This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456 RAF Manual'.



AP3456 – 3-1 - Basic Theory and Principles of Propulsion 
CHAPTER 1 - BASIC THEORY AND PRINCIPLES OF PROPULSION 
Introduction 
1. 
When an aircraft is travelling through air in straight and level flight and at a constant true airspeed 
(TAS), the engines must produce a total thrust equal to the drag on the aircraft as shown in Fig 1.  If 
the engine thrust exceeds the drag, the aircraft will accelerate, and if the drag exceeds the thrust, the 
aircraft will slow down. 
3-1 Fig 1 Arrangement of Thrust and Drag Forces 
2. 
Although  a  variety  of  engine  types  are  available  for  aircraft  propulsion,  the  thrust  force  must 
always come from air or gas reaction forces normally acting on the engine or propeller surfaces. 
3. 
The two common methods of aircraft propulsion are: 
a. 
The propeller engine powered by piston or gas turbine. 
b. 
The jet engine. 
Rotary wing aircraft are powered by turboshaft engines which produce shaft power to drive a gearbox 
and  work  on  similar  principles  to  gas  turbine  propeller  engines  (turboprops),  except  that  all  the 
available  energy  is  absorbed  by  the  turbine,  with  no  residual  jet  thrust.    Turboshaft  engines  are 
considered in Volume 3, Chapter 16. 
The Propeller Engine 
4. 
With  a  propeller  engine,  the  engine  power  produced  drives  a  shaft  which  is  connected  to  a 
propeller usually via a gearbox.  The propeller cuts through the air accelerating it rearwards.  The blade 
of  a  propeller  behaves  in  the  same  way  as  the  aerofoil  of  an  aircraft;  the  air  speeds  up  over    the 
leading  face  of  the  propeller  blade  causing  a  reduced  pressure  with  a  corresponding  increase  of 
pressure  on  the  rearward  face  (see  Fig  2).      This  leads  to  a  net  pressure  force  over  the  propeller 
(where Force = Pressure × Area), thus providing thrust.  For example: 
Net pressure of 40 kPa (Pa = N/m2); Blade area of 1 m2, 
Thrust = 40 kPa × 1 m2 = 40 kN 
With  gas  turbine  powered  propeller  engines,  a  small  amount  of thrust is produced by the jet exhaust 
which will augment the thrust produced by the propeller. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 – 3-1 - Basic Theory and Principles of Propulsion 
3-1 Fig 2 Propeller Thrust 
Direction
of Flight
Slipstream Velocity Vj
Relative Air
Flow V
Net Force
Direction
a
(Axial Component)
of Propeller
5. 
An  alternative  method  of  calculating  the  thrust  produced  by  a  propeller  is  provided  by  Newton’s 
laws of motion which give: 
Force

Mass × Acceleration 
∴ Thrust

Mass flow rate of air through Propeller × Increase in velocity of the air 

M × (Vj – Va) 
Where M

Mass flow rate of the air 
Vj

Velocity of slipstream 
Va

Velocity of the aircraft (TAS) 
This will give the same result as that given by the sum of pressure forces.  In the case of the propeller, 
the air mass flow will be large, and the increase in velocity given to the air will be fairly small. 
The Jet Engine 
6. 
In all cases of the jet engine, a high velocity  exhaust gas is produced, the velocity of which, relative to 
the engine, is considerably greater than the TAS. Thrust is produced according to the equation in para 5 i.e.: 
Thrust 
= M × (Vj – Va) 
where Vj is now the velocity of the gas stream at the propelling nozzle (see Fig 3).  This represents a 
simplified  version  of  the  full  thrust  equation  as  the  majority  of  thrust  produced  is  a  result  of  the 
momentum change of the gas stream. 
3-1 Fig 3 Jet Thrust - Relative Velocities 
a
j
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 – 3-1 - Basic Theory and Principles of Propulsion 
7. 
In the rocket engine (Fig 4) the gases which leave the engine are the products of the combustion 
of  the  rocket  propellants  carried;  therefore  no  intake  velocity  term  Va  is  required:    The  simplified 
version of the equation giving the thrust produced thus becomes: 
Thrust = Mass flow rate of propellant × Vj
3-1 Fig 4 Rocket Engines 
Solid Propellant Rocket
Liquid Propulsion Rocket
The Turbofan (By-pass) Engine 
8. 
The Turbofan or by-pass engine (Fig 5) powers the vast majority of modern aircraft, and is likely to 
do so for the foreseeable future.  It can be seen as the link between the Turbopropeller and the Turbojet 
engine.  The thrust from a by-pass engine is derived from the mass air flow from the 'fan' plus the mass 
air flow from the core engine and can be exhausted separately or mixed prior to entering the jet pipe. 
3-1 Fig 5 Turbofan Thrust 
9. 
The thrust for a mixing turbofan engine can be treated in the same way as a simple turbojet, as 
the mass flows are mixed prior to entering a common exhaust and propelling nozzle.  However, where 
the by-pass air flow is exhausted separately the simplified thrust calculation becomes: 
Thrust = Mass flow rate of air through fan duct × (Vjb – Va) + Mass flow rate of air through core engine × (Vje – Va) 
   = Mfan × (Vjb – Va) + Mcore × (Vje – Va) 
The ratio Mfan/Mcore is called the by-pass ratio and is quoted for both mixing and non-mixing turbofans.  
Engines  with  by-pass  ratios  of  less  than  1.5  are  termed  low  by-pass  ratio  engines,  while  those  with 
ratios above 1.5 are considered high by-pass. 
Engine Efficiency 
10.  As the engine thrust propels the aircraft, propulsive power is being developed in proportion to the 
airspeed, 
i.e.:Propulsive power = Engine thrust × TAS 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 – 3-1 - Basic Theory and Principles of Propulsion 
The power developed must be sufficient to overcome aircraft drag with an adequate margin to increase 
aircraft velocity as required. Fuel is consumed during combustion  thus  releasing energy to generate 
power.    (1 kg  of  kerosine  produces  43  MJ  of  energy.)    The  overall  efficiency  (ηο)  of  the  engine  as  a 
propulsive powerplant is defined as: 
Propulsive power d
  eveloped
ηo 
=
Fuel power c
  onsumed
Thermal and Propulsive Efficiency of Gas Turbines 
11.  In  the  conversion  of  fuel power into propulsive power it is convenient to consider the conversion 
taking place in two stages: 
a. 
The conversion of fuel power into gas power. 
b. 
The conversion of gas power into propulsive power. 
The airbreathing engine burns fuel to produce useful gas kinetic energy.  Some of this energy is lost in 
the form of heat in the jet efflux, by kinetic heating, conduction to engine components, and friction.  The 
ratio  of  the  gas  energy  produced  in  the  engine  to  the  heat  energy  released  by  the  fuel  in  unit  time, 
determines the THERMAL efficiency (ηth ) of the engine, i.e.: 
Rate of increase in KE of gas stream
ηth  = 
Rate of energy r
  elease from fuel
12.  Of the gas kinetic energy produced, some is converted into propulsive power, whilst the remainder 
is discharged to atmosphere in the form of wasted kinetic energy.  The ratio of the propulsive power to 
the rate of increase in kinetic energy of the gas stream determines the PROPULSIVE efficiency (ηp ) of 
the engine, i.e.: 
Propulsive power d
  eveloped
ηp 

Rate of increase in KE of gas stream
13.  An  examination  of  the  expressions  derived  for  the  thermal,  propulsive  and  overall  efficiencies 
shows that the following relationship exists: 
ηο = ηth × ηp 
14.  Fig 6 shows a typical breakdown of the total fuel power produced from burning kerosine at a rate of 1.4 
kg/s to produce a power potential of 60 MW.  By calculating the efficiencies of the above example viz: 
ηth = 15/60 = 25% 
ηp = 12/15 = 80% 
ηο = 12/60 = 20% 
It  can  be  seen  that  the  biggest  single  loss  is  through  waste  heat,  the  majority  of  which  (75%)  is  lost 
without  being  converted  to  useful  kinetic  energy.    A  further  loss  (5%)  is  experienced  by  failing  to 
convert all the remaining kinetic energy to useful propulsive power. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 – 3-1 - Basic Theory and Principles of Propulsion 
3-1 Fig 6 Representation of Energy Efficiency 
15.  The generation of thrust as shown in Fig 7, M × (Vje – Va), is always accompanied by the rejection 
of power in the form of wasted kinetic energy (kinetic energy = ½ × M × (Vje – Va)2 ) with a consequent 
effect on the propulsive efficiency (ηp). 
3-1 Fig 7 Gas Turbine Thrust - Absolute Velocity 
For a given thrust, this wasted kinetic energy can be reduced by choosing a high value of air mass flow 
rate (M) and a low value of (Vje – Va), since kinetic energy is proportional to the square of the velocity.  
This result is shown in Fig 8. 
3-1 Fig 8 Variation in KE Loss with Mass Flow Rate at Constant Thrust 
y
rg
e
n
E
tic
e
in
K
d
te
s
a
W
Air Mass Flow
Therefore, provided that the thermal efficiency remains constant, engines with a large mass flow and 
relatively low increase in gas velocity will be more efficient (see Fig 9). 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 – 3-1 - Basic Theory and Principles of Propulsion 
3-1 Fig 9 Comparison of Propulsive Efficiencies 
Propeller)
Propfan
80
(Advanced
Turbo-Jet
%
cy
ss
n
a
ie
yp
B
ffic 60
h
E
T
ig
ypass
u
n
H
B
r
-
b
io
o
n
ls
Low
-
a
P
u
-F
-
r
p
o
an
p
ro
P
urbo
40
T
Turbo-F
20
0
200
400
600
800
Airspeed (kt)
16.  The sudden drop in propulsive efficiency, shown in Fig 9, for a propeller aircraft is caused by the 
propeller tip speed approaching Mach 1.0, with a corresponding loss of effectiveness of the propeller, 
at aircraft speeds  in excess of about 350 kt.  Advanced propeller technology designs have produced 
propellers with a tip speed in excess of Mach 1.0, enabling aircraft speeds of over 430 kt at sea level. 
17.  Fig 9 also shows the advantage of the propeller over other forms of powerplant at low speeds.  
Similarly, the turbofan engines can be seen to have advantages over the turbojet.  The low by-pass 
mixing turbojet bridges the gap between high by-pass turbofans and pure turbojets.  The mixing of 
the two gas streams is theoretically more efficient than exhausting the gas streams separately, but 
on  high  by-pass  turbofans  it  is  almost  impossible  to  achieve  efficient  mixing.    Many  other  factors 
affect the choice of powerplant (see para 23), and the decision becomes a complex one, often with no 
clear cut answer. 
Specific Fuel Consumption and Overall Efficiency 
18.  For  a  turboprop  or  turboshaft  engine,  the  specific  fuel  consumption  (SFC)  can  be  defined  as 
either: 
Mass flow rate of fuel
Mass flow rate of fuel
 or  
, respectively. 
Equivalent power
Shaft p
  ower
Therefore, 
Mass flow rate of fuel × Propeller e
  fficiency
SFC = 
Propulsive power d
  eveloped
Propeller e
  fficiency
From which SFC ∝ Overallefficiency
Propeller efficiency
Thus, Overall efficiency ∝ 
SFC
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 – 3-1 - Basic Theory and Principles of Propulsion 
19.  For a jet engine (including turbofans): 
Mass flow rate of fuel
SFC =
Thrust
Mass flow rate of fuel × airspeed
ie SFC ∝
Thrust  × airspeed
TAS
Thus, Overall efficiency ∝ SFC
Factors Affecting Thermal Efficiency of Piston Engines 
20.  The  principle  of  operation  of  the  spark  ignition  piston  engine  is  described  briefly  in  Volume  3, 
Chapter  2.    The  thermal  efficiency  depends  upon  compression  ratio,  combustion  chamber  design, 
mixture  strength,  engine  rpm,  air  inlet  temperature,  etc.    Under  normal  operating  conditions,  there  is 
little  variation  from  engine  to  engine,  a  typical  figure  being  30%.    In  particular,  there  is  little  variation 
with engine size. 
Factors Affecting Thermal Efficiency of Gas Turbine Engines 
21.  Gas turbine engines are widely used as turboprop, turboshaft, turbojet and turbofan engines.  The 
thermal  efficiency  will  vary  considerably,  not  only  from  engine  to  engine,  but  also  with  operating 
conditions.  The thermal efficiency of these powerplants depends mainly upon: 
a. 
Compression ratio. 
b. 
Component efficiency. 
c. 
Air inlet temperature. 
d. 
The turbine entry temperature. 
The efficiency of the engine increases with increasing compression ratio (pressure ratio) so values in 
the  order  of  30:1  are  now  being  produced.    These  high  pressure  ratios  are  more  easily  employed  in 
larger  engines,  with  the  result  that  large  gas  turbines  are  usually  more  efficient  than  small  ones.  
Thermal efficiencies of gas turbines are approximately in the range of 10% - 40% at normal operation. 
Power Output of Gas Turbines 
22.  Gas or shaft power output from a gas turbine is mainly dependent upon: 
a. 
Size. 
b. 
Turbine entry temperature. 
c. 
Component efficiencies. 
d. 
Inlet air density. 
e. 
Turbine speed (rpm). 
The  turbine  entry  temperature  will  be  limited  to  a  certain  maximum  value  by  the  properties  of  the 
turbine  blade  and the degree of blade cooling: current values of this temperature are in the region of 
1,800  K.    The  inlet  air  density  decreases  with  increasing  altitude  and  ambient  temperature  and, 
therefore, adverse climatic conditions may have a serious effect on performance.  Water injection may 
be used to compensate for loss of thrust under these conditions. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 – 3-1 - Basic Theory and Principles of Propulsion 
Choice of Aircraft Powerplant 
23.  The factors which affect the choice of powerplant for a particular aircraft include: 
a. 
Power output. 
b. 
Efficiency. 
c. 
Power/weight and power/volume ratios. 
d. 
Cost. 
e. 
Reliability. 
f. 
Maintainability. 
g. 
Noise and pollution. 
For low speed application, propeller engines are often chosen because of their overall high efficiency.  
Piston  engines  are  used  in  small  aircraft  because  of  their  advantages  of efficiency and cost over the 
small  gas  turbine.    For  larger  aircraft,  turboprop  engines  have  gained  favour  as  they  have  good 
power/weight  ratios  and  are  easily  maintained.    For  higher  speeds,  the  propeller  is  replaced  by  the 
turbofan or turbojet. 
24.  For air transport application, where fuel efficiency is extremely important, high by-pass ratio turbofans 
are being used by the majority of large aircraft, with lower by-pass ratio turbofans and turboprops used in 
the  smaller  aircraft.    The  choice  for  training  and  combat  aircraft  is  less  clearcut.    In  the  past,  pure  jets 
have been used for jet trainers, but have been replaced by low by-pass ratio turbofans and turboprops.  
Modern strike aircraft use low by-pass afterburning turbofans, which give a higher efficiency at subsonic 
speed and provide a greater thrust augmentation (>80%) in afterburning mode. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-2 - Introduction to Piston Engines 
CHAPTER 2 - INTRODUCTION TO PISTON ENGINES 
Introduction 
1. 
The  internal  combustion  piston  engine  consists  basically  of  a  cylinder  (Fig  1)  which  is  closed  at 
one  end,  a  piston  which  slides  up  and  down  inside  the  cylinder,  and  a  connecting  rod  and  crank  by 
which reciprocating movement at the piston is converted to rotary movement of the crankshaft.  In the 
closed end of the cylinder, known as the 'Cylinder Head', are inlet and exhaust valves and a sparking 
plug.  An engine-driven magneto generator supplies a high voltage current to the sparking plug. 
3-2 Fig 1 A Four-stroke Internal Combustion Engine 
Inlet and Exhaust Valves
Sparking Plug
Cylinder
Piston
Connecting
Magneto
Rod
Crankshaft
2. 
One of the most noticeable differences between car and aero-engines is that, with the exception 
of  those  fitted  to  light  aircraft,  aero-engines  generally  have  more  cylinders.    This  is  because  it  is 
impracticable  for  design  and  physical  reasons,  to  obtain  much  more  than  74.5  kW  (100  bhp)  per 
cylinder; consequently, a high output would not be developed by a scaled-up version of a low-powered 
engine with the same number of cylinders. 
3. 
Even  in  engines  of  modest  power,  it  is  often  better  to  use  a  number  of  small  cylinders  in 
preference to fewer and larger, for not only does smoother operation result, but also, in many cases, a 
smaller frontal area can be obtained. 
The Four-stroke Cycle 
4. 
The sequence of operations by which the engine converts heat energy into mechanical energy is 
known  as  the  four-stroke  cycle.    The  four  strokes  are  known  as  Induction,  Compression,  Power  and 
Exhaust and are discussed individually in the following paragraphs and illustrated in Fig 2. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-2 - Introduction to Piston Engines 
3-2 Fig 2 The Four-stroke Cycle 
Induction
Compression
Power
Exhaust
Sparking
Plug
Exhaust
Inlet Valve
Valve Open
Open
Exhaust
Inlet and
Gaseous Mixture
Burnt Gases
Valve
Exhaust
Entering Cylinder
Going to
Closed
Valves
Atmosphere
Closed
Connecting Rod
Crank
Direction
of Rotation
5. 
The Induction Stroke.  On the induction stroke, the piston descends in the cylinder, thereby lowering 
the internal pressure.  Because the inlet valve is open, the mixture of fuel and air is forced in by the higher 
outside air pressure.  However, because of inertia and the limited time available, it is not possible to fill the 
cylinder to the same pressure as the outside air. 
6. 
The  Compression  Stroke.  At the start of the compression stroke, the inlet valve is closed and 
the piston starts to move upwards.  The effect of reducing the volume in the cylinder is to compress the 
fuel/air mixture.  Just before the piston reaches the top of the stroke, the fuel/air mixture is ignited by 
the sparking plug. 
7
The  Power  Stroke.    During  the  power  stroke,  the  flame  spreads  and  the  intense  heat  generated 
increases the pressure rapidly.  The peak pressure is reached when the piston has just started to begin the 
downward  stroke.    The  gas  continues  to  burn  and the pressure in the cylinder decreases as the piston is 
forced down until, towards the end of the power stroke, combustion is complete and the pressure on the top 
of the piston is comparatively small. 
8. 
The  Exhaust  Stroke.    At  the  start  of  the  exhaust  stroke,  the  exhaust  valve  is  opened,  and  the 
burnt  gases  are  forced  out of the cylinder by the ascending piston.  At the end of the upward stroke, 
the exhaust valve is closed, and the inlet valve opens to begin the cycle again. 
Timing 
9. 
In theory, the opening and closing of the valves, and the supply of the spark are all timed to take 
place  at  either  top  dead  centre  (TDC),  i.e.  when  the  piston  is  at  its  highest  point  in  the  cylinder,  or 
bottom dead centre (BDC), as appropriate (see Fig 3). 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 8 




AP3456 - 3-2 - Introduction to Piston Engines 
3-2 Fig 3 Theoretical Timing Diagram 
TDC
Inlet
Valve
Open
Ignition
Induction
Compression
Exhaust
Valve
Po
xhaust
Closed
w
E
er
Direction
of Rotation
Exhaust
Valve
Open
Inlet
Valve
Closed
BDC
10.  In practice, the valve timing is modified to take into account the following facts: 
a. 
There is a limit to the speed at which valves can be made to open and close, beyond which 
excessive stresses would be imposed on the valve operating gear. 
b. 
When a valve is almost closed, the flow of gases is minimal. 
c. 
There is an appreciable time between the ignition of the compressed fuel/air mixture, and the 
build up to a maximum pressure in the cylinder head. 
d. 
There are two periods during one revolution of the crankshaft when the vertical movement of 
the piston is very small.  These upper and lower areas of minimal piston movement are known as 
the  'ineffective  crank  angles'  and  occur  at  the  top  and  bottom  of  the  stroke  (see  Fig  4).    These 
periods are utilized by having both valves open at the same time (valve overlap).  This assists the 
movement of gases both into and out of the cylinder. 
3-2 Fig 4 Ineffective Crank Angles 
Ineffective
Crank Angles
Area of Minimum
Vertical Piston
Movement
Vertical Movement of
Crankshaft
Piston Corresponding
Rotation
to Crankshaft Rotation
Area of Minimum
Vertical Piston
Movement
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 8 


AP3456 - 3-2 - Introduction to Piston Engines 
11.  To  allow  for  the  factors  outlined  in  para  10,  the  valve  timing is modified with valve lead, lag and 
overlap as shown in Fig 5. 
3-2 Fig 5 Typical Practical Timing Diagram 
TDC
Valve
Overlap
(50°)
Inlet
Valve
Open
Valve
Lead
(20°)
In
Ign
duc
25
30
P
tio
o
n
Exhaust
we
pression
Valve
r
st
m
o
Closed
C
xhau
E
Exhaust
Valve
Direction
Open
of Rotation
Inlet
Valve
Va
L
l
Closed
v
a
e
(
g
7
Valve

Lead
)
(62°)
BDC
12.  Because  aero  engines  normally  drive  the  propeller  directly,  they  have  to  operate  at  much  lower 
speeds (measured in revolutions per minute (rpm)) than those used in automotive applications.  The rpm 
range is also much smaller than that in car engines.  The ignition timing of a magneto is not fitted with an 
advance and retard mechanism.  Apart from during the engine starting cycle, the spark is normally fixed 
to  fire  at  about  25º  before  TDC.    To  compensate  for  the  fixed  ignition  timing,  adjustments  have  to  be 
made to the fuel/air mixture to overcome the problems of operating the engine at low rpm. 
13.  During  the  engine  start-up  cycle,  the  magnetos  are  revolving  slowly  and  not  producing  their 
normal high voltage.  A mechanical system can be used to speed up one of the magnetos so that the 
spark  intensity  is  increased,  and  the  timing  is  retarded  to  assist  ignition.    This  magneto  is  called  an 
impulse magneto and is normally selected 'ON', on its own, during the initial stage of the engine start.  
Both  magnetos  are  then  selected  'ON'  when  the  engine  has  fired  and  picked  up  speed  towards  idle.  
Some aircraft are fitted with a separate booster coil that is used during the starting sequence to provide 
the high voltage.  Other alternative electrical systems can be used to provide a series of sparks at the 
plugs to aid starting. 
Cooling 
14.  If an engine was perfectly efficient, all of the heat produced in it would be turned into useful work, and 
the problem of cooling would not arise.  This is impossible, however, and, in practice, less than 30% of the 
heat  generated  during  combustion  is  converted  into  mechanical  energy.    Heat  losses  in  the  exhaust 
gases account for a further 40%, while the remaining 30% is absorbed by the engine components.  If no 
steps  were  taken  to  extract  this  heat  from  the  engine,  it  would  cause  mechanical  deterioration  and 
breakdown of the oil. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 8 


