Pressurization and Air Conditioning Systems 
aircraft is a maximum climb rate of 500 ft/min and a maximum descent rate of 300 ft/min.  These rates of 
change are higher for combat aircraft (see Fig 1). 
5. 
Cabin  Differential  Pressure.    Flying  an  aircraft  at  high  altitude,  with  the  cabin  pressure  set  to  a 
lower  altitude,  results  in  a  pressure  difference  acting  on  the  structure  of  the  aircraft  fuselage.    This 
pressure  difference  is  known  as  the  'cabin  differential  pressure'.    The  maximum  permissible  cabin 
differential  pressure  is  based  on  the  fuselage  design  strength,  and  will  limit  the  aircraft’s  operational 
ceiling and its associated maximum cabin altitude.  The differential pressures relating to aircraft and cabin 
altitudes are depicted graphically at Fig 2.  The example annotated shows that, at a pressure altitude of 
31,000  ft  and  a  cabin  altitude  of  8,000  ft,  a  differential  pressure  of  0.46  bar  is  imposed  upon  the  cabin 
structure.  As mentioned earlier, most passenger-carrying aircraft, and many combat aircraft, use a cabin 
altitude of about 8,000 ft.  However, combat aircraft may be required to operate with a cockpit altitude as 
high as 25,000 ft when the possibility of battle damage could cause rapid depressurization. 
6. 
Air  Supply.    The  supply  of  air  for  use  in  pressurizing  and  conditioning  the  cabin  or  cockpit  is 
normally obtained from a late compressor stage of a gas turbine engine.  Older aircraft types may use 
separate, engine-driven compressors.  The high-pressure, high-temperature air supply is regulated and 
conditioned before being fed into the cabin.  The air supply must be sufficient to maintain required cabin 
pressures, notwithstanding the normal small leakage of air from the cabin and the deliberate dumping of 
air as part of the air conditioning cycle.  Aircraft equipped with an Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) are usually 
configured  so  that  the  air  conditioning  system  can  also  operate  using air supplied by the APU during 
periods when the aircraft is on the ground. 
4-5 Fig 2 Cabin Differential Pressures at Altitude 
7. 
Control.    Pressurization  is  achieved  by  making  the  cabin  a  sealed  container,  into  which  a 
pressurized  supply  of  air  is  fed.    The  air  supply  can  be  selected  on/off,  by  means  of  a controllable 
bleed  valve  (it  should  be  noted  that  there  is  a  slight  loss  of  engine  thrust  when  the  pressurization 
bleed  valve  is  open).    The  cabin  pressure  and  its  rate  of  change  are  controlled  by  the  regulated 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 4-5 - Cabin Pressurization and Air Conditioning Systems 
release of air to atmosphere through a discharge valve in the aircraft skin (Fig 3).  In some aircraft, 
the  crew  can  select  the  required  cabin  altitude  and  the  rate  of  pressure  change;  in  others  these 
parameters  are  preset.    In  flight,  the  cabin  altitude  is  automatically  monitored  by  a  control module, 
which sends a control signal to the discharge valve unit.  The discharge valve compares the actual 
cabin pressure with the control signal, and opens or closes the outlet valve accordingly. 
8. 
Safety Devices.  Most pressurization systems use multiple discharge valves.  In addition, at least 
two safety devices are incorporated, to provide for cabin pressurization malfunction: 
a. 
Safety Relief Valve.  If the cabin differential pressure approaches the maximum permitted, it 
will  be  sensed  by  a  safety  relief  valve,  which  is  independent  of  the  normal  control  system.    The 
safety  relief  valve  outlet  will  then  automatically  open  to  dump  air  outwards,  thereby  reducing the 
interior cabin pressure. 
b. 
Inward  Relief  Valve.    An  inward  relief  valve  is  necessary  in  case  the  outside  air  pressure 
becomes greater than the cabin pressure (e.g. in a very rapid descent).  The inward relief valve is 
sometimes combined in the same unit as the safety relief valve. 
9. 
Pressurization  Failure.    Passenger-carrying  aircraft  have  a  limited  oxygen  supply  available  for 
crew  and  passengers.    This  will  be  used  in  the  event  of  pressurization  failure  at  altitude.    If  the 
pressurization system fails, the aircraft must immediately descend to an altitude below the normal safe 
cabin altitude. 
4-5 Fig 3 Pressurization Control System – Schematic 
Aircraft
Skin
Cabin
Pressure
Control Module
Calibrated
Spring
Cabin
Control
Pressure
Pressure
Valve
Outlet
Diaphragm
Altitude
Static Vent
Rate
 Capsule
Discharge Valve Unit
Capsule Metering
Static
Orifice
Pressure
Valve
Outlet
Inward
Relief Valve
Cabin Area
Diaphragm
Calibrated
Spring
Cabin
Pressure
Safety Relief Valve
Air Conditioning Systems 
10.  The air conditioning system must be able to provide a supply of air sufficient to satisfy ventilation 
and  pressurization  requirements,  at  a  temperature  and  humidity  necessary  to  maintain  cabin  and 
cockpit conditions at a comfortable level. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 4-5 - Cabin Pressurization and Air Conditioning Systems 
11.  Composition  of  the  Cabin  Atmosphere.    To  prevent  the  build  up  of  carbon  dioxide,  water 
vapour,  dust,  fumes  and  odours,  cabin  atmosphere  must  be  changed  continuously  by  the  ventilation 
system.  The rate of ventilating airflow is dependent upon the volume of cabin space per occupant (the 
space  per  occupant,  in  cubic  metres,  is  termed  'complement  density').    The  smaller  the  complement 
density, the higher must be the airflow.  This is illustrated at Fig 4.  In passenger aircraft, an airflow of 
approximately  1.5  kg/min  is  normally  provided.    This  usually  comprises  50%  fresh  air  and  50% 
recirculated  air.    The  air  is  discharged  into  the  cabin  to  create  a  general  circulatory  flow,  although 
higher speed airflows are generally provided for each passenger and crew member through individually 
controlled facilities.  In the more restricted volume of a combat aircraft cockpit, a flow of up to 5 kg/min 
is usually provided.  In normal flight conditions, 80% of this air is arranged to circulate directly around 
the crew, whilst the remainder is used for demisting and general cockpit ventilation. 
4-5 Fig 4 Ventilation Flow Requirements 
12.  Temperature and Humidity.  The range of ambient temperatures and humidity in which a crew can 
operate  comfortably  without  rapidly  becoming  fatigued  is  known  as  the  'Comfort  Zone'  (see  Fig  5).    Air 
conditioning systems control both temperature and humidity within the cabin to remain within this zone. 
4-5 Fig 5 The Comfort Zone 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 4-5 - Cabin Pressurization and Air Conditioning Systems 
13.  Conditioning  Systems.    Fig  6  shows  a  typical  air  conditioning  system.    The  hot  air  from  the 
engine compressor is cooled by routing it through primary and secondary heat exchangers, and a cold 
air unit, as necessary.  Within the heat exchangers, the hot air is cooled by indirect contact with cold 
ram  air.    The  cold  air  unit  uses  principles  of  expansion  and  energy  conversion  to  reduce  the  air 
temperature.    To  provide  the  final  airstream  at  the  temperature  required  for  cabin  conditioning,  the 
cooled  air  passes  through  a  mixture  chamber,  where  it  is  combined  with  hot  moist  by-pass  air  and 
recycled  cabin  air.    Any  water  resulting  from  the  cooling  process  is  separated  from  the  air  before  it 
enters  the  cabin.    Most  water  separators  utilize  momentum  separation  techniques  to  remove  the 
majority  of  water  from  the  airstream.    This  type  of  separator  comprises  a  bank  of  swirl  vanes,  or 
louvres,  and  a  coarse  mesh  coalescent  filter.    As  the  air  passes  through  the  unit,  its  velocity  and 
momentum are changed and any water held within the air coalesces into droplets.  These droplets are 
then  separated  from  the  main  airstream  and  are  ducted  overboard.    Most  air  conditioning  systems 
provide  control  and  adjustment  of  air temperature and control of air humidity.  Some provide positive 
filtration  of  the  incoming  air,  although  the  majority  achieve  a  degree  of  filtration  only  as  a  secondary 
function of the water extraction devices used for humidity control. 
4-5 Fig 6 Typical Air Conditioning System 
Engine
Cooling
Cooling
Ram Air
Ram Air
Secondary
Primary
Heat
Heat
Air from Cabin
Exchanger
Exchanger
for Recycling
Hot Air from
Engine Bleeds
Recycle
Air Valve
Non-return
Air to
Valve
Cabin
By-pass
Cold Air
Valve
Water
Mixing
Drain
Unit
Extractor
Chamber
Bleed Air
Pressure Reducing
Shut-off Valve
and
Shut-off Valve
Bleed Air
Temperature
Control Valve
Part-conditioned Air
Engine
Conditioned Air
Ram Air
14.  Conditioning  Failures.    Multiple  air  conditioning  systems  are  usually  employed  to  provide  an 
element  of  redundancy.    However,  if  the  pressurization  air  supply  is  suspended  (during  an  airborne 
emergency,  for  instance),  ambient  ram  air  will  normally  be  used  as  an  alternative  supply  for 
conditioning.  The temperature in the cabin can therefore by expected to fall rapidly, depending upon 
the ambient air temperature. 
Aircraft Configuration 
15.  Pressurization  and  air  conditioning  systems  need  to  be  self-contained  and,  ideally,  duplicated  to 
provide an acceptable degree of conditioning in the event of one failure.  For combat aircraft, they need 
to  be  simple,  compact  and  automatic  (or  semi-automatic).    For  transport  aircraft  the  systems  must 
have  large  capacity  and  a  flexible  control  system,  to  cope  with  widely  varying  conditions.    Ventilation 
systems  need  to  be  capable  of  operating  on  the  ground.    It  should  be  noted  that  supplies  of 
pressurized  and  conditioned  air  are  used  for  other  tasks,  including  pressurization  and  cooling  of 
avionics modules, sealing of canopies, and supply of pressure for aircrew anti-g clothing.  Fig 7 shows 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 4-5 - Cabin Pressurization and Air Conditioning Systems 
a  representative  system  installation  for  a  two  seat, single engine combat/training aircraft, whilst Fig 8 
shows a typical system for a multi-engine transport aircraft. 
4-5 Fig 7 Combat Aircraft System Configuration 
4-5 Fig 8 Transport Aircraft System Configuration 
Ram Air Duct
Hot Pressure Air
(Cooling Air)
from Engines and APU
APU
Air Conditioning Units
Pressurization Controller
and Discharge Valves
Cabin Air Supply is ducted to
top of Cabin and exhausted
into Freight Bay below
Cockpit Air Supply
(also cools avionics)
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
CHAPTER 6 - UNDERCARRIAGES 
Introduction 
1. 
The  undercarriage  of  an  aircraft  includes  the  wheels,  tyres  and  brakes  as  well  as  the  main 
undercarriage  leg  components.    It  performs  the  essential  function  of  providing  an  interface  between 
aircraft  and  ground  during  landing,  take  off,  ground  manoeuvring  and  whilst  at  rest.    However,  it  is 
completely  redundant  during  flight,  and  therefore  the  design  of  an  undercarriage  is  usually  a  critical 
compromise between optimising performance on the ground and minimizing weight and drag penalties 
in the air.  Examples of the extremes of this compromise range between the provision of the minimum 
for  a  Remotely  Piloted  Vehicle  -  a  detachable  wheeled  dolly  for  the  aircraft  to  take  off  from  and  a 
parachute to lower it safely after flight - to the more generally serviceable - such as the undercarriage 
of the Tornado, shown at Fig 1 - which allows the aircraft to be landed at high weights and on a wide 
variety of surfaces, and to be manoeuvred rapidly and precisely between the runway and its dispersal 
area for replenishment, prior to dispatch on further sorties. 
4-6 Fig 1 Undercarriage of the Tornado Aircraft 
Fig 1a Tornado Nose Landing Gear 
Fig 1b Tornado Main Landing Gear 
Runway Pavements 
2. 
The increase in aircraft performance has led to the need for ever-higher landing speeds and weights.  
Eventually,  the  practical  and  tactical  limitations  of  stronger  and  longer  runways  were  reached,  and 
research  and  development  were  then  concentrated  on  improving  the  aircraft  rather  than  the  runways.  
This gave rise to the introduction of STOL and V/STOL technology, a trend which continues for military 
and  many  civil  transport  aircraft.    As  discussed  at  Volume  2,  Chapter  21,  standard  systems  are  now 
available for classifying and matching the landing requirements of aircraft and the strength (load bearing 
capabilities) of runways. 
Design Considerations 
3. 
Principal factors which govern the design configuration of a particular undercarriage are: 
a. 
The  aircraft’s  role  and  its  intended  theatre  of  operation  -  for  example,  the  requirements  for 
strategic  aircraft  operating  from  well  founded  airfields  are  considerably  different  from  those  of 
tactical STOL aircraft intended to operate from semi-prepared strips. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
b. 
The  configuration  of  the  aircraft  and  its  intended  performance/cruise  speed  -  for  example, 
high  wing,  high-speed  aircraft  impose  greater  design  problems  than  do  low  wing,  low  speed 
aeroplanes and helicopters. 
c. 
The  numerical  factors  -  for  example,  landing  speeds  and  weights,  permissible  length  of 
landing  run  and  cross  wind  landing/take  off  capability  -  all  have  considerable  influence  upon 
undercarriage design. 
Typical Configurations 
4. 
The  general  design  configuration  for  an undercarriage emerges from consideration of the above 
factors: 
a. 
Physical strength of the components necessary to withstand landing, braking, and crosswind 
loads.  The strength parameters are set out in defined design standards. 
b. 
Shock  absorber  performance  capable  of  accepting  the  maximum  intended  sink  rate  of  the 
aircraft  onto  the  ground,  the  type  of  surface  over  which  the  aircraft  will  taxi  and  the  speed  of 
turning during taxi. 
c. 
Fixed (stronger, simpler and lighter) undercarriage or a retractable (less drag) undercarriage. 
d. 
Streamlining and provision of undercarriage doors necessary to reduce drag during flight. 
e. 
Dimensions of the ground track needed to provide stability during landing and taxi. 
f. 
Fuselage or wing space available for stowing and attaching the gear. 
g. 
Basic  configuration.    For  instance,  the  standard  tricycle  for  good  ground  manoeuvre  and 
stability,  bicycle  (with  outriggers)  for  strength  and  relative  ease  of  stowage  or  tail  wheel  for 
simplicity and low cost.  The most appropriate undercarriage for a small helicopter may be a pair 
of skids, despite the complications which these impose upon ground handling. 
The  retractable  main  undercarriages  of  the  Airbus  A310  and  the  BAe  146  are  shown  in  Fig  2.    The 
A310  undercarriage  is  a  very  simple  assembly  which  retracts  into  a  space  in  the  wing  root  and 
fuselage.    However,  that  for  the  146 (a high wing aircraft) retracts into the bottom of the fuselage (to 
minimize its length and thus maximize its strength) and extends sideways (to give a good wheel track 
for stability).  This has resulted in the complex, multi-pivoting mechanism shown. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
4-6 Fig 2 Examples of Retractable Main Undercarriages 
Fig 2a A310 Main Landing Gear 
Fig 2b BAe 146-200 Main Landing Gear 
Undercarriages 
5. 
Undercarriage Legs.  The undercarriage leg performs the functions of absorbing the forward, aft 
and side loads of landing and braking.  Nose and tail undercarriages also require to swivel to allow the 
aircraft  to  be  steered.    These  functions  must  be  performed  by  as  few  components  as  possible,  and 
Fig 3 shows several undercarriage legs (in schematic form) designed to achieve these objectives. 
4-6 Fig 3 Basic Undercarriage Leg Configurations 
Telescopic
Lever Suspension
Forward Lever
Quadrilateral
Sideways Lever
Deformable
Semi-articulated
6. 
Shock  Absorbers.    The  shock  absorber  is  the  most  complex  component of the undercarriage.  Its 
role is to dampen the shocks of landing and taxiing and of movement over uneven runway pavements.  Two 
basic types of shock absorber are available, one utilizes the compressibility of oil at pressures above 700 bar 
to  damp  out  shocks,  whilst  the  other  utilizes  various  combinations  of  oil  and  nitrogen  under  pressure  to 
provide damping.  The principle of the oil filled (liquid spring) absorber is shown at Fig 4. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
4-6 Fig 4 Principle of the Liquid Spring 
Piston
Non
Return
Valve
Piston
Ring
Sliding
Cylinder
No Load
Landing Load
Recoil
Static Load
On  landing,  movement  of  the  leg  is  restricted  by  the  slow  rate  at  which  oil  is  able  to  pass  through  the 
damping  orifices  into  the  upper  chamber  of  the  liquid  spring.    If  large  shocks  are  experienced,  the  oil 
remaining beneath the piston is compressed until its pressure exceeds the loading of the piston non-return 
valve spring.  At this point, a larger volume of oil is released round the valve, thus damping out the larger 
landing  shocks.    On  the  recoil,  oil  is  forced  back  below  the  piston  through  the  small  damping  orifices.  
Variations on the oil/gas (oleo-pneumatic) absorber are shown at Fig 5. 
4-6 Fig 5 Oleo-pneumatic Absorbers 
a  Unseparated Oleo with
c  Separator-type Oleo
d  Two-stage Shock Absorber
Positive Recoil Control
Oil Level
Tube
Oil Level
Tube
Closure
First
Chamber
Gas
Stage gas
Gas
Chamber
Chamber
Chamber
Outer
Main
Cylinder
Fitting
Damping
Tube
Damping
Recoil
Orifice
Recoil
Valve
Recoil
Recoil
Valves
Valves
Damping 
Valve
Orifices
Orifice
Recoil
Compression
Plug
Chamber
Recoil
Chamber
Damping 
Valve
Closure
Orifices
Recoil
Chamber
Recoil
Chamber
Damping
Chamber
Positive
Recoil
Orifice
Chamber
Recoil Valve
Closure
Sliding
Separator
Chamber
Cylinder
Piston
Second
Stage Gas
Gas Chamber
Chamber
Inflation Valve
Fluid
Nitrogen
Oil
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
The combination of oil and gas provides a more effective method of shock absorption, enabling a reduction 
in component size and weight to be made for the same performance.  Shock absorbers must be designed 
so  that  they  never  reach  full  extension  or  closure  under  any  operational  load  condition,  otherwise  the 
undercarriage  will  momentarily  become  rigid  passing  very  high  peak  loads  into  the  aircraft  structure.  The 
nose undercarriage is subjected to a wider range of conditions than is the main undercarriage, because of 
centre of gravity movement and pitching moments caused by braking reactions.  For this reason, two stage 
shock absorbers similar to that shown at Fig 5d are often fitted to the nose to provide the greater required 
range of operation. 
7. 
Retraction  Mechanisms.    Although  retracting  undercarriages  are  usually  configured  specifically 
for  a  particular  aircraft  type,  all  have  similar  basic  features.    The  more  significant  of  these  are 
highlighted in Fig 6 and are described in the following sub-paragraphs. 
4-6 Fig 6 Undercarriage Retraction Mechanisms 
Sequencing
Door
Valves
Actuating
Sequencing
Jack
Uplock
Valve
Mechanism
Door
Linkage
Door Actuating
Jack
Main Leg
Fairing
Doors
Downlock
Cylinder
Shock
Absorber
Strut
Uplock
Roller
a. 
Doors and Fairings.  To avoid undesirable aerodynamic effects, the receptacles or wells in 
which  retracting  undercarriages  are  housed  require  to  be  faired  over  after  the  gear  has  been 
retracted  and,  as  far  as  possible,  after  the  gear  has  been  extended.    This  is  achieved  by  the 
fitment  of  doors  which  are  either  mechanically  attached  to  the  undercarriage  legs  or  are 
sequenced to open and close at appropriate times during the retraction or extension cycle. 
b. 
Jacks  and  Linkages.    Because  of  the  extremely  high  power  to  weight  and  power  to  volume 
ratios  which  their  use  offers,  hydraulics  are  used to power all conventional retraction mechanisms.  
Typically,  3  or  4  hydraulic  jacks  operating  in  a  controlled  sequence  will  raise  or  lower  the 
undercarriage  leg,  open  and  close  the  doors  and  lock  the  undercarriage  in  the  fully  up  or  down 
position.  A series of mechanical linkages transfer jack forces to separate areas of the mechanism. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
c. 
Up  and  Down  Locks.    When  fully  retracted,  the  undercarriage  must  be  positively 
restrained against 'g' forces in flight.  Equally, when fully extended it must lock solidly to absorb 
landing loads.  Mechanical locks are provided to achieve these requirements.  A typical 'up' lock 
is  shown  at  Fig 7a.    It  comprises  a  simple  rotating  jaw  which  turns  to  lock  round  a  pin  on  the 
undercarriage.    The  lock  is  turned  into  position  by  engagement  with  the  pin,  as  the 
undercarriage moves to its fully retracted position.  When the undercarriage is lowered, the lock 
is  opened  hydraulically  to  release  the  pin.    Because  it  is  critically  important  that  'up'  locks 
release, even in the event of total hydraulics failure, secondary and sometimes tertiary opening 
methods  are  provided.    These  usually employ an electrical solenoid, although light aircraft are 
sometimes fitted with manual release mechanisms operated by cables from the cockpit.  Whilst 
the  'up'  lock  must  be  capable  of  supporting  the  full  weight  of  the  undercarriage,  it  can  be 
arranged for the 'down' lock to take none of the landing forces. 
4-6 Fig 7 Up and Down Locks 
Fig 7a Up Lock 
Locked
Unlocked
Uplock
Lever
Uplock
Actuator
Main Landing Gear
Latch
Uplock Pin
Fig 7b Down Lock 
Jack Body
Piston
Jack
Ram
Sprags Engaged in Body Slots
Sprags Free of Body
Two types of lock are in common use.  The one shown in Fig 6 is a small hydraulic 'bolt' which 
geometrically  locks  a  hinged  lever  when  the  undercarriage  is  fully  lowered.    Thus,  the  lever  is 
locked  in  its  fully  unhinged  position,  taking  all  landing  forces  and  imposing  none  on  the  bolt.  
The other is integral with the extension jack and mechanically locks the jack in its fully extended 
position.    Fig  7b  includes  a  simplified diagram of the device.  An integral lock offers the many 
advantages of simplicity. 
d. 
Sequencing.  Complex folding and unfolding movements of the undercarriage and opening 
and closing of the doors must all be sequenced precisely to prevent damage and failure occurring.  
This  is  achieved  by  fitment  of  hydraulic  valves  or  electrical  switches  in  the  system  which  do  not 
permit one part of the sequence to commence until the preceding part has been completed. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
8. 
Controls  and  Indications.    Retraction  or  extension  is  initiated  by  operation  of  simple  cockpit 
control, usually in the form of a single lever or switch.  The international standard indications provided 
in the cockpit, and usually integrated in the switch unit, consist of 3 green lights to show when each of 
the  undercarriages  are  locked  down  and  3  red  lights  to  show  that  the  undercarriages  are  unlocked  - 
that  is  moving  between  their  up  and  down  positions.    In  most  aircraft,  a  series  of  interlocks  and 
safeguards are incorporated in the control system to prevent inadvertent operation on the ground or at 
too high an air speed, and to reduce crew workload during landing and take off.  'Weight on wheels' or 
'nutcracker' switches, activated by deflection of the undercarriage on the ground, are used to prevent 
operation  of  the  retraction  mechanism  and  to  unlock  operation  of  the  steering,  braking  and  thrust 
reverser systems.  The signals from these switches are used in other aircraft systems to prevent their 
operation on the ground or to initiate their operation immediately after the aircraft has taken off. 
9. 
Steering.  Whilst taxiing and during initial stages of take off and final stages of landing, airspeeds are 
too low for rudder authority to be maintained.  A system of differential operation of the main wheel brakes, 
achieved  by  manipulation  of  brake  pedals  attached  to  the  rudder  bar,  provides  a  steering  force  in  most 
aircraft  at  these  lower  speeds.    However,  precise  ground  manoeuvring  is  required  in  crowded  aircraft 
dispersal  areas,  and  a  system  of  positively  steering  the  aircraft  wheels  is  therefore  necessary.    In  light 
aircraft, such steering is often provided through direct mechanical linkage of the rudder pedals to a steerable 
nose or tail wheel.  The majority of high performance aircraft utilize steering systems in which the nose wheel 
can  be  controlled  hydraulically  during  taxi,  through  a  small  tiller  or  wheel  in  the  cockpit.    To  avoid  such  a 
steering system providing an unwanted input at the points of lift off and touch down, the steerable nose wheel 
is automatically aligned centrally whenever aircraft weight is lifted off the wheels. 
10.  Emergency  Extension.    To  avoid  the  inevitable  consequences  of  a  'wheels  up'  landing,  design 
standards  require  that  all  aircraft  fitted  with  retractable  undercarriages  are  equipped  with  at  least  one 
alternative  driving  force  for  extending  the  undercarriage.    In  the  majority  of  aircraft,  this  is  achieved  by 
pressurizing  the  undercarriage  hydraulic  extension  system  either  directly  by  the  release  of  compressed 
nitrogen into the system or indirectly by release of nitrogen into an associated booster system.  Operation 
of  the  emergency  extension  control  lever  releases  the  nitrogen  and  affects  any  necessary  changes  in 
hydraulic valve settings.  Many aircraft are equipped with a secondary emergency system which releases 
the  undercarriage  up  lock  allowing  the  undercarriage  to  extend  under  gravitational  and  aerodynamic 
forces.    Use  of  the  emergency  systems  prevents  subsequent  retraction  of  the  undercarriage,  until 
necessary engineering actions have been carried out on the ground. 
Wheels 
11.  The design criteria for aircraft wheels are: 
a. 
Light weight. 
b. 
Minimum size. 
c. 
Easy tyre replacement. 
d. 
Accommodation for the brake unit and dissipation of the heat generated during braking.  
e. 
Good fatigue resistance. 
Aircraft wheels differ in many ways from those fitted to road vehicles.  For instance, aircraft wheels are 
made  in  2  halves  which  unbolt  to  allow  the  fitment  of  tyres  without  stretching  their  beading  over  the 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
wheel rims.  Also, the wheels house the wheel bearings, unlike automobile practice in which a separate 
axle  houses  the  bearings  and  the  wheels  bolt  to  this  axle.    A  typical  wheel  and  axle  arrangement  is 
shown at Fig 8. 
4-6 Fig 8 Aircraft Twin Main Wheel and Axle 
Leg and 
Shock Absorber
Wheel (Tyre removed)
Brake Unit
Axle Assembly
Wheel and Tyre
Tyres 
12.  Aircraft tyres must be able to withstand higher loads than road tyres, but they are not required to be 
capable of continuous running over great distances.  However, the general structure of aircraft and road 
tyres is similar, and radial ply tubeless tyres are now used almost exclusively in both applications.  Radial 
ply tubeless tyres offer higher strength, lower weight, cooler running, and better overload capabilities than 
the  earliercross  ply  tyres  fitted  with  inner  tubes.    The  construction  of  the  radial  tyre  is  shown  at  Fig  9.  
Because the load bearing carcass and the tread are effectively two separate components of the tyre and 
the tread tends to wear out before the carcass, aircraft tyres are retreaded as a matter of course to extend 
their life.  Most tyres used on fixed wing aircraft are retreaded several times before their carcasses require 
to  be  scrapped.    Under  the  high  impact  loads  experienced  during  landing,  tyres  tend  to  creep  by  small 
distances around the wheels.  This presents no problem with tubeless tyres, but if tubed tyres creep, the 
valve stem of the inner tube which is firmly attached to the wheel is stretched and will eventually fracture.  
For this reason, white 'creep' witness marks are painted on tubed tyres at fitment, so that the degree of 
creep can be monitored.  Aircraft nose and tail wheel tyres are constructed to be electrically conductive, 
by the addition of carbon in the rubber mix.  This enables the static charges built up in an aircraft during 
flight to be discharged automatically on landing. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
4-6 Fig 9 Construction of a Radial Ply Tyre 
Tread
Fabric Ply Layers
Arranged in Radial
Layers Over Each Other
Steel Beading Forms
Low Leakage
Carcass with Ply Wraps
Butyl Rubber
Lining
O-Ring
Sealing Grooves
on Rim Flange
Sealed Valve Stem
Braking Systems 
13.  Principles.  Stopping an aircraft requires the rapid dissipation of large amounts of kinetic energy.  
The energy is dissipated by conversion to heat energy in the wheel braking system and by being used 
to  do  work against applied loads.  Such loads include drag (from aerodynamic devices such as flaps 
and  spoilers)  and  opposing  forces  provided  by  reverse  thrust  devices  or  propeller  reverse  pitch.    In 
extreme cases, brake parachutes or external retardation devices such as arrester wires are also used 
to  absorb  the  kinetic  energy.    Typically,  wheel  brakes,  aerodynamic  devices,  and  thrust  reversers 
absorb equal amounts of energy during a normal landing. 
14.  Heat  Dissipation.    Temperatures  of  up  to  1400  ºC  are  reached  in  high  performance  braking 
systems.    To  prevent  damage  to  the  tyres  and  undercarriage  structure,  the  heat  energy  must  be 
dissipated rapidly into the surrounding air.  If this does not happen, as can be the case after an aborted 
take off and subsequent long taxi back to a dispersal, the tyres can overheat and burst, and brake fires 
are likely to occur.  To prevent tyres bursting due to overheating, wheels are fitted with fusible plugs which 
melt at a preset temperature.  This allows the tyre to deflate at a steady controlled rate. 
15.  Design  Objectives.    The  following  general  specification  is  typical  of  the  design  objectives  for 
combat aircraft braking systems: 
a. 
Absorb the energy of a normal landing or a rejected take off, due allowance being made for 
aerodynamic and rolling drag and for engine thrust decay time and idling thrust developed during 
the landing run. 
b. 
Provide a deceleration of 0.3g. 
c. 
Dissipate the heat generated during a normal landing sufficiently quickly to allow operational 
turn round of the aircraft. 
d. 
Have minimum friction material wear to give a long life. 
e. 
Have automatic adjustment and visible wear rate indication. 
f. 
Provide a static drag force sufficient to enable engines to be run up to full dry power without 
wheel rotation. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
g. 
Permit ground manoeuvring without the use of excessive brake pedal pressures and without 
snatching. 
h. 
Provide a completely independent method of hydraulic brake application capable of meeting 
all of the above criteria. 
16.  Configuration.  Most aircraft are equipped with hydraulically operated disc brakes, although drum 
brakes  are  sufficiently  effective  for  light  aircraft.    Disc  brakes  offer  the  advantages  of  higher  surface 
area for contact between the brake material and the rotating surfaces and larger capacity heat sinks to 
absorb the heat generated during braking.  High performance disc brakes are constructed as multiple 
stacks  of  discs  made  from  carbon  composites  which  are  able  to  operate  at  the  necessary 
temperatures.    A  typical  multiple  disc  unit  consists  of  four or more rotors keyed to the inside of each 
main  wheel,  and  five  or  more  stators  assembled  on  to  splines  of  each  main  undercarriage  axle 
assembly.  Fig 10 shows such a brake assembly in situ.  Operation of the brakes is usually through a 
single selection lever.  Pedals attached to the pilot’s rudder bar direct differential hydraulic pressure to 
the main wheel brake units to provide steering.  Hydraulic pressure operates either directly or through a 
servo  system  upon  the  brake  units.    The  pressure  causes  rotor  and  stator  discs  to  be  pressed 
together, and the resulting friction provides a retarding force to the main wheels generating heat in the 
process.  Rotor discs are usually constructed in segments which allow a small amount of deflection to 
take place.  This reduces stresses and prevents the discs cracking. 
4-6 Fig 10 Brake Assembly 
Pressure
Plate
Stationary Discs Attached to Axle
End Plate
Backing Plate
(Attached to Axle)
Hydaulic
Cylinder &
Piston
Rotating Discs Attached to Wheel
(Note:  Colours used for  clarity only)
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
17.  Emergency  Braking  Systems.    Hydraulic  braking  systems  are  normally  configured  to  operate 
from two different hydraulic power sources.  Thus, in the event of one power source failing, the other 
can  be  selected  either  automatically  or  manually.    In  addition,  most  electronic  systems  have  fail-safe 
characteristics  which  allow  acceptable  standards  or  braking  to  be  achieved  through  simple  pulse 
modulation of hydraulic pressure in the event of failure of the electronic control system. 
18.  Parking  Brakes.    Braking  during  periods  when  the  aircraft  is  parked  is  provided  by  permanent 
pressurization  of  the  brake  hydraulic  circuits.    This  is  normally  achieved  by  utilizing  a  hydraulic 
accumulator pressurized by nitrogen.  In some simple braking systems, the accumulator also provides 
the  source  of  emergency  braking  system  pressure,  albeit  for  only  a  limited  number  of  brake 
applications after which pressure in the accumulator becomes exhausted. 
Braking Control and Anti-skid Systems 
19.  Braking  Dynamics.    To  minimize  the  landing  run,  it  is  imperative  that  brakes  apply  maximum 
retardation  force  without  causing  the  adhesion  between  tyre  and  pavement  to  be  exceeded  thus 
causing  the  aircraft  wheels  to  skid.    The  point  of  skidding  is  dependent  upon  the  condition  of  the 
runway  surface,  the  vertical  load  which  the  aircraft  tyres  exert  on  the  ground  and  the  retarding  force 
applied  by  the  brakes.    The  mathematical  relationship  between  vertical  load  and  retarding  force  is 
termed 'μ'.  Because vertical load is inversely proportional to the aerodynamic lift acting on the aircraft, 
it follows that µ will increase as aircraft speed decreases.  Fig 11 shows this relationship for constant 
runway conditions.   
4-6 Fig 11 Relationship Between µ and Vertical Load on the Tyres 
Maximum Available Friction
Area of Pilot
Controlled Modulation
µ
Aircraft Speed
Whenever braking force is applied to the tyre, a degree of slip occurs between the tyre and the surface 
of the pavement.  This is defined in terms of the difference between the rotational speed of a braked 
wheel  and  the  rotational  speed  of  a  similar  free  rolling  wheel.   It is expressed as a percentage.  The 
value of µ varies with wheel slip, and Fig 12 shows the relationship between maximum available µ and 
wheel slip for varying conditions on the same runway. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 11 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
4-6 Fig 12 Relationship Between µ and Wheel Slip for Varying Runway Conditions 
0.8
Dry
0.7
0.6
0.5
µ
Wet
0.4
0.3
Snow
0.2
Ice
0.1
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
% Slip
20.  Control  Systems.    As  can  be  deduced  from  the  above  considerations,  the  application  of 
maximum  braking  effort  to  minimize  the  landing  run  requires  the  solution  of  complex  dynamic 
equations, balancing braking forces with speed, weight and runway conditions.  Electronic sensing has 
permitted all phases of the braking process to be inter-related and fail safe over-rides to be employed.  
A typical brake system operation profile is at Fig 13. 
4-6 Fig 13 Typical Brake System Operation Profile 
No Brakes
Brakes With Anti-skid Protection
Brakes - No Anti-skid Protection
Aircraft Path
15 mph
Touch
Landing Run
Taxi
Down
Ground Line
Wheel
Locked Wheel Protection
Wheels will lock but hazard
Touchdown Protection
Spin-up
for a wheel below 30% of
reduced at such low speeds
(No braking applied)
overrides
aircraft speed
touch
(see note below)
Note: During take-off,
down
brakes are automatically
protection
Note: A deceleration of the wheels of 26 ft/sec/sec
applied after lift off
system
(or 30% differential between wheel speeds)
actuates anti-skid modulation sequence
21.  Anti-skid Systems.  Early mechanical anti-skid systems utilized the inertia of a small flywheel 
to sense rapid changes of main wheel rotational speed such as occurs during a skid.  On sensing 
a skid, the systems reduced hydraulic pressure - thereby reducing braking effort and stopping the 
skid.    They  reinstated  pressure  when  skidding  had  reduced.    The  resultant  cycling  between 
skid/no  skid  conditions  caused  the  braking  pressure  to  continuously  pulse  or  modulate,  and  the 
technique  became  known  as  brake  modulation.    Subsequent  electrical  systems  used  sensors  to 
measure  wheel  speed  and  compared  the  speed  to  a  datum.    The  use  of  simple  electronic 
processing  allowed  a  controlled  profile  of  modulation  to  be  achieved  instead  of  the  on/off 
characteristics  of  the  earlier  mechanical  systems,  and  considerable  improvements  in  braking 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 12 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-6- Undercarriages 
efficiency were achieved.  Modern anti-skid systems utilize control technology to vary not only the 
frequency  of  modulated  braking  pulses  but  also  their  amplitude  (pressure).    Thus,  the  systems 
can  maintain  braking  forces  at  a  level  immediately below that which would cause skidding for all 
speeds and surface conditions.  The systems also hold the brakes off until after touch down and 
wheel spin up has occurred, and similarly apply braking to spin down the wheels after take off and 
undercarriage retraction has taken place.  Thus, the systems can relieve the crew of much of the 
workload of brake management at the critical periods of landing and take off. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 13 of 13 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
CHAPTER 7 - AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  Problem.    Since  the  first  days  of  flight,  the  need  to  compromise  between  aircraft 
performance and controllability of the aircraft has formed a central factor influencing specification and 
design.    The  pilot  has  to  contend  with  a  demanding  workload,  whilst  maintaining  a  span  of 
concentration  throughout  the  whole  flight,  sometimes  of  long  duration.    At  the  same  time,  a  rapid 
response  is  necessary  to  counter  any  adverse  changes  in  aircraft  attitude.    Historically,  therefore, 
major  compromises  in  performance  have  been  necessary  in  order  to  obtain  an  acceptable  balance 
between stability and controllability. 
2. 
The Solution.  The problems posed by workload, speed of reaction and fatigue have been solved 
gradually,  by  the  development  and  subsequent  evolution  of  automated  flight  control  systems.    Such 
systems augment the control applied directly by a pilot, whilst ensuring that full command of the aircraft 
is retained.  The earliest systems consisted of automatic stabilization devices to counter gross changes 
in aircraft trim.  Later systems, known as 'automatic pilots', provided stability in three axes and ensured 
that a selected heading and altitude were maintained. 
3. 
Progression  towards  Maximum  Performance.    The  continuing  advances  in  technology, 
particularly the development of computing and fly-by-wire controls, have made it possible to combine the 
outputs  of  individual  avionics  systems.    This  has  resulted  in  the  introduction  of  the  fully  integrated 
automatic flight control system (AFCS), and its successor, the flight management system.  The latter has 
permitted advances to be made towards achieving maximum theoretical performance during a flight. 
AUTO STABILIZERS AND BASIC AUTOPILOTS 
Auto stabilizers 
4. 
An  auto  stabilizer  will  maintain  the  aircraft  in  an  attitude  as  initially  set  up  by  the  pilot.    This  is 
achieved  by  sensing  any  variation  from  the  prescribed  attitude,  and  employing  a  feedback  control 
circuit  to  eliminate  the  unwanted  change.    Auto  stabilizers  are  sometimes  known  as  stabilization 
augmentation systems (SAS).  Fig 1 illustrates a single-channel auto stabilizer system. 
4-7 Fig 1 Auto stabilizer Feedback System 
Pilot s

Control
Servo
Input
Actuator
Output Signal
Control Surface
Aerodynamic
Effects
Autostabilizer
Rate 
Signal Processor
Gyro
Sensor
5. 
The main components of the simple auto stabilizer illustrated in Fig 1 are: 
a. 
Sensor.    Aircraft  movement  in  the  pitch,  roll  or  yaw  axes  is  sensed  by  an  associated  rate 
gyroscope. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
b. 
Signal Processor.  The signal processor is usually electronic, but some mechanical systems 
do exist.  Typical functions within an auto stabilizer processor include: 
(1)  Amplification.  The signal from the sensor will be amplified. 
(2)  Phase Advance.  In any practical control loop, there will always be a time delay between 
the detection of a disturbance and the application of corrective action.  Since disturbances in 
the  aircraft  flight  path  will  result  in  oscillatory  motions,  it  is  easy  to  use  a  phase  advance 
network  to  ensure  that  the  corrective  action  applied  at  the  control  surface  occurs  in  exact 
antiphase to the disturbing oscillation. 