AP3456 - 3-2 - Introduction to Piston Engines 
15.  The two methods of cooling an engine are air cooling and liquid cooling.  With air cooling, heat is 
transferred directly to the air through which the engine moves (Fig 6).  Liquid cooling, as used in most 
cars,  utilizes  a  fluid  circulating  continuously  between  the  cylinders  and  a  radiator  (see  Fig  7).    In-line 
engines  can  be  either  air  or  water  cooled  but  large  radial  engines  are  air  cooled.    Some  common 
cylinder layouts are shown at Fig 8. 
3-2 Fig 6 Air Cooled Engine 
Cooling fins
Crank case
3-2 Fig 7 Liquid Cooled Engine 
Filler
Header
Coolant
Tank
Temperature
Air Vent
Gauge
Cylinder Block
Pump
Radiator
Drain Tap
3-2 Fig 8 Some Common Cylinder Layouts 
a  Inverted In-line
b  Flat Opposed
c  Radial
(Only Front Cylinder illustrated)
(Only Front Cylinders illustrated)
Single Row of Cylinders
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-2 - Introduction to Piston Engines 
Ignition System 
16.  The aircraft engine ignition system is required to provide a rapid series of sparks of sufficient intensity to 
ignite the weakest fuel/air mixtures normally used.  The sparks must be correctly timed to coincide with each 
compression stroke and arranged to fire each cylinder in the desired sequence.  The following paragraphs 
describe briefly the main components of a simple ignition system as shown in Fig 9. 
3-2 Fig 9 Ignition System Circuit Diagram 
Sparking Plugs
Distributor
and Rotor
Magneto
17.  Sparking Plugs The sparking plugs provide the air gap which carries the electrical spark to ignite the 
fuel/air  charge  in  the cylinder.  There are two plugs to each cylinder, each driven by a separate magneto.  
Igniting the charge from two points gives more efficient combustion which rapidly produces a high pressure 
in the cylinder.  It also provides an alternative source of ignition should a sparking plug fail. 
18.  Magneto The magneto is a self-contained, engine-driven electrical generator designed to supply 
the high voltage to the plugs in sequence, and at a precise time in the compression stroke. 
19.  Distributor The distributor is an integral part of each magneto and consists of two parts, a rotor 
and  a  distributor  block.    The  rotor  is  attached  to  a  distributor  gear  and  rotates  at  a  fixed  ratio  with 
respect to the magneto and crankshaft.  As it rotates, it comes opposite to, but does not actually make 
contact with, each of a number of electrodes in turn.  These electrodes, which are insulated from each 
other  and  from  the  body  of  the  magneto,  are  connected  by  high-tension  (HT)  ignition  cables  one  to 
each  of  the  plug  leads.    The  rotor  receives  the  high  voltage  from  the magneto and passes it, via the 
electrodes and HT ignition cables, to the appropriate sparking plug. 
System Integrity 
20.  To  guard  against  engine  failure  due  to  a  defect  in  the  ignition  system,  two  entirely  independent 
magnetos, each with an individual set of sparking plugs and HT ignition cables, are fitted to the engine.  
The provision of two sparking plugs in each cylinder also ensures more efficient ignition of the charge, 
as  noted  in  para  17,  and  it  is  for  this  reason  that  a  small  drop  in  rpm  occurs  when  each  magneto  is 
switched off during the pre-flight engine check. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-2 - Introduction to Piston Engines 
Carburation 
21.  Liquid fuels will not burn unless they are mixed with air.  Carburation is the process by which fuel 
is  vaporized  and  mixed  with  air  in  the  required  proportions.    For  the  mixture  to  burn  efficiently  in  an 
engine cylinder, the air/fuel ratio must be kept within a certain range, around 15:1 by weight.  The ratio 
is expressed in weight because volume varies considerably with temperature and pressure. 
22.  Carburation is achieved by the use of either a carburettor or fuel injector.  Their function is twofold: 
a. 
To supply an atomized, and correctly proportioned, mixture of fuel and air to the engine. 
b. 
To provide a method of limiting the power output by controlling the flow of this mixture. 
Manifold Air Pressure 
23.  The power developed by a piston engine is directly proportional to the weight of the fuel/air mixture 
burnt in the cylinders in a given time.  As each piston descends in its cylinder during the induction stroke 
(Fig 2), the pressure in the cylinder is reduced, thereby drawing in the fuel/air mixture from the induction 
manifold  (the  system  of  pipes  which  conducts  the  fuel/air  mixture  to  the  inlet  valves).    The  weight  of 
fuel/air  mixture  that  enters  the  cylinder  in  this  period  (the  'charge')  is  dependent  on  the  pressure  in  the 
manifold  and  the  amount  of  throttle  opening.    The  manifold  air  pressure  (MAP  or  MP)  is  shown  on  a 
cockpit  gauge,  usually  calibrated  in  inches  of  mercury  (in  Hg),  where  30  inches  is  approximately  the 
length of a column of mercury that will be supported by atmospheric pressure at sea level. 
24.  Supercharging.    Because  atmospheric  pressure  decreases  with  altitude,  the  weight  of  charge 
entering the cylinders for a given throttle setting decreases as the aircraft climbs.  To prevent a loss of 
power as altitude is gained, it is necessary to maintain the pressure in the manifold by compressing the 
incoming air.  This can be achieved by using an engine-driven compressor ('supercharging') or by the 
use  of  a  turbine  driven  from  the  exhaust  gases  ('turbocharging').    The  MAP  for  a  supercharged  or 
turbocharged engine is referred to as 'boost pressure'. 
Detonation and Pre-ignition 
25.  Under  normal  conditions,  the  fuel/air  mixture  is  ignited  in  the  cylinder  at  the  start  of  the  power 
stroke.  It burns at a steady rate with a flame velocity of about 60 ft per second.  Peak pressure in the 
cylinder  is  developed  just  after  top  dead  centre,  and  the  force  on  the  piston  is  steady.    However, 
abnormal conditions can occur and lead to problems known as 'detonation' and 'pre-ignition'. 
26.  Detonation.  When detonation occurs, although combustion begins normally, the temperature of the 
unburned part of the mixture is raised so high that it ignites spontaneously.  This occurs at an early stage 
of the power stroke and the mixture burns with a flame velocity in the region of 1,000 ft per second. 
27.  Effects  of  Detonation.    When  detonation  occurs,  the  cylinder  walls  and  the  piston  receive  a 
hammer-like blow.  The rate of pressure rise is too early in the power stroke (in the ineffective crank angle 
area)  for  the  piston  to  move  downwards,  so  that  much  of  the  chemical  energy  is wasted as heat.  The 
subsequent excessive cylinder temperatures can result in burning of the top of the piston and the exhaust 
valves.    In  addition,  carbonization  of  the  oil  may  occur,  leading  to  burning  of  the  piston  walls  and 
vaporization of the oil.  Unlike a car engine, where detonation can be clearly heard (the noise is known as 
'pinking'), detonation in an aero engine cannot be heard because of propeller and other noises. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-2 - Introduction to Piston Engines 
28.  Preventing Detonation.  The likelihood of detonation occurring can be reduced by the following 
measures: 
a. 
Always using the correct mixture strength.  The greater the amount of fuel for a given amount 
of air, the greater the power that can be obtained without detonation. 
b. 
Avoiding  anything  that  raises  the  temperature  or  pressure  of  the  mixture  before  it  burns.  
Examples  of  this  are  the  use  of  carburettor  heating  at  high  power  settings  and  using  high 
manifold/boost pressures at low rpm. 
c. 
Always using the correct grade of fuel. 
29.  Pre-ignition.  Pre-ignition should not be confused with detonation, though it may be an after-effect 
of  it.    If  an  engine  is  allowed  to  become  overheated,  the  temperature  of  some  projections  into  the 
combustion chamber, such as the sparking plug points or a piece of carbon, may rise so much that the 
mixture  is  prematurely  ignited  during  the  compression  stroke.    The  engine  may  also  continue  to  run 
after  shut  down  with  the  ignition  switched  off,  though  probably  not  on all cylinders.  With pre-ignition, 
there  is  a  loss  of  power,  rough  running,  and  further  overheating.    Unlike  detonation,  which  usually 
diminishes  with  an  increase  in  rpm,  pre-ignition  gets  worse  as  the  engine  speed  increases.    Pre-
ignition can be avoided by always using the correct mixture setting. 
Icing 
30.  When flying in certain conditions of humidity and temperature, ice can quickly build up inside the 
carburettor or injector air intakes.  To overcome this problem, all piston-engine aircraft are fitted with a 
manual or automatic shutter system to blank off entry of the cold air and obtain warm or hot air from 
inside the engine cowling.  However, it should be noted that the use of hot intake air will reduce engine 
power. 
Lubrication 
31.  The  primary  purpose  of  lubrication  is  to reduce friction between moving surfaces.  The lubricant is 
also  used  to  clean  the  interior  of  the  engine  and  to  dissipate  heat  from  the  moving  parts.    Pistons  and 
cylinders are particularly dependent on oil for cooling. 
32.  The  viscosity  of  a  fluid  (ie  its  internal  friction  or  resistance  to  flow)  is  temperature  dependent.  
When  oil  is  cold,  it  has  a  high  viscosity  and  flows  slowly,  thus  making  circulation  extremely  difficult.  
However,  if  the  oil  gets  too  hot,  the  viscosity  may  become  so  low  that  the  film  between  the  bearing 
surfaces breaks down and metal-to-metal contact occurs, resulting in rapid wear and overheating. 
Oil Dilution 
33.  The object of oil dilution is to facilitate the starting of large piston engines in cold weather.  A quantity of 
fuel is added to the oil to reduce its viscosity.  This reduces the torque necessary to rotate the engine.  By 
improving  the  flow  of  the  oil, it also helps to ensure that an adequate supply of lubricant is available to all 
moving  parts  immediately  after  engine  starting.    When  the  engine  reaches  normal operating temperature, 
the  fuel  evaporates  and  is  vented  to  atmosphere  and  the  oil  viscosity  returns  to  normal.    If  carried  out 
regularly,  irrespective  of  the  atmospheric  temperature  prevailing,  oil  dilution  helps  to  minimize  the 
accumulation of sludge deposits within the engine by flushing them into the oil filters. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-3 - Piston Engine Handling 
CHAPTER 3 - PISTON ENGINE HANDLING 
ENGINE LIMITATIONS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  Aircrew  Manual  for  each  type  of  aircraft  specifies certain engine limitations.  These limitations 
are based on calculations and type tests on the bench.  They may subsequently be modified in the light of 
service experience and operational requirements.  In addition, they may vary for the same type of engine 
fitted  in different types of aircraft.  The limitations are designed to secure an adequate margin of safety 
against immediate breakdown and give the engine a reasonable life.  Proper handling throughout the life 
of an engine will improve reliability towards the end of the period between overhauls and will also improve 
the chance of the engine standing up to operational overloads. 
2. 
With all engines, large and small, optimum reliability and long trouble-free life are assured by restricting 
the use of high power settings as much as possible.  During take-off, the aim should be to use the maximum 
power setting for the shortest duration, and to reduce the power setting as soon as it is safe to do so.  On 
lightly loaded aircraft, it may not be necessary to use the maximum power setting if reference to the Aircrew 
Manual/Operating Data Manual shows that, for particular conditions of weight, weather and available take-off 
run, the take-off can be safely performed at a reduced power setting.  Similarly, the climb should be made at 
less than the intermediate power permitted, provided that overheating does not result and an acceptable rate 
of climb can be maintained. 
Engine Limitations 
3. 
The  stresses  on  engine  components  are  increased  at  high  rpm,  giving  rise  to  increased  wear.  
Consequently,  maximum  rpm  limitations  are  usually  imposed.    Table  1  is  an  example  of  an  engine 
limitations table, typical of that found in Aircrew Manuals.  It shows the principle limitations associated 
with each of the main power conditions.  If the specified engine limitations are exceeded, or extended 
beyond the time permitted, a report must be made after landing. 
Table 1 Typical Engine Limitations Table 
Power Rating 
Time Limit 
rpm 
Temp °C 
Take-off and Operational Necessity 
5 min 
2800 
270 
90 
Intermediate 
1 hour 
2400 
260 
90 
Max Continuous 

2400 
260 
80 
Max Overspeed 
20 secs 
3000 


Oil pressure
 
 
 
a. 62 to 75 kPa (90 to 110 psi) at 80 ºC and max continuous power. 
 
 
 
b. Flight minimum: 55 kPa (80 psi). 
Oil temperature:  Minimum for take off: +15 ºC. 
Cylinder temperature:  Maximum for stopping the engine: 210 ºC. 
4. 
High  cylinder  temperatures  lead  to  a  breakdown  in  cylinder  wall  lubrication,  excessive  gas 
temperatures  and  distortion.    High  oil  temperatures  cause  failure  of  cylinder  and  bearing  lubrication.  
Accordingly,  maximum  cylinder  head  and  oil  temperature  limitations  are  also  imposed  for  the  main 
power conditions. 
5. 
Shortage  of  oil,  or  a  defect  in  the  lubrication  system,  may  result  in  inadequate  lubrication  and 
bearing failure.  A minimum oil pressure limitation is therefore included. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-3 - Piston Engine Handling 
Considerations for Imposing Engine Limitations 
6. 
The engine limitations table (Table 1) may specify minimum oil and/or cylinder head temperatures 
(CHT),  which  must  be  achieved  before  applying  full  power  (ie  before  take-off).    These  minimum 
temperatures  ensure  proper  circulation  of  the  oil  and  prevent  damage  to  the  engine  caused  by  rapid 
and uneven heating or excessive oil pressure. 
7. 
A maximum CHT for take-off is given for air-cooled engines to ensure that the high power used at 
take-off will not cause damage to the engine by overheating. 
8. 
When an engine is shut down after flight, its temperature may rise by a considerable amount 
before  it  starts  to  fall.    This  is  particularly  true of air-cooled engines.  Consequently, a maximum 
CHT at which the engine can be shut down after flight is imposed.  This prevents damage to the 
cylinder  cooling  fins  caused  by  rapid  and  uneven  cooling,  and  also  ensures  that  the  HT  ignition 
leads  do  not  become  overheated.    After  flight,  all  engines  should  be  run  at,  or  a  little  above,  the 
warming-up rpm whilst confirming that the CHT is below the maximum for shut-down.  This should 
ensure even cooling and leave an adequate film of oil on the cylinder walls. 
9. 
A  diving  rpm  limitation  is  imposed  on  engines  having  a  fixed  pitch  propeller  where  the  normal 
maximum  rpm  may  be  exceeded  in  a  dive.    The  diving  overspeed  limit  is  usually  allowed  only  for  a 
period of up to 20 seconds; however, the Aircrew Manual must be consulted for any limitations. 
Lubrication System Faults 
10.  Serious damage will occur quickly through overheating or failure of the lubrication system; therefore, 
the limitations should be strictly observed.  Frequent checks should be made of the oil temperature and 
pressure, and the power should be adjusted when necessary to keep them within limits. 
11.  Variations in Oil Pressure On many in-line engines, under normal conditions, the oil pressure 
tends  to  vary  through  a  considerable  range,  increasing  with  rpm  but  decreasing  with  rising 
temperature.    Older  engines  tend  to  run  at  lower  pressures  as  the  bearing  clearances  increase  with 
wear.    The  minimum  oil  pressure  limitation  stated  is,  however,  the  lowest  at  which  satisfactory 
lubrication  is  obtained.    When  the  Aircrew  Manual specifies 'normal oil pressure', this is for guidance 
only and is not necessarily representative of all engines of the same type. 
12.  Warning of Impending Failure The first indication that a fault is developing in an engine, which 
has previously been running at normal oil temperatures and pressures, may be a fairly abrupt drop in 
oil  pressure,  or  a  rapid  rise  in  oil  temperature.    Therefore,  depending  on  the  circumstances,  with  a 
single-engine aircraft a precautionary landing should be made as soon as possible if a sudden change 
in these parameters is indicated. 
13.  Ground Check.  When checking the engine before take-off, if the oil pressure is apparently lower 
than that normally experienced under comparable conditions, a defect should be suspected. 
ENGINE STARTING 
Precautions Before Starting and Testing 
14.  Before  starting  the  engine,  the  following  general  points  should  be  observed (the Aircrew Manual 
will give specific instructions for any particular engine). 
a. 
If practicable, the aircraft should be facing into wind to ensure the best possible cooling. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-3 - Piston Engine Handling 
b. 
Other  aircraft  (or  anything  else  likely  to  be  damaged)  should  not  be  in  the  path  of  the 
propeller slipstream. 
c. 
The aircraft should not be on dusty or stony ground.  Propeller slipstreams can pick up loose 
particles, and damage may be caused to the airframe and propellers. 
d. 
Chocks should be positioned in front of the main wheels and the parking brake selected 'ON'. 
e. 
All of the ignition switches must be 'OFF'. 
f. 
If  the  aircraft  has  been standing for some time, the engine should be turned over, preferably by 
hand, through two revolutions of the propeller to break down any oil film which may have formed. 
g. 
With  inverted  or  radial  engines,  the  propeller  must  be  turned  by  hand  through  at  least  two 
complete  revolutions  to  prevent  damage  by  hydraulic  lock  caused  by  oil  or  fuel  draining  into 
cylinder  heads.    If  hydraulic  lock  is  indicated  (by  a  resistance  to  rotation),  the  plugs  should  be 
removed from the inverted/lower cylinders, which should then be allowed to drain. 
h. 
All fuel cocks and engine controls should be set to the positions specified in the Aircrew Manual. 
i. 
Ground fire extinguishers should be positioned and manned. 
15.  The ignition should never be switched on until the engine is ready to be started.  The engine fuel 
system must be primed ready for start by means of the priming pump.  This can be either electrical or 
mechanical.    In  either  case,  the  priming  should  be  carried  out  in  accordance  with  the  instructions 
specified  in  the  Aircrew  Manual.    If  necessary,  priming  may  be continued while the engine is turning, 
and until it is running smoothly.  If the engine fails to start, and over-richness is suspected, the engine 
may be cleared by: 
a. 
Switching off the ignition. 
b. 
Turning off the fuel. 
c. 
Opening  the  throttle  and  having  the  propeller  turned  (by  hand  or  mechanically)  through 
several revolutions. 
d. 
The  throttle  lever  should  never  be  'pumped',  either  before  or  after  an  engine  has  been 
started,  as  with  many  types  of  carburettor  this  will  cause  an  unpredictable  excess  of  fuel  to  be 
delivered to the induction system by the accelerator pump.  If the engine is running, this will cause 
an excessively rich or uneven mixture, irrespective of the type of carburettor.  This could lead to a 
rich cut (the engine stops because excessive fuel will not burn in the cylinder) or an induction fire, 
and also subjects the engine to undesirable fluctuations of internal loading. 
Starting by Propeller Swinging 
16.  Small engines may be hand-started as follows: 
a. 
Ensure that the wheels are correctly chocked. 
b. 
Check ignition switches are 'OFF'. 
c. 
Prime the cylinders as instructed for the type. 
d. 
If an engine has not been run for some time, or it is cold, it may be necessary to have it hand-
cranked,  or  the  propeller  hand-swung  for  one  or  two  revolutions,  with  the  ignition  'OFF'  and  the 
throttle closed (or nearly closed).  This ensures that the induction system, and as many cylinders 
as possible, contain fuel vapour. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-3 - Piston Engine Handling 
e. 
Switch on the ignition, and have the propeller hand-swung, or hand-cranked, smartly until the 
engine starts. 
f. 
If  the  engine  fails  to  start  after  a  few  turns,  over-richness  is  the  most  probable  cause.  
Therefore,  switch  off  the  ignition  and  the  fuel,  open  the  throttle  fully  and  have  the  engine  turned 
through several revolutions to clear the cylinders of fuel.  Then turn on the fuel, close the throttle, 
and proceed as in sub-paras c and e. 
17.  There is always a possibility that, owing to a fault in the ignition system, a piston engine may fire 
when  being  rotated  by  hand,  even  with  the  ignition  'OFF'.    Therefore,  whenever  hand-turning  a 
propeller, the ground crew should stand in a safe position, and treat the propeller as if expecting the 
engine to fire. 
Direct-cranking Electric Starters 
18.  The direct-cranking electric starter, together with its reduction gear, is normally an integral part of 
the engine.  To start the engine, the ignition is switched on, and the starter push-button pressed 
until the engine fires. 
19.  Failure  to  Start.    To  avoid  overheat  damage  to  the  starter  motor,  it  should  never  be  operated 
continuously for more that 30 seconds.  If an engine fails to start, a pause of 30 seconds should elapse 
to  allow  the  starter  motor  to  cool  before  a  further  attempt  is  made.    If  three  abortive  attempts  have 
been  carried  out,  the  starter  motor  must  be  allowed  to  cool  for  10  to  15  minutes  before  any  further 
attempts are made. 
Starting in Cold Weather 
20.  In very cold weather, engines which have been cold for long enough for the oil temperature to fall 
below 0 ºC may prove difficult to start because: 
a. 
The  oil  thickens,  producing  high  internal  resistance  to  the  starter  motor,  thus  reducing  the 
cranking speed. 
b. 
The fuel does not vaporize readily to provide a suitable combustion mixture. 
21.  To overcome the problem of thick oil, oil dilution (see Volume 3, Chapter 2) may be used to make 
the  engine  easier  to  turn,  and  to  ensure  an  immediate  flow  of  oil  to  all  moving  parts.    With  poor  fuel 
vaporization, considerably more priming is required than under temperate conditions. 
Starting a Warm or Hot Engine 
22.  The main reason why a hot engine fails to start is over-priming.  The starting drill for an engine that has 
been recently run, or just shut down, must therefore be modified to reduce the amount of priming, or even 
dispense with it completely.  The degree of priming required will depend on the ambient temperature, and the 
length of time the engine has been stationary.  There is also a serious risk of fire developing if a hot engine is 
over-primed. 
Warming Up 
23.  Engine oil pressure should be monitored for the first 30 seconds after start-up.  When normal oil 
pressure is indicated, the throttle should be opened gradually until the engine is running at the speed 
recommended in the Aircrew Manual, generally 1,000 to 1,200 rpm.  The engine should be warmed up 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-3 - Piston Engine Handling 
at this speed until the prescribed temperature and pressures have been reached.  Note:  If normal oil 
pressure is not reached within the first 30 seconds, the engine should be shut down. 
Testing After Starting 
24.  Once the engine has been warmed up, it can be exercised and tested as required in the Aircrew 
Manual.    The  following  tests  are  applicable  to  most  piston  engines.    Any  differences  from  these 
procedures will be specified in the Aircrew Manual. 
25.  The checks described in paras 27 to 29 will determine if the engine is running correctly and, at the 
same  time,  ensure  that  ground  running  at  high  power  settings,  which  is  damaging  to  any  engine,  is 
kept to a minimum. 
26.  As a general rule, ground testing should not be carried out with the carburettor air intake in the hot 
position, unless heavy throttle icing is being experienced.  If an intake filter is fitted, it should be set to 
the 'filter' position. 
27.  During the run-up period, the charging rate of the generator should be checked, together with the 
rpm at which it cuts in.  The vacuum pump suction and change-over cock, if fitted, should be checked.  
Temperatures  and  pressures  should  be  monitored  throughout  the  run-up  to  ensure  that  the 
instruments are working, and that the limitations are not being exceeded. 
28.  At warming-up rpm, test each magneto in turn by selecting it 'OFF'.  If the engine stops during this 
procedure (known as a 'dead cut'), then the magneto which is selected 'ON' is not functioning, i.e. it is 
'dead'.    Both  magnetos  should  also  be  switched  off  together  to  ensure  that  neither  is  live  when 
switched off. 
29.  Test each magneto in turn at the reference rpm.  If there is marked vibration, rough running or a 
drop of rpm outside limits, the engine is unserviceable. 
ENGINE HANDLING 
Taxiing 
30.  Care must be taken to avoid overheating the engine while taxiing.  The throttle should be used as 
little as possible and set to a position which gives a safe speed. 
31.  The  rpm  lever  (if  fitted)  should  be  in  the  take-off  (high  rpm)  position  to  obtain  the  best  cooling 
airflow over the engine and provide the most tractive effort.  The engine rpm should be at or above the 
warming-up figure whilst taxiing.  The use of low rpm on the ground should be kept to a minimum, as 
many engine configurations tend to overheat. 
Use of Intake Filters and Heat Controls 
32.  Intake  filters  and  heat  controls  should  be  set  as  specified  in  the  Aircrew  Manual.    Intake  filters 
should always be used when operating in dust-laden zones 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-3 - Piston Engine Handling 
Take-off 
33.  If the engine is not run up immediately before take-off, air-cooled engines should be 'cleared' by 
opening the throttle to the maximum power that can be held on the brakes.  This is to clear any carbon 
deposits from the plugs and/or to remove excess fuel from the inlet manifold. 
34.  When  starting  the  take-off  run,  the  throttle  should  be  opened  steadily  up  to  the  required  power.  
The aim is to obtain full power in the shortest time consistent with controlling the aircraft and avoiding 
'slam accelerations'. 
Climbing 
35.  On  most  supercharged  engines,  the  rpm  is  maintained  at  the  value  set  by  the  pilot  until  the  full 
throttle height is reached.  If the climb is continued above this height, the rpm will reduce progressively. 
General Handling 
36.  The  throttle  lever  should  always  be  moved  slowly  and  evenly  to  avoid  undesirable  strain  on  the 
engine. 
37.  Clearing  the  Engine  in  Flight.    When  cruising  at  low  power,  it  is  advisable  to  clear  engines  at 
regular intervals by opening up to not less than intermediate power and moving the engine rpm control 
from cruise setting to maximum several times.  Clearing in this manner should be carried out once per 
hour (or more frequently, depending on the circumstances) or as specified in the Aircrew Manual. 
38.  Rejoining  the  Circuit.    Before  entering  the  circuit  at  the  conclusion  of  a  flight,  engines  should  be 
cleared  as  recommended  in  para  37.    This  will  minimize  plug  fouling  and  ensure  that  full  power  will  be 
available if required.  This is especially necessary if the engines have been running for a long time at very low 
power in cold weather. 
39.  Ignition Checks in Flight.  If the pilot has reason to suspect the ignition system, a precautionary 
landing  as  soon  as  practicable  is  recommended.    An  ignition  check  in  flight  is  not  recommended.    If 
one magneto has failed completely, the otherwise serviceable sparking plugs from the other magneto 
may become wetted with fuel and not function correctly.  There is also a risk of blowback and damage 
to the engine when the ignition is switched on again. 
Effects of Low and Negative g 
40.  In  engines  with  injected  fuel,  flooding  and  starvation  are  unlikely  to  occur  through  the  effects  of 
low or negative 'g' (where 'low' means less than 1).  However, the effect on the oil system may lead to 
starvation and the engine must not be allowed to run with less than the minimum oil pressure specified 
in the Aircrew Manual. 
41.  When an aircraft is suddenly put into a dive, or is subjected to certain aerobatics or inverted flying, fuel 
moves  to  the  top  of  the  tanks.    In  float-type  carburettors,  flooding  first  takes  place  and  a  rich  cut  is 
experienced, followed by a weak cut if negative 'g' is sustained.  The engine will cut less readily and recover 
more quickly with the throttle well open, but the pilot must close the throttle before power begins to return to 
avoid an excessive power surge/rpm over swing. 
Engine Temperature 
42.  The importance of monitoring cylinder head and oil temperatures, and keeping them within limits, 
cannot be emphasized too strongly. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-3 - Piston Engine Handling 
43.  Climbing with a weak mixture selected may lead to high engine temperatures.  However, by flying 
the aircraft at some 10 to 15 knots faster than the recommended IAS for the climb, the temperature of 
all types of piston engines can be reduced, without seriously affecting the rate of climb. 
44.  'Coring' occurs when the engine oil congeals and restricts the flow through the oil cooler.  It can 
happen in some oil coolers at low air temperatures.  Coring should be suspected if there is a sudden 
rise  in  oil  temperature,  which  is  not  accompanied  by  a  corresponding  rise  in  cylinder  head 
temperatures.    The  remedy  is  to  increase  rpm  as  soon  as  the  situation  is  identified.    If,  however, 
coring  is  well  advanced,  and  the  oil  temperature  still  remains  high,  the  airflow  through  the  cooler 
needs to be reduced without reducing power.  This can be achieved by lowering the flaps to reduce 
the airspeed.  A descent to a level where the air temperature is higher is then advisable. 
45.  Generally, the engine should not be allowed to get cold or it may not readily respond when required.  
During descent, the engine may be kept warm by diving moderately with the throttle well open, rather than 
by gliding with the throttle closed.  In a long glide, the throttle should be opened at intervals. 
Stopping the Engine 
46.  The  correct  method  of  running-down  and  stopping  an  engine  is  just  as  important  as  the  correct 
starting  and  running-up  procedures.    Use  of  the  correct  procedure  ensures  that  an  engine  is  cooled 
down in the best way, and that it is left in the most serviceable condition for future starting. 
47.  Duration  of  Run-down.    The  engine  should  be  cooled  by  idling  at  the  rpm  specified  in  the 
Aircrew Manual (this is usually between 800 and 1,200 rpm).  The idling period varies with the type of 
engine,  but  is  normally  one  to  two  minutes,  or  until  the  CHT  falls  to  the  recommended  value  before 
shutting down, whichever is the longer.  Idling at the recommended rpm allows the scavenge pump to 
remove the surplus oil from the crankcase, thus reducing the danger of a hydraulic lock when starting 
up.    Very  low  idling  rpm  should  be  avoided  as  it  may  cause  fouling  of  the  plugs.    During  this  idling 
period the magnetos should be tested again for a dead cut. 
48. Effect of Excessive Temperature If a hot engine is shut down too rapidly, uneven cooling will 
result.  This may cause damage to the cylinder block and distortion of the cylinders or cooling fins.  On 
reaching the dispersal, the aircraft should be parked into wind, to ensure even and gentle cooling. 
49.  Suspect Engine If after flight, for any reason, the serviceability of the engine is in doubt, the run-up 
checks should be carried out.  These checks are not normally necessary, but, if a fault is suspected, it is 
better discovered when stopping an engine after flight than when starting it before flight. 
50.  Stopping the Engine To stop an engine, close the throttle and operate either the slow running 
cut-out or fuel cut-out, or set the mixture control to lean.  After the engine has stopped, switch off the 
ignition  and  turn  off  the  fuel.    Any  additional  instructions  for  stopping  the  engine  are  specified  in  the 
Aircrew Manual. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
CHAPTER 4 - GAS TURBINE THEORY 
Introduction 
1. 
On the 16th January 1930, Sir Frank Whittle filed British patent no 347 206 for the first practical 
turbojet (Fig 1). 
3-4 Fig 1 Drawing of Whittle Patent 
Centrigugal
Fuel Injector
Compressor
Two Stage
Axial Compressor
Turbine
Disc
Turbine/Compressor
Connecting Shaft
Divergent
Combustion
Nozzle
Chamber
Ring
Although differing from his first experimental engine, WU (Whittle Unit), the layout shown in Fig 1 can 
be  easily  recognised  as  the  basic  arrangement  of  the  modern  gas  turbine,  particularly  the  use  of  an 
axial/centrifugal  compressor  arrangement  which  is  used  quite  extensively  in  small  gas  turbine  and 
helicopter turboshaft engines.  Despite Whittle’s work, the first jet engine powered aircraft to fly was the 
Heinkel  HE178  in  1939.    This  was  followed  a  year  later  by  the  jet  powered  Camproni  Campini,  the 
engine  of  which  used  a  piston  engine  instead  of  a  turbine  to  drive  the  compressor.    Britain’s  first 
successful jet powered aircraft, the Gloster E28/39 flew in 1941, powered by Whittle’s W1 engine. 
2. 
Developments  led  to  the  W2B  (Fig  2)  which,  after  further  work  by  Rolls  Royce,  went  into 
production  as  the  Welland  1  turbojet,  with  a  design  thrust  of  7  kilo-newtons  (kN).    This  powered  the 
Meteor Mk1 aircraft.  It is interesting to note that, in March 1936, Whittle filed patent no 471 368 for a 
turbofan engine design. 
3-4 Fig 2 Whittle Engine W2B 
Fuel Inlet
Inlet Guide
Vanes
Single Stage
Turbine
Double Sided
Centrifugal
Connecting
Reverse Flow
Compressor
Combustion
Shaft
Chamber
Working Cycle 
Revised May 2010 
Page 1 of 9 


AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
3. 
A gas turbine is essentially a heat engine using air as a fluid to produce thrust.  The working cycle 
of  the  gas  turbine  is  similar  to  that  of  a  piston  engine  and  both  engine  cycles  have  induction, 
compression,  combustion  and  exhaust  phases  (Fig  3).    However  a  gas  turbine  is  able  to  deal  with 
much larger amounts of energy for a given size and weight, and it has the added advantage that the 
mechanical motion is continuous and entirely rotational, whereas the piston engine uses an intermittent 
reciprocating motion which is converted to rotary motion by means of cranks.  In consequence, the gas 
turbine runs more smoothly. 
3-4 Fig 3 Working Cycle 
4. 
The  gas  turbine  cycle  can  be  represented  by  a  temperature/entropy  (T-S)  diagram  (entropy  is  a 
measure of disorder; the greater the entropy or degree of disorder in the gas, the less work can be extracted 
from  it).    Referring  to  Fig  4,  Point  1  represents  the  entry  to  the  compressor;  the  air  undergoes  adiabatic 
compression along the line 1-2.  Heat is added to the air in the form of burning fuel which causes constant 
pressure heating along the line 2-3.  Adiabatic expansion through the turbines, line 3-4, extracts energy from 
the gas stream to drive the compressor and possibly a propeller, fan or rotor system.  The remainder of the 
gas stream is discharged through the exhaust system to provide thrust, line 4-1. 
Revised May 2010 
Page 2 of 9 


AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
3-4 Fig 4 Gas Turbine T-S Diagram 
3
E
x
p
a
n
s
stion
io
T
bu
n
om
C
2
Pressure
4
n
Increasing
io
s
s
re
xhaust
p
E
m
o 1
C
S
5. 
As the gas turbine engine is reliant upon heat to expand the gases, the higher the temperature in 
the combustion phase the greater the expansion of the gases.  However, the combustion temperature 
has to be limited to a level that can be safely accepted by the materials used in the turbine and exhaust 
components.    Fig  5  shows  the  gas  flow  through  a  typical  gas  turbine  and  also  gives  representative 
values for temperature, gas velocities, and pressures. 
3-4 Fig 5 Typical Gas Flow through a Gas Turbine 
PROPELLING NOZZLE
AIR
INTAKE
COMPRESSION
COMBUSTION
EXPANSION
EXHAUST
Deg C m/s
kPa
3000
914 1034
TOTAL PRESSURE
2500
762
862
Flame temperature
2000
610
690
1500
457
517
TEMPERATURE
1000
305
345
AXIAL VELOCITY
500
152
172
0
0
0
TYPICAL   SINGLE-SPOOL   AXIAL  FLOW  TURBO-JET  ENGINE
Thrust Distribution 
6. 
The  thrust  forces  within  a  gas  turbine  result  from  pressure  and  momentum  changes  of  the  gas 
stream,  passing  through  the  engine,  reacting  on  the  engine  structure  and  rotating  components.    The 
various  forces  either  react  forward  or  rearward,  and  the  amount  by  which  the  forward  forces  exceed 
the  rearward  forces  is  the  rated  thrust  of  the  engine.    The  diagram  in  Fig  6  illustrates  the  various 
forward and rearward forces in a typical turbojet engine. 
Revised May 2010 
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
3-4 Fig 6 Thrust Distribution of a Typical Turbojet 
Forward Gas Load 259.96 kN
Rearward Gas Load   
−207.63 kN
Total Thrust 50.33 kN
84.73 kN
150.72 kN
−182.78 kN
 
− 24.85 kN
11.75 kN
10.76 kN
Propelling
Nozzle
Diffuser
Turbine
Compressor
Combustion
Exhaust Unit
Chamber
and Jet Pipe
7. 
The  distribution  of  thrust  forces shown in Fig 6 can be derived by considering the conditions at each 
section of the engine in turn.  However, it is more useful to calculate the thrust over the whole engine. 
8. 
The  force  of  gravity  provides  an  acceleration  force  of  9.81  metres  per  second  per  second  (32.2 
feet  per  second  per  second)  to  all  bodies  near  the  surface  of  the  Earth.    This  acceleration  is 
independent  of  the  mass  of  the  body.    However,  mass  and  weight  are  often  confused.    Mass  is  the 
amount  of  matter  in  a  body  whereas  the  weight  of  a  specified  mass  will  depend  upon  the  force  of 
gravity exerted upon it such that: 
Weight = Mass of Object ×Acceleration due to gravity 
The majority of thrust from an engine results from the momentum change of the gas stream.  This is 
termed 'momentum thrust': 
W × V
Momentum Thrust = 
 = M × V 
g
Where:  W  = Weight of Air in kilograms (kg). 
 
 

= Mass Flow of Air in kilograms per second (kg/s). 
 
 

= Velocity of Gas Stream in metres per second (m/s). 
 
 

= Acceleration due to gravity in metres per second per second (m/s/s). 
An  additional  thrust  is  produced  when  the  propelling  nozzle  becomes  'choked'  (see  Volume  3, 
Chapter 9, Para 6).  This thrust is a result of aerodynamic forces created by the gas stream which in 
turn  exert  a  pressure  difference  across  the  exit  of  the  propelling  nozzle,  and  this  action  produces 
'pressure thrust': 
Revised May 2010 
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
Pressure Thrust = A × (Pe – Po) 
Where 
A  = Area of Propelling Nozzle in square metres (m2). 
 
 
Po = Atmospheric Pressure in kilo pascals (kPa). 
 
 
Pe = Exit Pressure from Propelling Nozzle in kPa. 
The concept of momentum and pressure thrust give rise to the full thrust equation: 
Thrust (in kilo newtons (kN)) = (M × Vj) – (M ×Vo) + (Ae × (Pe – Po))  (Ai × (P1 – Po)) 
Where 
M  = Mass Flow of Air in kg/s 
 
 
Vj  = Final Velocity of Gas Stream in m/s 
 
 
Vo = Initial Velocity of Gas Stream in m/s 
 
 
Ae = Area of Propelling Nozzle in m2
 
 
Ai  = Area of Intake in m2
 
 
Pe = Exit Pressure from Propelling Nozzle in kPa 
 
 
Po = Atmospheric Pressure in kPa 
 
 
P1 = Engine Inlet Pressure in kPa 
If we calculate the thrust at sea level static (SLS) conditions, the above equation can be simplified as 
follows: 
Thrust (kN) = (M × Vj) + (Ae × (Pe – Po)) 
     since Vo = 0 
              P1 = Po. 
9. 
To illustrate the calculation of thrust, using data from the calculations used to derive the values in Fig 6: 
Propelling Nozzle Outlet: 
 
 
 
Area (Ae) 
  =  0.2150 m2
 
 
 
Pressure (Pe)    =  143.325 kPa 
 
 
 
Pressure (Po)    =  101.325 kPa (ISA) 
 
 
 
Mass Flow (M) =  70 kg/s 
 
 
 
Velocity (Vj)    =  590 m/s 
Thrust (kN) = 70 × 590 + (0.215 × (143325  101325)) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     = 50.33 kN 
This is the sum of the individual values in Fig 6. 
10.  By  fitting  an  afterburner  to  the  engine,  the  thrust  can  be  greatly  increased.    The  afterburner 
achieves this by burning fuel in the jet pipe, reheating the gas stream thus increasing its volume.  This 
in turn will provide a greater exit velocity at the propelling nozzle. 
11.  The  effect  of  afterburning  upon  thrust  can  be  readily  seen  if  we  replace  the  propelling  nozzle 
parameters from the previous calculation with data for an afterburner, jet pipe, and nozzle.  The recalculation 
shows  a  significant  thrust  increase.    However,  by  employing  afterburning  the  fuel  flow  will  also  increase 
considerably. 
Revised May 2010 
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
12.  The parameters of the afterburning nozzle are as follows: 
Afterburner Propelling Nozzle Outlet: 
 
 
 
Area (Ae) 
 =  0.2900 m2
 
 
 
Pressure (Pe)   =  136.325 kPa 
 
 
 
Pressure (Po)   =  101.325 kPa (ISA) 
 
 
 
Mass Flow (M) =  70 kg/s 
 
 
 
Velocity (Vj)   =  740 m/s 
Thrust (kN) = 70 × 740 + (0.29 × (136325 – 101325)) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     = 61.950 kN 
It  can  be  seen  that  the  increase  in  thrust  is  11.62  kN  or  23%.    This  increase  is  small  compared  to 
modern by-pass engines with afterburning which have thrust increases in the order of 80%.  However, 
the use of this increased thrust results in a disproportionately high increase in fuel consumption. 
Performance 
13.  The designed performance of an aircraft engine is dictated by the type of operations for which the 
aircraft is intended.  Although turbojet engines are rated in accordance with their thrust force in kN and 
turbo-propeller engines in accordance with their power in kilo-watts (kW), both types are assessed on 
the power produced for a given weight, fuel consumption and frontal area. 
14.  Since  the  thrust  or  shaft  power  developed  by  the  gas  turbine  is  dependent  on  the  mass  of  air 
entering  the  engine,  it  follows  that  the  performance  of  the  engine  is  influenced  by  such  variables  as 
forward speed, altitude, and climatic conditions.  The efficiency of the intake, compressor, turbine, and 
nozzle  are  directly  affected  by  these  variables  with  a  consequent  variation  in  thrust  or  shaft  power 
produced from the gas stream. 
15.  To maximize range and fuel economy, the ratio fuel consumption to thrust or shaft power should be 
as low as possible.  The ratio of fuel used in kg/hour per kN thrust, or kW of shaft power, is known as the 
specific fuel consumption (SFC).  This is related to the thermal and propulsive efficiency of the engine. 
16.  Comparison Between Thrust kN (Force) and Shaft Power kW (Power) Because the turbojet 
engine  is  rated  in  thrust  and  the  turboprop  engine  is  rated  in  equivalent  shaft  power,  no  direct 
comparison  can  be  made  without  the  use  of  power  conversion  factors.    Factors  converting  the  shaft 
power developed into thrust, or the thrust developed in the turbojet to shaft power may be used, thus, 
converting power to force or force to power. 
17.  In the SI system of units 1 watt (W) = 1 newton metre per second (Nm/s) so the conversion of thrust 
to power requires the aircraft velocity, in m/s, to be taken into account.  For an aircraft travelling at 150 
m/s (approx 290 kt), and the engine producing 40 kN, the thrust to power conversion is: 
40,000 × 150 = 6,000,000 = 6,000 kW 
Now,  for  a  turboprop  engine  powering  an  aircraft  at  the  same  velocity,  150  m/s,  with  a  propeller 
efficiency of 60%, and producing 6,000 kW the engine rating will be: 
6,000 × 100/60 = 10,000 kW 
Therefore, in an aircraft travelling at 150 m/s 1 kN of thrust =  250 kW of power. 
Revised May 2010 
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
18.  Effect of Engine RPM on Gas Turbine Performance.  At minimum engine rpm, below which the 
engine will not be self-sustaining, all the available power is absorbed by the turbine in order to drive the 
compressor.  It is not until high engine rpm is reached that the output becomes significant (Fig 7).  The 
conversion  of  fuel  energy  into  gas  energy  is  poor  at  low  rpm,  but  improves  rapidly  to  become  most 
efficient between 90% and100% rpm. 
3-4 Fig 7 Effect of Engine RPM on Thrust 
t
s
ru
h
T
100%
Engine rpm
19.  Effect of Airspeed on Gas Turbine Performance From the formula for thrust (para 8), it can be 
seen that thrust will vary with airspeed: 
Momentum Thrust = M × (Vje – Va) 
 
 
 
Where M = Mass Air Flow 
 
 
 
          Vje = Gas Exit Velocity 
 
 
 
           Va = Gas Inlet Velocity 
If the ram effect is discounted, any increase in Va because of airspeed will result in a corresponding fall 
in  thrust  (Fig  8).    However,  for  most  fixed  wing  aircraft,  the  intake  geometry  is  designed  to  take  full 
advantage  of  the  ram  effect,  and  therefore  as  forward  speed  increases  so  will  the  mass  flow  of  air 
inducted into the engine intake.  The ram effect becomes apparent at about 300 kt, and it increases as 
airspeed  increases  until,  at  about  500  kt,  the  static  thrust  loss  is  fully  recovered.    The  thrust  then 
continues to increase for a time, but eventually tends towards zero as the Va approaches the effective 
jet velocity (Vje).  The effect of increasing airspeed limits the use of a turbojet to Mach numbers of the 
order of 3.0.  This limit can be extended slightly by afterburning which increases the value of Vje. 
Revised May 2010 
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
3-4 Fig 8 Effect of Airspeed on Thrust 
Thrust with
Ram Effect
e
d
ltitu
A
t
n
ta
s
n
o
Thrust without
C
Intake Ram
t
a
Pressure
t
s
ru
h
T
500 kt TAS
1
2
3
Mach Number
20.  At zero airspeed, the overall efficiency is zero since no propulsive power is generated (overall efficiency 
is the ratio Work Produced: Fuel Used).  The overall efficiency increases rapidly with airspeed, although the 
thermal  efficiency  suffers  because  of  the  increased  temperature  of  the  air  entering  the  engine  (Thermal 
efficiency is the ratio Work Transfer from Engine: Heat Transfer to Engine).  However, as the thrust falls off 
rapidly above about Mach 2, a corresponding fall in overall efficiency takes place (Fig 9). 
3-4 Fig 9 Effect of Airspeed on Overall Engine Efficiency 
η ο
y
c
n
ie
ffic
E
e
in
g
n
E
ll
ra
e
v
O
Airspeed
21.  Effect of Altitude on Gas Turbine Performance.  As altitude increases, thrust decreases because 
of  reducing  air  density  (Fig  10).    However,  there  is  a  slight  compensating  effect  due  to  decreasing  air 
temperature with increasing altitude, therefore increasing overall efficiency. 
Revised May 2010 
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-4 - Gas Turbine Theory 
3-4 Fig 10 Effect of Altitude on Thrust 
100
Airspeed
Constant
e
s
u
75
a
p
t
o
s
p
ru
ro
h
T
T 50
%
25
0
10
20
30
40
Altitude ( 1
× 000 ft)
Revised May 2010 
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
CHAPTER 5 - INTAKES 
Introduction 
1. 
Because of its design and principle of operation, the gas turbine needs a large amount of air for it 
to  operate  efficiently.    The  intake  should  provide  this  air  as  efficiently  as  possible  with  the  minimum 
pressure loss.  The ideal intake should: 
a. 
Provide the engine with the amount of air which it demands. 
b. 
Provide the air over the full range of Mach numbers and engine throttle settings. 
c. 
Provide the air at all operating altitudes. 
d. 
Provide the air evenly distributed over the compressor face. 
e. 
Accelerate  or  decelerate  the  air  so  that  it  arrives  at  the  compressor  face  at  the  required 
velocity (normally about M0.5 (160-220 m/s)). 
f. 
Provide optimum initial air compression to augment compressor pressure rise. 
g. 
Minimize external drag. 
2. 
The intake effectiveness is expressed in terms of pressure recovery (Fig 1), defined as the ratio of 
the  mean  total  pressure  across  the  engine  face  (Pt1)  to  the  freestream  total  pressure  (Pt0).    This  is 
always  less  than  unity  (Pt1/Pt0  <  1),  though  great  efforts  are  made  to  minimize  total  pressure  losses 
which  arise  through  surface  friction,  the  intake  shock-wave  system,  and  shock-wave  boundary  layer 
interaction. 
3-5 Fig 1 Pressure Recovery 
Engine Face
Intake
Ambient
Pressure
P
= P
P
t1
Pressure
t0
t1
=
Recovery
Airflow Through Ducts 
3. 
Before  considering  intakes  in  any  more  detail,  the  behaviour  of  airflow  through  a  duct,  and  the 
consequent affect the cross sectional area has on the pressure, temperature, and velocity need to be 
understood. 
4. 
With  steady  continuous  airflow  through  a  duct,  the  mass  flow  rate  at  any  cross  section  must  be 
the  same,  i.e.  m  =  ρAV.    It  fol ows  therefore  that  at  a  minimum  cross  sectional  area  the  velocity  is 
highest, and at a maximum cross sectional area the velocity is lowest. 
5. 
Because of the change in velocity there is also an effect on the pressure and temperature of the 
airflow at these points.  Where the velocity is highest the static temperature and pressure are lowest
and where the velocity is lowest the static temperature and pressure are highest (Fig 2). 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
3-5 Fig 2 Airflow Through a Duct 
Velocity - Increase
Static Temperature - Decrease
Static Pressure - Decrease
Velocity - Constant
Static Temperature - Constant
Static Pressure - Constant
Velocity - Decrease
Static Temperature - Increase
Static Pressure - Increase
6. 
The  above  paragraph  can  be  expressed  using  a  modified  version  of  Bernoulli’s  equation, 
representing the total pressure of the airflow.  The first term (pressure) is often referred to as the static
pressure, and is the pressure of the surrounding air, whereas the second term (½ρV2) is referred to as 
the dynamic pressure and represents the kinetic energy of the airflow. 
P + ½ρV2 = Constant 
Where P = Static Pressure 
 