(3)  Band Pass Filtering Aircraft manoeuvres initiated by the pilot will also be detected by the 
rate gyro, and would therefore be opposed by the auto stabilizer.  This occurrence is prevented 
by the use of band pass filters, which detect the oscillation frequency, and, with preset values to 
suit the axis plane, can differentiate between pilot input and other disturbances. 
(4)  Limiting.    A  limiter  circuit  will  ensure  that  certain  parameter  changes  are  kept  within 
prescribed limits. 
(5)  Shaping  or  Scheduling.    A  shaping  circuit  will  adapt  the  system  response  to  suit  the 
handling qualities or flight path of the aircraft. 
c. 
Servo Actuator The correction signal is fed from the signal processor to the servo actuator, 
to move the control surface. 
(1)  The error signal moves the control surface, without moving the pilot’s controls. 
(2)  The actuator reverts to a rigid link when not operative. 
(3)  The authority of an actuator is normally limited (usually 10 to 15% of the total movement 
available) as a safety precaution in the event of a failure with subsequent active runaway. 
6. 
Auto stabilizers may be able to augment control in all three axes, but they do not usually include 
the facility to implement changes in attitude.  Single or dual-axis auto stabilizers are installed in most 
aircraft  which  have  insufficient  natural  stability.    In  VSTOL  aircraft,  they  counter  the  problems  of 
maintaining  stable  flight  at  low  forward  speeds.    In  helicopters,  they  compensate  for  the  marked 
changes in dynamic stability that occur at different airspeeds, and counter the low values of longitudinal 
stability and manoeuvre stability. 
7. 
Yaw Autostabilizers.  Yaw auto stabilizers are required in most jet aircraft to suppress the lightly 
damped, short period motion and oscillatory rolling motion, known as Dutch Roll.  A yaw auto stabilizer 
is essential to produce the steady air platform necessary for weapon aiming.  
8. 
Pilot  Over-ride.    The  pilot  may  select  or  disengage  the  auto  stabilizer  channels  by  means  of  a 
control  panel  (Fig  2).    In  the event of auto stabilizer failure, an override button is normally located on 
the pilot’s control column to enable rapid disconnection of all engaged channels. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
4-7 Fig 2 Typical Auto stabilizer Control Panel 
PITCH
YAW
OFF
OFF
Basic Autopilot Systems 
9. 
A  basic  autopilot  system  will  hold  the  aircraft  on  a  flight  path  selected  by  the  pilot.    When  the 
autopilot is selected, it will initially hold the aircraft attitude at that moment.  This function is carried out 
by an 'attitude store', which is a memory unit within the processor.  When the attitude hold is engaged, 
the  input  to  the  memory  unit  is  disconnected  so  that  the  recorded  attitude  becomes  a  fixed  datum, 
against which the actual flight attitude can be measured. 
10.  Principles  of  Operation.    The  autopilot  will  normally  work  in  all  three  axes,  with  attitude  hold 
loops for pitch, roll and yaw.  A typical pitch loop is represented in Fig 3. 
4-7 Fig 3 Autopilot Loop (Pitch Axis only) 
Attitude
Sensors
Pitch Attitude
Command
Pitch
+
Elevator PFCUs
Processor
Aerodynamic
Response
Pitch
Rate
Gyro
The  autopilot  will  detect  disturbances  to  the  aircraft  flight  path  by  means  of  three  rate  gyros,  one  for 
each  axis.    Other  sensors  may  also  be  used;  these  would  include  attitude  gyros,  lateral 
accelerometers,  and  some  form  of  heading  reference  such  as  a  gyro-magnetic  compass.    Amplified 
signals  from  the  gyros  and  sensors  will  be  summated  with  the  datum  attitude,  and  fed  back  to  the 
processor, which will then send correcting signals to the servos driving the control surfaces.  In the yaw 
axis  loop,  a  cross-feed  system  is  incorporated  which  enables  correction  signals  to  be  fed  to  both 
aileron and rudder circuits; corrections to heading are thus made with both of these circuits. 
11.  Manoeuvring the Aircraft.  Whilst the autopilot is engaged, the pilot may enter attitude demands 
manually,  by  means  of  switches  or  knobs  located  on  the  autopilot  control  panel.    These  controls  will 
produce electrical signals which are fed directly to the autopilot as pitch, roll and yaw demands.  Fig 4 
shows a typical autopilot control unit.  The unit illustrated also controls the yaw damper circuit, and can 
be linked to signals from ILS azimuth and glideslope beams. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
4-7 Fig 4 Autopilot Control Panel 
Yaw Damper Engage
Autopilot
Engage
Pitch Control
Bank Control
12.  Automatic Control Facilities.  The outputs of other aircraft systems can be fed into the autopilot 
manoeuvring facility by selection on the control panel. Typically, signals may be derived from: 
a. 
Heading  or  track  demand,  set  by  moving  an  index  marker  on  the  horizontal  situation 
indicator. 
b. 
Radials derived from TACAN or VOR. 
c. 
ILS glidepath and localizer signals. 
d. 
Datum speed or barometric altitude from air data systems. 
e. 
Steer signals from navigation computers. 
13.  Advanced Autopilot Systems.  The autopilot systems described thus far are simple, largely self-
contained  and  inexpensive.    They  therefore  provide  an  extremely  cost-effective  method  of  reducing 
pilot  workload  by  the  augmentation  of  control  during  stable  periods  of  flight.    By  introducing  steering 
commands  to  the  autopilot,  from  external  avionics  systems,  the  design  becomes  progressively  more 
complex, and generally requires computer processing.  Safety features and system integrity become of 
paramount importance as more active control is assumed.  An autopilot that is fully integrated with the 
aircraft’s  avionics  is  usually  referred  to  as  an  Automatic  Flight  Control  System (AFCS). However, the 
precise  point  of  division  between  an  autopilot  and  an  automatic  flight  control  system  is  difficult  to 
quantify.    For  this  reason,  advanced  autopilot  design  is  covered  in  the  following  section,  under  the 
generic heading of automatic flight control systems. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMS 
Principles of AFCS Operation 
14.  Basic  Mode  of  Operation.    The  automatic  stabilization  of  an  aircraft  in  roll,  pitch  and  yaw  is  a 
basic function of an AFCS.  All AFCSs carry out this task by following the same basic principles: 
a. 
Compare the actual response of the aircraft with that demanded by the pilot. 
b. 
Process  any  error  between  actual  and  required  performance,  in  order  to  generate  a 
correcting control command. 
c. 
Communicate the correcting control command to the relevant aircraft control components. 
d. 
Implement the corrections by moving the relevant control surfaces. 
e. 
Monitor compliance with the original command by feeding back the actual effect of the control 
input to comparator circuits. 
The basic mode of operation (in one axis only) is shown in Fig 5, with appropriate input and feedback 
loops. 
4-7 Fig 5 Basic Flight Control System Operation 
Processing of integrated error signal 
Control Surface
to determine output correction needed
Flight Path
Changes
External
Processor
Control
Control
+
+
Unit
Aircraft
Aircraft
Actuator
Input
Aerodynamics
Aerodynamics
Rate
Position
Sensor
Sensor
Integration of
input and
Accelerometer/Rate Gyro Feedback
feedback to
establish error
Attitude (Position) Gyro Feedback
15.  System  Integrity.    Whether  a  system  is  a  fully  integrated  AFCS,  or  a  simple  part-system  (ie 
autopilot or auto stabilizer), it must:  
a. 
Be reliable. 
b. 
Be accurate.   
c. 
Provide a stable output. 
d. 
Offer a fail-safe solution. 
AFCS Components 
16.  Although the precise configuration of an AFCS will vary with aircraft type, each will utilize the same 
basic components, as illustrated in Fig 5. 
17.  External Control Input.  The external control input to an AFCS will originate from three sources: 
a. 
The initial flight profile demanded by the pilot. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
b. 
Changes to attitude, course and altitude needed for operational or air traffic reasons.  These 
are interpreted and fed into the system by the pilot. 
c. 
Basic navigational information fed directly into the AFCS from ILS/MLS, VOR, GPS, INS and 
Flight Director systems. 
18.  Sensors.  To evaluate the difference between the performance demanded and that achieved, the 
AFCS  processing  unit  requires  datum  information  for  all  relevant  parameters.    This  data  may  be 
obtained from: 
a. 
Sensors provided specifically for this purpose, or, more usually, outputs from sensors forming 
part of other discrete systems. 
b. 
Standard model parameter profiles, usually stored within the AFCS processor, against which 
the  flight  conditions  may  be  compared.  These would include the performance data for optimum 
flight profiles. 
19.  Processor  Unit.    The  processor  unit  performs  the  basic  judgemental  process  which  would  be 
provided by the pilot in manual systems.  Its functions include: 
a. 
Manipulating sensor information into useable and comparable signals. 
b. 
Comparing  rate  and  positional  sensors  and  feedback  inputs  by  using  differentiation  and 
integration computing techniques. 
c. 
Establishing what degree of error exists between parameters demanded and achieved.  
d. 
Calculating the amount of control response needed to correct any error.  Any solution would 
remain within defined limits and suit the handling qualities or scheduled flight path of the aircraft. 
e. 
Initiating  control  response  by  signalling  movement  commands  to  the  appropriate  control 
surfaces. 
The relatively simple processing needed for the operation of part-systems can be provided by mechanical 
levers and linkages, or by simple electrical bridge balance networks.  However, a full AFCS requires the 
more powerful and versatile electronic processing capabilities of microchip devices. 
20.  Actuators.    AFCS  actuators  are  powered  flying  controls,  and  were  dealt  with  in  Volume  4, 
Chapter  4.    The  need  for  actuators  to  respond  rapidly  and  accurately  to  signal  inputs  has resulted in 
the elimination of all types other than those powered by hydraulics or electrics. 
AFCS Functions 
21.  Altitude and Heading Control.  Each AFCS is based on a sophisticated autopilot system, which 
will be used to provide altitude and directional command and control of the aircraft. 
22.  Automatic  Throttle  Control.    Many  of  the  tasks  related  to  AFCS  control  of  the  aircraft’s  flight 
path and profile require associated throttle adjustment.  The auto-throttle facility provides such control.  
It can be employed for cruise conditions, such as maximum range or endurance, and also to provide 
for automatic landings.  Fig 6 shows an auto-throttle system in schematic form.  The system monitors 
airspeed  and  pitch  rate  against  datum  parameters  set  either  by  the  pilot  or  as  a  product  of  an 
associated auto-land system.  Any airspeed error will be resolved by a closed loop control system.  By 
this  means,  the  error  signal  is  processed  and  controls  the  throttle  actuators,  thereby  increasing  or 
decreasing the thrust. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
4-7 Fig 6 Auto-throttle Control System 
Rate of Change of Speed
Aerodynamic
Accelerometer
Feedback
Datum
Airspeed
+
No 1
No 1
No 1
Throttle
Throttle
Jet Engine
Processor
Actuator
Thrust
Actual
Airspeed
Integrated
Throttle Rate
Airspeed
Feedback
Error
Pitch Rate
Pitch Rate
Integrator
Gyro
input Signal
Integrated
Airspeed
Throttle Rate
Actual
Error
Feedback
Airspeed
No 2
No 2
Thrust
No 2
Throttle
Throttle
Jet Engine
Processor
Actuator
+
Datum
Airspeed
Aerodynamic
Accelerometer
Feedback
Rate of Change of Speed
23.  Automatic  Landing.    An  AFCS  with  auto-land  facility  will  process  the  signals  received  from 
external ILS or MLS facilities.  Following the closed loop principle, similar to the one depicted in Fig 5, 
the auto-land system compares the actual aircraft landing profile, detected from on-board sensors and 
ILS/MLS  signals,  with  a  programmed  profile.    It  then  makes  appropriate  corrections  in  attitude, 
direction  and  engine  power  settings.    Fig  7  shows  the  profile  of  a  typical  automatic  landing,  and 
includes reference to the associated ILS signals used. 
4-7 Fig 7 Typical Auto-land Sequence 
Autopilot and Auto-throttle
Channels engaged
Flare Mode armed
Localizer
and Glideslope
intercept
1500 ft Altitude
Flare Mode
330 ft Altitude
Glideslope Beam
disengaged
45 ft Gear Altitude
Flightpath
Surface
Point of 
Glideslope
2 ft/sec Descent Path
Touchdown
Transmitter
24.  Automatic  Compliance  with  a  Defined  Flight  Profile.    Micro-processors  and  associated 
memory storage devices provide the capability for an AFCS to be programmed with details of required 
flight profiles.  By integrating the sub-routines of auto-land, auto-cruise, autopilot and autostabilization 
as  necessary,  fully  automatic  flight  control  can  be  achieved.    With  much  of  the  routine  workload  of 
mission profiles now automated, the overall crew workload is reduced, permitting additional time to be 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
allocated  to  the  more  important,  non-routine  work  of  combat  or  transport  missions.    Similarly,  the 
facility  for  auto-hover  in  SAR  and  ASW  helicopters  greatly  increases  mission  effectiveness.    The 
integration of the sub-routines of auto-control with an easily managed, user interface is developed still 
further within the concept of a Flight Management System (see para 36). 
Influence of AFCS on Aircraft Design 
25.  The description of AFCS functions assumes that such systems are fitted to conventional aircraft in 
order  to  improve  handling  or  operational  effectiveness.    However,  the  full  integration  of  AFCS 
technology  into  purpose-designed  aircraft  enables  many  of  the  design  compromises  previously 
necessary  in  aircraft  performance  to  be  avoided.    Thus,  use  of  an  AFCS  allows  the  building  and 
operation of much higher performance aircraft, in which the AFCS performs the core function of aircraft 
control, albeit at the direction of the crew. 
26.  The size, and hence the structural weight, of the control surfaces fitted to conventional, inherently 
stable,  aircraft  is  dictated  by  the  need  to  achieve  manoeuvrability.    Inherent  stability  in  an  aircraft 
results in a balance between lift forces and aircraft weight such that tail plane forces act downwards.  
This  reduction  of  lift  requires  the  wing  to  be  larger,  or  at  a  greater  angle  of  attack,  which  leads  to 
reduced  aerodynamic  performance.    The  use  of  Fly-by-wire  and  Fly-by-light  systems  (see  para  27), 
and Active Control Technology (ACT) (see para 44) enables the size of the tail plane balancing force to 
be  reduced  by  allowing  the  aircraft’s  centre  of  gravity  and  centre  of  lift  to  be  placed  closer  together.  
Sensors and computer processors then balance the moments generated by the wing lift and tail lift, to 
provide the pilot an artificially stable aircraft with excellent manoeuvrability. 
Fly-by-wire and Fly-by-light Systems 
27.  Fly-by-wire Systems.  The term 'fly-by-wire' (FBW) was first coined to describe the control of an 
aircraft,  by  the  pilot,  through  electrical  signals  generated  by  movements  of  the  pilot’s  controls,  and 
transmitted along twisted-pair cable or coaxial cable.  Such systems were initially introduced purely to 
obtain the advantages of electrical signalling over the bulk and mechanical complexity of control rods 
and linkages.  FBW also permits duplication of signalling paths without incurring significant weight and 
space penalties.  The introduction of FBW also resulted in easier integration of pilot control inputs with 
other  autopilot  functions;  this  has  been  a  major  contributor  to  the  development  of  the  fully  integrated 
AFCS.    The  term  FBW  is  now  used  to  denote  systems  in  which  electrical  signals  generated  by  pilot 
control inputs are integrated with sensor signals within the flight control computer, before being fed to 
the control surfaces (see Fig 8). 
4-7 Fig 8 Fly-by-wire Flight Control System 
Aircraft
Aircraft
Aerodynamic
Motion
Dynamics
Effects
Control
Stick
Motion
Sensors
Air Data
Sensors
Flight
Actuator
Control
Computer(s)
Key
Actuator Position
Feedback
Electrical Links
Air Data
Aerodynamic Motion
Sensors
28.  Fly-by-light  Systems.    Fly-by-light  (FBL)  systems  operate  in  the  same  manner  as  FBW 
systems, but the electrical signals are transmitted via fibre optic cable.  Fibre optic cable is superior 
to coaxial or twisted pair cable, in that it is lighter in weight and easier to maintain.  Also, the optical 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
power  source  has  a  low  power  requirement.    Fibre  optic  cable  has  advantages  associated  with 
electromagnetic interference (EMI), and provides greater immunity to: 
a. 
Lightning strikes. 
b. 
Failures caused by flying close to sources of high intensity radiation transmissions. 
c. 
Failures in the aircraft’s electromagnetic screening system. 
d. 
Electromagnetic emissions from nuclear explosions. 
As  far  as  flight  control  is  concerned, the use of FBW and FBL is the same, so the term FBW will be 
used as a generic term for both, in this chapter.   
29.  Optimizing  Flight  Performance.    FBW  makes  it  relatively  easy  for  computers  to  modify  the 
signals that are fed to the control surfaces.  No direct link remains between pilot and control surfaces.  
The  severing  of  such  a  direct  link  allows  the  AFCS  to  optimize  aircraft  performance  in  all  flight 
conditions.  FBW provides a basis for ACT (see para 44) to be readily incorporated into aircraft such as 
Typhoon.  The use of FBW enables computers to monitor the flight regime for divergence, leaving the 
pilot free to concentrate on the mission in hand. 
30.  FBW Control Loop.  Fig 8 illustrates the essential features of a FBW flight control loop.  Electrical 
links have replaced the mechanical links of a conventional flight control system.  In early FBW aircraft, 
the flight control computer was analogue, but now digital systems are used, enabling complex control 
law algorithms to be implemented. 
31.  Benefits  of  FBW  Control.    The  major  benefit  of  FBW  is  the  ability  to  tailor  the  system’s 
characteristics at each point in the aircraft’s flight envelope.  The performance benefits from FBW are 
often  quoted  in  terms  of  manoeuvrability,  but  it  is  often  the  avoidance  of  a  manoeuvre,  which  would 
stall or over-stress the aircraft, that is a more important benefit.  The other benefits of FBW include: 
a. 
Carefree handling, provided by automatic protection against stall and departure (using angle-
of-attack  control  and  angle-of-sideslip  suppression).   In addition, overstressing of the airframe is 
prevented by automatic limiting of normal acceleration and roll rates. 
b.
Handling qualities which are optimized across the flight envelope, providing for a wide range 
of  aircraft  stores,  asymmetric  configurations  and  in-flight  changes,  such  as  those  encountered 
when ordnance is released. 
c. 
Improved agility for fighter aircraft.  Aircraft configurations with negative stability assist rapid 
changes in fuselage aiming and/or velocity vector.  This greatly enhances offensive and defensive 
manoeuvrability. 
d. 
Improved  aircraft  performance,  due  to  increased  lift/drag  ratio.    FBW  is  lighter  than 
mechanical linkages, and also permits the use of a smaller tailplane, fin and rudder.  Drag is also 
reduced due to the optimized trim setting of controls. 
e. 
An  extended  flight  envelope,  provided  by  the  use  of  thrust  vectoring  to  augment  or  replace 
aerodynamic control surfaces. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
f. 
The  ability  to  reconfigure  systems  easily  following  failures  or  battle  damage.    This  enables 
missions to be completed, or safe recoveries made. 
g. 
Reduced  maintenance  costs,  resulting  from  a  reduction  in  mechanical  complexity  and  the 
introduction of built-in test facilities. 
32.  FBW Integrity The overall system integrity of FBW must be as high as the mechanical control system 
it replaces.  The probability of a catastrophic failure must not exceed 10-9/hour for civil aircraft and 10-7/hour 
in military aircraft.  In order to achieve this reliability, multiple signal sources and several lanes of computing 
are necessary to provide redundancy.  A system of cross-monitoring is included in order to isolate any failed 
equipment,  thereby  ensuring  safe  operation.    The  current  trend  is  towards  mixed  triplex  and  quadruplex 
redundancy,  as  illustrated  in  Fig  9.    A  comprehensive  built-in  test  capability  is  used  to  identify  and  locate 
failures,  and  to  ensure  that  the  system  is  safe  prior  to  each  flight.    The  back-up  systems  in  FBW  usually 
provide limited flight control capability, although the trend is towards a full capability. 
4-7 Fig 9 Typical Redundancy in a FBW Control System 
Motion 
Control 
Sensors  
Stick
Flight 
Flight 
Flight 
Fli C
g o
ht n
  trol 
Control 
Contr ol 
Co C
n o
tr m
ol p
  uter(s
Voter
Voter
Computer(s
Computer(s
Co
Unit
Unit

mputers  
Air Data 
Actuator 
Sensors  
Processor
Back-up
Flight 
Actuation System
Flight 
Back-up 
Control 
C
Flio
gn
htr ol 
Voter/
CC
o o
n m
tr p
ol u
  te
Voter/
Compute
Monitor Unit
C
Monitor Unit
r(
o s)
m  
puters
 
33.  Use  of  Dissimilar  Systems.    In  many  early  FBW  systems,  the  back-up  computer  was 
analogue  but  digital  computers  are  now  employed.  Dissimilar hardware is used to avoid failures 
being  repeated  in  duplicated  systems;  this  may  occur  through  common  design  errors.    System 
integrity  requires  back-up  digital  computers  to  be  procured  through  alternative  requirement 
documents,    using    different  software,  independent  programming  teams,  and  utilizing  dissimilar 
operating systems.  Fig 9 illustrates a back-up control surface actuation system.  This is more common 
in civil airliners but has been partially used on military jets.  Early FBW aircraft, such as the Tornado, 
reverted to mechanical flight control but only with a 'get you home' capability.  FBW is being developed 
for  helicopter  use,  but  the  development  of  full  authority  flight  control  is  slow  because  of  the  complex 
nature  of  helicopter  flight  controls.    The  only  operational  FBW  in  a  military  helicopter  is  a  simplified 
flight control system, used as a back-up in event of failure of the mechanical system. 
34. Voting and Monitoring.  Examples of triplex and quadruplex systems employed in a FBW flight 
control  system  are  shown  in  Fig  10.    Provided  the  monitoring  is  to  a  high  degree  of  integrity  and 
confidence  level,  such  systems  provide  sufficient  redundancy  to  survive  any  two  failures,  from 
whatever cause. 
a. 
Monitored Triplex Redundancy.  Fig 10a illustrates a monitored triplex redundancy system, 
consisting  of  three  independent  and  parallel  channels.    Each  channel  incorporates  its  own 
monitoring  system,  to  check  the  channel’s  functioning    to  a  high  confidence  level.    If  any 
channel  fails,  its  associated  monitoring  system  will  identify  the  failure,  and  isolate  the  output  by 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
means of relays.  The system illustrated could survive two lane failures, leaving the third to run the 
service. 
4-7 Fig 10 Triplex and Quadruplex Voter/Monitor Systems 
Fig 10a Triplex System 
Fig 10b Quadruplex System 
L
L a
a n
n e
e  1
1
Lane 1
Voter
Relay
Logic
Relay
Circuits
Monitor
L
L a
a n
n e
e  2
2
Lane 2
Voter
Relay
Logic
Relay
Monitor
Circuits
L
L a
a n
n e
e  3
3
Voter
Relay
Lane 3
Logic
Lane 4
Relay
Monitor
Circuits
Voter
Relay
b. 
Quadruplex  Monitoring.    Fig  10b  shows  a  quadruplex  system,  which  detects  failures  by 
cross-comparison  of  the  parallel  channels,  and  uses  majority  voting  to  determine  the  'odd  man 
out'.  Once a failure is identified, that channel is disconnected.  This system is able to survive two 
failures on majority voting.  Depending upon the nature of a third channel failure, the system may 
be able to survive on a single channel. 
FLIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
35.  Computerized systems, known as Navigation Management Systems (NMS), were introduced in the 
early  1980s,  to  simplify  the  navigation  task  and  to  optimize  the  use  of  navigation  aids.    With  the 
introduction of computer processors in aircraft, along with advanced AFCS and FBW technology, it has 
been  possible  to  integrate  the  outputs  from  multiple  aircraft  systems,  and  to  correlate  aircraft  flight 
conditions  with  a  database  containing  performance  values.    By  these  means,  achievements  have  been 
made  towards  attaining  the  theoretical  maximum  performance  from  an  aircraft.    A  Flight  Management 
System  (FMS)  is  a  computer-controlled  AFCS,  which  allows  the  pilot  to  select  specific  modes  of 
operation.  These might include standard instrument departures and auto-landings.  In large aircraft, the 
FMS  has  become  one  of the key avionics systems because of the reductions it can make to the pilot's 
workload.    In  military  aircraft,  the  FMS  has  enabled  single-crew  operation  of  advanced  combat  aircraft.  
Fig 11 illustrates, in schematic format, the relationship between an FMS and the AFCS. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 11 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
4-7 Fig 11 Relationship between an FMS and the AFCS 
Flight
Management
System
Inertial Navigation
System
Rate Gyros
Aircraft Stick
& Accn
& Controls
Attitude / Heading
Displays
Reference System
Radio Altimeter
Actuators
Air Data
Central Warning
System
System
Radio
Aircraft Trims
Navigation Aids
36.  The  FMS  combines  navigational  and  performance  data  with  flight-derived  data  to  determine  an 
automatic  flight  profile  that  is  normally  optimized  for  specific  operational  parameters,  such  as 
maximum endurance or minimum fuel use.  In its most comprehensive form, the FMS is directed to the 
auto-throttle system to optimize the power controls.  An FMS can lead the pilot through the complete 
profile  of  the  flight:  takeoff,  climbout,  cruise  climb,  initial  level  off,  step  climb,  cruise,  top-of-descent, 
descent, approach and landing. 
Flight Planning 
37.  Flight  Planning  Database.    The  FMS  plays  a  major  role  in the flight planning task.  It will hold a 
readily available database of air traffic significant points, runway information  and  navigation  beacons.    
The navigation database is updated in accordance with the AIRAC dates (see Volume 9, Chapter 13).  
A  typical  FMS  flight  plan  may  contain  up  to  100  waypoints  and  the  system  can  store  a  library  of 
prepared flight plans for future use.  As the FMS is essentially just a computer, there are many types 
and  variations.   The applications and the extent of the integration and automation vary greatly, as do 
other criteria such as accuracy. 
38.  Navigation  Aids.  The  FMS  will  select  and  tune  navigation  aids  in  accordance  with  the  planned 
profile.    It  will  then  determine  the  best  estimate  of  aircraft  position  from  all  the  navigation  sources, 
through a Kalman filter process.  Navigation sources will include: 
a. 
Multiple INS. 
b. 
GPS. 
c. 
Air Data. 
d. 
Radio navigation aids such as VOR and DME. 
e. 
ILS/MLS. 
The FMS will compute and display groundspeed, track and wind velocity. 
39.  Flight  Profile.    The  FMS  will provide both lateral and vertical guidance signals to the AFCS.  In 
the  lateral  mode,  the  FMS  computes  the  aircraft's  position  relative  to  the  planned  route,  and  gives 
guidance signals to the AFCS to capture and follow the track specified by the flight plan. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 12 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
Optimized Flight Performance 
40.  The FMS will continually monitor the aircraft flight envelope.  It can ensure that speed restrictions 
are  not  exceeded.    It  can  also  compute  the  optimum  speed  and  altitude  for  each  phase  of  the  flight 
profile.  To do this, the FMS will monitor: 
a. 
Aircraft mass. 
b. 
The position of the centre of gravity. 
c. 
Constraints imposed by the route flight plan and air traffic regulations. 
d. 
Wind velocity and outside air temperature. 
It can therefore compute the recommended cruise altitude, and maximum altitude possible. 
FMS Operations 
41.  The FMS can be programmed for a multiplicity of operational modes, to suit all different stages of 
the flight.  Examples are: 
a. 
Standard Instrument Departures.  The FMS can fly the aircraft along a complicated Standard 
Instrument Departure, controlling engine power, altitude restrictions and route navigational aspects. 
b. 
Holding Patterns.  The FMS can fly the aircraft through a precise holding pattern, based on 
a selected datum, using ICAO procedures. 
c. 
Time Control.  The FMS can calculate ETAs, or, if required, produce aircraft performance to 
meet a specified arrival time. 
42.  Crew/FMS Interface.  The crew must retain ultimate control of the aircraft at all times.  They will 
therefore operate the FMS by means of multi-function control and display units.  Fig 12 shows a typical 
pilot/FMS interface unit. 
4-7 Fig 12 A Typical Pilot/FMS Interface 
Display Area
Soft Keys
MENU PAGE TITLE
SCRATCHPAD
BRT
COMM
NAV
IFF
CTRL
MSN
EXEC
DIR
TOLD
INDX
MC
CAPS
INDX
Function
LEGS
MARK
A
B
C
D
E
Keys
PREV
NEXT
F
G
H
I
J
D
M
S
S
P
G
Y
1
2
3
K
L
M
N
O
O
F
A
F
I
S
L
4
5
6
P
Q
R
S
T
T
7
8
9
U
V
W
X
Y
.
0
+/-
Z
-
DEL
/
CLR
Alphanumeric
Keyboard
Multiple  units  are  provided  to  allow  for  redundancy.    However,  by  necessity,  the  units  are  normally 
positioned  in  a  'head-down'  location.    The  display  area  may,  therefore,  be  reproduced  on  one  of  the 
larger multi-function screens in front of the pilots. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 13 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
ACTIVE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (ACT) 
Introduction 
43.  Passive  Technology.    Conventional  design  of  airframes  has  brought  aircraft  technology  to  its 
present  high  level,  but  in  many  cases  has  reached  its  limits.    Aircraft  lifting  surfaces  have  been 
designed to be strong enough to meet loading requirements, with material added to provide stiffness 
adequate  to  keep  them  free  from  flutter,  divergence  and  buckling.    However,  this  added  stiffness 
usually  means  adding  structural  weight.    For  a  given  set  of  aerodynamic  requirements,  aircraft 
design  has  therefore  been  a  compromise  between  weight  and  aerodynamic  performance.    This 
legacy  of  normally  stable  aircraft  with  conventional  control  surfaces  is  sometimes  referred  to  as 
'passive control'. 
44.  Active  Control  Systems.    The  trend  in  aircraft  development  is  towards  high  manoeuvrability, 
lower  specific  fuel  consumption,  higher  power-to-weight  ratios  and  lower  life-cycle  cost.    An  active 
control  system  (ACS)  may  be  likened  to  an  AFCS,  but  designed  to  provide  several  special  features 
including: 
a. 
Activation of flight control surfaces to minimize gust loads and bending stresses in the wing.  
This is done by detection and response to normal accelerations. 
b. 
Provision of stability to a naturally unstable aircraft. 
c. 
Implementation of pilot manoeuvre demands by more active means than conventional control 
surfaces. 
An ACS requires extensive integration between aerodynamics, structure and electronic system design 
to achieve these advantages with reliability and safety. 
Employment of ACT 
45.  The  employment  of  ACT  has  become  one  of  the  most  important  aspects  of  aircraft  design  and 
operation,  and,  in  some  cases,  there  is  potential  for  retrofit.    ACT  is  linked  to  the  development  of 
computer  technology,  sensors  and  actuators,  micro  electro-mechanical  technology,  smart  materials 
and improved knowledge of process laws.  Specific uses for ACT include: 
a. 
Gas Turbine Engines.  Active control can be used within gas turbine engines, in areas of 
compression,  combustion  and  airflow.    ACT  can  produce  higher  pressure  ratios,  which  in  turn 
leads to smaller engines.  Better performance and advanced diagnostics can lead to reduction 
on overall life cycle costs and savings in maintenance. 
b. 
Fluid Aerodynamics.  Boundary layer control and vortex flow can be influenced, and used to 
control  flight  attitude,  thus  avoiding  the  use  of  control  surfaces,  which  are  heavy  and  energy 
consuming.   
c. 
Vertical  Take-off  and  Landing  Aircraft  (VTOL).    ACT  has  proven  to  be  advantageous  in 
controlling VTOL aircraft, particularly when manoeuvring in the hover.  The development of the 
Joint Strike Fighter utilizes this concept, whereas, by contrast, the Harrier still requires much of 
the hover control to be a manual input from the pilot. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 14 of 16 



AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
d. 
Helicopters.    The  introduction  of  FBW  and  ACT  to  helicopter  design  would  revise  control-
system architecture through revised crew/machine interface and pilot-assistance systems.  Such 
developments  offer  potential  'carefree  handling'  qualities,  and  may  introduce  new  rotorcraft 
configurations. 
e. 
Active Aeroelastic Wings.  There is high potential for use of ACT in structural applications.  
The concept of the active aeroelastic wing (AAW) makes use of multiple leading edge and trailing 
edge control surfaces, each activated by a digital flight control system to reshape the wing cross-
section.    This  reshaping  of  the  wing  (sometimes  referred  to  as  'wing  twisting')  provides  roll 
manoeuvre, in place of conventional ailerons.  Fig 13 demonstrates the AAW principle, based on 
a port wing, with right roll demand input. 
4-7 Fig 13 Comparison of AAW and Conventional Controls 
Fig 13a Conventional Aileron Controls 
Fig 13b Active Aeroelastic Configuration 
Leading Edge
Trailing Edge
Control Surfaces
Control Surfaces
Conventional Aileron
Aerodynamic Torque
Aerodynamic Force
Twist
46.  Control Configured Vehicles.  By using FBW control systems and ACT to stabilize the aircraft, it is 
now possible to reduce the need for conventional aerodynamic stability.  The centre of gravity can now be 
positioned  well  aft  of  the  centre  of  pressure.    In  such  instance,  reversion  to  manual  control  would  be 
difficult, or impossible.  However, the advantages gained by reducing longitudinal stability are: 
a. 
The aircraft becomes highly manoeuvrable. 
b. 
Because the tailplane can now contribute positive lift, the weight and size of the airframe can 
be reduced. 
Aircraft  designed  this  way  are  termed  Control  Configured  Vehicles  (CCVs).    Fig  14  compares  the 
relative plan view of a conventional aircraft with that of a CCV.  By using a canard-delta configuration, 
with ACT, positive lift is generated by all flying surfaces, and the weight and size of a fighter aircraft can 
be reduced. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 15 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-7- Automatic Flight Control Systems 
4-7 Fig 14 Comparison of Conventional and Control Configured Aircraft 
Profile of Conventional Aircraft
Profile of Equivalent
Performance CCV Aircraft
47.  ACT and Safety.  The fast response to un-demanded flight path divergence, inherent in a CCV, will 
improve  the  ride  quality  in  turbulent  conditions.   Trim  alteration,  due  to  configuration  changes  such  as 
weapon  release,  can  be  eliminated  by  suitable  inputs  to  the  pitch  computer.    In  addition,  the  control 
system  can  be  programmed  to  provide  manoeuvre  envelope  protection.    However,  once  the  step  of 
utilizing  ACT  to  produce  CCVs  has  been  taken,  the  aircraft’s  control  system  must  be  designed  such 
that  there  is  minimal  likelihood  of  failure,  since  the  pilot  may  well  be  unable  to  control  the  aircraft 
without the assistance of AFCS computers. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 16 of 16 

AP3456 – 4-8 - Fire Warning and Extinguisher Systems 
CHAPTER 8 - FIRE WARNING AND EXTINGUISHER SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
The design philosophy used in aircraft is first to prevent fire and secondly to provide adequate fire 
protection.    Protection  is  usually  in  the  form  of  fire  resistant  materials  used  in  the  construction  of 
strategic systems and structures and fire retardant materials used in aircraft furnishings.  However, in 
those  areas  where  a  risk  of  fire  remains,  active  aircraft  fire  protection  systems  are  utilized.    These 
perform two basic, and usually independent, functions: 
a. 
Fire and overheat detection. 
b. 
Fire extinguishing. 
The fire detection and overheat systems sense the presence of fire or excessive heat.  They employ area 
detectors in large fire zones and spot detectors for individual pieces of equipment.  In freight and passenger 
aircraft, they are often supplemented by smoke detectors positioned in the freight bays, baggage holds, and 
toilet compartments.  In the case of fire, overheat or smoke, the systems provide a visual and aural warning 
to  the  crew,  identifying  the  area  in  which  the  problem  exists.    The  fire  extinguisher  system  provides  a 
capability  for  fighting  airborne  fires  in  specific  major  areas,  typically  the  engines  and  auxiliary  power  unit 
(APU).  Fire extinguisher systems invariably require crew intervention for their operation in the air.  However, 
in the event of a crash or crash landing, they are activated automatically by switches which close under high 
retardation forces or through airframe deformation.  Aircraft are also equipped with hand-held extinguishers 
for use against small fires in internal areas and equipment. 
2. 
The most common causes of aircraft fires are: 
a. 
Fuel leaks in the vicinity of hot equipment. 
b. 
Hot gas leaks, from engines or ducting, impinging on inflammable materials. 
c. 
Electrical or mechanical malfunctions in equipment. 
The initiating cause is usually equipment failure, although, obviously, damage incurred during combat 
or a crash landing would provide ample additional cause.  It follows, therefore, that the areas in which 
fire  protection  systems  are  deployed  should  include  the  engine  bays,  the  APU  enclosure,  and 
significant  pieces  of  high-energy  equipment.    Fig  1  provides  a  summary  of  the  equipment  given 
protection  in  a  medium-size  aircraft.    The  table  includes  the  temperature  at  which  a  fire  or  overheat 
warning  will  be  given  and  the  visual  warning  which  the  crew  will  receive.    Although  the  carriage  of 
dangerous  cargo  in  aircraft  is  adequately  legislated  for,  spontaneous  fires  can  occur  in  freight  and 
baggage holds.  Access to such areas whilst airborne may be possible, allowing the crew to enter them 
and fight the fires with portable extinguishers. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-8 - Fire Warning and Extinguisher Systems 
4-8 Fig 1 Equipment Monitored by a Fire Detection System 
Unit/Area Covered 
Type of Detector 
Indication 
Engine fire detection 
Graviner continuous wire 
L or R Fire lights 
Fire/short test 
Graviner continuous wire 
L or R ENG FIRE DET fault 
Engine (cooling air) overheat 
Thermal switches 860 ºF 
R and L ENGINE HOT 
Four thermal switches 
APU fire detection 
Three at 450 ºF 
APU FIRE light 
One at 600 ºF 
FWD RADIO RACK HOT 
Radio rack overheat 
Twelve thermal switches 200 ºF 
light 
Alternator overheat 
Thermal switches 250 ºF  
L or R ALT HOT light 
APU alternator overheat 
Thermal switches 300 ºF 
APU ALT HOT light 
Emergency transformer rectifier overheat 
Thermal switch 375 ºF  
TRU HOT light 
Tail compartment overheat 
Two thermal switches 200 ºF 
AFT EQUIP HOT light 
Auxiliary hydraulic pump overheat 
Thermal switch 300 ºF 
AUXILIARY HYD HOT light 
Pylon overheat 
Thermal switches 325 ºF 
L or R PYLON HOT light 
Bleed-air duct overheat 
Thermal switches 550 ºF 
L or R BLEED AIR HOT light 
Flight system hydraulic reservoir overheat 
Thermal switch 220 ºF 
FLT HYD HOT light 
Combined system hydraulic reservoir 
Thermal switch 220 ºF 
CMB HYD HOT light 
overheat 
Wing anti-ice overheat 
Thermal switches 180 ºF 
L or R WING HOT light 
Cowl anti-ice overheat 
Thermal switches 675 ºF  
L or R COWL A/I OVHT 
Bootstrap units 
Thermal switches 450 ºF 
L or R COOL TURB HOT 
Forward radio rack 
Thermal switches 200 ºF 
FWD RADIO RACK HOT 
Fire Detection Systems 
3. 
The functions of fire detection systems are to: 
a. 
Monitor designated areas or equipment for a rise in temperature, either at a higher rate, or to 
a higher level, than predetermined acceptable limits. 
b. 
Provide a warning to the crew. 
c. 
Complete  electrical  safety  circuits  within  the  fire  extinguisher  systems,  to  permit  necessary 
operation by the crew. 