    ρ = Density 
 
    V = Velocity 
and the Pressure law : 
P  = Constant 
T
Where P = Static Pressure 
            T = Temperature 
so that at constant density, any increase in velocity will cause a decrease in static pressure, and be 
accompanied by a decrease in static temperature.  Conversely, any decrease in velocity will cause an 
increase in static pressure, and therefore an increase in static temperature (see Fig 2). 
7. 
This relationship holds for airflows below the speed of sound (Mach 1).  As the airflow approaches 
M1.0, the density of the air decreases dramatically so that an increase in the duct cross sectional area 
causes an increase in velocity.  (Note: at low speeds air density also decreases as velocity increases, 
but the effect is not very significant.) 
SUBSONIC INTAKES 
Introduction 
8. 
In operation, the subsonic intake captures the required air mass flow and delivers it to the engine 
compressor at the correct speed.  This is achieved by converting the dynamic pressure of the airflow to 
static  pressure  using  a  divergent  duct  or  diffuser.    This  method  is  used  by  all  subsonic  fixed  wing 
aircraft  using  a  ‘pitot’  intake  (Fig  3).    The  pitot  intake  has  thick,  well-rounded  lips  to  prevent  flow 
separation, particularly during yawing manoeuvres.  Proper design enables high intake efficiency over 
a wide operating range. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
3-5 Fig 3 Subsonic 'Pitot' Intake 
Rounded
Divergent
Lips
Duct
M > 0.5
M = 0.5
9. 
Helicopters  and  engine  test  facilities  use  a  bellmouth  or  nozzle  intake  (Fig  4)  which  has  the 
opposite effect and will accelerate the airflow as the 'flight' speed will be below M0.5. 
3-5 Fig 4 Bellmouth Intake 
M < 0.5
M = 0.5
Boundary Layer Effects 
10.  Fuselage boundary layer air is a slow moving region containing little kinetic energy that must not 
be  allowed  to  enter  the  compressor  as  it  may  cause  compressor  stall.    There  are  three  widely  used 
methods to avoid this: 
a. 
Diverter.    By  setting  the  intake  a  few  centimetres  from  the  fuselage  and  using  ramps  and 
ducts to divert the boundary layer air away from the intake (Fig 5a). 
3-5 Fig 5 Methods of Avoiding Boundary Layer Intake Interference 
3-5 Fig 5a  Diverter (Plan View) 
b. 
Fence.  This device prevents the boundary layer from entering the intake by 'fencing off' the 
intake region from the fuselage (Fig 5b). 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
3-5 Fig 5b  Fence (Plan View) 
Boundary Layer
Fuselage
c. 
Bleed.    In  this  method  the  boundary  layer  air  is  bled  away  to  a  low-pressure  region  using 
perforations or slots inside the intake (Fig 5c). 
3-5 Fig 5c  Bleed (Plan View) 
Boundary Layer
Fuselage
Intake Operation 
11.  Subsonic intakes are designed to operate most efficiently at the aircraft design cruising speed.  In 
subsonic  operation,  ambient  air  will  be  affected  by  a  pressure  wave  in  front  of  the  intake.    The  air 
diffuses in preparation for entry into the intake at a lower velocity, according to the mass flow continuity 
equation  (para  4).    The  effectiveness  of  the  intake  can  be  expressed  as  a  ratio  between  the  cross 
sectional area of the free stream volume of air entering the intake (the capture stream-tube) to that of 
the intake entry plane (Fig 6).  This is termed the Capture Area Ratio, and the intake operates under 
three basic conditions, critical, sub-critical, and super-critical. 
3-5 Fig 6 Capture Area Ratio 
Capture
Stream
Tube
A0
A
A
< 1
0
1
A1
Pre-entry Diffusion
12.  Critical Operation.  An intake is said to be in the critical condition when the capture ratio is unity 
(Fig 7).  Critical operation should occur at the aircraft design cruising speed, however, in practice most 
intakes are designed to be just sub-critical at cruise conditions. 
3-5 Fig 7 Critical Intake Conditions 
A0 = 1
A1
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
13.  Sub-critical Operations.  This situation occurs when the engine requires less air than the intake 
is delivering.  When this happens a back pressure will be felt in front of the intake causing the excess 
air  to  spill  over  the  cowl,  thereby  matching  intake  delivery  to  engine  demand  (Fig  8).    Sub-critical 
operation is undesirable because it gives rise to high drag forces. 
3-5 Fig 8 Sub-critical Operation 
A0 < 1
A1
14.  Super-critical  Operation.    Super-critical  operation  occurs  when  the  engine  demands  more  air 
than the intake can deliver (Fig 9).  The suction created causes the boundary layer to separate inside 
the intake and could starve the engine of air.  This condition is caused by a combination of high engine 
rpm and low flight speed.  During take-off, severe super-critical operation occurs and to overcome the 
problem  aircraft  are  fitted  with  auxiliary  intake  doors  to  increase  the  effective  cross  sectional  area  of 
the  intake.    These  doors  are  often  spring-loaded  and  are  'sucked-in'  when  compressor  demand 
exceeds intake delivery. 
3-5 Fig 9 Super-critical Operation 
A0 > 1
A1
Intake Location 
15.  The positioning of the intakes are influenced by the location of the engines and aircraft design, which 
can mean that aircraft handling in flight will dramatically affect the airflow into the intake (Fig 10). 
3-5 Fig 10 Effect of Aircraft Handling in Flight 
High angles of yaw cause blanking of intake
therefore reduced mass airflow to affected intake
High angles of attack cause reduction in effective
cross section of intake therefore reduces mass airflow
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
SUPERSONIC INTAKES 
Shock Waves 
16.  Before  considering  supersonic  intakes,  a  brief description of shock waves and their effect on air 
pressure  is  given.    At  supersonic  speed  the  intake  still  has  to  produce  air  at  about  M0.5  at  the 
compressor  face,  requiring  the  air  to  be  decelerated  which  will  cause  the  formation  of  shock  waves.  
There are essentially two types of shock wave, a normal shock which is perpendicular to the air-flow, 
and an oblique shock which, as the name implies, is created at an angle to the air-flow.  Both types of 
shock  wave  decelerate  the  air  flow  but  the  pressure  loss  which  occurs  when  supersonic  flow  is 
decelerated  to  subsonic  speed  across  a  normal  shock  wave  is  greater  than  the  loss  occurring  when 
flow is decelerated across an oblique shock wave to a lower supersonic speed.  A combination of the 
two shock wave formations are usually employed to achieve the desired effect. 
Types of Intake for Supersonic Flight 
17.  There  are  several  different  supersonic  intake  concepts,  however,  two  -  the  pitot  and  external 
compression type, are currently used for the majority of supersonic aircraft. 
a. 
Pitot  Type.   This type uses a single normal shock across the intake lips and is suitable for 
maximum supersonic operating speeds of up to about Mach 1.5. 
b. 
External Compression.  This uses a combination of oblique shocks outside the intake and a 
normal shock at the duct entrance.  This type of intake is used on aircraft with maximum operating 
speeds in excess of Mach 2. 
18.  Pitot  Intake.    At  supersonic  speed  the  pitot  intake  forms  a  normal  shock  wave  at  the  intake  lip 
(Fig 11).  The Mach number of the airstream is instantaneously reduced below unity through the shock, 
the intake then acts as a subsonic diffuser.  However, as the normal shock is very strong, there is a sharp 
loss of total pressure across it, and so the pressure recovery is poor.  At Mach 2, the pressure recovery of 
the pitot intake is only some 70%, compared with as high a figure as 97% for more efficient multi-shock 
intakes.  As the Mach number drops across the shock a static pressure rise occurs, causing the intake to 
act  as  a  compressor,  contributing  some  thrust  to  the  power  plant.    The  pitot  intake  is  used  on  some 
aircraft  with  supersonic  capability  as  the  simplicity  gained  outweighs  the  slight  loss  of  efficiency.    One 
problem  with  the  supersonic  pitot  intake  is  that  the  lips  must  be  sharp  to  prevent  shock  detachment 
causing reduced efficiency at low speed. 
3-5 Fig 11 Supersonic Pitot Intake 
Sharp
Lips
Airflow
Normal
Shock
19.  External  Compression  Intake.    For  aircraft  that  operate  at  high  Mach  numbers,  the  pressure 
recovery  of  the  pitot  intake  is  unacceptably  low,  because  of  the  large  total  pressure  loss  across  the 
normal shock.  By using a multi-shock intake, this loss can be considerably reduced by doing most of 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
the compression through a series of oblique shocks, and using a final shock to bring the Mach number 
below unity.  Because oblique shocks are weak and involve only small losses, the normal shock now 
occurs at a lower Mach number and is therefore much weaker than in a pitot intake.  There are various 
multi-shock intake configurations: 
a. 
Two-shock Intake.  The two-shock intake shown in Fig 12 is the simplest form of multi-shock 
intake, consisting of one oblique shock followed by a normal shock.  The oblique shock is created by 
introducing a ramp (or wedge) into the intake, which is so designed that the shock touches the cowl 
lip  at  the  design  Mach  number.    Since  the  oblique  shock  angle  depends  upon  Mach  number,  the 
shock will not touch the lip except at the design point. 
3-5 Fig 12 Two-shock Intake 
Ramp
Normal
Shock
Airflow
Oblique
Shock
Cowl Lip
b. 
Three-shock Intake.  By introducing a further oblique shock, a higher pressure recovery can 
be obtained (Fig 13).  This causes the final normal shock to occur at an even lower Mach number.  
Such  an  intake  is  known  as  a  three-shock  intake  with  the  second  oblique  shock  created  by  an 
additional ramp or wedge. 
3-5 Fig 13 Three-shock Intake 
Ramp 1 Ramp 2
Normal
Shock
Oblique
Airflow
Shocks
Cowl Lip
c. 
The Isentropic Intake.  If compression could be achieved through a series of infinitely weak 
oblique shocks, each infinitesimally stronger than its predecessor, the total pressure loss would be 
zero.  In practice, this is not possible, but by using a suitably curved compression surface (Fig 14), 
nearly  isentropic  compression  is  possible,  with  a  very  high  total  pressure  recovery.    In  practice, 
such an intake is only practical at a particular design point. 
3-5 Fig 14 Isentropic Intake 
Compression
Surface
Airflow
Oblique
Shocks
Normal
Shock
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
d. 
Variable  Geometry  Intakes.    The  preceding  examples  are  fixed  geometry  intakes;  although 
having the advantage of simplicity they only operate efficiently at the design Mach number.  At any 
off-design  point,  sub-critical  or  super-critical  operation  will  occur  when  the  oblique  shock  is  not 
positioned on the lip, because shock angle depends on Mach number.  This will cause spillage below 
the  design  Mach  number.    For  aircraft  which  operate  over  a  wide  range  of  Mach  numbers,  the 
penalties  imposed  by  a  fixed  geometry  intake  may  be  unacceptable.    In  such  cases,  variable 
geometry intake systems are fitted, with the following features: 
(1)  A moveable ramp or wedge (Fig 15), to position the oblique shock on the lip. 
3-5 Fig 15 Moveable Ramps 
(2)    A  system  of  auxiliary  intake  and  dump  doors  (Fig  16)  to  take  in  extra  air  when  engine 
demand exceeds supply, or dump some air when supply exceeds engine demand. 
3-5 Fig 16 Auxiliary Intakes 
20.  Variable  Position  Intakes.    This  type  of  intake  is  found  increasingly  on  modern  fighter  aircraft 
where high angles of attack (AOA) are experienced.  The front of the intake can pivot or rotate forward 
presenting the intake entry into the airstream during high AOA manoeuvres (Fig 17). 
3-5 Fig 17 Variable Position Intake 
Second
Third
Bypass
Diffuser
Ramp
Ramp
Door
Ramp
G Eng
First 
Ramp
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-5 - Intakes 
Supersonic Intake Criticality 
21.  As with subsonic intakes, supersonic intakes may operate under the 3 basic conditions of critical, 
sub-critical or super-critical: 
a. 
Critical Operation.  A supersonic intake is said to be critical when the shock system rests on 
the cowl lip (Fig 18). 
3-5 Fig 18 Critical Intake Operation 
Normal
Shock
A = A
A
0
1
0 = 1
A1
b. 
Sub-critical  Operation.    If  the  engine  requires  less  air  than  the  intake  delivers,  then  pre-
entry diffusion will occur after the shock wave, pushing the shock system forwards and spilling air 
(Fig 19).    Under  certain  severe  sub-critical  conditions  shock  wave  resonance  (intake  buzz)  can 
occur. 
3-5 Fig 19 Sub-critical Operation 
< 1
Normal
Shock
c. 
Super-critical  Operation.    Super-critical  operation  occurs  when  the  engine  demands  more 
air than the intake can deliver.  The suction created causes the normal shock to occur inside the 
intake,  and  at  a  higher  Mach  number  as  the  diffuser  now  acts  as  a  supersonic  duct  and 
accelerates  the  air  ahead  of  the  shock  (Fig  20).    This  condition  is  preferable  to  sub-critical 
operation  since  no  drag  is  generated,  although  there  may  be  some  instability  inside  the  intake.  
Note that A0 cannot exceed A1. 
3-5 Fig 20 Super-critical Operation 
Acceleration
A
Instability
0
A  = A
= 1
0
1
A1
Complex Shock Pattern
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
CHAPTER 6 - COMPRESSORS 
Introduction 
1. 
Two  types  of  compressor,  the  centrifugal  and  the  axial,  are  used  in  gas  turbine  engines  to 
compress the ingested air prior to it being fed into the combustion system.  Both centrifugal and axial 
compressors  are  continuous  flow  machines  which  function  by  imparting  kinetic  energy  to  the  air  by 
means  of  a  rotor,  subsequently  diffusing  the  velocity  into  static  pressure  rise.    In  the  centrifugal 
compressor, the airflow is radial, with the flow of air from the centre of the compressor outwards.  This 
type of compressor was used extensively in the early days of gas turbines, the technology being based 
upon piston engine superchargers.  In the axial compressor, the flow of air is maintained parallel to the 
compressor shaft.  Either type, or a combination of both, may be used in gas turbines and each has its 
advantages  and  disadvantages.    Axial/centrifugal  compressor  combinations  are  used  extensively  in 
turboshaft  and  turboprop  engines,  while  axial  flow  compressors  are  used  in  turbofan  and  turbojet 
engines.    Centrifugal  compressors  are  limited  to  the  small  gas  turbine 'gas generators' for engine air 
starters and missile engines.  Centrifugal compressors generally need to operate at much higher rpm 
than axial compressors. 
2. 
Compressor design is a balance of the aerodynamic considerations.  Some of the principle factors 
affecting  the  performance  being  the  aerofoil  sections,  pitch  angles,  and  the  length/chord  ratios  of  the 
blades.  Another important detail is the clearance between the blade tips and the compressor annulus. 
Requirements of a Compressor 
3. 
The  efficiency  of  a  compressor  is  one  of  the  factors  directly  influencing  the  specific  fuel 
consumption  (SFC)  achieved  by  the  engine.    For  maximum  efficiency  to  be  realized  a  compressor 
must satisfy a number of requirements: 
a. 
High Pressure Ratio.  The thermal efficiency and the work output of the constant pressure 
cycle  are  both  proportional  to  the  compressor  pressure  ratio.    In  this  respect,  the  centrifugal 
compressor has a maximum pressure ratio of about 4.5:1 for a single stage.  This pressure ratio 
can be raised to approximately 6:1 by using a two-stage, single-entry centrifugal compressor.  The 
upper limit for axial compressors is more a matter of stability and complexity, with current values 
of  approximately  10:1  for  single-spool  compressors,  and  in  excess  of  25:1  for  multi-spool 
compressors.    Although  higher  pressure  ratios  give  higher  engine  efficiency  due  to  an  improved 
SFC, as shown in Fig 1, a balance must be struck between efficiency and the power needed from 
the turbine to drive the compressor.  Sufficient power must remain to propel the aircraft, and the 
turbine has a finite limit to the power which it can generate. 
3-6 Fig 1 SFC and Pressure Ratio 
2.00
1.50
1.00
0.50
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
Pressure Ratio
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
b. 
High Mass Flow.  Jet engine air mass flows are becoming much larger and, apart from any 
ram-compression contributed by the intake, these must be matched by the swallowing capacity of 
the  compressor.    Thus,  for  a  large  subsonic  transport  type  the  required  airmass  flow  at  altitude 
requires the use of high by-pass turbofan engines. 
c. 
Stable Operation Under All Conditions.  Both  centrifugal  and  axial  compressors  are liable 
to exhibit unstable characteristics under certain operating conditions.  The centrifugal type is 
less  likely  to  stall  and  surge  than  the  axial  but  it  is  not  capable  of  the  high  pressure  ratios 
now  required.    In  high  pressure  ratio  axial  compressors  anti-stall/surge  devices  are  often  a 
design requirement to guard against unstable conditions.  These devices are discussed more 
fully in para 31 et seq. 
4. 
Compressor  design  in  most  engines  is  a  compromise  between  high  performance  over  a  narrow 
band  of  rpm,  and  moderate  performance  over  a  wide  band  of  rpm.    Consequently,  although  it  is 
possible  for  the  compressor  to  be  designed  so  that  very  high  efficiency  is  obtained  at  the  highest 
power,  any  deviation  from  the  design  conditions  may  cause  significant  changes  in  the  aerodynamic 
flow leading to a loss of efficiency and unstable conditions within the engine.  Because flow varies with 
operating  conditions,  it  is  usual  to  compromise  by  designing  for  a  lower  efficiency  giving  greater 
flexibility, thus optimising performance over a wider range of rpm. 
CENTRIFUGAL COMPRESSORS 
Introduction 
5. 
The  rotating  part  of  a  centrifugal  compressor,  known  as  an  impeller,  can  be  either  single  or 
double-sided (Fig 2). 
3-6 Fig 2 Types of Impeller 
Double Entry
Single Entry
Although normally used singly to give a single compression stage, two impellers can be linked together 
in  a  two  stage,  single-sided  arrangement.    The  single  stage  compressor  unit  consists  of  three  main 
components: the compressor casing, which embodies the filled air inlet guide vanes and outlet ports, 
the impeller and the diffuser (Fig 3). 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
3-6 Fig 3 Double-entry Centrifugal Compressor 
Compressor Air
Outlet Casing
Front Air
Intake Casing
Rear Air
Intake Casing
Impeller Shaft
Coupled Direct
Impeller
to Turbine
Intake Chutes
Swirl Vanes
Rotating Guide Vane
Diffuser
The main features of the single stage centrifugal compressor are: 
a. 
For  a  given  useful  capacity  and  pressure  ratio,  it  can  be  made  comparatively  small  in  size 
and weight. 
b. 
Reasonable efficiency can be maintained over a substantial range of operating conditions. 
c. 
Very robust. 
d. 
Simple and cheap to manufacture. 
e. 
Tolerant to foreign object damage (FOD). 
Principles of Operation 
6. 
The  impeller  is  rotated  at  high  speed  by  the  turbine,  and  air  entering  the  intake  at  atmospheric 
temperature and pressure passes through the fixed intake guide vanes, which direct the air smoothly 
into  the  centre  of  the  impeller.    The  impeller  is  designed  to  admit  the  air  without  excessive  velocity.  
The air is then picked up by the rotating guide vanes of the impeller, and centrifugal force causes the 
air to flow outwards along the vanes to the impeller tip.  The air leaves the impeller tip approximately at 
right  angles  to  its  intake  direction,  and  at  an  increased  velocity.    On  leaving  the  impeller  vane 
passages, the air acquires a tangential velocity which represents about half the total energy acquired 
during its passage through the impeller.  The air then passes through the diffuser where the passages 
form divergent nozzles which convert most of the velocity energy into pressure energy.  Work is done 
by the compressor in compressing the air and since the process involves adiabatic (no heat transfer) 
heating, a rise in air temperature results. 
7. 
It can be seen that the air mass flow and the pressure rise through the compressor depend on the 
rotational speed of the impeller and its diameter.  Impellers operate at tip speeds of up to 500 m/s to 
give  high  tangential  air  velocity  at  the  impeller  tip  for  conversion  to  pressure.    Intake  air  temperature 
also influences the pressure rise obtained in the compressor.  For a given amount of work done by the 
impeller, a greater pressure rise is obtained from cold than from warm air.  Fig 4 shows the changes in 
velocity and pressure through a centrifugal compressor. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
3-6 Fig 4 Pressure and Velocity Changes through a Centrifugal Compressor 
Diffuser
Outlet
Impeller
ressure
P
elocity
V
Inlet
8. 
Efficiency losses in the compressor are caused by friction, turbulence, and shock, and these are 
proportional to the rate of airflow through the system.  Consequently the actual pressure rise is lower 
than  the  ideal  value  of  4.5:1  and  a  constant  pressure  ratio  for  a  given  rpm,  with  varying  inlet  flow 
conditions, is not obtained.  Therefore: 
a. 
The pressure obtained for a given impeller design is less than the ideal value and is dependent on 
the impeller rpm and variations of the mass airflow. 
b. 
The  temperature  rise  depends  mainly  on  the  actual  work  capacity  of  the  impeller  and  on 
frictional losses. 
Another  source  of  loss  is  caused  by  leakage  of  air  between  the  impeller  and  its  casing.    This  is 
minimized by keeping their clearances as small as possible during manufacture. 
Impellers 
9. 
Airflows through the two main types of impeller for centrifugal compressors, the single-entry and 
the double-entry are shown in Fig 5.  If a double-entry impeller is used, the airflow to the rear side is 
reversed  in  direction  and  a  plenum  chamber  is  required,  which  encircles the rear inlet region with an 
opening directed towards the oncoming airflow (Fig 5b).  The impeller consists of a forged or sintered 
disc with radially disposed vanes on one or both sides forming divergent passages.  At high tip speeds, 
the velocity of the air relative to the vane at entry approaches the speed of sound, and it is essential for 
maximum  efficiency  that  there  is  the  minimum  shock  wave  formation  at  entry.    Therefore,  on  most 
compressors the pick-up portions of the blades are curved and blended into the radial portions at the 
tip.    There  are  consequently  no  secondary  bending  stresses  in  the  vanes from the effects of rotation 
alone and the loads that arise from imparting angular motion to the air are negligible.  The vanes may 
be  swept  back  to  increase  the  pressure  rise  slightly,  but  radial  vanes  are  more  commonly  employed 
because they are more easily manufactured, and are stable in their action.  
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
3-6 Fig 5 Airflow through Impellers 
a Single-entry Impeller
b Double-entry Impeller
Guide Vanes
Diffuser
Combustion
Diffuser
Chamber
Intake Guard
Air Intake
Impeller
Single
Shroud
Air
Intake
Swirl Vanes
Impeller
Single Shroud
10.  The type of impeller employed is dictated by the engine design requirements.  On the one hand, 
the single-sided, single-entry impeller (like Fig 5a) lends itself to efficient ducting, and makes more use 
of  the  ram  effect  at  high  speeds  than  does  the  double-entry  arrangement  (Fig 5b).    Surging  at  high 
altitudes  may  also  be  less  prevalent  with  a  single-entry  system.    On  the  other  hand,  an  increase  in 
mass  flow  can  only  be  obtained  by  increasing  the  impeller  diameter,  with a consequent necessity for 
lower rotational speed so that a maximum tip speed of approximately 500 m/s is not exceeded.  This 
leads to an increase in the overall diameter of the engine for a given thrust.  A double-entry system can 
handle  a  higher  mass  flow  with  the  penalties  of  relatively  inefficient  intake  ducting,  and  a  degree  of 
preheating imparted to the air by virtue of its reversal on entry into the rear face of the impeller. 
11.  The  centrifugal  compressor  is  a  highly  stressed  component.    Vibration  arises  mainly  from  the 
pressure  concentration  around  the  leading  edge  of  the  vanes.    As  each  vane passes  a  diffuser  tip  it 
receives  an  impulse,  the  frequency  of  which  is  a  product  of  the  number  of  vanes  and  rpm.    If  this 
frequency  should  coincide  with  the  natural  frequency  of  part  of  the  compressor,  resonance  occurs  and 
vibration develops, which could lead to structural failure.  The clearance between the impeller tip and the 
diffuser  vanes  are  important  factors  in  compressor  design,  as  too  small  a  clearance  will  set  up 
aerodynamic buffeting impulses which could be fed back to the impeller thus creating an unsteady airflow 
and additional vibration.  Balancing is an important operation in compressor manufacture and any out-of-
balance  forces  must  be  eliminated  to  prevent  the  serious  vibration  that  might  otherwise  develop  at  the 
high speeds of which the compressor operates.  The double-entry arrangement largely balances out the 
bending stresses in the impeller and requires minimal axial balancing. 
Diffuser 
12.  The  object  of  the  diffuser  assembly  is  to  convert  energy  of  the  air  leaving  the  compressor  to 
pressure energy before it passes into the combustion chambers.  The diffuser may be formed integral 
with the compressor casing or be bolted to it.  In each instance it consists of a number of vanes formed 
tangential  to  the  impeller.    The  vane  passages  are  divergent  to  convert  the  velocity  energy  into 
pressure energy, and the inner edges of the vanes are in line with the direction of the resultant airflow 
from the impeller (Fig 6). 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
3-6 Fig 6 Airflow at Entry to the Diffuser 
Diffuser Vanes
Tip Clearance
IMPELLER
The passages between the vanes are so proportioned that the pressure increase is correct for entry to 
the  combustion  chambers.    The  ducts  require careful design since an excessive angle of divergence 
may lead to break-away of the boundary layer causing general turbulence and loss of pressure energy.  
The  outside  diameter  of  the  tangential  portion  of  the  diffuser  varies  considerably,  depending  on 
whether it completes the diffusing process or not.  In some engines, further diffusion takes place in the 
elbow leading to the combustion chambers.  The usual design of the diffuser passages is such that the 
area increases very gradually for the first 2-4 cm from the throat, the rate of increase being increased 
during the latter stages of expansion. 
AXIAL FLOW COMPRESSORS 
Introduction 
13.  The axial flow compressor converts kinetic energy into static pressure energy through the medium 
of rows of rotating blades (rotors) which impart kinetic energy to the air and alternate rows of stationary 
diffusing vanes (stators) which convert the kinetic energy to pressure energy. 
Construction 
14.  The  axial  flow  compressor  consists  of  an  annular  passage  through  which  the  air  passes,  and 
across which are arranged a series of small blades of aerofoil section, alternately rotating on a central 
shaft assembly or fixed to the outer case.  Each pair of rotor and stator rings is termed a stage, and a 
typical gas turbine engine may have between 10 and 15 stages on a single spool or divided between 
multiple spools.  Each rotating ring is mounted on either a separate disc, or on an axial drum attached 
to the turbine drive shaft.  Some of the rotating stages may be manufactured with integral blades and 
discs  (BLISKS).    BLISKS  are  used  in  turboshaft  and  turbofan  engines.    An  additional  row  of  stator 
blades may be fitted to single spool-engines to direct the incoming air onto the first row of rotor blades 
at the optimum angle.  These are the inlet guide vanes (IGVs), which may be at a fixed pitch but are 
more usually automatically adjusted to suit prevailing intake conditions.  The final set of stator blades 
situated  in  front  of  the  combustion  chamber  are  called  the  outlet  guide  vanes  (OGVs),  and  these 
straighten the airflow into the combustion stage. 
15.  The cross-sectional area of the annulus is progressively reduced from the front to the rear of the 
compressor  in  order  to  maintain  an  almost  constant  axial  velocity  with  increasing  density.  
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
Consequently,  the  rotors  and  stators  vary  in  length  according  to  the  pressure  stage,  becoming 
progressively smaller towards the rear of the compressor. 
16.  As  the  pressure  increases  throughout  the  length  of  the  compressor  unit,  each  stage  is  working 
against an increasingly adverse pressure gradient.  Under such conditions, it becomes more difficult to 
ensure that each consecutive stage operates efficiently, and this limits the flexibility of the single-spool 
engine (Fig 7). 
3-6 Fig 7 Single-spool Compressor 
Main Shaft
Intake Casing
Stator Vane
Rotor Blade
Drive From Turbine
Accessory Drive
Combustion System
Mounting Flange
A  more  flexible  system  is  achieved  by  dividing  the  compressor  into  separate  pressure  sections 
operating  independently  and  driven  on  coaxial  shafts  by  separate  turbines.    Such  arrangements  are 
termed multi-spool compressors and the construction and layout are shown in Figs 8 and 9. 
3-6 Fig 8 Twin-spool Compressor 
HP Shaft
Drive from Turbine
LP Compressor
HP Compressor
LP Shaft
Drive from Turbine
Combustion System
Mounting Flange
Accessory Drive
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
3-6 Fig 9 Triple-spool Compressor 
IP Compressor
LP Compressor
HP Compressor
Combustion Case
Mounting Flange
IP Shaft
Drive from Turbine
LP Shaft
Drive from Turbine
HP Drive
from Turbine
17.  Multi-spool compressors may be used in both turbojets and turbofan engines.  In the turbofan engine 
the  multi-spool  layout  enables  the  low-pressure  compressor  or  fan  to  handle  a  large  mass  flow,  a 
proportion of which is fed into the subsequent compressors, while the remainder is ducted to the rear of 
the engine.  The ratio of bypass to through-flow air may vary to suit the changing conditions of the engine.  
Turbofan engines exhibit an improved SFC over normal turbojets. 
18.  In  the  quest  for  improved  efficiency,  engines  with  by-pass  ratios  greater  than  existing  turbofans 
have been designed and are currently being developed.  These engines are termed prop-fans or ultra 
high by-pass (UHB) ratio engines (see Volume 3, Chapter 17). 
19.  The axial compressor provides a convenient supply of air at various pressures and temperatures which 
can be tapped off at the appropriate stages and used to provide engine intake and IGV anti-icing, cooling of 
high temperature components (Volume 3, Chapter 12) and, combined with the cooling, provide a system of 
pressure  balancing  to  reduce  the  end-loads  throughout  the  engine.    End-loads  are  caused  by  the  rotor 
stages,  consisting  of  numerous  aerofoil  sections,  creating  a  forward  thrust  of  several  kilo-newtons  on  the 
front end bearings.  Similarly, the gas stream impinging on the turbine assembly imposes a rearwards load.  
Although the loads can be reduced considerably by careful design of the turbine arrangement, this is only 
effective at a given power setting.  Departure from design power requires the addition of compressor bleed 
air to achieve adequate pressure balance. 
Principles of Operation 
20.  Air is continuously induced into the engine intake, and is encountered by the first stage rotor or LP fan.  
If fitted, the IGVs direct the flow onto the first row of rotor blades.  The rotor and fan blades are rotated at high 
speed  by  the  turbine,  and  impart  kinetic  energy  to  the  airflow.    At  the  same  time,  the  divergent  passage 
between  consecutive  rotor  blades  diffuses  the  flow  to  give  a  pressure  rise.    The  airflow  is  then  swept 
rearwards through a ring of stator blades, which converts the kinetic energy of the stream to pressure energy 
by diffusing arrangements of the blades.  The stator blades also direct the airflow at the correct angle onto 
the next stage rotor blades, where the sequence is repeated.  Thus, at each compressor stage, the airflow 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
velocity is increased by the rotor, and then converted to a pressure increase through the diffusing action of 
both  rotor  and  stator.    The  net  effect  is  an  approximately  constant  mean  axial  velocity  with  a  small,  but 
smooth, pressure increase at each stage (Fig 10).  As mentioned previously, the cross-sectional area of the 
compressor annulus is progressively reduced from front to rear of the compressor to maintain constant axial 
velocity with increasing pressure in accordance with the Equation of Continuity: 
M = AVρ = Constant 
   Where M = Airmass flow 
A = Annulus (decreasing) 
V = Axial velocity (constant) 
ρ = Airflow density (increasing) 
3-6 Fig 10 Flow Through an Axial Compressor 
Rotor Blade
Stator Vane
Pressure
Inlet
Outlet
Velocity
21.  The  pressure  ratio  across  each  stage  of  the  compressor  is  in  order  of  1:1.1  or  1.2.    This  small 
pressure rise at each stage assists in reducing the possibility of blade stalling by reducing the rate of 
diffusion and blade deflection angles. 
22.  Because of the small pressure increase at each compressor stage, it follows that a number of stages 
are  required  to  achieve  the  desired  delivery  pressure  at  the  combustion  system.    The  limitations  which 
tend to restrict the practical number of stages were discussed briefly in para 16 et seq. 
COMPRESSOR STALL AND SURGE 
Introduction 
23.  A  compressor  is  designed  to  operate  between  certain  critical  limits  of  rpm,  pressure  ratio  and  mass 
flow, and, if operation is attempted outside these limits, the flow around the compressor blades breaks down 
to give violent turbulent flow.  When this occurs, the compressor will stall or surge.  The greater the number 
of stages in the compressor, the more complex the problem becomes because of the variety of interactions 
that are possible between stages.  The phenomenon of compressor stall and surge is a highly complex one 
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
and  beyond  the  scope  of  this  chapter,  therefore  the  following  paragraphs  are  only  intended  as  a  brief 
introduction to the causes of stall and surge, and to explain how the onset of such is alleviated by careful 
compressor design and the incorporation of anti-stall/surge devices within the engine. 
Compressor Rotor Blades 
24.  Compressor rotor blades, which are smallaerofoils, stall in the same way as an aircraft wing by an 
increase in the angle of attack to the point where flow breakaway occurs on the upper surface.  Since 
the pitch of the blades is fixed, this condition is brought about by a change in direction of the relative 
airflow (V1).  This is shown in Fig 11. 
3-6 Fig 11 Relative Airflow on Compressor Blades 
1
V
V
a
a
U
U
1
V
V1
1
Original Angle
New Angle of
of Attack
Attack increased
beyond Stalling Angle
25.  A  reduction  in  the  axial  velocity  Va  to  a  value  Va1  (Fig  11),  while  the  rpm  and  hence  blade  speed  U 
remains constant, increases the angle of attack.  If the fall in Va is sufficient, the blade stalling angle will be 
reached.  The fall in Va at constant rpm is associated with a reduction in mass flow from the stable value on 
the  operating  line  and  is  due  to  a  variety  of  causes  which  will  be  discussed  shortly.    Generally,  when  the 
critical condition is approached, due to velocity gradients and local effects, a group of blades will be affected 
first rather than the complete blade row.  Flow breakaway on the upper surfaces will reduce the available air 
space between the blades.  Air will be deflected to adjacent blades causing an increase in angle of attack for 
those  on  one  side  and  a  decrease  on  the  other.    Thus,  the  stall  'cell'  moves  around  the  blade  row,  the 
movement  being  about  half  rotor  speed.    There  may be several 'cells' which can coalesce and eventually 
stall the whole row, or they may die out.  The 'rotating' stall is only one example of the development of the 
unstable operation which can result from numerous situations. 
Causes of Compressor Stall and Surge 
26.  Compressor Stall at Low Rpm.  With a reduction in mass airflow at low rpm, the angle of attack 
of  the  first  low  pressure  stages  is  greater  than  that  of  the  high  pressure  stages,  so  that  the  low 
pressure stages are the first to stall, the succeeding stages not necessarily being affected.  Stalling of 
the initial compressor stages may be indicated by an audible rumbling noise and a rise in turbine gas 
temperature (TGT).  The stall of the first stage may affect the whole compressor, or confine itself to the 
one stage.  In the latter case, a further reduction in mass flow would cause a successive breakdown of 
the remaining stages. 
27.  Compressor  Acceleration  Stall.    On  starting,  or  during  rapid  acceleration  from  low  rpm,  the 
sudden  increase  in  combustion  pressure  caused  by  additional  fuel  can  cause  a  momentary  back 
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
pressure which affects the compressor by reducing the mass airflow thus causing the same conditions 
as described above. 
28.  Compressor Stall at High Rpm.  At high compressor rpm, the angle of attack of all the stages is 
about  the  same,  so  that  a  sudden  reduction  in  mass  flow  causes  a  simultaneous  breakdown  of  flow 
through all the stages.  This type of stall is usually initiated by airflow interference at the intake during 
certain  manoeuvres  or  gun  firing.    The  compressor  may  be  unstalled  by  throttling  fully  back,  but  in 
some cases it may be necessary to stop the engine. 
29.  Compressor Surge.  In  an  axial  compressor,  surging  indicates  a  complete  instability  of  flow 
through  the  compressor.    Surging  is  a  motion  of  airflow  forwards  and  backwards  through  the 
compressor,  which  is  accompanied  by  audible  indications  ranging  from  muffled  rumblings  to  an 
abrupt  explosion  and  vibration,  depending  on  the  degree  of  severity.    A  rapid  rise  in  TGT  and 
fluctuating  or  falling  of  rpm  are  the  instrument  indications  of  this  condition.    Compressor  surge 
causes very severe vibrations and excessive temperatures in the engine, and should therefore be 
avoided or minimized. 
30.  Surge Point.  The combinations of airflow and pressure ratio at which surge occurs is called the surge 
point and such a point can be derived for each combination of mass airflow and pressure for given value of 
rpm.    If  these  points  are  then  plotted  on  a  graph  of  pressure  ratio  against  airflow,  the  line  joining  them  is 
known as the surge line which defines the minimum value of stable airflow that can be obtained at various 
rpm  (Fig  12).    The  safety  margin  shown  is  designed  into  the  engine.    In  a  good  axial  compressor,  the 
operating line is as near to the surge line as possible to maximize the efficiency for each value of rpm, whilst 
being far enough away to give a reasonable safety margin for control of the airmass flow. 
3-6 Fig 12 Limits of Stable Airflow 
Line
Line
urge
S
unning
R
tio
Unstable Area
a
Constant
R
rpm Lines
re
u
s
s
re
100%
P
90%
80%
70%
Mass Flow
Avoidance of Compressor Stall and Surge 
31.  In the case of a high pressure ratio engine with an inadequate stable acceleration capability there 
is  a  need  for  stall/surge  protection.    Anti-stall/surge  devices  can  be  added  retrospectively,  but  are 
normally incorporated in the original design. 
32.  Variable  Inlet  Guide  Vanes  and/or  Stators.    To  suit  off-design  operation  such  as  start-up  and 
acceleration from idling, variable angle guide vanes, and sometimes variable stator blades, are fitted.  
The function of these is to match the air angles to the rotor speed and avoid the stalling condition.  The 
blade mechanism is actuated by rpm and outside air temperature (OAT) signals.  The effect is to move 
the operating line further from the surge line (Fig 12), thus increasing the stall margin and acceleration 
Revised May 10   
Page 11 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
capability.  The control system is set to move the blades in response to engine speed to avoid low rpm 
and  acceleration  difficulties.    From  earlier  comments  on  the  need  to  operate  near  the  surge  line  for 
high  efficiency  and  pressure  ratio,  it  will  be  evident  that  there  is  a  loss  of  blade  efficiency  when  the 
angles are not the design values. 
33.  Blow-off or Bleed Valves.  Since the air mass flow, and hence the axial velocity, at the front of 
the  compressor  depends  on  the  flow  resistance,  relief  of  the  resistance  will  prevent  high  angles  of 
attack during off-design operation.  Blow-off or bleed valves at an intermediate stage are activated by 
an rpm or OAT signal to relieve the back-pressure.  The effect will be to reduce the angle of attack at 
the front and relieve the choking tendency at the back.  Again, the effect is to move the operating line 
away  from  the  surge  line  (see  Fig  12).    When  the  valves  are  in  operation  there  is  not  only  a  fall  in 
compressor efficiency but also a spill of airflow, which means an increase in SFC. 
34.  Multi-spool  Engines.    The  difficulty  of  matching  the  compressor  rpm  to  the  off-design  flow 
conditions  in  high  pressure  ratio  engines  is  relieved  by  rotating  the  front  low  pressure,  intermediate, 
and high pressure sections at different speeds.  Multi-spool design enables the front stages to run at a 
lower rpm more suited to the low pressure air angles, and the higher pressure sections to run at higher 
rpms to avoid choking. 
35.  Variable Area Nozzle.  Engines having an afterburner are fitted with variable area nozzles.  Whilst 
afterburning  is  in  operation,  the  nozzle  control  system  varies  the  nozzle  area  to  maintain  a  constant 
pressure drop across the turbines for a given engine rpm.  This avoids undue backpressure being felt by 
the compressor section and subsequent surge occurring.  On some engines, a limited nozzle variation is 
allowed in the non-afterburning range to increase dry nozzle area for taxiing and reduced nozzle area for 
emergency operation. 
COMPARISON OF AXIAL FLOW AND CENTRIFUGAL FLOW ENGINES 
Factors 
36.  Power.  For a given temperature of air entering the turbine, power output is a function of the quantity of 
air handled.  The axial flow engine can handle a greater mass of air per unit frontal area than the centrifugal 
type. 
37.  Weight.  Most axial flow engines have a better power/weight ratio, achieving a given thrust for a 
slightly lower structural weight. 
38.  Efficiency.  The centrifugal compressor may reach an efficiency of 75 to 90% up to pressure ratios of 
4.5:1.  Above this ratio, efficiency falls rapidly.  The axial flow compressor may have an efficiency of 80 to 
90% over a wide range of compression ratios and is more economical in terms of fuel used per kN of thrust 
per hour. 
39.  Design.    The  power  of  the  centrifugal  compressor  engine  can  be  increased  by  enlarging  the 
diameter of the impeller, thus increasing the rotor stresses for a given rpm, and increasing the rotational 
speed  of  the  rotor  up  to  a  maximum  of  500  m/s.    This  increases  the  diameter  and  frontal  area  of  the 
fuselage  or  nacelle.    The  power  of  the  axial  flow  engine  on  the  other  hand  can  be  increased  by  using 
more stages in the compressor without a marked increase in diameter.  The smaller frontal area of the 
axial flow engine leads to low drag which is an important fact in engines designed for high-speed aircraft. 
Revised May 10   
Page 12 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
40.  Construction and Durability.  The centrifugal compressor is easier and cheaper to manufacture, 
and has better FOD resistance than the axial compressor. 
Materials 
41.  Compressors  rotate  at  high  rpm,  and  the  materials  chosen  must  be  capable  of  withstanding 
considerable stresses, both centrifugal and aerodynamic.  The aerodynamic stresses arise mainly from the 
buffeting imparted by the pulsating pressure concentration between the impeller tip and the leading edge of 
the diffuser. 
42.  The  centrifugal impeller is cast and drop stamped in aluminium alloy, which is then milled to the 
required  shape,  heat  treated,  and  polished  to  resist  cracking  and  aid  crack  detection.    Production 
methods  using  powder  metallurgy  techniques  and  ceramic-based  materials  are  also  available.    The 
rotating intake guide vanes at the eye of the impeller are sometimes edged with steel to resist against 
erosion and FOD.  The diffuser for centrifugal compressors is usually cast in aluminium or magnesium 
alloy.  Because of the limited pressure ratio of the centrifugal compressor, the temperature rise across 
the impeller and through the diffuser is within the 200 ºC limit for aluminium alloy. 
43.  The stator and rotor blades of the axial compressor are made from variety of materials depending 
on  the  pressure,  temperature,  and  centrifugal  force  encountered  at  the  various  stages.    Aluminium 
alloy can be used for the low-pressure stages, although titanium is often used for the first stage of the 
LP  compressor,  because  of  its  superior  strength  and  FOD  resistance.    Steel,  titanium,  carbon  fibre 
composites,  and  advanced  ceramics  may  be  used  on  the  higher-pressure  stages  where  the 
temperature  due  to  compression  exceeds  200  °C.    Indeed,  ceramic  blades  have  been  tested 
successfully  to  1300  °C.    Modern  blades  are  usually  manufactured  hollow  with,  or  without,  a 
honeycomb core (Fig 13).  One method of manufacture uses rolled titanium side panels assembled in 
dies,  hot  twisted  in  a  furnace  and  hot  pressure  formed  to  achieve  the  precise  required  configuration.  
The  centre  is  milled  to  accommodate  the  honeycomb.    Both  panels  and  the  honeycomb  are  finally 
joined  using  automated  furnaces  for  diffusion  bonding.    In  another  method,  the  two  machined  and 
contoured  halves  of  the  blades  are  diffusion  bonded  under  high  heat  and  pressure.    The  resulting 
homogeneous  piece  of  defect-free  material  is  then  given  its  aerodynamic  shape  by  superplastic 
forming.  In a vacuum furnace, the flat, bonded piece is placed over a special fixture which is shaped 
like  the  finished  blade.    The  blade  is  heated  to  a  superplastic  state  and  then,  by  the  force  of  gravity, 
settles on the curved fixture.  This process gives the blade about 90% of its twist.  The final shape is 
created  in  a  heat  die  where  argon  gas  pressure  is  applied  to  the  blade.    The  drums  or  discs  which 
support  the  rotor  blades  are  often  made  from  steel  forgings.    However,  powder  metallurgy  is 
sometimes used.  As with the centrifugal compressor, the compressor casing for axial compressors is 
usually manufactured from aluminium or magnesium alloys. 
Revised May 10   
Page 13 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-6 - Compressors 
3-6 Fig 13 Axial Compressor Blade Construction 
Honeycomb Core
Convex Skin
Concave Skin
Revised May 10   
Page 14 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
CHAPTER 7- COMBUSTION SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  combustion  system  is  required  to  release  the  chemical  energy  of  the  fuel  in  the  smallest 
possible space, and with the minimum of pressure loss.  At the outlet from the combustion system, the 
gases  should  have  a  reasonably  uniform  velocity  and  temperature  distribution,  within  the  peak 
temperature  limit  imposed  by  the  turbine  blade  material.    The  system  should  give  efficient,  stable 
operation  over  a  wide  range  of  altitudes  and  flight  speeds,  and  it  must  be  possible  to  relight  in  flight 
after shutting down an engine.  It must be reliable and have a life at least as long as the overhaul life of 
the complete engine.  With the introduction of 'on condition maintenance' (see Volume 3, Chapter 20), 
and modular engine design, the combustion chamber can be monitored throughout its operational life 
and replaced as necessary. 
COMBUSTION CHAMBERS 
Combustion System Requirements 
2. 
High  Rate  of  Heat  Release.    To  achieve  total  combustion  in  as  small  a  space  as  possible,  the 
rate of heat release must be as high as possible, and a number of factors influence its value: 
a. 
A high combustion chamber pressure will raise the rate of heat release. 
b. 
When fuel is sprayed into the chamber it does not ignite instantaneously, but a delay occurs 
while  the  combustible  mixture  of  fuel  and  air  is  being  formed  and  its  temperature  raised  to  self-
ignition point.  This delay period must be minimized. 
c. 
The  walls  of  the  chamber  tend  to  quench  or  chill  the  flame  by  lowering  the  temperature  in their 
region to below that required for combustion.  Thus, there is an area in the system which is wasted from 
the combustion viewpoint and this is known as the 'dead space'; it must be kept to a minimum.  This 
may well conflict with the desirable feature of keeping the chamber walls cool to increase their life. 
3. 
High  Combustion  Efficiency.    Combustion  efficiency  is  the  percentage  of  chemical  energy 
available  in  the  fuel  which  is  released  as  heat  energy  during  combustion.    Complete  combustion  will 
convert  all  carbon  present  in  the  various  constituents  of  the  fuel  to  carbon  dioxide.    Incomplete 
combustion  will  result  in  carbon  and  carbon  monoxide  remaining  in  the  exhaust  gas.    A  high  rate  of 
heat  release  and  gradual  admission  of  air  during  combustion  give  good  combustion  efficiency  and  a 
figure  of  nearly  100%  is  achieved  at  full  throttle,  low  altitude  and  high  forward  speed.    The  efficiency 
falls off with increase in altitude and decrease in rpm and ram pressure. 
4. 
Flame  Stabilization.  Flame instability will lead to flame out and, in its worst case, will lead to cyclic 
stresses and temperatures which will shorten component lives.  Fig 1 and Fig 2 show that the region over 
which stable combustion can occur is fairly limited, and thus the combustion chamber must be designed so 
that the conditions at the burning region fall within these limits.  The problem is aggravated by the varying 
conditions under which the chamber must work during the normal operation of the engine.  The velocity of 
propagation of a flame through a mixture of hydrocarbon fuel and air is comparatively low, the flame speed 
will vary with mixture strength and with temperature and pressure, but in most cases, it will be about 2 m/s to 
4  m/s.    As  the  airflow  through  the  combustion  system  is  likely  to be almost 10 times this figure, a sheltered 
region of recirculating low velocity air must be provided to hold the flame in one place. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
3-7 Fig 1 Combustion Loop 
200/1
150/1
tio
a
R
l
e
u
F 100/1
/
Stable Region
ir
A
50/1
0 0
0.22
0.45
0.68
0.81
1.13
Air Mass Flow  (kg/s)
3-7 Fig 2 Limits of Flammability 
101.35
Combustion Possible
34.5
4:1
25:1
Air / Fuel Ratio
5. 
Even Distribution of Turbine Entry Temperatures.  The maximum permissible temperature for 
gases  leaving  the  combustion  system  is  set  by  the  temperature  limitations  of  the  turbine.    These 
limitations are imposed by the stress and creep characteristics of the individual turbine blades, as they 
vary  along  the  length  of  the  blade.    Therefore,  to  ensure  maximum  efficiency,  the  maximum  gas 
temperature on entry to the turbine must also vary.  A poor temperature distribution with hot spots can 
have serious effects on the mechanical conditions of the turbine stator and rotor blades and therefore 
shorten the life of the turbine. 
6. 
Minimum Pressure Loss.  As the gas turbine operates on a constant pressure cycle, any change 
in  total  pressure  during  the  combustion  process  will  result  in  a  drop  in  thermal  efficiency.    There  are 
two sources of loss: 
a. 
Hot  Loss.    When  heat  is  added  to  a  constant-area,  frictionless  gas  stream,  a  drop  in 
stagnation  pressure  will  occur.    As  this  process  is  non-isentropic,  there  will  be  a  loss  in  total 
pressure.  This loss is often referred to as the 'fundamental loss due to heat addition', and it is a 
function  of  combustion  system  inlet  Mach  number  and  the  temperature  ratio  across  the 
combustion  system.    Generally,  the  pressure  loss  due  to  heat  addition  is  low  compared  to  the 
losses due to friction and mixing.  These losses are called the cold losses. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
b. 
Cold Loss.  Pressure losses occur through turbulence required for flame stabilization and rapid 
burning.    Pressure  loss  will  occur  on  entry  through  the  various  cooling  holes,  by  stagnation  on 
baffles, and through skin friction.  Cold losses, therefore, are dependent on the gas velocity on inlet 
to  the  combustion  system.    A  diffuser  is  located  between  the  compressor  and  the  combustion 
system to convert kinetic energy into pressure energy.  Not only does this reduce the gas velocity, 
but it also raises the gas static temperature; increase in gas temperature reduces the Mach number 
of  the  gas  (for  a  given  velocity)  and  reduces  the  temperature  ratio  (for  a  given  turbine  entry 
temperature  (TET)).    The  overall  effect  therefore,  is  for  the  hot,  as  well  as  the  cold,  losses  to  be 
decreased with increased diffusion. 
7. 
Minimum Carbon Formation.  Carbon formation is caused by over-rich mixture strengths in the 
combustion  zone  of  the  chamber,  in  conditions  of  low  turbulence  (i.e.  inefficient  atomization  and 
mixing).  Carbon formation is of two main types: the first is a hard coke deposit which builds up in the 
combustion chamber, and the second is dry soot.  Coke deposit will cause blocking of the combustion 
chamber,  and  disruption  of  the  turbine  assembly  as  pieces  of  carbon  become  detached  and  pass 
through the blades.  The sooty carbon is ejected as smoky exhaust.  Whilst it represents a negligible 
loss  in  combustion  efficiency,  it  gives  rise  to  visible  pollution  of  the  atmosphere,  which  is  not  only 
socially unacceptable but, in the case of military aircraft, a means of visible detection. 
8. 
Reliability.    Although  it  has  no  moving  parts  to  wear  out,  a  combustion  system  must  withstand 
considerable thermal and vibrational stresses.  These are caused by: 
a. 
Unsteady combustion which causes vibration in the chamber walls. 
b. 
Pressure and temperature differentials across the walls of the combustion chamber. 
c. 
Change in momentum of the gas flow through the chamber. 
The effects of thermal stress can be reduced by suitable choice of materials, but reducing vibration is 
more a matter of trial and error during engine development.  Failure to eliminate vibration will result in 
fatigue cracking and reduction in the useful life of the combustion system. 
Flow Through Typical Combustion Chamber 
9. 
Fig  3  shows  the  apportioning  of  the  airflow  within  the  combustion  chamber.    A  small  amount 
(20%)  of  air  enters  the  snout  and  flows  through  either  the  swirl  vanes  (12%)  to  mix  directly  with 
atomized  fuel  from  the  burner  nozzle,  or  the  flare  (8%)  which  stabilizes  the  flame  by  creating  a 
turbulent, slow moving zone of air called the 'combustion' or 'primary zone'. 
3-7 Fig 3 Apportioning of Airflow 
40%
20%
20%
Cooling
8%
80%
Dilution
20%
12%
Primary Zone
Dilution Zone
A further 20% of the air is introduced into the primary zone which mixes with the flame to form the main area 
of burning.  Fig 4 shows the location of the main components of a typical combustion chamber. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
3-7 Fig 4 Typical Combustion Chamber 
Swirl
Secondary
Flame
Air Casing
Dilution
Vanes
Air Holes
Tube
Air Holes
Perforated
Flare
Snout
Fuel Spray
Primary
Interconnector
Corrugated
Sealing Ring
Nozzle
Zone
Joint
10.  The rear half, or dilution zone, of the combustion system is used for the introduction of the remaining 
60%  of  the  air.    This  air  not  only  increases  the  burning  efficiency,  but  also  cools  the  burnt  gases  to  a 
temperature  which  is  acceptable  to  the  turbine  blades.    In  practice,  these  zones  overlap,  with  air  being 
admitted gradually and continuously over practically the whole length of the flame tube (Fig 5). 
3-7 Fig 5 Flame Stabilization and General Airflow Patterns 
Combustion System Layout 
11.  Three types of layout are used for combustion systems (see Fig 6). 
a. 
Multiple chamber. 
b. 
Tubo-annular or cannular chamber. 
c. 
Annular chamber. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
3-7 Fig 6 Cross-section of Combustion Chamber Layouts 
a  Multiple Chamber Layout
b  Tubo-annular (Cannular) Layout
c  Annular Chamber Layout
Casing
Casing
Casing
Shaft
Shaft
Shaft
Combustion
Flame
Flame
Liner
Tube
Tube
12.  Multiple  Chamber.    The  multiple  chamber  layout  (Fig  7)  consists  of  a  number  of  individual 
chambers,  disposed  round  the  engine,  between  the  compressor  and  turbine  sections.    Within  each 
chamber  is  a  flame  tube.    These  were  used  extensively  in  earlier  gas  turbines  but  have  largely  been 
superseded by the tubo-annular and annular layouts.  The chambers are fed by individual ducts from the 
compressor and are interconnected to equalize the delivery pressure to the turbine and also to avoid the 
need for separate ignition systems in each chamber. 
3-7 Fig 7 Multiple Combustion Chambers 
Main Fuel
Compressor Outlet
Manifold
Engine Fireseal
Elbow Flange Joint
Combustion
Chamber
Primary
Air Casing
Air Scoop
Drain Tube
Primary Fuel
Interconnector
Manifold
13.  Tubo-annular  Chamber.    The  tubo-annular  arrangement  (Fig  8)  was  the  logical 
development of the multiple chamber.  In this design, rather than have separate casings for the 
flame  tubes,  an  annular  casing  containing  all  the  flame  tubes  is  disposed  radially  round  the 
engine  between  the  compressor  and  turbine  section.    This  arrangement  maintains  the  close 
control  of  airflow  in  the  combustion  zone,  but  it  also  has  advantages  in  weight  and  ease  of 
construction. 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
3-7 Fig 8 Tubo-annular Combustion Chamber 
Turbine
Dilution Air
Outer Air
Mounting
Holes
Casing
Flange
Inner Air
Casing
Nozzle
Guide
Vanes
Flame Tube
Swirl Vanes
Interconnector
Primary Air
Igniter Plug
Scoop
Diffuser Case
14.  Annular  Chamber.    An  annular  combustion  chamber  (Fig  9)  uses  the  whole  of  the  annulus 
between the compressor and turbine for combustion and has distinct advantages over the other two 
types.  For the same power output, the annular chamber length is 75% of a tubo-annular chamber of 
similar  diameter.    Therefore,  the  flame  tube  wall  area  is  considerably  less,  and  the  amount  of 
cooling  air  required  to  prevent  burning  of  the  flame  tube  wall  is  reduced  by  approximately  15%.  
Combustion efficiency is therefore increased, and air pollution reduced.  Annular combustion systems 
are fitted to the majority of gas turbines. 
3-7 Fig 9 Annular Combustion Chamber 
Combustion
Flame Tube
Outer Casing
Turbine
Nozzle Guide
Vanes
HP Compressor
Outlet Guide Vanes
Combustion
Inner Casing
Fuel Spray Nozzle
Fuel Manifold
Compressor Casing
Dilution
Turbine Casing
Mounting Flange
Mounting Flange
Air Holes
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
15.  Comparison Between Combustion Chamber Layouts The advantages and disadvantages of 
annular combustion chambers over multiple and tubo-annular chambers are given in Table 1. 
3-7 Fig 10 Advantages and Disadvantages of an Annular Combustion Chamber
Advantages 
Disadvantages 
Good utilization of area. 
Difficult to develop. 
Structural member of engine. 
More difficult to replace. 
No transition pieces or interconnections. 
Poor control of gas flow and burning. 
Few losses. 
Uneven stress when heated. 
Complete gas flows make design more difficult and 
Simple to manufacture. 
reduces validity of research data. 
Even gas distribution. 
Easy starting. 
Short. 
Light. 
16.  Reverse  Flow  Combustion Chamber.  Because of the length of a combustion chamber, some 
early  gas  turbines  featured  a  reverse  flow  combustion  chamber  that  enabled  designers  to  keep  the 
shaft  between  the  compressor  and  turbine  short.    A  typical  example  of  this  was  the  Rolls  Royce 
Welland.    Development  in  gas  turbine  technology  led  to  a  reduction  in  the  length  of  the  combustion 
chamber  from  about  0.75  m  to  0.25  m  and  advances  in  material  technology  has  enabled  the  use  of 
longer shafts.  Thus, reversed flow combustion chamber designs have ceased to offer any advantages 
for turbojet and bypass engines.  However, reverse flow combustion chambers are used extensively in 
turbo-shaft  helicopter  engines  and  small  gas  turbines,  where  overall  reduction  in  length  is  more 
important  than  reduction  in  engine  cross-sectional  area.    A  reverse  flow  combustion  chamber  is 
illustrated in Fig 10. 
3-7 Fig 11 Reverse Flow Combustion System 
Compressor 
Cooling Air Holes
Burner
Delivery
Gas Discharge
Combustion Chamber Materials and Defects 
17.  Materials.    The  flame  tube  of  the  combustion  chamber  must  be  capable  of  withstanding  the  high 
burning temperature involved and must also be resistant to thermal shock.  The latter is caused by high 
temperature  differentials  during  rapid  transient  changes  of  combustion  temperature.    Carbon  formation 
can  also  cause  stresses  by  creating  local  hot  spots.    The  flame  tube  must  also  be  resistant  to  fatigue 
caused  by  vibration.    The  materials  used  in  this  demanding  task  are  from  the  Nimonic  series  of  alloys.  
Flame  tube  walls  are  cooled  with  air  acting  as a thermal barrier, and various methods are employed to 
achieve this (Fig 11).  One, called transpiration cooling, allows air to enter a network of passages within 
the  flame  tube  wall  before  exiting  to  form  an  insulating  film  of  air.    This  method  reduces  the  airflow 
required  for  cooling  by  up  to  50%.    The  combustion  casing  is  subjected  to  a  lower  temperature,  being 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
insulated  from  the  flame  tube  by  the  moving  layer of cooling air (see Fig 5).  It does, however, have to 
withstand the full pressure of the compressor delivery (typically in excess of 2,000 kPa), and steel alloys 
are generally used. 
3-7 Fig 12 Flame Tube Cooling Methods 
a  Corrugated Strip Cooling
b  Splash Cooling Strip
Flame Tube
Corrugated Strip
Film of
Film of
Cooling Air
Cooling Air
c  Machined Cooling Ring
d  Transpiration Cooling
Laminated Flame
Tube Wall
Flame Tube
Cooling Air In
Film of
Cooling Air
Film of
Internal
Cooling Air Out
Cooling
18.  Defects.    Combustion  systems  are  liable  to  deteriorate  because  of  the  high  stresses  and 
temperatures to which they are subjected.  The deterioration takes the form of cracking and buckling 
which distorts the flame pattern.  Burning of the outer case can follow, and rupture may then occur.  In 
addition, it is possible for parts of the flame tube to break away and block off some of the nozzle guide 
vanes.  This will lead to uneven loading of the turbines. 
BURNERS 
Introduction 
19.  The purpose of any burner is to introduce fuel into the combustion chamber in a state in which it will 
burn  efficiently.  In  most  engines,  the  burner  must  be  able  to  do  this  over  a  wide  range  of  operating 
conditions, e.g. from maximum power at take-off to idling at high altitude. There are two basic burner types: 
a. 
Atomizers 
b. 
Vaporizers 
Atomizers 
20.  The principle used in the atomizer is to create a highly turbulent flow at the exit of the nozzle so 
that  the  spray  disintegrates  into  minute  droplets  of  approximately  20  microns  to  200  microns  in 
diameter.    Atomized  fuel  droplets  present  a  large  surface  area  to  the  medium  into  which  they  are 
injected  (e.g.  a  volume  of  liquid,  having  the  surface  area  equivalent  to  that  of  a  postage  stamp, 
presents  an  area  equivalent  to  that  of  a  large  newspaper  sheet  when  properly  atomized).    The  high 
turbulence is obtained by creating a large pressure difference (up to 2,100 kPa) across the orifice. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
21.  The gas turbine atomizer provides a continuous supply of fuel (Fig 12).  The fuel at high pressure 
passes  through  tangential  grooves  or  holes  into  a  concentric  conical  and  cylindrical  swirl  chamber 
ahead of the short outlet orifice.  As the fuel spins around, its angular velocity increases as the radius 
of  swirl  decreases,  thus  converting  all  the  fluid  pressure  energy  into  kinetic  energy.    The  fluid,  in  its 
passage  through  the  swirl  chamber  to  the  orifice,  has  both  axial  and  tangential  velocity  components 
and it therefore emerges from the orifice as a hollow cone-shaped spray. 
3-7 Fig 13 Basic Spray Pattern 
Swirl 
Conical
Tangential
Chamber
Spray
Swirl Ports
Axial
Final
Orifice
Whirl
Resultant
Air Core
22.  The penetration of the spray into the combustion chamber is of great importance and depends on 
the following: 
a. 
Discharge velocity. 
b. 
Properties of the surrounding medium. 
c. 
Atomizer design. 
d. 
Fuel properties. 
e. 
Degree of spray dispersion. 
f. 
Degree of spray atomization. 
23.  Duplex Burner.  The Duplex burner has a primary and main fuel manifold and two independent 
orifices,  one  much  smaller  than  the  other.    The  smaller  orifice  operates  at  the  lower  flows,  and  the 
larger  orifice  at  higher  flows  as  burner  pressure  increases  (Fig  13).    As  fuel  flow  and  pressure 
increase, the pressurizing valve moves to progressively admit fuel to the main manifold and thus to the 
main  orifice,  thus  giving  a  flow  through  both  orifices.    In  this  way,  the  duplex  burner  is  able  to  give 
effective  atomization  over  a  wide  flow  range.    It  also  provides  efficient  atomization  at  the  lower  flows 
required at high altitude. 
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
3-7 Fig 14 Duplex Burner and Pressurizing Valve 
Fuel Inlet
from Throttle
Engine Shut-off Cock
Pressurizing Valve Opens
as Pressure Increases
Air Flow to Prevent Formation
of Carbon over Orifice
Main Orifice
Primary
Orifice
Filter
Primary
Main 
Compressor
Fuel
Fuel
Delivery
24.  Spray  Nozzle.    The  spray  nozzle  or  air  spray  atomizer  (Fig  14)  mixes  a  proportion  of  the  primary 
combustion air with the injected fuel.  By aerating the spray, the local fuel-rich concentrations produced by 
other types of burner are avoided, thus giving a reduction in both carbon formation and exhaust smoke.  An 
additional advantage of the air spray atomizer is that the low pressures required for atomization of the fuel 
permit the use of a simpler high-pressure pump. 
3-7 Fig 15 Spray Nozzle 
Fuel Inlet
Feed Arm
Strainer
Swirl Slot
Air Inlet Port
Deflector
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
Vaporizers 
25.  In  the  vaporizer,  fuel  is  sprayed  from  feed  tubes  into  vaporizing  tubes  which  are  part  of  the 
combustion chamber.  The tubes are heated by combustion and the fuel is therefore vaporized before 
passing into the flame tube.  Primary air is fed into the vaporizer and mixes with fuel as it passes down 
the  tube.    Air  is  also  fed  through  holes  in  the  flame  tube  entry  section  which  provide  'fans'  of  air  to 
sweep the flame rearwards.  In order to start an engine employing a vaporizing system, it is necessary 
to incorporate a set of spray nozzles with the igniter plugs, to initiate the combustion process.  Fig 15 
shows a typical vaporizing system. 
3-7 Fig 16 A Vaporizer Combustion Chamber 
Dilution Air Holes
Flame Tube
Turbine
Nozzle
Guide Vanes
Fuel
Feed Tube
Vaporizing
Secondary
Tube
Air Holes
26.  Advantages of Vaporizers.  The advantages of vaporizers are as follows: 
a. 
The vaporizer is effective over a wider operating range than the atomizer.  Combustion can 
be controlled more easily, and is usually a more complete process, producing less smoke. 
b. 
The system does not depend on fuel pressure as does the atomizer, and so lower pressures can 
be used (typically around 3,000 kPa against 13,000 kPa). 
c. 
Because the vaporizers are located behind the flame, the flame can be stabilized at the front 
of  the  combustion  chamber.    The  combustion  zone  is  therefore  shorter,  allowing  a  shorter 
combustion section to be used. 
Matching of Burner to Combustion Chamber 
27.  Annular  combustion  chambers  pose  the  problem  of  achieving  even  combustion  throughout  the 
system.  With atomizers of the duplex type, it would be almost impossible to shape the flame to give an 
even combustion front to the turbine (necessary to reducing the risk of vibration) and, at the same time, 
prevent interaction between burners.  The initial answer was to use vaporizers which gave an almost 
annular  flame.    However,  development  has  shown  that  the  spray  nozzle  can  also  be  matched  to  an 
annular chamber. 
28.  With tubo-annular combustion chambers, the geometry of the flame tube is ideal for the use of the 
atomizing  burner.    The  flame  can  be  controlled  much  more  easily  by  recirculating  air,  and  it  is  more 
efficient to have a cone of flame for each chamber rather than a sheet of flame. 
Revised May 10   
Page 11 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
POLLUTION CONTROL 
Introduction 
29.  Pollution of the atmosphere by gas turbine engines falls into two categories: visible (ie smoke) and 
invisible  (i.e.  oxides  of  nitrogen,  unburnt  hydrocarbons,  oxides  of  sulphur  and  carbon  monoxide).    The 
combination of the traditional types of duplex burner with increasing compression ratios has led to visible 
smoke during take-off and climb.  The increasing awareness, both in scientific and public circles, of the 
effect of atmospheric pollution has forced engine manufacturers to develop 'green clean' engines. 
Sources of Pollution 
30.  Pollution  is  caused  by  the  combustion  process  within  the  engine,  although  combustion  technology 
improvements have played, and will continue to play, the major role in reducing emissions.  The need to 
reduce emissions (CO2 and water vapour as well as NO) without diminishing safety and reliability causes 
several design conflicts.  For example, although an increase in engine pressure ratio leads to a reduction 
in fuel consumption, and therefore reduced CO2 and H2O, it also leads to increased NO production.  To 
obtain low NO, combustion must be restricted to lean conditions and low temperatures. 
Pollution Reduction 
31.  Significant NO abatement requires the reduction of peak flame temperature within the combustor.  
To  achieve  flame  temperature  reductions,  while  still  maintaining  acceptable  combustor  performance 
and  operation  at  low  engine  power  conditions,  there  is  a  need  to  use  combustion  process  staging.  
Combustors  with  leaner  primary  combustion  zone  fuel/air  premixing  should  reduce  NO  emissions  by 
up  to  90%.    These  concepts  are  known  as  Lean  Premixed/Prevaporized  (LPP)  or  Rich  Burn,  Quick 
Quench, Lean Burn (RQL). 
32.  Because the sulphur content in aviation kerosine is kept very low to reduce chemical attack on the 
turbine  blading, oxides of sulphur do not normally present a serious pollution problem.  However, the 
quantity  of  unburnt  hydrocarbons  and  carbon  monoxide  in  the  engine  exhaust  do  pose  a  problem.  
They are, to a large extent, dependent on the combustion efficiency of the engine.  The most serious 
pollution  problem,  therefore,  occurs  only  at  idle  when  combustion  efficiency  is  well  below  100%.    At 
take-off and climb, the combustion system is operating near to 100% efficiency. 
IGNITION 
Ignition Systems 
33.  High-energy  ignition  units  are  used  in  most  engines.    Each  engine  has  two  separate  igniters, 
usually positioned in opposite sides of the flame tube.  The ignition units are designed to deliver a high 
voltage, high current discharge at the igniter plug from a low voltage AC or DC supply. 
34.  In some conditions of flight, e.g. icing, take-off in heavy rain or gun firing, it may be desirable to have 
continuous operation of the ignition unit to avoid the possibility of flame out.  In order to prolong the life of 
the ignition unit, some installations allow for a dual-level output, with a low level for continuous operation, 
and a high level for start-up and relight conditions.  In older installations, an alternative method is to supply 
one igniter plug with a low-level output, and the other with a high level output.  The operation of the main 
types of ignition unit and the igniter plug are discussed below. 
Revised May 10   
Page 12 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
DC Trembler-operated Ignition Unit 
35.  An  induction  coil,  operated  by  the  trembler  mechanism  from  the  aircraft  24-volt  DC  supply, 
repeatedly charges a reservoir capacitor through a high voltage rectifier (Fig 16).  The rectifier prevents 
a discharge back into the coil winding while the capacitor builds up to a value of approximately 2 kV, at 
which stage the sealed discharge gap breaks down.  The capacitor then discharges through the sealed 
discharge gap, choke, and the engine igniter plug, which are all connected in series.  The capacitor is 
then  recharged,  and  the  cycle is repeated at a frequency of not less than one discharge per second.  
The discharge can be heard as a cracking or loud clicking noise. 
3-7 Fig 17 DC Trembler-operated Ignition Unit 
Trembler Mechanism
Induction Coil
HT Connection
Reservoir Capacitor
To Igniter Plug
Choke
Safety
Resistors
Discharge
Gap
Discharge
Resistors
Rectifier
Housing
Reservoir
Capacitor
Rectifier
Secondary
Trembler
Induction
Mechanism
Coil
Primary
Choke
Primary
Capacitor
Safety Resistors
Glass sealed
Discharge Gap
LT Connection
DC Supply
HT Connection
to Igniter Plug
LT Connection
NOTE: COLOURS USED FOR CLARITY ONLY
36.  Discharge  resistors  are  connected  across  the  reservoir  capacitor  to  ensure  that  the  stored 
energy is dissipated within one minute of the unit being switched off.  The safety resistors across 
the output circuits prevent the voltage building up if the unit should be accidentally operated while 
the igniter plug lead is disconnected.  The choke controls the duration of the discharge to give the 
best ignition conditions. 
Transistorized Ignition Unit 
37.  The  transistorized  ignition  unit  is  basically  similar  to  the  trembler-operated  unit  described above.  
In the transistorized unit however, the trembler mechanism is replaced by a transistor chopper circuit 
(Fig 17).  As this unit has no moving parts, it has a longer operating life than the trembler unit.  There 
are also advantages of size and weight reduction compared to the latter unit. 
Revised May 10   
Page 13 of 15 


AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
3-7 Fig 18 Transistorized Ignition Unit 
Capacitor
HT Connection
Choke
Discharge Gap
Choke
Capacitor
Transistor
Generator
Discharge
Gap
Rectifier
HT Connection
Diode
to Igniter Plug
LT Connection
NOTE: COLOURS USED FOR CLARITY ONLY
LT Connection DC Supply
AC Ignition Unit 
38.  The AC ignition unit (Fig 18) transforms and rectifies the low voltage AC aircraft supply, which is then 
used to charge the reservoir capacitor.  Subsequent operation is identical to the trembler and transistorized 
units. 
3-7 Fig 19 AC Ignition Unit 
HT Connection
to Igniter Plug
Reservoir Capacitor
Spark Rate
Resistors
Safety
Discharge
Resistors
Gap
Discharge Gap
Discharge
Resistors
Reservoir
Spark Rate
Resistor
Secondary
Transformer
Primary
Suppressor
HT Connection
to Igniter Plug
Suppressor
Discharge
Spark Rate
Resistors
LT Connection
Resistor
LT Connection
AC Supply
Igniter Plug 
39.  The igniter plug (Fig 19) is a discharge plug of a type having no air gap.  The electrode end of the 
plug is integral with the central electrode, insulator, and the earthed outer metal casing.  The discharge 
is initiated by a small electrical leakage across the surface of the insulator from the central electrode to 
earth, which provides a low resistance path for the capacitor discharge.  In practice, it is found that a 
heavily  carbonized  igniter  plug  gives  a  better  spark  than  a  clean  plug  by  causing  a  greater  initial 
leakage. 
Revised May 10   
Page 14 of 15 