The electrical safety circuits are provided to prevent accidental operation of extinguishers, and they are over-
ridden either by the detection systems or by deliberate manual selection by the crew.  The APU fire detection 
circuits  are  usually  arranged  to  automatically  close  down  the  equipment  as  part  of  their  operation.    It  is 
important that detection systems reset automatically when conditions return to normal, not only to inform the 
crew that the problem has receded, but also to be ready to react again if further overheating occurs.  Two 
basic  principles  of  operation  are  used  in  detectors,  either  as  simple  electrical  switches  activated  by  the 
differential thermal expansion of component metals, or as sensors in which temperature-dependent changes 
in  the  electrical  resistance  or  capacitance  are  used  to  activate  an  electronic  circuit.    Smoke  detectors  are 
devices  which  are  sensitive  to  an  increased  presence  of  the  chemical  products  of  combustion  in  the 
surrounding air.  If smoke is detected, an alert is given to the crew, indicating the problem area. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-8 - Fire Warning and Extinguisher Systems 
4. 
Fig 2 shows the construction of a typical heat-sensitive, self-resetting thermal switch.  It consists 
of  a  stainless  steel  barrel,  which has a high coefficient of thermal expansion, attached to a mounting 
flange.    Inside  the  barrel  is  a  spring  bow  assembly,  which  has  a  low  coefficient  of  expansion.    At 
normal  operating  temperatures,  the  contacts  attached  to  the  assembly  remain  open  because  the 
cylinder restricts the bow, forcing its arms apart.  As the temperature rises, the cylinder expands more 
than the bow, thus removing the restraint upon its length, and allowing the contacts to spring together.  
This process is reversed as the temperature returns to normal.  The device can be adjusted to operate 
precisely at the required temperature. 
4-8 Fig 2 Thermal Switch 
Mounting
Flange
End
Retaining
Ring
Terminal
Plug
Lock-nut
Spring
Block
Bows
Calibrating
Detector
Terminal
Sleeve
Barrel
Contacts
Studs
5. 
Fig 3 shows the sensing element used in the majority of area fire detectors.  The sensing element is 
in  the  form  of  a  wire  about  2  mm  in  diameter,  and  is  known  as the 'continuous wire' detection element 
(although the term 'Firewire', an early trade name, is still widely used).   
4-8 Fig 3 Continuous Wire Detection Element 
Stainless
Steel Tube
Filling
Central
Material
Electrode
The  element  can  be  relatively  easily  installed  around  the  areas  which  require  to  be  monitored.    Fig  4 
shows such an installation comprising two separate systems.  The system in Zone 1 monitors the engine 
pod for fire, whilst that in Zone 2 monitors the jet pipe area for overheating caused by gas leaks.  Similar 
installations would also be used in an APU enclosure.  Such systems are invariably installed in continuous 
loops, as shown in the figure.  The wire is vulnerable to damage caused by vibration, which may result in 
a reduction in electrical properties or actual fracture.  The use of a continuous loop avoids the effect of the 
resultant open circuit, allowing the wire to operate normally and provide a fire signal even when defective 
in part.  A test device is included in the system to highlight the existence of a fault, and, thus, allow timely 
rectification to be carried out. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-8 - Fire Warning and Extinguisher Systems 
4-8 Fig 4 Installation of a Continuous Element System 
Fire Seal
Connections to
Fire Indicator
Overheat Detector
Fire Detector
Connections to
Overheat Indicator
Zone 1
Zone 2
6. 
Crash  Switches.    Crash  switches  operate  either  by  sensing  high  retardation  forces  (typically  in 
excess of 6 g), or by the effect of structural deformation around them.  They are usually installed in the 
undercarriage bays or inside the belly of an aircraft. 
a. 
Inertia Switches.  The inertia switch senses excessive 'g' forces, utilizing either electronic or 
mechanical  accelerometers.    Fig  5  shows  a  pendulum  inertia  switch.    It  has  the  advantage  of 
being omni-directional, albeit only in a horizontal plane.  The pendulum is suspended on a beam 
which  allows  it  to  swing  horizontally  in  any  direction.    Normally  it  is  restrained  from  moving  by  a 
spring-loaded  lever  below  it.    However,  if  subjected  to  excessive  horizontal  deceleration,  the 
pendulum breaks away from its restraining lever, allowing the lever to rotate and actuate a bank of 
electrical contacts in the fire extinguisher circuits. 
b. 
Piston  Switches.    The  piston  type  of  switch  operates  on  a  similar  principle.    A  horizontal 
piston  is  restrained  in  its  cylinder  by  a  sprung  lever.    Under  the  effect  of  high  horizontal 
deceleration forces, the piston will overcome its restraint and move along the cylinder, allowing the 
sprung lever to rotate and make a series of electrical contacts. 
c. 
Structural Distortion Switches.  Structural distortion switches are positioned inside the belly 
of  the  aircraft.    They  are  intended  to  operate  during  a  crash  landing  when  skin  deformation  will 
occur, despite horizontal deceleration forces not being excessive. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-8 - Fire Warning and Extinguisher Systems 
4-8 Fig 5 A Pendulum Inertia Switch 
Fig 5a Before Operation 
Fig 5b After Operation 
Pendulum
Lever
Spring
Engine Fire Extinguisher Systems 
7. 
Permanently  installed  fire  extinguisher  systems  are  normally  provided  to  suppress  fires  in  the 
engine  nacelles  or  bays,  and  the  APU  and  heater  enclosures  of  an  aircraft.    The  fire  extinguisher 
system  comprises  selection  switches,  sited  with  the  cockpit  engine  control  levers,  which  activate  the 
fire  bottles  adjacent  to  the  engines  or  APU.    Power  is  provided  from  the  28  V  DC  essential  bus,  to 
ensure that the systems are always live.  The systems are designed to deliver predetermined volumes 
of  extinguishant  from  the  fire  bottles  to  designated  areas  of  the  appropriate  engine  installation.    One 
fire  bottle  per  engine  is  provided,  and  the  systems  of  multi-engine  aircraft  are  invariably  arranged  so 
that  extinguishant  from  each  fire  bottle  can  be  fed  to  one  or  other  engine.    Thus  a '2-shot' system is 
provided,  allowing  the  crew  two  attempts  to  extinguish  a  fire.    This  arrangement  is  shown  in  the 
schematic layout of a typical system at Fig 6.  The figure shows the pipe and electrical interconnections 
necessary to provide the second shot capability.  Shot 1 fires the left engine bottle to the left engine or 
the right engine bottle to the right engine.  Shot 2 fires the right engine bottle to the left engine or the 
left  engine  bottle  to  the  right  engine.    The  extinguishant  used  in  such  systems  is  likely  to  be  an  inert 
gas or a halocarbon agent.  When released from the system, the gas 'blankets' the fire, purging oxygen 
away from it. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-8 - Fire Warning and Extinguisher Systems 
4-8 Fig 6 Typical Engine and APU Systems Diagram 
Thermal
Discharge
APU
APU Fire
Fire
Power Supply
Bottle
Ext
from Essential DC Bus
APU
Enclosure
Gauge
Fire Wall
Fire Wall
LH Fire Bottle
RH Fire Bottle
LH Engine
RH Engine
Bay
Bay
Gauge
Gauge
Shot 2
Thermal
Thermal
Shot 2
Shot 1
Shot 1
Discharge
Discharge
Power Supply
from Essential DC  Bus
Legend
Engine
Shot 1
L
R
L Fire Ext SW
R Fire Ext SW
Shot 2
L
R
APU Discharge
8. 
The  fire  bottles  comprise  metal  spheres  or  cylinders  containing  the  extinguishant,  pressurized  by 
nitrogen, typically at 40 bar.  At this pressure, the agent is in liquid form.  A range of bottle sizes is available to 
meet different fire threats.  A typical engine bottle holds a charge of 2.5 kg, whilst a bottle of l kg would be 
used for smaller applications such as the APU.  Fig 7 shows more detail of the 2-shot bottles used in the 
above system.   
4-8 Fig 7 Detail of a 2-shot Fire Bottle 
Connection
Thermal
to system
Discharge
Port
Gauge
Cartridge
Cartridge
Diaphragm retains 
(Shot 1)
(Shot 2)
extinguishant until
burst by explosion of 
cartridge
The bottle has two firing heads, each containing an electrically actuated explosive squib cartridge.  When a 
head  is  fired,  either  by  crew  selection  or  automatically  by  operation  of  the  crash  switches,  the  agent  is 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-8 - Fire Warning and Extinguisher Systems 
propelled  into  the  relevant  pipe  gallery.    It  flows  under  pressure  to  the  fire  area  and  issues  through  spray 
nozzles, vaporizing as it does so.  The reduction of pressure, and vaporization of the agent, as it is sprayed 
from the system nozzles, cools the resultant gas thus enhancing its fire fighting capability by cooling the area 
of the fire.  As a safety device, each bottle is fitted with a safety disc.  If excessive pressure builds up in the 
bottle, the disc ruptures, allowing the agent to vaporize and escape harmlessly overboard.  Each bottle has 
an integral pressure gauge which is read during each flight servicing. This enables any failure or inadvertent 
discharge of the system to be detected before further flight.  Although the explosive squib cartridges have a 
limited  effective  life,  and  need  to  be  replaced  routinely,  very  little  maintenance  is  required  by  extinguisher 
systems.  Essential servicing includes the annual weighing of the bottles to ensure that they still contain a full 
charge of agent, and five-yearly pressure testing to validate their integrity. 
Portable Fire Extinguishers 
9. 
Portable hand-operated fire extinguishers are fitted in aircraft to combat fires that may occur in crew 
compartments. 
 
For 
this 
role, 
Military 
aircraft 
carry 

fire 
extinguisher 
containing 
bromochlorodifluoromethane  (BCF)  extinguishant,  pressurized  with  dry  nitrogen  gas.    BCF  is  a  non-
corrosive chemical that, when released, forms a blanketing mist to deprive the fire of oxygen. 
a. 
Description.    The  BCF  extinguisher  is  coloured  red,  and  has  a  label  with  the  operating 
instructions on.  It is secured in a mounting bracket by a retaining band, which has a quick-release 
fastener.  A sealing cap is fitted over the nozzle to prevent the ingress of dirt (see Fig 8a).  As the 
BCF extinguisher has no safety pin, the mounting bracket incorporates a shaped guard to prevent 
inadvertent  operation  of  the  lever  whilst  stowed.    A  modified  bracket,  with  a  secondary  locking 
system, is available for high 'g' aircraft. 
b. 
Pre-flight  Checks.    Pre-flight,  the  BCF  extinguisher  should  be  checked  to  confirm  that  the 
nozzle cap is present, and that the cap covering the discharge indicator pin is flush with the top of the 
extinguisher  head.    If  the  discharge  indicator  pin  is  visible,  or  its  cap  distorted,  the  extinguisher 
should  be  treated  as  unserviceable,  as  the  quantity  of  the  contents  cannot  be  guaranteed.    The 
extinguisher should also be checked for signs of external damage. 
c. 
Operation.    To  operate  the  extinguisher,  the  lever  must  be  fully  depressed  by  a  sharp  action 
(rather than by gradual squeezing).  This action lifts the valve against the compression spring (Fig 8b), 
thereby  breaking  the  frangible  plug  and  allowing  the  BCF  to  flow  from  the  container  to  the  nozzle 
(forcing off the sealing cap).  At the same time, the lever bolt pierces the indicator disc.  Releasing the 
lever  allows  the  spring  to  push  the  valve  back  against  a  seal  and  stops  the  flow  of  extinguishant.  
Further operation of the lever allows extinguishant to flow, until the container is empty. 
Note: 
Many  aircraft  currently  in  service  are  equipped  with  the  Kidde  Graviner  Handheld  Fire 
Extinguisher,  NSN  4120-99-1042111.    The  manufacturer  recommends  that  to  ensure  optimum  fire 
fighting performance from this extinguisher, it should be used at a range between 4 to 6 feet from the 
source and held within 60 degrees of the vertical. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-8 - Fire Warning and Extinguisher Systems 
4-8 Fig 8 The BCF Portable Fire Extinguisher 
Fig 8a Operating Head Schematic 
Fig 8b Operation 
Valve
Discharge
Indicator Pin
Frangible
Plug
Sealing
Cap
Lever
Nozzle
Cabin Protection 
10.  Research and development continue into means of safeguarding passengers and crew in the event 
of a cabin fire on the ground.  Although more relevant to civil passenger aircraft, equipment improvements 
resulting  from  such  research  will  be  read  across  to  military  aircraft  in  due  course.    Two  main  areas  of 
research are being followed.  One is the provision of smoke hoods or masks for passengers and crew, to 
prevent smoke inhalation.  The other is the provision of water mist inside the cabin to cool it and to wash 
away smoke particles.  The latter system requires considerable volumes of compressed air and water to 
be  pumped  into  the  cabin  through  the  aircraft  air  conditioning  ducting.    Since  this  process  relies  on  the 
availability of specialist ground equipment, its use would be restricted to major airports. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-9 - Ice and Rain Protection Systems 
CHAPTER 9 - ICE AND RAIN PROTECTION SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
The operation of military aircraft may necessitate flying in adverse weather conditions.  Provision 
must  therefore  be  made  to  safeguard  the  aircraft  against  icing,  the  effects  of  which  may  endanger 
performance and safety.  The areas on an aircraft which are sensitive to ice formation are: 
a. 
Aerofoil surfaces 
b. 
Engine intakes 
c. 
Engine internal surfaces 
d. 
Rotor blades and propellers 
e. 
Windscreens 
f. 
Instrumentation probes and vanes 
g. 
Control hinges and linkages 
h. 
Weapons and weapon carriers. 
Principles of Operation 
2. 
Ice  protection systems are either active or passive.  Active systems operate either by increasing 
the  temperature  of  local  areas  of  the  aircraft  to  above  freezing  point,  or  by  chemically  reducing  the 
freezing point of precipitation impinging upon the aircraft.  Passive methods harness the momentum of 
the  main  airstream  to  separate  out  precipitation  and  divert  it  away.    Active  systems  may  be  further 
categorized  as  either  anti-icing  or  de-icing.    Anti-icing  systems  prevent  the  formation  of  ice  in  critical 
areas whilst de-icing systems work to remove ice which has already formed. 
3. 
Many active systems will perform both functions, and the type used for each particular application 
will depend both upon the sensitivity of a specific area to the effects of ice, and upon the overall need 
to minimize aircraft weight and aircraft power consumption.  Most aircraft utilize more than one type of 
system, because of the wide range of requirements.  De-icing systems tend to be lighter and use less 
energy,  but  in  certain  areas  the  formation  of  any  ice  cannot  be  tolerated  and  therefore  an  anti-icing 
system must be used.  Such an area is the engine air intake.  Any build-up of ice would dramatically 
reduce  its  aerodynamic  efficiency  -  thus  affecting  engine  performance  -  whilst  ice  dislodged by a de-
icing system would be ingested risking an engine flame out and damage to compressor blades.  Both 
active and passive systems are used for intake anti-icing. 
Ice Protection Systems 
4. 
Thermal  (Hot  Air)-Airframe.    The  majority  of  airframe  structure  anti-icing  and  de-icing  systems 
utilize hot air bled from the engine compressors.  Fig 1 shows the airframe areas of a typical medium 
transport, which may be protected by engine bleed air.  Such systems sometimes allow air to be bled 
from an APU for anti-icing use during critical periods of flight, and this configuration allows anti-icing to 
be  used  during  an  emergency  landing,  even  though  maximum  power  from  the  main engines may be 
essential, and therefore no engine bleed air is available.  The hot air is fed through a system of selector 
valves, pressure regulators, and mixing valves which reduce the pressure and temperature of the air to 
operating levels.  The controlled air is then ducted through galleries to relevant areas. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-9 - Ice and Rain Protection Systems 
4-9 Fig 1 Aircraft Structure Anti-icing System 
Ducts along Spine
Tailplane Anti-icing
Auxiliary Power 
Unit (APU)
Ducts aft of Rear Spar
Wing Anti-icing
(Outboard)
Heat Exchanger
(Cooler)
Wing De-icing
Engine Bleed
(Inboard)
Fig  2  shows  the  configuration  of  a  typical  hot  air  bleed  to  a  wing  leading  edge.    Included  in  the 
illustration  is  a  temperature  sensor  installed  to  activate  system  temperature  control  valves  and  to 
provide  a  warning  to  the  crew  if  overheating  occurs.    Normal  cockpit  indications  include  the 
temperature and pressure of air in the system. 
4-9 Fig 2 Typical Wing Leading Edge Anti-icing System 
Piccolo
Sensor
Tube
From Bleed-air
Manifold
Plenum
Web
5. 
Thermal  (Hot  Air)  -  Engine.    Hot  air  systems  are  also  used  for  engine  anti-icing.    The 
components  which  require  protection  include  the  inlet  guide  vanes  and  first  stage  compressor  stator 
blades  plus  the  nose  cone  and  structural  support  members  within  the  intake.    Engine  anti-icing 
systems are often an integral part of the engine and are independent of the airframe anti-icing system.  
Fig 3 shows such an arrangement. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-9 - Ice and Rain Protection Systems 
4-9 Fig 3 Integral Engine Anti-icing System 
Intake Strut
Nose Cowling
Hot Air Valve
Inlet
Guide
Vanes
Fuel Heater
Air
Intake
Casing
From
Scavenge
Pump
Junction
Box
To Oil Tank
Hot Air
Oil
Oil Cooler
Electrical
6. 
Thermal  (Electrical).    Although  hot  air  systems  offer  advantages  of  simplicity  and  robustness, 
electrical  heating  is  widely  used  for  anti-icing  and  de-icing  systems  when  complex  control 
arrangements are needed or only small areas require to be heated.  Electrical systems usually include 
heater  elements  made  from  copper-manganese  alloy  either  built  up  onto  a  backing  material  or 
deposited (sprayed) onto the backing.  Fig 4 shows both a built up and a deposited system. 
4-9 Fig 4 Electrically Heated Mats 
Heater Mat
Spray Mat
Outer
Glass Cloth
Insulation
Layers
Sprayed Metal
Element
Base
Insulation
Base
Material
Electrical
Elements
The versatility which such manufacturing techniques offer, and the small cross section of the resultant 
element make them ideal for anti-icing pitot heads, static vents and other probes and vanes such as 
stall/angle  of  attack  indicators.    Heater  mats  are  also  used  for  de-icing  helicopter  rotor  blades  and 
fixed  wing  propellers.    The  rotor  blade  application  offers  particular  problems  in  system  control.    A 
typical  rotor  blade  has  a  span  of  8  to  10  metres  and  a  cord  of  0.5  metres.    The  electrical  load 
required  to  heat  such  large  areas  continuously  exceeds  the  power  available  in  a  helicopter,  and 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-9 - Ice and Rain Protection Systems 
therefore  the  blades  are  de-iced  by  intermittent  heating.    However,  the  aerodynamic  and  dynamic 
balance of rotor blades are critical to the controllability and airworthiness of the aircraft.  Therefore, 
blade  heating  must  be  programmed  so  that  the  ice  build  up  and  subsequent  break  down  occur 
symmetrically,  and  the  control  system  must  protect  against  asymmetric  failure  of  the  heater  mats.  
Because  of  the  resultant  complexity  and  cost  of  helicopter  rotor  blade  anti-icing,  helicopters 
operating in temperate or tropical areas are not normally equipped with blade anti-icing systems. 
7. 
Chemical  (Fluid)  Diffusion.    Chemical  fluid  systems  are  limited  in  use  to  anti-icing  aerofoil 
surfaces.  The advantage of chemical diffusion methods is that they require only a limited power 
input.  The disadvantages are that they require replenishment after use and that they are difficult 
and expensive to maintain and repair.  Their principle of operation is shown in Fig 5.  When anti-
icing or de-icing is required, de-icing fluid is pumped from a reservoir into porous surfaces which 
form  the  aerofoil  leading  edges.    The  fluid  diffuses  through  to  the  surface  of  the  leading  edges 
where  it  mixes  with  any  moisture  lowering  its  freezing  point.    This  prevents  the  formation  of  ice 
and  causes  existing  ice  to  break  away.    The  effectiveness  of  chemical  fluid  systems  is  very 
dependent upon an even distribution of fluid over the aerofoil leading edge.  In turn, distribution is 
sensitive to the aerofoil angle of attack and the resultant air-stream pattern along its top surface.  