AP3456 - 3-7 - Combustion Systems 
3-7 Fig 20 Igniter Plug 
Tungsten Tip
Tungsten Alloy
Silicon Carbide
Semi-conductor Pellet
Steel Body
Nickel-Iron
 Electrode
Ceramic
 Insulator
Glass Seal
Contact 
Button
40.  The  igniter  plug  is  positioned  so  that  the  electrodes  protrude  into  the  primary  zone  of  the 
combustion  chamber,  but  just  outside  the  high  temperature  area.    Once  the  mixture  is  ignited,  the 
flame is self-sustaining within the limits of the air/fuel ratio working range. 
Revised May 10   
Page 15 of 15 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
CHAPTER 8 - TURBINES 
Introduction 
1. 
The  high  temperature,  high  pressure  gases  leaving  the  combustion  system  contain  a  large 
amount  of  energy,  most  of  which  needs  to  be  extracted  as  efficiently  as  possible  to  drive  the 
compressor and engine driven accessories.  The remainder is available for output, either by driving a 
power turbine or by forming a propelling jet. 
2. 
The extraction of this energy is done by the turbine which, like the axial flow compressor, consists 
of stages of fixed blades, known as turbine stator blades or more usually nozzle guide vanes (NGV), 
and rotor blades.  Each turbine 'stage' contains one set of NGVs followed by one set of rotor blades. 
3. 
The turbine differs from the compressor, however, in that by expanding the gas flow it is moving it in 
the direction of decreasing pressure, ie the gas’s direction of natural flow, so the tendency to incur losses 
is much reduced.  This fundamental difference between compressor and turbine is useful to the engine 
designer, as it allows the use of a turbine with few stages to drive a multi-stage compressor spool. 
Energy Transfer from Gas Flow to Turbine 
4. 
Reaction and Impulse Turbines.  Turbine stages may be designed as predominantly impulse or 
predominantly reaction with a considerable change in contour from blade root to tip. 
a. 
Impulse.  In a turbine stage where the blading is of the impulse type, a pressure drop occurs 
only  in  the  convergent  NGV  passages,  together  with  a  corresponding  velocity  increase.    The 
resultant stream of high velocity gas is directed at the rotor blades (Fig 1a) where the passages 
are constant in area and therefore there is no further pressure drop.  However, although its scalar 
element  remains  constant,  the  direction  of  the  air  velocity  is  changed,  producing  an  impulse  on 
the turbine  which causes it to rotate.  This is the oldest system and can be likened to the  water 
wheel.  It is used for starter turbines and APUs, but not in its purest form, in gas turbine engines. 
3-8 Fig 1 Impulse and Reaction Blading 
Fig 1a  Impulse Blading 
Nozzle
Rotor
Guide Vanes
Buckets
P V A
1
1
1
P  = P 
2
3

V  = V 
2
Gas Flow
2
3

A  = A 
2
2
3
A 2
P 3
V 3

P  > P 
3
1
2
V  < V 
1
2
A  > A 
1
2
Direction 
of Motion
b. 
Reaction.  Exactly the opposite series of events takes place in a reaction turbine.  The entire 
pressure  drop  takes  place  between  the  rotor  blades  which  have  convergent  passages  in  the 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 11 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
direction of flow - the NGVs do no more than alter or guide the flow for the rotors (Fig 1b).  The 
turbine is driven round by the reaction force resulting from the acceleration of the gas through the 
converging blade passage; both the direction and the magnitude of the gas velocity are changed.  
Again, in practice, pure reaction blading is not used in gas turbine engines, as it is inefficient. 
Fig 1b  Reaction Blading 
Nozzle
Guide Vanes
Rotor Buckets
P V A
1
1
1
P  > P 

2
3
2
V  < V 

2
3

2
Gas Flow
3
A  > A 

2
3

2
3
A 3
P  = P 
1
2
V  = V 
1
2
Direction 
A  = A 
1
2
of Motion
c. 
Practical  Aircraft Engine Blading.  In an aircraft turbojet, a compromise between impulse 
and  reaction  blading  is  used,  where  the  blade  root  is  largely  impulse  blading  and  the  blade  tip 
mainly reaction blading, with a smooth transition along the length of the blade. 
Turbine Operating Conditions 
5. 
Owing to the emphasis on low weight and small diameter, the turbine in a gas turbine engine is 
subjected to severe operating conditions: 
a. 
The  operating  temperatures  experienced  are  extremely  high,  as  the  specific  work  output 
from the turbine is dependent on turbine entry temperature (TET).  TETs of the order of 1640 K 
(1367 °C) are not uncommon and engines under development have TETs of 1850 K.  In addition 
to the high entry temperatures, the turbine must also accept a fairly high stage temperature drop 
(approximately 200 K) without a serious drop in efficiency. 
b. 
As well as experiencing high thermal stresses, the turbine must be capable of withstanding 
the  large hoop and centrifugal stresses generated  by  the  high rotational speeds.  Tip speeds  of 
around 400 m/s and associated gas velocities of 600 m/s are normal. 
c. 
The  power  absorbed  by  the  turbine  to  drive  the  compressor  can  be  very  high.    Fig  2 
illustrates typical power transmission values of a multi-spool engine. 
3-8 Fig 2 Power Transmission Values on Multi-spool Engine 
LP Compressor
LP Turbine
HP Compressor
HP Turbine
1640 KW
8800 KW
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 11 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
NGV and Turbine Blade Design Considerations 
6. 
Nozzle  Guide  Vanes.    NGVs  are  of  aerofoil  shape  and  form  a  convergent  passage  between 
adjacent blades to convert the pressure energy of the gas flow to kinetic energy.  The gas flow must be 
turned  through  a  relatively  large  angle  of  deflection  from  the  axial  direction  and,  at  the  same  time, 
undergo  expansion  from  low  velocities  to  sonic  or  near  supersonic  speeds.    NGVs  operate  ‘choked’ 
under design conditions in order to effect the maximum energy conversion.  NGVs must withstand higher 
gas temperatures than those which the turbine blades experience, and they are normally hollow, so that 
they can be cooled by passing HP air through them.  In addition, NGVs are subjected to temperature and 
stress fluctuations caused by either uneven flow distribution from the compressor, or by flame pulsating 
within  the  combustion  chamber.    NGVs  are  normally  manufactured  with  shrouds  fitted  to  both  the  top 
and bottom of the vane (see Fig 3).  These shrouds form a smooth passage for the gas flow, avoid tip 
leakages,  and  permit  a  thinner  vane  wall  section  by  providing  increased  rigidity.    The  vanes  are  often 
welded  together  in  sets  providing  limited  radial  movement.    The  outer  shroud-locating  ring  generally 
forms part of the engine casing and is usually extended to protect the turbine blades. 
3-8 Fig 3 Typical Nozzle Guide Vane Installation 
7. 
Turbine Blading.  The type of blading used in the rotor, along with the number and arrangement 
of turbine stages required, depends upon several factors: 
a. 
Speed of gas delivered by the combustion system. 
b. 
Rotor rpm. 
c. 
Turbine size and weight. 
d. 
Turbine entry temperature. 
e. 
Outlet temperature, pressure and velocity. 
f. 
Power output. 
Turbine  blades  have  to  extract  sufficient  work  from  the  gas  flow  to  drive  the  compressor  in  as  few 
stages  as  possible.    In  addition,  if  the  engine  is  multi-spool,  the  situation  is  more  complex  with  each 
turbine section driving its corresponding compressor i.e. HP, IP or LP.  The HP turbine driving the HP 
compressor spool can be single stage, as it receives gases of high energy, but by the time the gases 
reach the IP or LP sections more blade area is needed if a proper work balance is to be maintained.  
To accomplish this, a multi-stage turbine may be necessary, with increasingly larger blades. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 11 


AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
Blade Manufacture 
8. 
Turbine blade materials have to meet some exacting requirements, such as: 
a. 
High fatigue strength. 
b. 
Good creep resistance qualities. 
c. 
Resistance to thermal shock. 
d. 
Resistance to corrosion. 
e. 
Economic to manufacture. 
9. 
Although turbine blades can be made in a number of ways, they are now almost exclusively cast.  
Cast blades are produced by the 'lost wax' or investment process.  Unlike forged blades, the blades so 
cast  receive  no  work  hardening  after  casting  and  the  blades  have  excellent  surface  finish  requiring 
only superficial grinding before final heat treatment.  This method is widely used for the manufacture of 
turbine blades, particularly those that require cooling holes. 
10.  Turbine Blade Grain Structure.   The grain structure of the turbine  blade is  vitally  important as 
the  grain boundaries are a  weakness at  high temperature, particularly  those that lie perpendicular to 
the applied stress (see Fig 4a). 
3-8 Fig 4 Turbine Blade Structures 
Fig 4a  Conventional Cast Blade Grain Structure 
Good Mechanical
Properties in 
All Directions
Equi-axed
Crystal Structure
By  manipulating  the  grain  structure  to  reduce  the  number  of  grain  boundaries  and  directions, 
significant  increases  in  creep  resistance  and  thermal  fatigue  life  can  be  achieved.    Two  methods 
currently used are: 
a. 
Directionally  Solidified.    In  directionally  solidified  blades,  the  transverse  boundaries  are 
eliminated by inducing the casting to solidify from one end only.  This is achieved by pouring the 
molten metal into a heated mould which is cooled from one end.  In this way, the grains can be 
made  to  run  the  length  of  the  blade  (see  Fig  4b).    The  combination  of  no  transverse  grain 
boundary and this preferred orientation results in approximately a two-fold improvement in creep 
life and a six-fold increase in thermal fatigue life over conventionally cast material. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 11 



AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
Fig 4b  Directionally Solidified Turbine Blade Structure 
Improved Mechanical
Properties in 
Longitudinal Axis
Columnar
Crystal
Structure
b. 
Single  Crystal.    The  single  crystal  blade  is  a  further  development  where  all  the  grain 
boundaries are eliminated.  This is achieved by a similar process to directional solidification, but 
the mould is designed so that all but one of the grains are choked off before they reach the blade 
(see Fig 4c).  If the blade contains no grain boundaries, there is no need to include in the alloy, 
elements  that  are  traditionally  included  to  strengthen  these  boundaries.    When  these  elements 
are  excluded  from  the  blade  alloy  the  melting  point  is  raised  appreciably,  which  allows  high 
temperature  heat  treatments  to  be  applied  to  single  crystal  alloys  which  cannot  be  used  with 
conventionally cast or directionally solidified material.  Creep life can be improved six-fold  whilst 
thermal fatigue life is increased ten-fold. 
Fig 4c Single Crystal Turbine Blade Structure 
Excellent Mechanical Properties
in Longitudinal Axis and Improved
Heat Resistance
Blade Installation 
11.  Blades in the majority of gas turbines are attached to the disc by means of the fir-tree root (Fig 5a). 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 11 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
3-8 Fig 5 Blade Attachment Methods 
Fig 5a  Turbine Blade Attachment - Fir-Tree Root 
Fir-tree Root
(with locking plate)
This  type  of  fixing  holds  the  blade  loosely  when  the  turbine  is  stationary,  and  provides  a  firm  fitting  by 
centrifugal  loading  when  the  turbine  is  rotating.    A  later  method  of  securing  the  blades  to  the  disc,  by 
bonding, produces a single unit called a BLISK (BLade and dISK) (see Fig 5b). 
Fig 5b  Section Through BLISK 
Cast Blade Ring
Diffusion Bond
Powder Disc
Turbine Discs 
12.  Although the temperatures are lower than those to which the blades are subjected, the centrifugal 
stresses in the disc are considerably higher.  Any hoop section must be capable of sustaining not only 
the centrifugal loading imposed by the blades, and the mass of disc material at the circumference, but 
also the thermal stresses caused by the temperature gradient across the disc.  The stress imposed by 
the  blades  alone  may  be  as  much  as  30  MN  per  blade,  equivalent  to  a  mass  increase  of 
approximately 3000 kg. 
13.  To equalise the hoop stresses at each hoop section, the disc is usually wide at the root tapering 
towards  the  tip.    The  disc  rim  is  generally  widened  to  carry  the  blade  root  fixings,  and  often  the 
labyrinth  section  of  the  disc  outer  air  seal.    Powder  metallurgy  discs  are  being  introduced  which  are 
lighter  and  stronger  than  conventionally  forged  discs  and  some  small  turbines  have  been  made  by 
precision casting of complete discs and blades in one piece. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 11 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
Turbine Installations 
14.  Turbine installations vary depending on the type and number of separate compressors or power 
shafts that need to be driven.  The different configurations are listed as follows: 
a. 
Single-spool Turbine.  With this arrangement, the turbine is connected by a single shaft to 
the  compressor.    The  number  of  turbine  stages  depends  on  the  power  required  to  drive  the 
compressor (Fig 6). 
3-8 Fig 6 Three-stage Single Spool Turbine 
Compressor
Shaft Drive
Turbine
b. 
Multi-spool  Turbines.    Engines  with  more  than  one  compressor  spool  require  a  separate 
turbine for each of the spools.  Fig 7 shows the turbine arrangement for such an engine, which in 
this instance is three spool. 
3-8 Fig 7 Multi-stage Turbine with Triple Shaft Arrangement 
LP Compressor
IP Shaft Drive
LP Shaft Drive
IP Compressor
HP Shaft Drive
HP Compressor
HP Turbine
IP Turbine
LP Turbine
c. 
Direct Coupled Turboshaft.  This configuration is similar to that described in 14a  with the 
addition of an extension shaft attached to the front of the compressor to drive a propeller (Fig 8).  
As  the  majority  of  the  energy  of  the  gas  stream  is  extracted  to  drive  the  compressor  and 
propeller, a multi-stage turbine is fitted.  (See also Volume 3, Chapter 16, Para 8). 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 11 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
3-8 Fig 8 Direct Coupled Turboshaft 
Compressor
Propeller
Shaft Drive
Turbine
Gearbox
d. 
Free  Turbine.    This  arrangement  is  another  turboshaft  engine  with  a  separate  or  'free' 
turbine driving the propeller or rotor (Fig 9). 
3-8 Fig 9 Typical Free-power Turbine 
Compressor
Propeller
HP Shaft Drive
HP Turbine
LP Turbine
Gearbox
LP Shaft Drive
Turbine and Disc Cooling 
15.  In  addition  to  being  designed  with  the  correct  contour  to  produce  the  desired  energy  transfer, 
turbine blades, vanes, and the discs must also withstand high temperatures.  The gas turbine is a high 
temperature  machine  and  increased  operating  temperatures  give  an  increased  specific  output  from 
the engine, i.e. higher thrust for the same engine size and weight. 
16.  At turbine entry temperatures (TET) suitable for adequate thrust, all materials suitable for blading and 
discs are affected by stress and creep.  Creep is the continuous extension of a component under loads, 
even though the load is less than that which would cause fracture.  The degree of creep is dependent on 
the  temperature,  where  the  higher  the  temperature  the  greater  the  amount  of  creep.    Thus,  the  guide 
vanes, the blades, and their discs must be cooled to permit them to withstand these high TETs. 
17.  Disc  Cooling.    The  turbine  disc  is  heated  by  the  effect  of  radiation  and  conduction  from  the 
turbine blades, and hot gas leakages past the seals.  HP air from the compressor is used to cool the 
front face of the turbine disc and also used to pressurize the labyrinth seal situated between the NGV 
shroud ring and the disc, to prevent the ingress of hot gases (see Fig 10). 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 11 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
3-8 Fig 10 Disc Cooling and Air Seals 
LP Air
Nozzle Guide
Overboard
Vanes
Turbine Blades
Pre-swirl
Nozzles
HP Cooling
Brush
Air Dispelled
Seal
Into Gas Stream
HP Cooling Air
Interstage
Hydraulic
Labyrinth
Seal
Seal
Ring
LP Cooling
Air
Seal
Turbine
Shaft Turbine
Turbine
Turbine
Disc
Disc
Disc
LP Air
HP Air
If  a  number  of  discs  have  to  be  cooled,  the  seals  are  arranged  to  provide  a  cascade.    The  cooling 
airflow will also pressurize the space around the shaft and prevent high temperature gas access.  The 
rear face of the turbine disc is protected by the exhaust cone and additional cooling air is sometimes 
bled over the rear face of the disc through the rear-fairing supports (Fig 11). 
3-8 Fig 11 General Arrangement of Turbine and Disc Cooling 
LP Compressor
By-pass Duct
HP Turbine
LP Turbine
Bearing
HP Compressor
Location Bearings
AIR INLET
LP Compressor
HP Compressor
HP Turbine
LP Turbine
Front Bearing
Front Bearing
Bearing
LP Compressor
AIR OUTLET
Air Transfer Ports
Rear Bearing
LP Air
HP Intermediate Air
HP Air
18.  Turbine  Blade  and  Vane  Cooling.    Blades  and  vanes  are  cooled  with  air  tapped  from  the 
compressor which is at a suitable temperature and pressure for cooling.  The amount of air required is 
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 11 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
only  a  small  percentage  of  the  total  compressor  output  and  is  taken  into  account  during  the  design 
stage.  Air-cooling of blades is currently carried out in one of two ways: by convection or film cooling. 
a. 
Convection  Cooling.    Convection  cooling  is  achieved  by  passing  cooling  air  through 
longitudinal holes or hollow blade sections.  Examples of this method are shown in Fig 12. 
3-8 Fig 12 Convection Cooled NGV Blade Installation 
Cooling Air Dispelled 
Nozzle Guide Vane
Into Gas Flow
Turbine Blade
HP Cooling Air Inlet
b. 
Film Cooled Blades.  Film cooling of the  blade successfully overcomes the effective  limits 
of cooling by convection by passing a film of cold air over the surface, thus protecting it from the 
hot gas flow.  However, it is expensive to develop and produce, so designers have concentrated 
their  efforts  at  providing  cooling  to  the  portions  of  the  blade  which  have  the  greatest  need  -  the 
leading and trailing edges.  Fig 13 shows the development of high-pressure turbine blade cooling. 
3-8 Fig 13 Turbine Blade Cooling Developments 
LP Cooling Air
HP Cooling Air
Single Pass,
Single Pass,
Quintuple Pass,
Internal Cooling
Multi-feed
Multi-feed
(1960's)
Internal Cooling
Internal Cooling
With Film Cooling
With Extensive
(1970's)
Film Cooling
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 11 

AP3456 -3-8- Turbines 
Turbine Faults 
19.  Loss  of  Tip  Clearance.    The  service  life  of  a  gas  turbine  engine  is  generally  limited  by  the 
condition  of  high  temperature  components.    The  designed  tip  clearance  between  the  turbine  blades 
and  the  shroud  ring  can  decrease  because  of  blade  creep  and  bearing  wear.    This  clearance  was 
originally  checked  periodically  but,  with  'on  condition'  maintenance,  it  is  only  checked  on  an 
opportunity basis during engine repair. 
20.  Buckling, Cracking and Distortion.  Hot spots from misaligned, damaged combustion systems 
or faulty blade cooling may give rise to blade troubles, particularly distortion and cracking of the NGV 
trailing edges.  If cracks are not rapidly seen, pieces of the material may break away and either cause 
further damage to the turbine, or impose eccentric dynamic loading on the assembly.  The turbine can 
be  visually  inspected  using  boroscope  equipment,  and  several  engine  types  incorporate  suitable 
inspection ports for this purpose. 
21.  Foreign Object Damage (FOD).  Occasionally, damage can result from foreign objects, although 
compressor  damage  will  occur  as  well.    Turbofan  engines  are  not  so  prone  to  FOD  on  turbines  as, 
after passing through the LP compressor, most of the debris is centrifuged into the bypass duct.  The 
majority  of  FOD  damage  to  the  turbine  comes  from  the  failure  of  the  combustion  liner,  or  by  carbon 
breaking  away  and  passing  through  the  turbine.    Small  scratches  and  chips  are  allowed,  but  these 
limits are very small because of the extreme operating conditions of the turbine. 
22.  Turbine  Blade  Containment.    Should  a  turbine  blade  become  detached  from  the  disc  during 
engine  operation,  the  destructive  force  is  so  great  that  secondary  damage  caused  by  the  blade  can 
result in the loss of the aircraft.  Various methods of containment are employed such as increasing the 
strength  of  the  turbine  casing  and  having  reinforced  bands  placed  around  the  aircraft  engine  bay 
protecting the vital parts of the aircraft structure, such as fuel tanks and control runs. 
Revised May 10   
Page 11 of 11 