Consequently,  most  aircraft  equipped  with  chemical  fluid  systems  must  be  flown  within  a 
restricted speed band when the system is in use. 
4-9 Fig 5 Typical Fluid Anti-icing System 
Fig 5a Schematic
Pump
Vent Traps
To Right Tail Plane
To Right Wing
Tank
Fin
Filter
Vent Pipe
Micro Porous
Panel
Porous Panel
Gallery Pipe
Back Plate
Wing Distribution Panels
Fig 5b Location of Components 
Distributor Panels
Main Feed Pipe
Gallery Pipe
Distributor Panels
Airframe De-icing Tank
Pump
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-9 - Ice and Rain Protection Systems 
8. 
Momentum  Separation.    Momentum  separation  devices  are  used  for  anti-icing  the  engine  intake 
systems  of  helicopters  and  some  ground  attack  aircraft  and  also  to  protect  exposed  control  system 
components.  They are passive devices, and their principle of operation is to force the air stream to make 
sharp  changes  in  direction  and  therefore  of  velocity.    During  such  changes,  the  higher  momentum  of 
water particles - because of their higher mass - causes them to separate from the main air stream.  They 
can  then  be  deflected  away  from  the  intake  or  other  critical  area.    Fig  6  shows  a  common  form  of 
momentum separation device - the air dam, or 'barn door', and its principle of operation. 
4-9 Fig 6 Principle of the Air Dam Separator 
Engine
Intake
Air streams flowing
Momentum of Liquid and Solid
round Air Dam
Particles causes Separation
Air Dam
9. 
Limitations  and  Effects.    Because  momentum  separator  systems  interfere  with  the  air  intake 
ram effect, their use is restricted to helicopters and other slow flying or piston engine aircraft which do 
not harness the ram effect.  There are many different configurations of separator ranging in complexity 
from the most simple arrangement of positioning the engines with their intakes facing downstream - so 
that  the  intake  air  stream  must  turn  through  180  degrees  throwing  water  and  debris  clear  -  to  the 
Aerospatiale  Polyvalent  (multi-purpose)  intake  shown  at  Fig  7a.    Figs  7b  and  7c  show  two  more 
commonly used systems.  Fig 7b is an intake shield and 7c is the more ingenious wire grill or basket.  
In  non-icing  conditions,  the  grill  imposes  little  resistance  to  the  air  stream,  but  in  icing  conditions,  air 
passing  through  the  grill  speeds  up  and  rapidly  cools  down  causing  water  particles  to  freeze  and 
adhere  to  the  mesh.    Thus,  a  shield  of  ice  rapidly  accumulates  and  protects  the  intake  in  much  the 
same way as does the conventional air dam.  The design of the grill is such that ample surface area 
along its sides will always remain clear of ice to allow sufficient air to enter the engine.  The theoretical 
disadvantage of the grill intake is that when the aircraft enters warmer air with a frozen grill ice will melt 
and  break  away  to  enter  the  engine.    In  practice  however,  this  problem  is  not  significant.    First,  the 
mesh size of the grill is selected during design to control the size of ice particles which do break away, 
and secondly, such large changes in climatic conditions are seldom encountered (or can be avoided) 
within the normal sortie pattern of a helicopter. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-9 - Ice and Rain Protection Systems 
4-9 Fig 7 Momentum Separation Device Configuration 
Fig 7a Aerosptiale Polyvalent (Multi-purpose) Intake 
Ice catchment Interspace
Panels of Micro-intakes
Purged Overboard by
with Integral Swirl Vanes
Engine Bleed Air
to Spin out Ice or Sand
Engine Intake
Plenum Chamber
Central Bullet Selectable
by Crew to Close or Open
Ram Intake in Flight
Fig 7b Intake Shield 
 
Fig 7c Wire Mesh ‘ChipBasket’ Intake 
Wire Mesh Panel in Sides
Open Rear Area
Central and Side
Solid Central
Wire Mesh Panels
Disc
Engine Intake
Engine Intake
Ground De-icing 
10.  Active and passive anti-icing and de-icing systems are designed to become effective as soon as 
the  aircraft  engines  are  started  so  that  the  aircraft  can  be  protected  from  ice  formation  during  the 
critical take-off and subsequent climb-out phases of flight.  However, if the aircraft has been parked in 
the open in adverse conditions prior to start-up, significant accretions of ice, snow, or slush may have 
built  up  on  the  aircraft  flying  surfaces.    Such  deposits  must  be  removed  prior  to  flight,  by  the  ground 
crews.    After  physically  removing  the  majority  of  such  deposits,  chemical  fluid  de-icing  is  used  to 
complete  the  task.    This  is  achieved  by  the  application  of  de-icing  fluids  in  specially  prepared 
thyxotropic paste or gel form by the use of ground-based spray equipment.  The effect of applying such 
a de-icing gel is to melt any ice present and to prevent its reformation until the aircraft is airborne.  The 
principle  is  also  sometimes  used  for  the  airborne  anti-icing  of  unheated  rotor  blades  on  helicopters 
which  must  fly  for  operational  reasons  in  icing  conditions.    However,  the  effectiveness  of  the  gel 
reduces during flight as it is gradually thrown from the blades by centrifugal forces. 
Ice Detection 
11.  Although  significant  flight  hazards  are  posed  by  ice  build-up,  the  fact  that  most  active  anti-icing 
and  de-icing  systems  consume  considerable  amounts  of  power  preclude their use except when icing 
conditions are actually encountered.  Meteorological forecasts go much of the way to alerting crews to 
the  likelihood  of  entering  icing  conditions  during  a  particular  flight.    However,  such  forecasts  are  not 
always sufficient, and the crew must therefore remain alert to the need to activate the anti-icing and de-
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-9 - Ice and Rain Protection Systems 
icing systems at any time.  The formation of ice on external visible projections would normally be the 
first  manifestation  of  having  entered  icing  conditions.    For  this  reason,  the  majority  of  aircraft  are 
equipped with flood lights aligned to illuminate relevant areas of the airframe which are visible from the 
cockpit.    Aircraft  in  which  crew  visibility  is  limited  are  often  equipped  with  illuminated  ice  accretion 
probes  as  shown  in  Fig  8a.    These  are  positioned  to  be  visible  from  the  cockpit.    In  addition,  most 
aircraft  are  equipped  with  ice  detection  devices  which  either  provide  a  positive  alert  or  automatically 
activate the anti-icing and de-icing systems. 
4-9 Fig 8 Ice Detection Devices 
Fig 8b Smiths Differential Static 
Fig 8a Teddington Visual Ice Detector 
Pressure Ice Detector 
Heated Aerofoil Rod
Heating Element
Inspection Lamp
Fig 8d Sangamo Weston Icing 
Fig 8c Rosemount Frequency Monitor Ice Detector   
Condition Monitor 
Moisture Sensing Heads
Vibrating Rod
Moisture
Detector
Controller
Thermal Switch
12.  Many  different  principles  of  operation  are  used  in  ice  detection  devices,  but  all  either  detect  the 
actual  build-up  of  ice  or  the  conditions  in  which  a  build-up  will  occur.    Three  different  devices  are 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-9 - Ice and Rain Protection Systems 
shown  in Fig 8a to d.  The probe shown in Fig 8b contains a series of holes positioned in its leading 
edge and a separate series in its trailing edge.  The detector monitors pressure differential between the 
two edges.  In icing conditions, holes in the leading edge rapidly become blocked by ice.  This causes 
a  change  in  the  pressure  differential.    The  change  is  detected,  and  a  cockpit  alert  is  activated.    The 
device in Fig 8c utilizes the change in resonant frequency of a probe which occurs when ice forms on 
it.  The probe is vibrated at its clean resonant frequency of about 35 kHz.  The mass of any ice which 
forms  on  the  probe  will  reduce  this  resonant  frequency,  and  the  detector  senses  any  significant 
frequency change and activates the cockpit alarm.  The device in Fig 8d works on the same principle 
as a wet and dry bulb hygrometer, and it comprises two heated bulbs, one exposed to the air stream 
and the other shielded, plus a simple outside air temperature (OAT) probe.  The detector monitors the 
temperature of the bulbs which are heated at a constant rate.  When the exposed bulb is in a moist air 
stream, it loses its heat to the surrounding air at a greater rate than does the dry shielded bulb.  The 
resultant  temperature  imbalance  is  detected.    If  the  OAT  is  detected  to  be  within  the  icing  range, 
contacts in the probe circuit close, and the alert system is activated. 
Windscreen Ice and Rain Protection 
13.  Although  de-icing  fluid  spray  systems  or  hot  air  jets  were  utilized  to  de-ice  the  windscreens  of 
older aircraft, all current aircraft are fitted with electrically heated screens.  The heating elements and 
associated  temperature  control  and  overheat  sensors  are  sandwiched  in the glass laminations of the 
screen.    A  thin  film  of  gold  is  used  for  the  heating  element,  and  it  is  deposited  directly  onto  glass.  
Electrical connectors formed on the edges of the panel interface with the system electrical supply and 
temperature controller.  The heater systems serve both to de-ice and de-mist the screens. 
14.  At normal flying speeds, rain falling onto the screens is rapidly dispersed by the airflow.  However, 
to keep the screen clear during landing or during low speed flight, conventional, high-speed windscreen 
wipers are fitted to most fixed and rotary wing aircraft.  The wipers are electrically activated by the crew 
as and when needed. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
CHAPTER 10 - AIRCRAFT FUEL SYSTEMS 
Principles 
1. 
The fuel system of an aircraft consists of two distinct sub-systems.  One is integral with the engine 
or  Auxiliary  Power  Unit  (APU)  and  the  other  with  the  airframe.    A  typical  engine  system  comprises  a 
high  pressure  (HP)  pump,  final  filtration,  a  fuel  control  unit  (FCU)  and  a  carburation  device  which 
introduces the fuel into the combustion system.  Details of engine fuel systems are included at Volume 
3, Chapter 11.  The functions of the aircraft airframe fuel system are to store the fuel until it is required 
and then to deliver it in quantities appropriate to the power being demanded of the engines or the APU, 
to a set pressure and quality. 
2. 
To  reduce  crew  workload,  and  to minimize the risk of a fuel management error occurring during 
flight, control of the system requires to be automatic or semi-automatic in operation.  Also, to provide 
for  the  extensions  in  aircraft  range  and  endurance  imposed  by  a  wide  variation  in  operational 
requirements,  the  system  configuration  requires  sufficient  flexibility  to  be  extended  when  operations 
demand greater range or endurance.  In many cases, this is achieved by fitting additional tankage or by 
providing  a  capability  to  pick  up  additional  fuel  during  flight.    A  typical  single-engine  fuel  system  is 
illustrated in Fig 1.  Fuel is held in integral wing and fuselage tanks, with (in this example) the option of 
extra fuel in an external tank. 
4-10 Fig 1 Typical Combat Aircraft Tank Configuration 
Pressure
Control
Fuselage
Tank Air
Valve
Bagtank
Vent
Wing Integral
Tank
Tank air pressurization
to prevent
fuel vaporization
Engine
Feed
Collector
Pressure
Tank with
Optional
Wing Integral
Refuelling
LP Cock and
Drop Tanks
Tank
Point
Fuel Pump
Fuel Storage 
3. 
Tank Position.  Fuel is stored in tanks which are usually an integral part of the aircraft structure 
or are constructed from flexible fabric membranes or bags.  The strength and rigidity of such bags are 
derived from the aircraft structure.  The disposition of the tanks depends upon the role of the aircraft 
and therefore the priority for space within its airframe.  For instance, the tanks of transport aircraft are 
generally  situated  in  the  wings,  those  of  helicopters  are  beneath  the  cabin floor and those of combat 
aircraft in the wings and centre fuselage.  The need to maximize the amount of fuel carried in flight has 
led to much ingenuity in tank location.  Tail fins, flaps and the outer walls of air intakes have all been 
used as tanks in various aircraft types. 
4. 
Structure.  The walls of integral fuel tanks are formed by the aircraft structure.  Considerable care 
must be taken during construction to ensure that all joints and inspection hatches in the structure are 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
adequately  sealed  and  that  tank  walls  are  treated  to  prevent  corrosion.    Such  corrosion  is  usually 
caused  by  bacterial  action  which  takes  place  at  the  interface  between  the  fuel  and  any  water,  which 
may settle into the bottom of the tank.  Fuel additives prevent the formation of such bacteria, but the 
availability  of  treated  fuel  cannot  be  guaranteed  in  all  operational  circumstances.    Bag  tanks  do  not 
suffer  the same problems of sealing and corrosion, but their use imposes both a weight penalty, and 
the need to remove them for periodic maintenance.  This necessitates access ports to be provided in 
the surrounding structure. 
5. 
Collector  Tank.    For  ease  of  control  and  system  integrity,  fuel  tanks  are  usually  arranged  in 
groups.  On multi-engine aircraft, fuel from each group feeds one specific engine, although the facility 
to  transfer  fuel to other engines or tank groups is provided.  Each tank in a group feeds fuel through 
pipes or galleries into a collector tank which is therefore always full of fuel.  The collector tank feeds the 
engine  directly,  thus,  an  uninterrupted  supply  of  fuel  is  ensured  to  each  engine  during  periods  of 
turbulence  or  manoeuvre.    Devices  to  ensure  the  supply  of  fuel  during  extreme  manoeuvre,  such  as 
inverted flight or flight in negative 'g' conditions are discussed in para 22. 
6. 
Tank Pressurization.  The boiling point of fuel will vary with the temperature of the fuel and the 
pressure at the fuel surface.  If an aircraft is refuelled with warm fuel and then climbed to altitude, the 
pressure  above  the  fuel  is  reduced  whilst  the  temperature,  because  of  the  large  volume  involved, 
remains  essentially  the  same.    The  fuel  will  boil  and  vapour  will  form  which  could  form  vapour  locks 
and engine malfunction.  The primary method of preventing this boiling action is to apply a positive air 
pressure  above  the  fuel.    The  fuel  tanks  are  therefore  pressurized  by  engine  air,  regulated  by  a 
pressure control valve.  The pressure control valve incorporates a non-return valve (NRV), a reducing 
valve  and  a  relief  valve.    The  NRV  prevents  reverse  airflow  to the engine during refuelling and stops 
fuel entering the air line.  The reducing valve controls the air pressure to a specified value and the relief 
valve prevents overpressure damage by venting excess air if the reducing valve fails to operate. 
Delivery System Components 
7. 
Low Pressure Cock and Pumps.  The boundary between the engine and airframe sub-systems 
is always defined as the low pressure (LP) cock which is fitted as the final component in the airframe 
system.  The typical arrangement of tank groups in a multi-engine aircraft, including the position of the 
LP cocks, is shown at Fig 2.  When required for the engines or APU, fuel is fed from the collector tanks 
by low pressure (LP) pumps. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
4-10 Fig 2 Arrangement of Tank Groups and Controls 
Inter-tank
Injector Pumps
These  provide  a  backing  pressure  to  the  engine  system  HP  pumps.    LP  pumps  are  often  termed 
booster pumps.  The LP pumps are electrically or hydraulically driven, and they run fully submerged in 
the collector tanks.  Unless the aircraft configuration is such that fuel will flow from the collector tanks 
to  the  engines  by  gravity,  multiple  LP  pumps  are  provided  to  obviate  fuel  starvation  occurring  in  the 
event of pump failure.  The intakes of LP pumps incorporate a coarse filter and also a by-pass valve to 
allow fuel to continue to flow in the event of filter blockage or pump failure.  Jet (or injector) pumps are 
often used to feed fuel from storage to collector tanks.  Such pumps work on a venturi principle and the 
motive force is provided by fuel bled from the LP pumps.  Fig 3 shows their principle of operation.  The 
advantages of the jet pump are that it requires no separate power supply or control circuits and that it 
is extremely reliable. 
4-10 Fig 3 Fuel Injector (Jet) Pump 
Injector flow
340 kg/hour
Resultant flow
at 2.0 bar (from
2000 kg/hour
LP Pump)
at 0.2 bar
Induced flow
from tank
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
8. 
Water Drains.  Hydrocarbon fuels tend to absorb water, and such water will precipitate out of the 
fuel when its temperature drops.  There is therefore a likelihood of some water collecting in aircraft fuel 
tanks,  despite  all  possible  precautions  being  taken  to  maintain  the  quality  of  fuel  up  to  the  point  of  it 
being pumped into the aircraft.  All tanks are fitted with simple to operate water drain valves, positioned 
in the tank bottoms, and these are operated during daily servicing to dump any water which may have 
collected. 
9. 
Filters.    Although  all  fuel  is  filtered  to  a  high  standard  immediately  prior  to  being  dispensed  into 
the aircraft, there remains a likelihood that debris may enter the fuel either through the tank vents, from 
residual deposits in the tanks or through open line refuelling points (see Para 17).  Therefore, as well 
as  there  being  a  very  fine  filter  in  the  engine  fuel  sub-system,  a  relatively  coarse  filter  is  usually 
included  in  the  airframe  sub-system.    Such  filters  are  often  of  the  paper  cartridge  type  and  include 
either visual tell-tales or electrical warning devices to indicate blockage.  The filters also incorporate by-
pass  systems  to  ensure  that  a  continuous supply of fuel, albeit unfiltered, reaches the engines in the 
event of filter blockage. 
10.  Venting.    As  mentioned  in  para  6,  fuel  tanks  require  to  remain  either  at  the pressure altitude of 
the aircraft or, more usually, at a small positive differential pressure during flight.  The tanks therefore 
require  venting  systems,  which  control  the  entry  and  exit  of  air  both  during  flight  and  on  the  ground.  
The requirements of such a system are: 
a. 
To  allow  air  to  enter  as  fuel  is  consumed,  as  the  aircraft  descends  or  as  the  fuel  cools  and 
contracts. 
b. 
To  allow  air  to  exit  as  it  is  displaced  during  refuelling,  as  the  aircraft  climbs  or  as  the  fuel 
warms and expands. 
c. 
To maintain the tanks at a controlled positive pressure differential thus reducing vaporization 
and, in some systems, providing the driving force for fuel transfer. 
d. 
To  prevent  fuel  being  lost  from  the  venting  system  during  flight  manoeuvre  -  although  the 
system must allow fuel to vent from full tanks as it warms and expands during diurnal temperature 
cycles. 
The vent system usually comprises one or more pipes positioned in the top of the tanks and which duct 
air from outside the aircraft into all the tanks in the group.  A system of float valves in the pipes allows air 
to enter the tanks when their pressure is lower than the pipe pressure, and air to vent from the tanks when 
their pressure is higher.  The float valves serve to prevent any significant amounts of fuel from entering 
the  vent  pipes,  but  because  small  amounts  of  fuel  will  be  carried  into  the  pipes  during  manoeuvre  or 
during heavy venting, a fuel surge tank is provided at the entrance to the pipe system, to separate out this 
fuel.  Air enters the system through a ram vent in the lower wing surface, thus ensuring that during flight 
the system pressure is always a little higher than static pressure.  During normal operation, air enters and 
vents from the system as necessary, and any fuel vented with this air collects in the surge tank.  When 
aircraft  fuel  contents  are  sufficiently  low  for  the  surge  tank  drain  float  valves  to  open,  vented  fuel  is 
allowed to drain back into the main tanks.  However, if relatively cold fuel is pumped into the tanks during 
replenishment, its volume will increase as the fuel heats up to tank-soak temperature.  Any fuel displaced 
from the tanks through such expansion will vent into the surge tank, and if this becomes over full, excess 
fuel will drain from the aircraft through the wing vent giving a misleading impression that a tank fuel leak 
exists.  This situation frequently occurs when aircraft are refuelled early in the morning and remain parked 
in hot sunlight throughout the day. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
Design Objectives and Typical Configuration 
11.  Considering  the  foregoing  description,  fuel  system  design  must  take  into  account  the  following 
criteria: 
a. 
Optimum use of the fuselage space available for fuel storage. 
b. 
Delivery  of  fuel  to  the  engines  and  APU  at  required  flow  rates  and  to  design  pressure  and 
quality. 
c. 
Cross flow of fuel between specific tank groups and engines and the transfer of fuel between 
tanks  both  to  allow  manipulation  of  the  aircraft’s  required  centre  of  gravity  position  during  flight 
and to counter any feasible system malfunction. 
d. 
Ease of system control and monitoring during flight. 
e. 
Rapid and safe fuel replenishment, and the flexibility to satisfy fuel requirements posed by a 
wide spectrum of operations. 
f. 
Tolerance to aircraft manoeuvre and to damage. 
g. 
Secondary uses of fuel - for example as a coolant. 
Transfer, Cross-feed and Jettison 
12.  Transfer and Cross-feed.  In the majority of aircraft, distribution of fuel is critical to aircraft balance.  
Although  devices  such  as  fuel  proportioners  are  used  wherever  possible  to  meter  the  flow from individual 
tanks and thus achieve a degree of automatic control of fuel distribution, system malfunction, uneven rates of 
fuel  burn  between  engines,  or  even  the  gradual  reduction  of  fuel  load during flight will necessitate system 
management action being taken to redistribute fuel from one tank to another.  Fuel transfer is achieved either 
automatically  by  the  control  system  sensing  an  imbalance  or  by  crew  selection.    Similarly,  if  an  engine  is 
closed down in flight or a lesser imbalance of fuel burn between engines occurs, it will become necessary for 
the  crew  to  cross-feed  fuel from one group of tanks to another engine.  To maintain fuel system integrity, 
transfer  and  cross-feed  networks  are  independent  of  each  other.    Fig  4  shows  a  typical  fuel  system  with 
transfer and cross-feed facilities.  In this case, the configuration of the multi-engine aircraft allows transfer to 
be accomplished through a simple gravity feed line between the two tank groups.  In other cases, such as 
depicted in Fig 2, fuel must be transferred by pumps. 
4-10 Fig 4 Fuel System with Transfer and Cross-feed 
Engine 1
Engine 4
Engine 2
Engine 3
LP Cocks
(open)
Left to/from Right
Crossflow Valve
Engines 1 to/from 2
Engines 3 to/from 4
Cro
Non-return
ssflow Valve
Crossflow Valve
Valves
Left Tank
Centre Tank
Right Tank
Tank 1
Tank 2
Tank 3
Tank 4
Collector
Centre to Left
Centre to Right
Injector
LP Fuel
Collector
Tanks
Transfer Valve
Transfer Valve
Pumps
Pumps
Tanks
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
13.  Jettison.  Because of undercarriage and structural stress constraints, the maximum permissible 
take off weight of an aircraft is often considerably higher than its maximum permissible landing weight.  
It is therefore possible for the crew of such an aircraft to take off at maximum weight, experience an in-
flight  emergency  or  be  recalled  for  operational  reasons,  and  then  be  unable  to  land  safely  until 
sufficient  fuel  has  been  consumed  to  bring  the  weight  within  safe  landing  limits.    To  resolve  this 
problem,  most  systems  incorporate  a  facility  for  dumping  fuel  in  flight.    The  system  in  Fig  5  includes 
such  a  facility.    Fuel  is  pumped,  or  it  feeds  by  gravity,  through  a  system  of  valves  and  pipes  to  be 
vented overboard well clear of the fuselage and the jet efflux. 
4-10 Fig 5 Tank Jettison System 
Engines on cabin roof
LP cock
LP filter
Fuel jettison
Cabin floor
valve
Individual bag tanks
Fuel jettison outlet
LP pumps
between fuselage frames
in undercarriage
(1 per engine)
Collector tank
nacelle clear of fuselage
Systems Management 
14.  Control.    Operation  of  the  fuel  system  is  often  automatic  or  semi-automatic,  and  many  such 
systems start to operate as soon as the crew has opened the LP cocks and switched on the LP pumps.  
Control  is  maintained  by  float  switches  sensing  changes  in  fuel  levels  and operating appropriate valves 
and  pumps.    However,  crew  intervention  is  normally  required  to  initiate  transfer  of  fuel  between  tank 
groups, cross-feed fuel from tank groups to different engines and to jettison fuel. 
15.  Indications.    Instrumentation  within  the  fuel  system  includes  continuous  measurement  of  fuel 
contents  plus  indicators  to  show  system  configuration,  alerting  the  crew  to  low  fuel  pressure  or 
contents and warning of malfunctions, such as pump failure or filter blockage.  Fig 6 shows a simple 
fuel  control  panel  and  indicators  within  the  cockpit  of  a  multi-engine  aircraft.    The  gauging  of  fuel 
contents in most aircraft is achieved by integrating the signals received from a network of sensor units 
positioned throughout the tank systems.  Electrical capacitance of the sensors varies proportionally to 
the  depth  of  fuel  surrounding  them,  and  this  enables  fuel  contents  to  be  computed  and  presented  to 
the crew.  In simple aircraft, float-actuated variable resistors are used to sense fuel levels and to effect 
an appropriate gauge reading. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
4-10 Fig 6 Fuel System Control and Instrumentation Panels 
Fuel
Feed Tank
1
2
3
4
Fuel Tank
Contents Gauges
L Feed
LAux Tank
R Aux Tank
R Feed
LO Level
Not Empty
Not Empty
LO Level
Control Position
Refuel
Transfer
Transfer
X Feed
Captions
Selected
to L Tank
to R Tank
Valve
CTR Tank
Transfer
X Feed
Fuel Temp
Auto
Shut
Transfer & Cross
Shut
Feed Controls
Open
Open
Common Feed
L Stby Pump
L Shut R
R Stby Pump
Norm
Norm
Standby Pump and
Valve Controls
On
On
Open
L Stby
L Feed
R Feed
R Stby
LO Press
Valve
Valve
LO Press
System Parameter
L Outer
L Inner
R Inner
R Outer
Warning Captions
LO Press
LO Press
LO Press
LO Press
Pumps
L Outer
L Inner
R Inner
R Outer
On
On
Engine Low Pressure
Fuel Pump Controls
Off
Off
Refuelling and Additional Fuel 
16.  Pressure Refuelling.  Most aircraft have a fuel capacity measuring thousands or even tens of 
thousands of litres.  To uplift such large volumes rapidly, cleanly and with minimum risk of spillage, 
pressure  refuelling  is  the  normal  method  used.    Ground  facilities  are  used  to  deliver  fuel  at  a 
standard  pressure  of  3.75  bar  through  hoses  and  quick-release  couplings.    The  hoses  are 
electrically  bonded,  and  aircraft  are  additionally  bonded  to  the  installation  during  refuelling.    This 
ensures that aircraft and installation are at the same electrical potential and that static charges built 
up  in  the  fuel,  because  of  the  high  flow  rate,  are  safely  dissipated.    Many  aircraft  systems  allow 
refuelling  to  selected  partial  fuel  loads  to  be  achieved  automatically.    Such  systems  usually  utilize 
signals  from  the  gauging  system  or  a  series  of  float  switches  to  close  the  tank  inlet  valves  as  the 
desired fuel levels for each tank are reached. 
17.  Open-line  Refuelling.    Some  smaller  turbine  powered  aircraft  and  all  piston  driven  aircraft  are 
refuelled  at  low  pressure  through  open  nozzles  feeding  into  the  top  of  the  aircraft  tank  system.    The 
technique  is  also  known  as  gravity  or  over-wing  refuelling,  and  it  is  identical  to  the  system  used  for 
motor vehicles.  Because the equipment is so widely available, open-line refuelling is often held as the 
reserve  system  at  remote  airfields  or  in  the  battlefield.    Therefore,  many  aircraft  which  are  likely  to 
operate in such areas have an added capability for open-line refuelling.  The system depicted in Fig 2 
shows such a feature on a medium transport aircraft which can be expected to operate into relatively 
remote airfields. 
18.  De-fuelling.  For operational reasons or during servicing, the requirement often occurs to reduce 
the fuel load of an aircraft prior to take off.  To achieve this, pressure refuelling systems all include a 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
facility  for  pumping  fuel  out  of  the  aircraft  tanks,  after  appropriate  manipulation  of  the  aircraft system 
controls.  To avoid damage to the aircraft structure, the suction level used for de-fuelling is much lower 
than the pressure for refuelling. 
19.  Additional  On-board  Fuel.    During  the  design  phase,  the  fuel  system  capacity  is  optimized  for 
the  range  or  endurance  normally  required  for  the  aircraft.    Thus,  if  a  temporary  increase  in  range  or 
endurance becomes necessary, such as a ferry flight, a fuel load greater than that designed for must 
be carried.  This is usually achieved by trading payload for fuel, fitting additional fuel tanks in the cargo 
space or on weapons stations.  For example, the aircraft depicted at Fig 1 is configured to carry ferry 
fuel in conventional drop tanks attached to the weapons stations.  The arrangements for carrying and 
managing additional fuel are decided upon at the design phase, and the aircraft fuel system is built to 
accept the additional tankage as role equipment, to be fitted and removed as necessary. 
20.  In-flight Refuelling.  When carriage of the full payload is required over an extended range, either 
more frequent refuelling stops must be made or, if this is not possible, the aircraft must be refuelled in 
flight.    Most  relevant  fixed  wing  aircraft  and  some  helicopters  are  equipped  for  in-flight  refuelling.  
However, the rotors of most helicopters sweep a path so close to the nose of the aircraft that the use of 
air-to-air refuelling techniques can be impracticable.  Nevertheless, helicopters frequently require to be 
refuelled  in  mid-sortie,  and  this  is  achieved  by  hovering  the  aircraft  close  to  the  ground  (or  with  the 
undercarriage  just  touching)  whilst  conventional  refuelling  is  carried  out.    The  technique  is  termed 
rotors  running  refuelling  (RRR),  and  it  is  commonly  used  to  extend  the  range  or  endurance  of  SAR, 
ASW and battlefield helicopters. 
Tolerance to Manoeuvre and Damage 
21.  Manoeuvre.    During  aircraft  manoeuvre  or  flight  in  turbulent  conditions,  fuel  in  the  tanks  will  be 
affected by the resultant g forces.  The surges of fuel produced will, if uncontrolled, cause interruptions 
in  flow.    Indeed,  in  extreme  cases,  the  rapid  movement  of  significant  masses  of  fuel  will  tend  to  de-
stabilise  the  aircraft  and  cause  structural  damage  to  the  tanks.    These  effects  are  minimized  by 
positioning  baffle  plates  in  the  tanks.    Usually  part  of  the  aircraft  structure,  they  effectively  divide  the 
tanks into small sub-compartments reducing and absorbing the energy in the surges. 
22.  Negative 'g' Devices.  Although collector tanks (see para 5) ensure a stable fuel flow to the engines 
in  most  flight  conditions,  more  positive  methods  are  required  for  providing  fuel  during  inverted  flight  or 
flight  in  negative  'g'  conditions.    Many  combat  or  aerobatic  training  aircraft  utilize  the  fuel  recuperator 
system.  The recuperator is a separate container positioned in the engine fuel supply line and always full 
of fuel.  The container is maintained at a pressure of about 0.5 bar, slightly below normal fuel LP pump 
pressure,  by  engine  bleed  air.    If  LP  pump  pressure  drops,  because  of  tank  fuel  surging  during 
manoeuvre or inverted flight, fuel from the recuperator is forced into the system and thus maintains the 
engine  fuel  supply  during  the  limit  of  its  capacity.    Another  frequently  used  and  simpler  device  is  the 
double  entry  LP  pump.    Situated  in  the  collector  tank,  this  pump  has  gravity  operated  flap  valves  in  its 
lower entry port.  During inverted or negative 'g' flight, the valves close allowing the now inverted pump to 
draw fuel through its upper port to the limit of the collector tank contents. 
23.  Damage.    Many  aircraft  fires  occurring  on  the  ground  and  in  the  air  have  been  caused  by  fuel 
leaks  resulting  from  damage  to  the  fuel  system.    Such  damage  may  be  caused  by  enemy  action, 
disintegration of engine components or by ground impact during an otherwise survivable crash landing.  
Therefore,  considerable  effort  is  made  to  ensure  that  systems  are  tolerant  to  such  damage.    It  is 
normal  for  fuel  lines  which  of  necessity  pass  adjacent  to  engines,  to  be  armoured  and  fire  proofed.  
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-10 - Aircraft Fuel Systems 
One  of  the  more  extreme  examples  of  designed  damage  tolerance  is  that  of  the  Chinook  helicopter.  
Its fuel tanks are external panniers, and no fuel is carried within the fuselage.  The tanks are designed 
to break away from the fuselage and roll clear of the aircraft on impact. 
Secondary Uses of Fuel 
24.  Coolant.  The most common secondary use for fuel is as a coolant for lubrication oils or hydraulic 
fluids.  Heat absorbed by the fuel from the fluids is dissipated into the tanks and ultimately through the 
aircraft structure to atmosphere.  Within obvious safety limits, turbine engine fuel can be put to this use 
before it is burnt.  However, the low flash point of gasoline tends to preclude the use of piston engine 
fuels  for  cooling  purposes.    Fuel  is  also  used  in  supersonic  aircraft  to  cool  areas  of  aerodynamic 
heating.  In such cases, cold fuel from the tanks is pumped through heat exchanger galleries in the hot 
structure prior to reaching the engines. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 4-11 - Secondary Power Systems,  
Auxiliary and Emergency Power Units 
CHAPTER 11 - SECONDARY POWER SYSTEMS, 
AUXILIARY AND EMERGENCY POWER UNITS 
Introduction 
1. 
Definitions.  Primary power is defined as the basic propulsive force for an aircraft and is provided 
by  its  main  engines.    Secondary  power  is  defined  as  the  electrical,  hydraulic  and  pneumatic  power 
generated  to  drive  the  aircraft  ancillary  systems.    When  the  aircraft  is  airborne,  secondary  power  is 
usually generated via a power take-off from the main engines.  However, most aircraft have additional 
integral secondary power sources to augment that of the main  engines, for use particularly when the 
aircraft  is  on  the  ground,  or  in  the  event  of  failure  of  a  main  engine  or  other  emergency.    These 
additional  sources  are  termed  Auxiliary  Power  Units  (APUs)  and  Emergency  Power  Units  (EPUs) 
respectively.    Secondary  power  may  also  be  provided  at  most  aircraft  fixed  operating  bases  from 
Ground  Power  Units  (GPUs).    GPUs  are  used  to  provide  power  during  prolonged  periods  of 
maintenance when the power output of APUs may not be adequate or their operation not practicable. 
2. 
Configuration Although the concept of secondary power and the methods of providing it can be 
readily defined, the related hardware is less clearly identifiable because many items are constructed to 
perform dual roles.  The schematic diagrams in Fig 1 present typical combinations of equipment and 
the roles which each item fulfils. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-11 - Secondary Power Systems,  
Auxiliary and Emergency Power Units 
4-11 Fig 1 Secondary Power System Arrangements 
Hydraulic
Key
Engine
Electrical
A
H
Pumps
E
Accessories
Generators
Fig 1a Accessory Gearbox with RAT 
Fig 1b Accessory Gearbox with APU 
A
H
E
A
H
E
Accessory
Accessory
Gearbox
Gearbox
Main
H
E
Main
H
E
Engine
Engine
Electrical
Air
H
E
Auxiliary
Starter
Starter
GPU
H
Hyd & Elec
RAT with
Hyd pump
Remote APU
Fig 1c SPS Module with APU and EPU 
 
Fig 1d SPS Module with Combined APU/EPU 
APU/Mechanical
Starter
Mechanical
Remote Drive
A
H
H
E
Main
H
H
E
Main
E
Engine
SPS
Engine
Module
Accessory
Emergency
Gearbox
H
E
Hyd & Elec
Combined
APU/EPU/Starter
Remote EPU
Modular Secondary Power Systems 
3. 
The  provision  of  secondary  power  has  evolved  from  the  simple  arrangement  still  common  in  light 
aircraft of attaching electrical generators, hydraulic pumps and pneumatic pumps directly to the engine and 
driving them through belts or drive shafts.  This arrangement for generating secondary power has developed 
into the provision of a discrete module of the engine, termed the accessory or ancillary gearbox, providing a 
location for all secondary power generators and driven through a power take-off from the main engine.  All 
engine  accessories  are  also  attached  to  this  module.    Fig  2  shows  a  typical  accessory  gearbox  and  the 
secondary power generators which it supports. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-11 - Secondary Power Systems,  
Auxiliary and Emergency Power Units 
4-11 Fig 2 Engine Accessory Gearbox and Secondary Power Generators 
Starter/Driven
Aircraft Electrical
Gearshaft
Generator
Radial Driveshaft
Centrifugal
Breather
High Pressure
Fuel Pump
Engine Electrical
Generator
Tachometer
Vent
Engine Hand-turn
Fuel Flow
Access
Governor
Starter
Rear Casing
Oil Pumps
Front Casing
Low Pressure
Hydraulic Pump
Fuel Pump
4. 
Such an arrangement achieves the desirable goal of locating all secondary power sources in 
one  unit,  but  it  suffers  the  basic  disadvantage  of  requiring  all  of  these  secondary  systems  to  be 
physically  disconnected  from  the  aircraft  whenever  the  host  engine  is  removed  for  maintenance.  
An  engine  change  therefore  adversely  affects  the  integrity  of  all  secondary  power  systems.    A 
method of overcoming this major disadvantage, whilst retaining the advantage of centralizing the 
location  of  all  components,  is  to  locate  all  secondary  power  generators  on  a  dedicated  gearbox 
mounted directly onto the airframe remote from the engine.  In such an arrangement, the gearbox 
is  still  driven  by  the  main  engine  either  through  a  mechanical  (shaft)  or  hydraulic  (pump/motor) 
coupling,  but  the  arrangement  enables  removal  of  the  engine  without  disturbing  the  secondary 
power system.  Fig 3 shows a typical modular secondary power system. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-11 - Secondary Power Systems,  
Auxiliary and Emergency Power Units 
4-11 Fig 3 Typical Secondary Power System Module 
APU Exhaust
Hydraulic
Pump
Right Accessory
Gearbox
Auxiliary Power
Unit
First Stage
Fuel Pump
Left Accessory
Gearbox
APU Air
Cross-drive
Intake Shutter
Cross-drive
Shaft
Clutch Housing
Air Cooled
Fuel Cooler
Integrated Drive
Generator
FWD
Hydraulic
Pump
Integrated Drive
Generator
Air Cooled
Fuel Cooler
5. 
A typical Secondary Power System (SPS) Module for a twin engined aircraft comprises two similar 
accessory  drive  gearboxes  each  mechanically  driven  by  an  aircraft  engine.    A  freewheel  attached  to 
the drive shaft of each accessory drive gearbox effectively disconnects the respective engine when it is 
not running or in the event of it being closed down during flight.  In the event of an engine failure, both 
accessory  drive  gearboxes  can  be  driven  by  the  remaining  engine  through  a  clutch  and  cross  shaft 
connecting the two units.  On the ground when neither engine is running, an APU attached to one of 
the accessory drive gearboxes can be operated to provide all secondary power requirements.  A clutch 
disconnects  the  APU  from  the  drive  train,  when  it  is  not  required.    The  APU  is  also  used to start the 
main  engines.    In  the  start  mode,  a  torque  convertor  in  the  drive  train  between  gearbox  and  engine 
transmits power from the APU, controlled to run at full speed, into each stationary engine in turn.  As 
the  engine  starts  and  commences  to  run  under  its  own  power,  the  torque  convertor  is  automatically 
programmed  to  cease  driving.    The  secondary  power  generators  fitted  to  each  aircraft  system 
accessory drive gearbox include a hydraulic pump, an electrical generator and a fuel boost pump. 
Auxiliary Power Units 
6. 
The  need  to  provide  an  auxiliary  secondary  power  source  on  aircraft  has  long  been  recognized, 
and  initial  arrangements  included  the  use  of  small  piston  engines  mounted  in  the  fuselage.    Most 
current  units  are  small  gas  turbine  engines.    Such  small  engines  develop  some  75 to l00 kW.  Their 
design  is  of  a  constant  speed,  variable  torque  engine  using  a  single  stage  centrifugal  compressor  to 
feed air to a single combustion chamber.  This in turn powers a single stage radial turbine driving either 
an accessory gearbox which is integral with the APU or an adjacent secondary power module.  Some 
higher power APUs use a separate free turbine output drive configuration. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 7 


AP3456 – 4-11 - Secondary Power Systems,  
Auxiliary and Emergency Power Units 
7. 
Services  Provided.    The  APU  is  able  to  power  all  of  the  ancillary  services  required  whilst  the 
aircraft is on the ground.  Air for cockpit and cabin air-conditioning and for main engine starting is bled 
from the compressor, whilst the required combination of hydraulic and pneumatic pumps and electrical 
alternators  are  driven  through  the  APU  accessory  drive  arrangement  or,  as  depicted  at  Fig  3  above, 
through  the  complete  secondary  power  system  module.    To  minimize  logistical  costs  and  to  provide 
maximum  flexibility,  the  APU  accessory  gearbox  is  normally  fitted  with  the  same  types  of  electrical 
generators and hydraulic and pneumatic pumps as those fitted to the main secondary power system.  
In most aircraft, the APU is situated in a fireproof enclosure in the tail cone or rear fuselage. 
8. 
Airborne  Auxiliary  Power  Units.    Certain  configurations  of  APU  may  be  used  during  flight  to 
augment  secondary  power  sources  or  to provide power during an emergency.  Such equipments are 
termed  Airborne  Auxiliary  Power  Units  (AAPUs).    The  air  bleed  output  available  from  a typical AAPU 
falls off rapidly with increasing altitude.  Therefore their use for engine re-starting is not usually possible 
above 25,000 feet or even less, whilst that for cabin air-conditioning and pressurization is often limited 
to ground level only. 
9. 
Control  of  APUs.  The panel shown in Fig 4 is typical of an APU cockpit control.  After manual 
selection  of  the  master  switch  and  the  start/stop  command  button,  the  APU  commences  to  operate 
within  set  parameters,  requiring  only  the  aircraft  battery  electrical  supply  for  starting  and  fuel  drawn 
from the main aircraft system.  All operations are automatically controlled by the APU integrated control 
system.  The unit provides start and close-down sequencing and governs the running RPM at a preset 
constant figure.  It acts to close down the APU in the event of a malfunction such as low power, over-
speed, overheating, loss of oil pressure or a fire warning.  The APU fire extinguisher system is similar 
to that used for the main engines. 
4-11 Fig 4 Typical APU Cockpit Control Panel 
Emergency Power 
10.  The total dependence of inherently unstable (active control) aircraft on the uninterrupted operation 
of  their  Automatic  Flying  Control  Systems  (AFCSs)  and  Powered  Flying  Control  Units  (PFCUs) 
demands  that  emergency  power  be  available  effectively  instantaneously  in  the  event  of  loss  of  main 
secondary  power  sources.    EPUs  capable  of  developing  full  power  within  2  seconds  of  initiation  are 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-11 - Secondary Power Systems,  
Auxiliary and Emergency Power Units 
therefore needed in such aircraft.  A similar if less urgent requirement exists for emergency power in 
more conventional aircraft.  A less rigourous specification may be applied to such EPUs or a variety of 
alternative power sources be used to satisfy the requirement. 
11.  Emergency Power Units.  Current rapid reaction EPUs are self contained modules consisting of 
a  small  mono-fuel  powered  gas  turbine  driving  the  necessary  essential  secondary  power  generators.  
Units under development include combined APU/EPU modules powered by gas turbines able to burn a 
mono-fuel  to  satisfy  the  rapid  reaction  criterion  and  then  to  revert  to  a  conventional  air/fuel  mixture 
once  they  are  running  or  when  they  are  used  as  an  APU.    Less  demanding  requirements  for 
emergency power are frequently met by the use of AAPUs. 
Alternative Sources of Emergency Power 
12.  Aircraft  Batteries.    Many  smaller  aircraft  are  reliant  upon  their  internal  batteries  for  emergency 
secondary power.  To conserve this finite power source, non-essential electrical loads must usually be 
shed  by  deliberate  manual  selection  or  by  automatic  load  shedding  systems.    Such  aircraft  are 
normally  equipped  with  manual  flying  controls  or  PFCUs  with  a  manual  reversion  facility,  and  their 
undercarriage  systems  include  an  alternative  system  of  lowering.    Therefore,  hydraulic power can be 
dispensed with for the period of the emergency. 
13.  Ram Air Turbines.  The Ram Air Turbine (RAT) is a rapid response emergency secondary power 
source, the operation of which relies upon aircraft forward speed.  Fig 5 shows the configuration of a 
typical  RAT  installation.    The  air  turbine  assembly  is  lowered  into  the  air  stream  either  upon  manual 
selection or upon automatic sensing of engine or main secondary power failure.  Once exposed to the 
air  stream,  the  unit  will  spin  up  to  operating  speed  within  2  to  4  seconds.    However,  although  it  will 
provide power for as long as the aircraft remains airborne, its power output will fall with airspeed. 
4-11 Fig 5 Typical RAT Installation 
Ram Air
Turbine Doors
Ram Air
Turbine
Ram Air
Turbine
Gearbox
Generator
Ram Air
Turbine
Air Scoop
Exhaust Duct
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-11 - Secondary Power Systems,  
Auxiliary and Emergency Power Units 
Ground Power Units 
14.  The  generic  term  GPU  covers  a  wide  range  of  equipments  from  the  simple,  towed  trolley-
accumulator  providing  limited  DC  power,  to  the  multi-purpose  unit  providing  hydraulic  and  electrical 
power and engine-start air from a single, self-propelled vehicle.  The major advantage of a GPU is that, 
since  it  is  not  part  of  the  aircraft,  no  weight  penalty  need  be  imposed  on  its  construction.    It  can 
therefore be built to produce large power outputs, using economical electrical or diesel engine power, 
and  it  can  be  constructed  robustly  for  minimum  maintenance.    Subject  to  suitable  arrangements  for 
cooling and the extraction of exhaust gases, mobile GPUs can also be used inside hangars or aircraft 
shelters.    Access  to  an  aircraft  being  prepared  for  flight  or  undergoing  servicing  is  always  at  a 
premium, and this factor has a major influence on the size and configuration of GPUs, and established 
maintenance hangars are designed to provide all such services as part of the fixed installations of the 
building.    The  services  can  then  be  ducted  as  necessary  to  the  aircraft  from  permanently  mounted 
power units sited well clear of the work area. Similar arrangements are also made in hardened aircraft 
shelters (HASs) and on the aircraft servicing platforms (ASPs) of major fixed operating bases. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-12 - Engine Starter Systems 
CHAPTER 12 - ENGINE STARTER SYSTEMS 
Principles 
1. 
All  turbine  and  piston  engines  require  starter  systems  which  are  able  to  accelerate  the  engine 
from rest to a speed at which stable (self-sustained) operation is achieved and from which the engine 
can produce usable power.  The basic components of a starter system are: 
a. 
A motor to impart sufficient force to overcome the inertia and friction of the rotating assembly 
of  the  engine  and  its  ancillary  equipment,  and  to  accelerate  it  to  self  sustaining  speed  within  an 
acceptable operational period. 
b. 
A  fuel  system  able  to  introduce  an  initial  charge  of  fuel/air  mixture  into  the  engine, 
appropriately metered for combustion to commence at the ambient temperature of the engine. 
c. 
An ignition system able to provide a means of igniting the initial charge of fuel/air mixture. 
d. 
A  control  system  to  programme  the  start  sequence  and  to  prevent  design  parameters 
(particularly speed and temperature upper limits) being exceeded during this initial, unstable stage 
of engine operation. 
Basic Components of Starter Systems 
2. 
Although  the  starting  procedure  for  all  engines  is  similar,  many  different  types  of  starter  system 
are  used.    In  all  cases  reliable  operation  is  the  prime  requirement.    However,  other  factors  such  as 
speed  of  operation,  independence  of  external  support  equipment,  overall  cost  effectiveness  and 
quietness of operation (particularly in passenger aircraft) must be balanced for each application. 
3. 
Motive  Power.    The  motor  or  engine  used  for  starting  the  main  engine  must  develop  very  high 
power  and  transmit  it  to  the  rotating  assembly  of  the  engine  in    a  manner  which  provides  smooth 
acceleration.  Some starter motors convert electrical energy, others use the potential energy of high or 
low  pressure  air  or  hydraulic  systems.    Starter  engines  use  solid  or  liquid  fuels  to  produce  high 
pressure gases which are subsequently used to turn the main engine.  Normally, power is provided to 
the  starter  motor  from  the  aircraft  auxiliary  power  unit  (APU)  or  internal  batteries,  although  external 
sources  may  be  used  as  alternatives.   Starter engines use on-board fuel supplies.  To achieve a net 
weight saving, commercial aircraft which always operate from large, well equipped airfields are usually 
equipped with light weight starter systems for which external power sources are essential. 
4. 
Fuel Control.  The simplest starter systems rely upon manual control of the initial fuel/air mixture.  
However, in most cases the mixture is programmed automatically by the engine fuel control unit. 
5. 
Ignition.    The  spark  ignition  systems  of  piston  engines  usually  require  only  minor  adjustment  of 
the  ignition  timing  to  achieve  combustion  during  the  start  cycle.    This  is  invariably  achieved 
automatically  either  mechanically  or  by  operation of the electronic engine management system.  Gas 
turbine engines use high energy electrical ignition systems to initiate and establish combustion during 
the  start.    Once  stable  engine  running  is  achieved,  combustion  of  the  fuel/air  mixture  is  self 
perpetuating, and the ignition system is switched off automatically. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-12 - Engine Starter Systems 
6 .  Igniter Units Gas turbine high energy ignition systems are always duplicated to ensure reliability.  
The  systems  comprise  a  transistorized  ignition  unit  feeding  power  to  igniter  plugs  inside  the  engine 
combustion chambers.  Fig 1 shows the construction of an igniter plug.  Each ignition unit receives a 
low voltage supply controlled by the starter system.  The electrical energy is stored in the unit until, at a 
predetermined value, it dissipates as a high energy discharge across the face of the semi-conductor in 
the igniter plug. 
4-12 Fig 1 Igniter Plug 
Tungsten Tip
Tungsten Alloy
Silicon Carbide
Semi-conductor Pellet
Steel Body
Nickel-Iron
 Electrode
Ceramic
 Insulator
Glass Seal
Contact 
Button
7. 
Relight  Systems.    In  adverse  engine  operating  conditions,  it  is  possible  for  combustion  to  be 
interrupted or to break down completely.  For this reason, the electrical igniter system is designed to be 
used  during  flight  as  well  as  during  engine  starting,  either  to  act as a precaution against such flame-
outs  or  to  achieve  relight  after  a  flame-out  has  occurred.    Ignition  units  are  designed  to  give  outputs 
appropriate to these differing requirements.  A high output, typically 12 joules, is necessary during initial 
starting and to ensure that a satisfactory relight is achieved at high altitude.  However, for continuous 
precautionary operation during flight, a low output of 3 to 6 joules is adequate and ensures longer life 
and  higher  reliability  of  the  unit.    The  starter  and  relight  control  circuits  automatically  ensure  that  the 
appropriate level of power is provided. 
8. 
Relight  Envelope.    The  ability  to  relight  an  engine  after  flame-out  will  vary  according  to  the 
altitude and forward speed of the aircraft.  A typical relight envelope showing the flight conditions under 
which  a  satisfactory  relight  can  be  achieved  is  at  Fig  2.    Within  the  limits  of  the  envelope,  airflow 
through  the  engine  will  be  sufficient  to  maintain  the  rotating  assembly  at  a  speed  satisfactory  for 
combustion to be re-established.  All that is required therefore, provided that a fuel supply is available, 
is operation of the ignition system by selection of the 'Relight' control. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-12 - Engine Starter Systems 
4-12 Fig 2 Flight Relight Envelope 
40
30
Engine Relight can be achieved at speeds
and altitudes within this envelope
ft)
0
0
0
(1 20
e
d
ltitu
A
10
0
0
100
200
300
400
Air Speed (kt)
9. 
Sequence  Controller.    The  simplest  starter  systems  rely  upon  manual  control  of  the  start 
sequence.    However,  to  achieve  consistency,  and  to  avoid engine parameters being exceeded, most 
aircraft  are  equipped  with  automatic  or  semi-automatic  start  sequence  controllers.    A  typical  start 
sequence  is  shown  at  Fig  3.    After  crew  initiation  of  the  start,  the  controller  will  automatically  run 
through the start cycle allowing the crew to monitor critical engine conditions and to resume full control 
of the engine once it has reached stable running. 
4-12 Fig 3 Start Sequence for a Gas Turbine Engine 
60
90
Stabilized
Idling RPM
50
Automatic Start
Cycle Complete
m 40
Stabilized
70
Self-sustaining
)
Idling TGT
T
rp
rpm Achieved
e
e
in
G
in
(T
g 30
rb
u
n
T
re
E
tu
Light-up
m
m
u
ra
u 20
Achieved
50
e
im
p
im
HP Fuel On
x
x
a
m
e
a
M
T
M 10
s
%
a
%
Ignitors On
G
30
5
10
15
20
25
30
Seconds After Start Initiated
Start Sequence
TGT
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-12 - Engine Starter Systems 
Main Types of Starter 
10.  Electrical.    Electric  motors  developing  sufficient  power  to  accelerate  the  rotating  assembly  of  a 
turbine  engine  are  large and heavy in comparison with other types of starter.  However, such motors 
are simple and comparatively cheap to produce and maintain, and electrical power is easy to transmit 
and control.  It is available from internal batteries or APUs and from external power sources.  For these 
reasons, electric starters are in wide spread use.  If the starter motor can be configured to perform the 
dual  role  of  driving  the  engine  for  starting  and  subsequently  being  driven  by  the  engine  to  generate 
electrical  power  for  the  aircraft  systems,  significant  advantages  of  low  net  weight,  simplicity  and  low 
cost are available.  The so called starter/generator is often used for small turbine engines, APUs and 
piston  engines.    Its  drive  shaft  is  permanently  coupled  to  the  engine,  whereas  single-role  electrical 
starter  motors  must  be  connected  to  the  engine  through  a  clutch  mechanism  which  engages  at 
commencement of the start cycle and disengages as the engine reaches self-sustaining speed. 
11.  Air  Turbine  (Low  Pressure).    Low  pressure  air  starting  is  widely  used  for  both  military  and 
commercial aircraft engines.  The air turbine starter is simple and has relatively low airborne weight.  A 
typical air turbine starter is shown below in Fig 4.   
4-12 Fig 4 Typical Air Turbine Starter Motor 
Air Outlet
Nozzle Ring
Reduction Gear
Turbine Rotor
Engine Drive
Air Inlet
Shaft
The  air  starter  motor  consists  of  a  turbine  which  transmits  power  to  the  engine  rotating  assembly 
through  reduction  gearing  and  a  clutch.    The  starter  turbine  is  rotated  by  compressed  air  from  an 
external  ground  supply,  the  aircraft  APU  or  dedicated  gas  turbine  air  producer.    Many  aircraft  are 
configured  so  that  compressed  air  can  be  ducted  from  a  running  engine  and  used  to  start  another.  
The  air  supply  is  controlled  by  electrically  actuated  valves  which  open  when  the  engine  start  cycle  is 
initiated.    The  air  supply  is  automatically  closed  and  the  starter  turbine  clutch  disengaged  once  the 
main  engine  reaches  self-sustaining  speed.    A  typical  air  turbine  starter  system configured to use air 
from an APU, another engine or from an external source is shown at Fig 5. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-12 - Engine Starter Systems 
4-12 Fig 5 Typical Air Turbine Starter System 
Turbine Exhaust
Air Intake
Pressure
Air Supply
Non-return
Auxiliary
Valve
Power Unit
Electric Starter
Optional Supply
from Other Engine
Non-return
Valve
Ground Start
Supply Connection
Exhaust Air
HP air
Engine
Air Starter
LP air
12.  Gas Turbine Starter.  The gas turbine starter is a small, compact engine.  It usually comprises a 
centrifugal compressor driven by an axial power turbine, a reverse flow combustion system (to reduce 
overall length of the unit) and a free turbine driving the main engine starter drive shaft.  The drive shaft 
is coupled to the main engine through reduction gearing and a clutch.  A typical example is shown at 
Fig 6.  The gas turbine starter engine is very similar in power output and size to the APU engine (see 
Volume 4, Chapter 11), and it is similarly used to provide services other than engine starting. 
4-12 Fig 6 Gas Turbine Starter 
Free-power Turbine
Reverse Flow
Reduction Gear
Combustion System
Air Intake
Engine Drive
Shaft
Exhaust
Turbine
Centrifugal Compressor
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-12 - Engine Starter Systems 
13.  Hydraulic.  Hydraulic power is sometimes used for starting small engines and APUs.  In a typical 
installation, a hydraulic pump which can also be driven by hydraulic power to act as a motor is used.  
Other applications may use a separate hydraulic motor.  Power from the motor is applied to the engine 
through reduction gearing and, in the case of the pure motor, through a clutch.  The start sequence is 
automatically  controlled  by  an  electrical  circuit  which  operateshydraulic  valves.    In  the  case  of  the 
motor/pump unit, the sequencing valves operate to allow the unit to act as a pump.  The motor/pump 
offers similar advantages to those of an electrical starter/generator.  Hydraulic power may be supplied 
from  external  sources,  the  APU  or  from  a  hydraulic  accumulator  in  the  aircraft  system.    Pressure  is 
stored in the accumulator during previous engine running or by operation of an internal hand pump.  A 
particular  advantage  of  hydraulic  starting  for  an  APU  is  that  the  system  can  function  by  manual 
operation  of  the  hand  pump  and  with  minimal  internal  electrical  power.    Therefore,  a  tactical  aircraft 
can be started after long periods on the ground remote from support. 
Miscellaneous Starters 
14.  Changes  in  operational  requirements  and  advances  in  the  appropriate  technologies  permitted 
considerable rationalization of aircraft systems to be achieved during the 1970s.  However, many 1970 
aircraft  remain  in  service  equipped  with  obsolescent  systems,  and  brief  descriptions  of  such  starter 
systems are included in the following paragraphs. 
15.  Air Impingement (High Pressure).  The high pressure air impingement starter system does not 
use a starter motor as such but relies upon direct impingement of large volumes of high pressure air 
acting  on  the  engine  turbine  blades  as  means  of  rotating  the  engine.    A  typical  system  is  shown  at 
Fig 7.    The  air  may  be  provided  from  an  external  source,  an  APU  or  from  a  running  engine.    The 
benefits  of  the  type  are  low  weight  and  simplicity.    However,  its  use  is  limited  by  its  requirement  for 
large volumes of high pressure air delivered from complex ground support units. 
4-12 Fig 7 Air Impingement Starting 
Discharge Nozzle
Non-Return
Valve (Open)
Air Supply
Tube
Turbine
16.  Cartridge  (Turbine  Engine).    The  turbine  cartridge  starter  provides  a  simple,  light  self-contained 
starter system.  The starter is basically a small impulse turbine powered by high pressure gases released by 
burning  cordite  in  the  cartridge.    It  usually  has  a  magazine  of  three  cartridges  each  large  enough  for  one 
engine start.  The turbine rotates the main engine through reduction gearing and a clutch.  This starter offers 
the advantage of low weight, but it suffers the disadvantages of providing a limited duration pulse of power 
per  start  and  a  limited  number  of  starts  (usually  three)  before  replenishment.    Also,  its  use  results  in  the 
complication of ground logistic support of transporting and storing cordite filled cartridges. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 4-12 - Engine Starter Systems 
17.  Liquid Fuel.  The liquid fuel starter is similar in principle to a cartridge starter.  However, its gas source 
is derived from burning a liquid rather than a solid mono-fuel.  The fuel is usually iso-propyl-nitrate (AVPIN).  
The starter develops high power, and this enables rapid engine starts to be achieved.  The system is self-
contained and consists of a fuel tank, a combustion chamber and the power turbine attached to the main 
engine through reduction gearing and a clutch.  During a start, fuel is pumped from the tank and is ignited in 
the  combustion  chamber.    The  gases  generated  are  then  directed  into  its  turbine.    Although  simple  in 
principle  and  overcoming  the  '3  shot'  disadvantage  of  the  cartridge  starter,  the  liquid  fuel  starter  was 
comparatively  unreliable  and  prone  to  catching  fire.    Its  use  was  complicated  by  the  extreme  caution 
necessary in handling and storing the highly volatile liquid fuel. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 7 

Document Outline