AP3456 - 3-9 - Exhaust Systems 
CHAPTER 9 - EXHAUST SYSTEMS 
Introduction 
1. 
After  leaving  the  turbine,  the  exhaust  gases  pass  into  the  exhaust  system  then  exit  through  a 
propelling nozzle, converting the energy in the gas stream into velocity to produce thrust.  On turboprop 
and turboshaft engines, the majority of the energy in the gas stream has already been extracted by the 
turbine, so little thrust is produced at the propelling nozzle. 
2. 
In the simple turbojet, the exhaust system consists of three main components: 
a. 
Exhaust unit. 
b. 
Jet pipe. 
c. 
Propelling nozzle. 
Fig  1  shows  the  arrangement  of  these  components  for  a  simple  turbojet  exhaust  system.    For  an 
engine  fitted  with  afterburning,  a  variable  area  propelling  nozzle  will  be  required  in  place  of  the  fixed 
propelling nozzle (see para 7). 
3-9 Fig 1 Basic Exhaust System 
Exhaust Cone
Convergent (Propelling) Nozzle
Jet Pipe
Turbine Rear
Stage
Turbine Rear
Support Struts
Bypass engines may have the hot and cold streams combined using a mixer unit (Fig 2a), exhausted 
through separate coaxial nozzles (Fig 2b), or through an integrated nozzle (Fig 2c).  The first method is 
adopted on low bypass ratio engines, whilst the last two are employed on high bypass engines. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 - 3-9 - Exhaust Systems 
3-9 Fig 2 Exhaust System Components 
a  Bypass Air Mixer Unit 
By-pass Duct
Turbine Rear
Support Struts
Mixer Chutes
By-pass Air 
mixing with
Exhaust Gas Stream
By-pass Air
Exhaust Gases
Splitter
Jet Pipe Mounting Flange
Exhaust Unit
Fairing
Inner Cone
b  Cold Air and Hot Gas Exhaust System 
External mixing of Gas Streams
Cold By-pass (Fan) Airflow
Hot Exhaust Gases
c  Integrated Nozzle 
Common or Integrated
Partial internal mixing of Gas Streams
Exhaust Nozzle
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 - 3-9 - Exhaust Systems 
An exhaust system may also include one or more of the following: 
d. 
Thrust reversal. 
e. 
Convergent-divergent nozzle. 
f. 
Nozzle vectoring. 
g. 
Noise suppression. 
The Exhaust Unit 
3. 
The  exhaust  gases  leave  the  turbine  at  very  high  speed,  and  then  slow  down  considerably  on 
entering the larger cross-section of the jet pipe.  The exhaust unit, owing to its conical shape, creates a 
divergent  duct  which  decelerates  the  gas  flow  thus  reducing  pressure  losses.    Its  other  purpose  is  to 
protect the rear face of the turbine disc from over heating.  The cone is held in place by struts attached to 
the exhaust unit walls, which also act as straightener vanes to remove any swirl present in the gas flow. 
The Jet Pipe 
4. 
The jet pipe is used to convey the exhaust gases from the exhaust unit to the propelling nozzle, its 
length  being  dependent  to  some  extent  on  aircraft  design.    Rear  fuselage,  or  podded,  engines  have 
short  jet  pipes  that  often  form  an  integral  part of the engine.  Where the engines are mounted in the 
middle  of  the  fuselage,  the    jet  pipe  may  be  quite  long,  although  more  commonly the jet pipe is kept 
short by using a longer intake duct. 
5. 
Jet Pipe Construction.  The jet pipe is  manufactured from heat resisting  alloys to  enable it to 
withstand  high  gas  temperatures (up to 2200 K  (1927 ºC)), whilst at the same time being as light as 
possible.  The complete jet pipe is usually of double  wall construction with an annular space between 
the  inner  and  outer wall; the hot gases leaving the  propelling nozzle induce a flow of air through the 
annular passage  which  cools  and  insulates them.  Bypass  air  is often used for cooling, but despite 
these  precautions,  the  jet  pipe  still  needs  to  be  insulated  from  the  surrounding  aircraft  structure  by 
means of an insulation 'blanket'. 
The Propelling Nozzle 
6. 
The  simple  propelling  nozzle  can  be  a  fixed  convergent  or  convergent-divergent  duct,  through 
which the pressure energy in the jet pipe is converted into kinetic energy.  This increases the velocity of 
the gases, producing thrust.  The method of operation of the two types of nozzle is as follows: 
a. 
The  Fixed Convergent Nozzle During normal operation, the nozzle will almost always be 
choked, ie the jet velocity at the nozzle exit will have reached a maximum flow rate dependent on 
the  local  speed  of  sound.    The  jet  can  only  be  accelerated  further  in  a  convergent  nozzle  by 
increasing the local speed of sound by raising the gas temperature, ie afterburning.  The exhaust 
gases  are  usually well above atmospheric pressure on exit from the nozzle which is undesirable 
because gas energy is exhausted from the nozzle without acting on it - a phenomenon known as 
under-expansion.  The energy dissipated in this manner is potential thrust that has been lost. 
b. 
The Convergent-divergent Nozzle.  By adding a divergent section to the convergent nozzle, 
it  is  possible  to  accelerate  the  exhaust  gases  beyond  the  speed  of  sound,  thus  expanding  the 
gases down to atmospheric pressure, avoiding under-expansion losses.  Such an arrangement is 
known  as  a  convergent-divergent,  or  con-di  nozzle  (Fig  3).  However,  the  con-di  nozzle  will  only 
operate  correctly  at its designed pressure ratio, which in turn is dependent upon the exit area to 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 - 3-9 - Exhaust Systems 
throat  area  ratio.    Although  offering  a  thrust  advantage    over  the    simple  convergent  nozzle, 
operation  outside  the  design  speed  will  cause  severe  over-expansion  losses  to  occur  in  the 
divergent  section  -  where  the  exit  pressure  is  lower  than  atmospheric  pressure  -  thus  causing 
shock waves to form inside the divergent duct.  For any vehicle required to operate over a  wide 
range of speeds, a variable geometry con-di nozzle arrangement is therefore desirable,  but for a 
fixed  velocity  vehicle,  eg  ramjet  or  rocket  powered  missile,  a  con-di  nozzle  of  fixed  area  ratio  is 
universally adopted. 
3-9 Fig 3 Convergent-divergent Nozzle 
Throat Area
Exit Area
Pe
Supersonic
Exhaust 
Velocity
Pa
Variable Geometry Nozzles 
7. 
The  need  for  variable  geometry  (VG)  was  briefly  mentioned  in  the  previous  paragraph  in 
connection  with  operation  over  a  range  of  speeds.    Variable  geometry  is  required  with  purely 
convergent nozzles for the following reasons: 
a. 
Afterburner Operation.  When afterburning is used the expansion of  gases in the jet pipe 
will cause a rise in static pressure, upsetting the turbine  pressure  ratio, thus causing a slowing 
down, and possible surge, of the compressor.  To prevent this happening, a VG nozzle is fitted 
which is opened as the afterburner is lit.  Reheat fuel flow and nozzle position are then linked by 
a control system which maintains a constant turbine pressure ratio. 
b. 
Noise Reduction If the final nozzle area is reduced, turbine pressure ratio will be reduced and 
the LP compressor speed will fall.  On high by-pass ratio engines, where much of the engine noise is 
associated with the LP fan, this technique is used to achieve noise reduction on the approach. 
c. 
Taxiing.    On  some aircraft, even with the engines at idle, the thrust produced  requires the 
pilot continually to apply the brakes to reduce taxi speed.  To reduce brake wear, the nozzle can 
be opened to a maximum value to reduce the thrust produced by the engine for taxiing. 
d. 
Surge  Control.    Varying  the  nozzle  area  allows  the  compressor  pressure  ratio  to  be 
controlled to avoid surge (see Volume 3, Chapter 6) when afterburning is used. 
8. 
The  VG  Convergent  Nozzle  for  Afterburning.    Convergent  nozzles    for  engines  fitted  with 
afterburners  operate  as  an  adjustable  diaphragm  which  allows  full  area  variation  without  leakage  or 
loss of circularity.  In Fig 4 the nozzle consists of 20 master flaps with cam roller tracks and 20 sealing 
flaps.  The nozzle is positioned by the fore and aft movement of an actuating sleeve operated by rams; 
20  nozzle  operating  rollers  are  bracketed  to  the  inside  of  the  actuating  sleeve.    The  rams  may  be 
actuated by engine oil, aircraft fuel, or by compressor bleed air. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 - 3-9 - Exhaust Systems 
3-9 Fig 4 A VG Exhaust Nozzle 
Nozzle
Operating
Rams
Afterburner
Jet Pipe
Actuating Sleeve
Interlocking Flaps
9. 
The  VG  Convergent-divergent  Nozzle.    A  VG  con-di  nozzle  consists  of  two  variable  nozzles, 
primary and secondary (Fig 5), the construction and operation of which is similar to that described in para 8. 
3-9 Fig 5 VG Convergent-divergent Nozzle 
Secondary
Nozzle
Exhaust
Velocity
Primary
Nozzle
The  nozzle  can  use  a  single  actuating  system  where  only  the  primary  nozzle  is  controlled,  the 
secondary  nozzle  being  altered  by  a  fixed  linkage  system  (see  Fig  6),  or  fully  independent  control  of 
both  primary  and  secondary  nozzles.    The  latter  system  requires  a  far  more  complex  control  system 
but can deliver good nozzle performance over a wide range of operating conditions. 
3-9 Fig 6 Con-di Nozzle Operation (Fixed Link) 
Nozzle
Secondary
Open
Actuation
Nozzle Link
Ring
Cavity
Position
Actuator
Outer
Fairing
Closed
Tailpipe
Rollers
Position
Tailpipe
Primary
Liner
Nozzle
Secondary
Cam
Primary
Nozzle
Nozzle
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 - 3-9 - Exhaust Systems 
10.  Thrust  Vectoring  Nozzle.    With  the  VG  nozzles  previously  described,  the  thrust  line  has  been 
maintained  through  the  centre-line  of  the  engine.    With  thrust  vectoring,  a  further  operation  of  the 
nozzle system may be included which will allow the thrust line to be altered to a pitch angle of up to 20º 
from  the  centre-line  in  any  direction.    Thrust  vectoring  will  enhance  the  performance  of  the  aircraft, 
allowing STOL operation, high AOA, and improved manoeuvrability. 
3-9 Fig 7 Thrust Vectoring Nozzle 
Zero (0)
Vector
20 Degrees
Vector
11.  Nozzle  Control.    On  many  aircraft,  only  the  primary  (convergent)  nozzle  position  is  closely 
controlled,  even  when  a  con-di  nozzle  is  fitted.    Such  control  is  associated  with  the  afterburning 
system, and is discussed in detail in Volume 3, Chapter 10. Where secondary nozzle position needs to 
be closely controlled, then the control system must vary nozzle position either with flight Mach number 
according to a pre-programmed relationship, or under manual control by the pilot.  Control of the thrust 
vectoring nozzle will require the integration of the flight and engine control systems. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
CHAPTER 10 - THRUST AUGMENTATION 
Introduction 
1. 
There  are  occasions  when  the  maximum  thrust  from  a  basic  gas  turbine  engine  is  inadequate,  and 
some  method  of  increasing  the  available  thrust  is  required  without  resorting  to  a  larger  engine  with  its 
associated penalties of increased frontal area, weight and fuel consumption. 
2. 
There are two recognized methods of augmenting thrust 
a. 
Afterburning  (or  reheat)  to  boost  the  thrust  at  various  altitudes  thus  increasing  aircraft 
performance.    This  is  limited  to  short  periods  only,  such  as  combat  or  take-off,  due  to  the 
increased fuel consumption. 
b. 
Water  or  water/methanol  injection  to  restore,  or  even  boost,  the  thrust  from  a  gas  turbine 
operating  from  hot  or  high  altitude  airfields.    This  method  is  now  normally  limited  to  turboprop 
powered transport aircraft. 
Afterburning 
3. 
Afterburning  or  reheat  is  the  common  method  of  augmenting  the  thrust  from  a  gas  turbine  engine.  
Within the engine the combustion chamber temperature rise is limited by the temperature limitations of the 
turbine blade material.  This limits the fuel-air ratio of the gas generator (ie the 'core' of the engine) to about 
1:5 and only 30% of the air is burned.  Afterburning, by mixing and burning fuel with this surplus air after the 
turbine, will accelerate the gases again and provide an increase to the basic thrust. 
4. 
Comparison  with  Non-afterburning  System.    Afterburning  is  the  most  direct  method  of 
increasing thrust, but increases the fuel flow substantially and therefore is normally used only for short 
periods.  If more thrust is required for longer periods, a larger engine may be needed, but considered 
solely  for  take-off,  climb  or  combat,  afterburning  is  a  better  proposition  since  a  larger  engine  would 
operate  for  the  majority  of  its  life  in  a  low  thrust,  throttled  condition,  giving  high  SFC  with  drag  and 
weight penalties.  Comparisons are made between adopting a large engine with no afterburning and a 
small engine with an afterburner facility in Table 1. 
Table 1 Comparison Between Possible High Thrust Sources 
Condition 
Large Engine(No Reheat) 
Small Engine(Reheat Facility) 
Low  SFC,  increased  airflow  and 
Take-off, climb, combat. 
Reheat on, high SFC, same airflow. 
momentum drag. 
Throttled, high SFC, low thrust/weight 
Reheat off, low SFC, high 
Normal cruise. 
ratio, large frontal area. 
thrust/weight ratio, small frontal area. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
Principles of Afterburning 
5. 
Thrust  Production.    As  stated  in  Volume  3,  Chapter  9,  when  the  engine  is  operating  under  its 
design condition the propelling nozzle is choked, therefore to increase thrust the gas flow temperature 
needs to be increased.  Typically, the gas temperature without afterburning (dry) may be 923 K, whilst 
that  for  afterburning  (wet)  may  be  1810  K.    Taking  the  thrust  levels  at  sea  level  static  (SLS)  for 
both wet and dry engine conditions, the thrust increase can be expressed by the following: 
Sea level stati  t
c hrust (w
 
et)
V (wet)
je
=
Sea level stati  t
c hrust (dry
 
)
V (dry)
je
T (wet)
je
= T (dry)
je
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Where Vje = Exit gas velocity 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Tje = Exit gas Temperature 
As Vje is proportional to the square root of Tje the thrust increase ratio can be expressed in terms of the 
temperature increase ratio.  Thus: 
T (wet)
je
1810
=
T (dry)
923
je
=
96
.
1
= 4
.
1
Thus,  a  96%  increase  in  temperature  gives  a  40%  increase  in  static  thrust.    Fig  1  shows  the  thrust 
increase with temperature ratio. 
3-10 Fig 1 Static Thrust Increase and Temperature Ratio 
80
e
s
a
re
60
c
In
t
s
ru
h
40
T
%
0
1.0
1.4
1.8
2.2
2.6
3.0
Temperature Ratio
Augmented  thrust  varies  in  a  similar  way  to  dry thrust with increasing altitude and increasing forward 
speed (Fig 2). 
6. 
Variation  of  Nozzle  Area.    If  it  is  assumed  that  an  engine  is  operated  initially  without  the 
afterburner, then at  full  throttle  conditions  the  nozzle  will  be  choked.    Fig 3 shows typical thrust/rpm 
and  compressor  characteristic  curves  for  the  engine.    When  afterburning  is  applied,  the  augmented 
thrust  will  occur  at  100%  rpm;  therefore,  on  the  compressor  characteristics,  the  augmented  thrust 
should  also  lie  on the 100% rpm line.  In Fig 3b, position 'X' represents the operating point for 100% 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
rpm  operation  without  afterburning.   When afterburning is applied without increasing the nozzle area, 
the pressure ratio across the compressor will increase, and the mass flow rate will decrease along the 
constant  rpm  line  to  produce  operating  point  'Y',  which  is  in  the  surge  region.    This  is  unacceptable 
and,  for  optimum  conditions,  the  increased  pressure  ratio  (caused  by  the  gas  volume  increase)  is 
prevented  by  opening  the  nozzle  to  maintain  a  constant  total  pressure  in  the  jet  pipe.    Under  these 
conditions,  the  operating  point  for  reheat  operation  will  remain  at  point  'X'.    In  practice,  the  nozzle  is 
operated to maintain a constant, pre-set pressure ratio across the turbine. 
3-10 Fig 2 Effects of Altitude and Forward Speed on Augmented Thrust 
b  Effect of Speed
200
100% rpm
with Reheat
190
a  Effect of Altitude
180
220
Reheat On
170
Aircraft Speed
200
600 kt
x 160
a
x 180
a
M 150
100% rpm Dry
M
tic
160
Altitude - 12,000 ft
tic
ta
S 140
ta 140
l
97% rpm
S
e
l
v 130
e 120
e
95% rpm
v
L
e
Reheat Off
L
a
100
e 120
a
S
e
f
S 80
o 110
90% rpm
f
o
Tropopause
%
60
-
%
100
t
-
s
t 40
s
ru 90
h
ru
T
h 20
T
80
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
Altitude (1,000 ft)
60
150
300
450
600
750
900
TAS (kt)
3-10 Fig 3 Typical Performance Characteristic Curves for an Afterburning Engine 
a
b
Max
e
l Lin
g
ta
Y
S
ratin
tio
pe e
a
O Lin
R
X
t
re
s
u
s
ru
s
h
re
T
P
100% rpm
95%
90%
Idle
100%
rpm
Air Mass Flow
As  nozzle  exit  temperature  rises  during  afterburning,  so  also  must  the  nozzle  exit  area  increase  to 
maintain a nozzle pressure such that the turbine pressure ratio is constant.  A further consideration for 
multi-spool  bypass  engines  incorporating  afterburning  is  the  backpressure  felt  by  the  LP  fan  or 
compressor  down  the  bypass  duct.    This  can  cause  the  compressor  or  fan  speed  to  change 
independently of the core engine and can be recovered to its max dry level by adjusting the fuel flow 
to the afterburner whilst maintaining a set nozzle area. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
7. 
Specific  Fuel  Consumption.    Afterburning  increases  SFC  because  the  temperature  rise 
increases  the  velocity  of  the  jet  efflux  (Vj),  reducing  propulsive  efficiency  (see  Volume  3,  Chapter  4).  
Assuming a SFC without afterburning of 158 kg/hr/kN at sea level and a speed of Mach 0.9 as shown 
in Fig 4, then with 50% afterburning, under the same conditions of flight, the SFC rises to approx 280 
kg/hr/kN.  With an increase in height to 35000 ft, this latter figure falls to about 234 kg/hr/kN due to the 
reduced intake temperature.  However, if the effect of afterburning on SFC in relation to the improved 
performance achieved is considered, then clearly the additional fuel consumed may be excessive, e.g. 
during climb to interception.  From Fig 4 it can also be seen that afterburning performance improves as 
flight Mach No increases (at either altitude), i.e. the ratio of augmented SFC to normal SFC decreases.  
At high Mach No (M2.5 plus), afterburning becomes a reasonably efficient system. 
3-10 Fig 4 SFC Variations with Altitude and Mach Number 
356
Reheat
305
Sea Level
n
tio
p 254
m
u
35,000 ft
s
n
o
C
l 203
e
u
Sea Level
F
ific
c 152
e
p
S
35,000 ft
Normal
107
50
0
0.5
1.0
1.5
2.0
Mach Number
8. 
Turbofan Afterburning.  Afterburning of a turbofan can be accomplished by: 
a. 
Gas  Generator  Afterburning.    Gas  generator  afterburning  is  where  only  the  hot  gas 
generator stream is reheated. 
b. 
Mixed  Stream  Afterburning.    Mixed  stream  afterburning  is  where  both  streams  are 
reheated in a common afterburner after mixing.  In this case, an additional constraint is placed on 
the  engine  cycle,  since  the  pressure  of  the  two  streams  during  mixing  should  be  about  equal  to 
avoid mixing pressure losses. 
c. 
Hot  and  Cold  Stream  Afterburning  Hot  and  cold  stream  afterburning  is  where  the  two 
streams are reheated separately then mixed.  In this method, the fuel flow is scheduled separately 
to the two gas streams, however, there is interconnection between the flame stabilizers in the two 
streams to assist combustion in the cold by-pass air. 
The turbofan with afterburning offers significant advantages over the turbojet.  In addition to improved 
cruise  SFC,  which  makes  the  turbofan  acceptable  for  subsonic  applications,  the  turbofan  also  offers 
impressive  augmentation  ratios,  up  to  80%,  with  afterburning.    This  performance  is  attractive  for 
supersonic  applications,  or  for  aircraft  which  combine  subsonic  cruise  speed  with  very  high-speed 
combat characteristics.  The high augmentation ratios are achieved because the afterburner receives 
pure air as well as the products of combustion from the main burner.  This means that more oxygen is 
available,  thus  more  fuel  can  be  added  in  the  afterburner  of  a  turbofan  than  in  a  turbojet  before 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 12 


AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
stoichiometric mixture ratios are attained (this is when the correct balance between the amount of fuel 
provided  and  the  amount  of  oxygen  supplied  is  reached).    Table  2  compares  the  performance  of  a 
turbojet with afterburning with that of a turbofan with afterburning. 
Table 2 Comparison between Afterburning Turbojet and Turbofan Engines 
Performance Characteristics 
Turbojet 
Turbofan 
Maximum dry weight of engine 
1379 kg 
1497 kg 
Maximum dry weight of afterburner jet pipe 
408 kg 
290 kg 
Maximum thrust, dry (SLS ISA) 
55 kN (5606 kg) 
55 kN (5606 kg) 
SFC dry, at maximum thrust 
86 kg/hr/kN 
64 kg/hr/kN 
Maximum thrust, wet (SLS ISA) 
72 kN (7339 kg) 
93 kN (9123 kg) 
SFC wet, at maximum thrust 
203 kg/hr/kN 
193 kg/hr/kN 
Power to weight ratio (after burning) 
4.1:1 
5.1:1 
By-pass ratio 
nil 
0.7:1 
Afterburner Components 
9. 
Jet Pipe and Propelling Nozzle.  Fig 5 presents a cutaway drawing of a typical jet pipe and propelling 
nozzle.    The  afterburner  meets  the  basic  requirements  of  the  normal  combustion  chamber.    First,  the  air 
discharging from the turbine must be slowed down to a low velocity so that combustion can be stabilized. 
3-10 Fig 5 Jet Pipe and Propelling Nozzle 
To decrease the air velocity adequately, a diffuser section is placed between the turbine and burner section 
(Fig 6). 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
3-10 Fig 6 Diffuser and Jet Pipe 
By-pass Air Flow
Diffuser
Cooling Flow
Nozzle Operating Sleeve
Fuel
Reburnt
Gases
Flame
Afterburner
Holders
Jet Pipe
Variable Propelling Nozzle
10.  Burner System.  The burner system consists of circular fuel manifolds supported by struts inside 
the jet pipe.  Fuel is supplied to the manifold by feed pipes in the support struts, sprayed from holes in 
the  downstream  edge  of  the  manifolds  into  the  flame  area,  and  ignited  by  the  afterburner  ignition 
system.    To  maintain  a  flame  after  ignition,  the  afterburner  requires  the  equivalent  of  the  primary 
combustion zone in the normal burner.  This is accomplished by a series of flame holders which, in the 
example  shown  in  Fig  6,  are  'V'  shaped  vapour  gutters mounted concentrically about the longitudinal 
axis of the burner.  Radially mounted mixing chutes may also be used, but the principle of design is 
the  same  for  any  type,  namely  to  produce  a  stable  combustion  zone,  at  the  same  time  producing as 
little  drag  as  possible  on  the  gas  flow  past  the  holders.    These requirements,  however,  are  in  direct 
conflict  with  each  other,  consequently,  attention  must  be  given  to  both  items,  especially  to  minimize 
flame holder drag since this produces a gas pressure loss with consequent loss in thrust.  The internal 
drag penalty is also important when the engine is operated with the afterburner off, with thrust and SFC 
penalized from 2.5% to 5% by the pressure losses in the afterburner. 
11.  Construction.  The afterburner jet pipe is made from heat resisting nickel alloy and requires more 
insulation  than  the  normal  jet  pipe  to  prevent  the  heat  of  combustion  being  transferred  to  the aircraft 
structure.  The jet pipe may be of double skin construction with the outer skin carrying the flight loads 
and the inner skin the thermal stresses.  Provision is also made for expansion and contraction and to 
prevent  gas  leaks  at  the  jet  pipe  joints.    The  inner  skin  or  heatshield  comprises  a  number  of  bands 
linked  by  cooling  corrugations  to  form  a  single  skin,  the  rear  of  which  is  formed  by  a  series  of 
overlapping tiles riveted to the surrounding skin to form a double section.  This arrangement provides 
improved  cooling  over  the  hotter  region  at  the  rear  of  the  burning section.  This method of cooling is 
further improved in bypass engines as relatively cool bypass air is used.  Insulation blankets are also 
wrapped around the outer shell to provide additional protection to heat transfer.  A heatshield of similar 
material to the jet pipe can be fitted to the inner wall to improve cooling at the rear of the burner section by 
allowing  a  further  airflow  boundary  between  the  combustion  flame  and  the  jet  pipe  wall  (Fig 5).    This 
shield also prevents combustion instability from creating excessive noise and vibration (howl). 
12.  Variable Nozzle.  The final requirement of an afterburner is its need for a variable exit nozzle and 
a  fully  variable  area  nozzle  is  used  although,  on  earlier  systems,  a  simpler  two-position  nozzle  was 
sometimes  employed.    The  variable  area  nozzle  shown  in  Fig  5  consists  of  eight  master  flaps  with 
cam-type  roller  tracks  and  eight  sealing  flaps  (Fig  7).    The  nozzle  is  positioned  by  fore  and  aft 
movement of an actuating ring operated by four nozzle operating rams.  Eight nozzle operating rollers 
are  bracketed  to  the  inside  of  the  actuating  ring  When  the  actuating  ring  is  moved  rearwards  by  the 
operating rams, the nozzle is opened to the large area position by the gas loading on the nozzle flaps 
and the small rollers acting on the underside of the master flap cam tracks.  Forward movement of the 
actuating ring closes the nozzle to the small area position. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
3-10 Fig 7 Variable Nozzle Actuating Mechanism 
Roller Bearing
Section Through Master Flap
Afterburner Ignition Systems 
13.  The three most common types of reheat ignition system are shown in Fig 8 and are: 
a. 
Spark  Ignition.    This type of ignition functions in a similar way to normal combustion chamber 
igniters.    Light  up  is  initiated  by  a  pilot  fuel  supply,  and  an  igniter  plug.    A  tapping  from  the  main 
afterburner flow supplies fuel for the pilot burner.  The burner sprays fuel into a region of low velocity 
inside a cone forming part of the afterburner assembly.  The igniter plug is of the spark gap type and 
projects into the cone adjacent to the pilot burner.  When afterburning is selected, the ignition system is 
energized via a time switch.  This switch will cut out the ignition system after a predetermined time. 
b. 
Hot-shot  Ignition.    The  hot-shot  ignition  system  is  operated  by  one  or  two  fuel  injectors,  one 
spraying fuel into the combustion chamber, whilst a second, if fitted, sprays fuel into the exhaust unit.  
The streak of flame initiated in the combustion chamber increases in volume progressively as it flows 
into the afterburner where it ignites the fuel/air mixture.  The turbine blades are not overheated by the 
hot streak because of its relatively low energy content, and, since a portion of the fuel vapourizes in the 
fuel stream, some cooling is provided; furthermore, the hot streak is operated only briefly. 
c. 
Catalytic Ignition.  The catalytic igniter consists of a Platinum/Rhodium element fitted into a 
housing secured to the burner.  The housing contains a venturi tube, the mouth of which is open 
to  the  main  gas  stream  from  the  turbines.    Fuel  is  fed  into  the  throat  and  a  fuel/air  mixture  is 
sprayed on to the element of the igniter.  Chemical reaction lowers the flash point of the mixture 
sufficiently for spontaneous ignition to take place. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
3-10 Fig 8 Afterburner Ignition System 
Catalytic Ignition
Spark Ignition
Fuel Feed
Ignition
Fuel Feed
Unit
Igniter
Burner
Igniter
Hot-shot Ignition
Fuel Feed
Hot-shot
Unit
Combustion Chamber
Afterburner Control 
14.  The  fuel  flow  and  propelling  nozzle  area  must  be  coordinated  for  satisfactory  operation  of  the 
afterburner.    These  functions  can  be  related  either  by  making  the  fuel  flow  dependent  on  the  nozzle 
area, or vice versa. 
15.  Pilot  Control  of  Nozzle  Area.    Coordination  is  achieved  physically  by  placing  the  nozzle  area 
under  the  control  of  the  pilot  and  subordinating  fuel  flow  control  to  a pressure sensitive device which 
responds  to  variations  in  exhaust  gas  pressure  or,  in  the  case  of  electronic  engine  control,  a 
predetermined fuel flow/nozzle area relationship.  Thus, when the nozzle area is increased, afterburner 
fuel flow increases proportionately and vice versa.  The fuel flow, whether in a mechanical or electronic 
system, is adjusted to maintain a constant pressure ratio across the turbine ensuring that the engine is 
unaffected by afterburning regardless of nozzle area or fuel flow.  Nozzle control is effected through the 
pilot’s throttle lever as a continuation of throttle movement beyond the maximum rpm position.  Thus, 
the afterburning operation is an extension of the principle that thrust increases as the throttle is moved 
forward.  As large fuel flows are required for afterburning, an additional fuel pump is necessary.  This 
pump may be of the centrifugal flow or the gear type and is energized automatically when afterburning 
is selected.  The system is fully automatic and incorporates fail-safe features to provide for afterburning 
malfunction.  An example of this type of system is shown diagrammatically in Fig 9. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
3-10 Fig 9 Simplified Nozzle Led Afterburner System (Electronic Control) 
Afterburner Fuel
Control Unit
Nozzle Area
Pilot’s
Nozzle Area/Fuel Flow
Feed Back
Lever
Relationship
Transducer
Nozzle Area
Control
Turbine Pressure
Ratio Transducer
Engine and Environment Control Input
HP Compressor
Turbine Exit
ie Intake Temperature; Intake Pressure;
Pressure
Pressure
HP Compressor Speed,  etc
16.  Pilot Control of Fuel Flow.  With this type of system, the pressure ratio control unit (PRCU) monitors 
the pressure drop across the turbine by sensing the HP compressor/turbine exit pressure ratio.  When the 
pilot  initiates  afterburning,  the  sudden  rise  in  jet  pipe  pressure  alters  the  pressure  ratio.    This  change  is 
sensed by the PRCU which in turn signals the afterburner control system to increase the nozzle area.  As the 
nozzle  area  increases,  the  pressure  ratio  returns  to  its  normal  value,  and  the  PRCU  signals  the  control 
system to halt the nozzle movement and maintain this new area.  When afterburning is reduced or cancelled, 
the nozzle area is decreased to maintain the pressure ratio.  A schematic diagram of this system is shown in 
Fig 10. 
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
3-10 Fig 10 Simplified Fuel Flow Led Afterburner System (Mechanical) 
17.  Control Variations.  Although afterburning is usually operated with the core engine running at its 
max  dry  condition,  there  are  engines  which  are  designed  to  operate  afterburning  outside  of  these 
conditions.    One  system  is  termed  'part  throttle  afterburning'.    This  allows  afterburning  to  be  used 
below the max dry condition and is usually invoked to increase thrust over a wider range of throttle 
settings  when  twin-engine  aircraft  suffer  a  single  engine  failure.    Another  system  is  when  the  core 
engine  can  be  increased  above  its  normal  max  dry  setting  to  increase  overall  thrust  during 
afterburning.    This  system  can  be  termed  'combat'  and  allows  the  core  engine  temperature  to  be 
increased for short periods of time. 
Choice of Ignition and Control Systems 
18.  The  choice  between  the  three  afterburner  ignition  systems  rests  to  some  degree  on  the  relative 
importance  of  fast  ignition  against  reliability.    Spark  and  hot-shot  methods  require  control  systems  that 
inevitably are less reliable than the catalyst method which has no control system other than a fuel feed to 
the  catalyst.    The  catalyst  method,  however,  is  considerably  slower  than  the  hot  shot  or  spark  ignition 
method and its effectiveness depends on the mass flow through the igniter. 
19.  The choice between the nozzle area controlling the fuel flow or vice versa, depends on response 
time  and  the  assessed  relative  importance  of  a  temporary  loss  in  thrust  that  is  inevitable  when 
selecting afterburning with the fuel flow following nozzle area, however, with electronic control this has 
been overcome.  The alternative sequence is where a rise in gas pressure in the jet pipe occurs when 
the afterburner has lit but the nozzle area has not yet had time to increase.  A rise in pressure in the jet 
pipe  can  have  an  undesirable  influence  not  only  on  the  turbine  but  also,  in  the  case  of  a  by-pass 
engine, on the LP compressor as well. 
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
Water Injection 
20.  As the thrust from a gas turbine depends on the mass flow of air passing through it, a reduction in 
the density of the air will produce a corresponding drop in the available thrust.  As density decreases 
with increasing altitude and with increasing temperature, the thrust available for take-off will decrease 
at hot, or high, airfields.  Thrust under these conditions can be restored, or even boosted by as much 
as 30%, for take-off by the use of water injection to increase density of the airflow (Fig 11). 
3-10 Fig 11 Turbofan Thrust Restoration by Water Injection 
110
Thrust Controlled
by Power Limiter
With Water Injection
100
t
s
ru
h
T
Without Water Injection
90
tic
ta
S
x
a
M
%
80
70
-30
-10
10
30
50
Air Temperature (° C)
Methanol is sometimes mixed with the water to act as antifreeze where it also provides an additional source 
of fuel.  On axial flow turbofans, the water/methanol mixture is usually injected directly into the combustion 
chamber (Fig 12).  The mass flow through the turbine is thus increased relative to the compressor, giving a 
smaller turbine pressure and temperature drop, an increase in jet pipe pressure, and therefore, an increase 
in thrust.  The burning of the methanol restores the reduced turbine entry temperature. 
Revised May 10   
Page 11 of 12 

AP3456 - 3-10 - Thrust Augmentation 
 3-10 Fig 12 A Typical Combustion Chamber Water Injection System 
WATER FLOW
Water
SENSING UNIT
Drain
Shut-off Valve
Valve
H.P
Air Inlet Restrictor
Compressor
Air
Air-cooling
Oil Tank
Water Flow
Non-Return
Vent
Valve
Microswitches
Drain
Non-return and
Water Sensing Valve
FROM WATER
TANK
To Fuel Flow
Regulator
Vent
Exhaust
Bearing
Restrictor
Cooling
Metering
Water
TURBINE PUMP
Piston
Flow
Drain
System Drain
Fuel Spray
Valve
Valve
Nozzle
LP Water
HP Water
Cooling Water
HP Air
Oil
Water Jets
Revised May 10   
Page 12 of 12 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
CHAPTER 11 - ENGINE CONTROL AND FUEL SYSTEMS 
ENGINE CONTROL SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS 
Introduction 
1. 
The thrust of a gas turbine engine is controlled by varying the fuel flow by means of a throttle control 
lever.  In practice, it is difficult to measure thrust directly and so a related parameter called the 'Controlled 
Variable' is used to represent it.  The controlled variable normally used is engine percentage rpm, and the 
relationship between thrust and engine rpm is shown in Fig 1. 
3-11 Fig 1 Variation of Thrust with RPM 
t
s
ru
h
T
rpm
In practice, this relationship allows the design of an ideal linear variation of throttle angle with thrust, so that 
50% throttle gives 50% thrust (Fig 2). 
3-11 Fig 2 Ideal Thrust/Throttle Angle Relationship 
t
s
ru
h
T
Throttle Angle
In  order  to  achieve  and  maintain  the  required  thrust  over  a  wide  range  of  operating  conditions,  without 
exceeding engine operating limitations, an automatic fuel control system is used.  A key to abbreviations is 
given in Table 1 at the end of the Chapter. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
General Requirements 
2. 
The  pilot  requires  a  system  which  will  maintain  the  engine  rpm  constant  at  a  selected  value 
irrespective of aircraft altitude, attitude, or speed.  He must be able to change the selected rpm at will, 
and  during  changes  the  engine  must  accelerate  or  decelerate  without  exceeding  its  operating 
limitations.  In summary, the system must: 
a. 
Give overriding rpm control to the pilot. 
b. 
Automatically  meter  fuel  to  keep  rpm  constant  at  selected  value  irrespective  of  ambient 
conditions. 
c. 
Protect against surge, overtemperature and rich extinction during acceleration. 
d. 
Protect against weak extinction during deceleration. 
e. 
Protect against mechanical overloading eg overspeeding, overpressure. 
f. 
Increase  the  idle  rpm  with  altitude  to  maintain  combustion  chamber  pressure  and  prevent 
flame out. 
g. 
Provide easy starting. 
3. 
Choice of Control System.  Fuel control systems fall into two main groupings: 
a. 
Open Loop Control in which fuel flow is scheduled to give a constant rpm for a given throttle 
position.  There  is no feedback, apart from the pilot  watching his rpm gauge, and such systems 
are  therefore  subject  to  drift  with  changing  forward  speed  and  altitude.    Most  hydro-mechanical 
fuel systems fall into this category. 
b. 
Closed  Loop  Control  in  which  the  control  variable  is  measured,  compared  with  a  desired 
value as set by  the pilot  and  any error used to adjust the fuel flow.  The combined acceleration 
and speed control (CASC) and electronic fuel systems are examples of closed loop control. 
HYDRO-MECHANICAL AND CASC MECHANICAL FUEL CONTROL 
System Layout and Control Principle 
4. 
The fuel supply is divided into 2 systems: 
a. 
Low Pressure (LP)  System.  A LP system is provided to supply fuel from the tanks to the 
high-pressure pump at a suitable pressure, temperature, and rate of flow.  The LP pump prevents 
vapour locking and cavitation of the fuel and a heater prevents ice crystals forming.  A fuel filter is 
always used in the system and, in some instances, the fuel is passed through a cooler to cool the 
engine oil.  The LP system is described in more detail in Volume 4, Chapter 10. 
b. 
High  Pressure  (HP)  System.    The  engine  mounted  high-pressure  fuel  system  consists  of 
two main parts: the HP fuel pump and the fuel control unit (FCU) (Fig 3).  The HP pump takes fuel 
from  the  LP  aircraft  fuel  system  and  raises  its  pressure  sufficiently  to  ensure  efficient  burner 
operation.  The FCU includes the throttle valve (a variable area orifice by which the pilot sets his 
required  thrust  level),  and  the  major  automatic  controlling  devices  (barometric  and  acceleration 
controls along with the engine protection devices). 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 3 Engine HP Fuel System 
Input
from
Pilot
Low
High
Fuel
Throttle
To
Pressure
Pressure
Control
Valve
Burners
Fuel
Pump
Unit
5. 
Barometric Control.  The function of the barometric control is to alter fuel flow automatically as the 
airflow changes due to altitude and forward speed, by sensing variations in the intake total air pressure and 
thus maintaining constant rpm at any fixed throttle setting. 
6. 
Acceleration Control.  If the pilot slams open his throttle, fuel flow will increase rapidly.  Because 
of the high inertia of the rotating spool, there will be no immediate increase in engine speed or airflow, 
and  a  back  pressure  will  be  created  causing  the  compressor  to  surge.    The  acceleration  control  unit 
(ACU) controls the fuel flow providing surge-free acceleration. 
7. 
Protection Devices.  Automatic safety devices are built into the FCU to protect the engine; these 
are discussed in para 15. 
8. 
Control Principle.  The hydro-mechanical control system uses the fuel itself as a hydraulic fluid 
to operate the various controlling devices, whilst the combined acceleration and speed control system 
uses mechanical rather than hydro-mechanical control methods. 
The High Pressure Pump 
9. 
The  HP  fuel  pump  receives  fuel  at  about  350  kPa  from  the  aircraft  fuel  system  and  raises  its 
pressure  to  a  level  at  which  efficient  burner  operation  is  possible.    Engines  that  use  atomizers  require 
higher fuel pressure than those employing vaporizers.  There are two types of HP fuel pump in general 
use on gas turbines: the piston-type variable stroke Lucas pump, and the gear-type pump. 
10.  The  Lucas  Pump.    The  Ifield  variable-stroke  pump, originally  designed  as  a  hydraulic  pump,  is 
generally known as the Lucas pump and although it has been fitted on gas turbines since early days, it 
is  still  in  widespread  use.    Although  a  heavy,  rather  complex  unit  it  is  capable  of  very  high  output 
pressures (up to 14 MPa), and the output flow can be varied by altering the pump stroke.  The pump 
has a gearbox driven rotor which has seven cylinders, each containing a piston which is spring-loaded 
outwards against a non-rotating camplate.  The camplate angle relative to the rotor axis can be altered 
by varying the servo piston (see Fig 4) which in turn is controlled by the engine fuel control unit (FCU).  
Variation of this angle regulates the 'stroke' of the pistons as the rotor is turned, and a pumping action 
takes place as the pistons rotate around the angled camplate; pistons that are extending draw in fuel, 
and those being compressed deliver fuel. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 4 Camplate Angle Control 
Camplate
Fuel
Outlet
Piston
Fuel
Inlet
Rotor
Driveshaft
Piston
Position Input from
Fuel Control Unit
11.  The Gear Pump.  The gear-type pump, lighter and simpler than the Lucas pump, is used on the 
majority of modern engines.  Its output is considerably less than that of a piston-type pump, and so it 
is best used with vaporizer or spray nozzle types of burner.  The fuel passes through the pump in the 
spaces between the teeth and the pump casing, the subsequent pressure rise being due to restrictions 
in  the  delivery  side  of  the  pump.    The  pump’s  output  is  always  greater  than  engine  demand  with 
excess fuel flow being spilled back to the inlet side of the pump (Fig 5). 
3-11 Fig 5 Gear Type Pump 
HP
Servo
LP
Hydro-mechanical Control Units 
12.  In  hydro-mechanically  operated  flow  control  units,  the  method  of  control  is  usually  to  use  servo 
fuel as a hydraulic fluid to vary fuel flow (eg by varying Lucas pump camplate angle).  The pressure of 
the servo fuel is varied by controlling the rate of flow out of an orifice at the end of the servo line; the 
higher the outflow, the lower will be servo pressure, and vice versa.  There are two common types of 
variable orifice: the half-ball valve and the kinetic valve. 
a. 
The Half-ball Valve.  In this arrangement, a half-ball on the end of a pivot arm is suspended 
above  the  fixed  outlet  orifice  (Fig  6).    Up  and  down  movement  of  the  valve  varies  servo  fuel 
outflow and thus servo pressure and pump output. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 6 Half-ball Valve Operation 
b. 
The Kinetic Valve.  A line containing pump output fuel is so placed as to discharge on to the 
face of the servo outflow orifice, and the kinetic energy so produced restricts servo fuel bleed.  A 
blade can be moved upwards to interrupt the high-pressure flow; this reduces the impact onto the 
servo  orifice,  thus  causing  a  greater  outflow  and  a  reduction  in  servo  pressure  (Fig  7).    The 
kinetic valve is less prone to dirt blockage than the half-ball type, although it is more complex. 
3-11 Fig 7 Kinetic Valve Operation 
a  Valve Open
Blade
Pump output 
decreasing
Condition 1.
With the kinetic valve in the open
position, the blade separates the opposing flows from
pump delivery and the servo cylinder.  As there is no
opposition to the servo flow, the volume of servo fluid
reduces and the piston moves against the spring 
under the influence of pump delivery pressure.  The 
movement of the piston reduces the pump stroke 
and, therefore, its output.
b  Valve Closed
Pump output 
increasing
Condition 2.
With the valve fully closed, the 
kinetic energy of the pump delivery fuel prevents 
leakage from the servo chamber.  Servo fuel 
pressure therefore increases and, with the 
assistance of the spring, overcomes the pump 
delivery pressure, thus moving the piston to increase 
the pump stroke and output.
c  Valve Intermediate
Pump output 
constant
Condition 3.
Under steady running conditions, the 
valve assumes an intermediate position such that the 
servo fuel and spring pressures exactly balance the 
pump delivery pressure.
HP fuel
Servo
13.  Barometric Controls.  The function of barometric control is to alter fuel flow to the burners with 
changes  in  intake  total  pressure  (P1)  and  pilot’s  throttle  movement.    Two  types,  using  the  half-ball 
valve method of controlling servo fuel pressure, are described below. 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
a. 
Simple Flow Control.  The simple flow control unit (Fig 8) comprises a half-ball valve acting 
on  servo  fuel  bleed,  the  position  of  which  is  determined  by  the  action  of  an  evacuated  capsule 
subjected  to  P1  air  pressure  and  a  piston  subjected  to  the  same  pressure  drop  as  the  throttle 
valve.    Fuel  from  the  pump  passes  at  pump  pressure  PP  through  the  throttle,  where  it 
experiences a pressure drop to burner pressure (PB).  The response to P1 and throttle variations 
can now be examined. 
3-11 Fig 8 Simple Flow Control 
Vacuum
l
P
Half Ball
Valve
Fulcrum
B
P urner
Servo Bleed
PPump
Throttle
Valve
To Burners
PBurner
P
P ump
From Pump
(1)  P1  Variations.    If  the  aircraft  climbs,  P1  will  fall,  causing  the  capsule  to  expand  and 
raise the half-ball valve against the spring force.  Servo pressure will fall, camplate angle will 
reduce,  and  fuel  pump  output  will  reduce.    The  reduced  flow  will  cause  a  reduced  throttle 
pressure drop. 
(2)  Throttle  Variations.    If  the  pilot  opens  the  throttle,  the  throttle  orifice  area  increases, 
throttle pressure drop reduces causing the piston to move down, allowing the spring to lower 
the  half-ball  valve  against  the  capsule  force,  thus  increasing  servo  pressure  and  pump 
output.    The  increased  fuel  flow  restores  the  throttle  pressure  drop  to  its  original  value, 
returning the half-ball valve to its sensitive position. 
Simple flow control keeps the throttle pressure drop constant at a given P1, regardless of throttle 
position.  At very high altitude the system becomes insensitive and is not used on large engines, 
however, it has proved a reliable and fairly accurate control unit. 
b. 
Proportional  Flow  Control.    The  Proportional  Flow  Control  Unit  (Fig  9)  was  designed  for 
use on large engines  with  a  wide range  of fuel flows  by  operating  the controlling elements on a 
proportion of the main flow.  The proportion varies over the flow range, so that at low flows a high 
proportion  is  used  for  control,  and  at  high  flows,  a  smaller  proportion.    Fuel  passes  into  the 
controlling (or secondary) line through a fixed orifice to the LP side of the pump.  Secondary flow 
is controlled by a diaphragm-operated proportioning valve, which maintains equal pressure drops 
across the throttle valve and secondary orifice.  Servo pressure is controlled by a half-ball valve 
operated by P1 and by secondary pressure. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 9 Proportional Flow Control Unit 
Pump
Throttle Valve
PLP
P
P ump
B
P urner
To Burners
Secondary 
Proportioning
Vacuum
Orifice
Valve
l
P
Servo Flow
Fixed 
Orifice
Sensing 
Unit
(1)  Throttle  Variations.    If  the  throttle  is  opened,  its  pressure  drop  is  reduced,  and  the 
proportioning  valve  closes  until  the  pressures  across  the  diaphragm  are  equalized.    Thus 
secondary  flow  and  pressure  are  reduced,  the  piston  drops,  the  half-ball  valve  closes  and 
pump stroke increases.  The increased fuel flow increases secondary pressure until the half-
ball  valve  resumes  its  sensitive  position,  but  the  proportioning  valve  remains  more  closed 
than previously, taking a smaller proportion of the increased flow. 
(2)  P1  Variations.    An  increase  in  P1  will  cause  the  capsule  to  contract,  thus  altering  the 
position  of  the  half-ball  valve  and  increasing  fuel  flow.    This  tends  to  cause  rapid  rises  in 
secondary  pressure  with  resultant  instability;  damping  is  provided  by  the  sensing  valve, 
which opens to increase the outflow to LP, thus reducing secondary pressure.  The valve is 
contoured  to  operate  only  over  a  small  range  of  pressure  drops,  so  that  during  throttle 
movements it acts as a fixed orifice. 
14.  Acceleration  Control  Units.    The  function  of  the  Acceleration  Control  Unit  (ACU)  is  to  provide 
surge-free acceleration during rapid throttle openings.  There are two main types of hydro-mechanical 
ACU currently used. 
a. 
The  Flow Type  ACU.   With  the  flow  type  ACU  (Fig  10),  the  fuel  passes  through  an  orifice 
containing  a  contoured  plunger;  the  pressure  drop  across  the  orifice  is  also  sensed  across  a 
diaphragm  which  is  attached  to  a  half-ball  valve  acting  on  pump  servo  bleed.    An  evacuated 
capsule,  subjected  to  LP  compressor  outlet  pressure  (P2),  operates  a  half-ball  valve  acting  on 
plunger servo bleed fuel, which controls plunger position. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 10 Flow Type Acceleration Control Unit 
To Burners
P2
PB
Plunger
Vacuum
Servo
Bleed
P
From
Pump
Pump
PP
PB
Pump
Servo
Plunger
PS
To Low Pressure
Diaphragm
Plunger Servo
(1)  Operation.    When  the  throttle  is  slammed  open,  the  pump  moves  towards  maximum 
stroke  and  fuel  flow  increases.    The  increased  flow  through  the  ACU  orifice  increases  the 
pressure  drop  across  it,  and  the  diaphragm  moves  to  the  right,  raising  the  half-ball  valve, 
reducing pump servo pressure and so restricting pump stroke.  The engine now speeds up in 
response  to  the  limited  overfuelling,  and  P2  rises,  compressing  the  capsule.    The  plunger 
servo-ball  valve  rises,  plunger  servo  pressure  drops,  and  the  plunger  falls  until  arrested  by 
the  increased  spring  force.    The  orifice  size  increases,  pressure  drop  reduces,  and  the 
diaphragm  moves  to  the  left,  closing  the  half-ball  valve  and  increasing  fuel  flow  in  direct 
proportion to the increase in P2. 
(2)  The  Air  Switch.    In  order  to  keep  the  acceleration  line  close  to  the  surge  line,  it  is 
necessary to control on 'split P2' initially and then on full P2 at higher engine speeds.  This is 
achieved  by  the  air  switch  (or  P1/P2  switch)  shown  in  Fig  11.    At  low  speeds,  P2  passes 
through  a  plate  valve  to  P1,  and  the  control  capsule  is  operated  by  reduced,  or  split  P2
pressure.  As engine speed builds up, P2 increases until it becomes large enough to close the 
plate valve, and control is then on full P2. 
3-11 Fig 11 Air Switch 
2
P Inlet
Split P Chamber
2
P Spill
1
Plunger
Servo
Bleed
Differential
Evacuated
Bellows
Control
Capsule
Plate Valve
Evacuated
Capsule
b. 
The  Dashpot  Throttle.    The  dashpot  throttle  consists  of  a  sliding  servo  controlled  throttle 
valve  whose  position  is  determined  by  a  control  valve  attached  to  the  pilot’s  lever  (Fig  12).  
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
During initial acceleration the control valve moves to restrict the flow of throttle servo fuel to low 
pressure; throttle servo  pressure rises and so the throttle piston moves to  the left, uncovering a 
larger throttle sleeve area  and so reducing throttle pressure drop.  This is sensed by the simple 
flow control barometric unit, which increases the pump stroke, and overfuelling is controlled below 
the surge line  by the designed rates of movement in the dashpot.  During final acceleration, the 
control  valve  uncovers  an  annulus  which  allows  a  further  flow  of  HP  fuel  to  throttle  servo, 
therefore increasing throttle valve movement, and subsequently increasing the acceleration rate. 
3-11 Fig 12 Dashpot Throttle 
Throttle Lever
Throttle Valve Control Valve
Annulus
a  Closed Position
c  Final Acceleration
FUEL PRESSURES
Pump Delivery
Low Pressure
Throttle Outlet
Throttle Servo
Throttle Control
b  Initial Acceleration
Engine Protection Devices 
15.  There  are  three  types  of  protection  device  used  in  the  hydro-mechanical  fuel  system  -  top 
temperature limiter, power limiter, and overspeed governor.  These ensure that engine limitations are 
not exceeded, and therefore prevent damage. 
a. 
Top Temperature Limiter (Fig 13).  Turbine gas  temperature (TGT) may be  measured by 
thermocouples  or  pyrometers.   When  maximum  temperature  is  reached,  these  pass  a  signal  to 
an amplifier which in turn signals the fuel system to reduce the pump output. 
3-11 Fig 13 Top Temperature Limiter 
Thermocouples
LP
Solenoid
Amplifier
Servo
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
b. 
Power Limiter (Fig 14).  A power limiter is fitted to  some engines to prevent overstressing 
due to excessive compressor outlet pressure during high-speed, low altitude running.  The limiter 
takes  the  form  of  a  half-ball  valve  which  is  opened  against  a  spring  force  when  LP  compressor 
outlet pressure (P2) reaches its maximum value.  The half-ball valve bleeds off air pressure to the 
ACU control capsule, thus causing the ACU to reduce pump output. 
3-11 Fig 14 Power Limiter 
Compressor
Intake
Delivery
Pressure
Pressure (P )
1
P
2
ACU Capsule
Split
from Air Switch
2
P
c. 
Overspeed  Governor  (Fig  15).    The  engine  is  protected  against  overspeeding  by  a 
governor  which,  in  hydro-mechanical  systems,  is  usually  fitted  on  the  fuel  pump  and  acts  by 
bleeding off pump servo fuel when the governed speed is reached.  On multi-spool engines, the 
pump  is  driven  from  the  HP  shaft  and  the  LP  shaft  may  be  protected  by  an  electro-mechanical 
device, again acting through the hydro-mechanical control system. 
3-11 Fig 15 Overspeed Governor 
Complete System Diagrams 
16.  Figs 16 and 17 show schematic diagrams of two common types of fuel system.  Fig 16 illustrates 
a  pressure  control  fuel  system  where  acceleration  control  is  exercised  through  a  dashpot  throttle, 
whilst  Fig  17  shows  a  proportional  flow  system.    It  can  readily  be  seen  that  the  pressure  control 
system is far simpler than the proportional type. 
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 16 Pressure Control System 
Servo Control Diaphragm
Servo
Spill Valve
Evacuated Capsule
LP
HP Shaft Governor
(hydro-mechanical)
Spill Valve
LP
Spill Valve
Rotating
Spill Valve
FLOW
CONTROL
Solenoid
Pressure
Drop Control
Diaphragm
From
Amplifier
FUEL PUMP
LP SPEED LIMITER AND
GAS TEMPERATURE CONTROL
Throttle Valve
Ported Sleeve
Main Fuel
Servo Spring
Control Valve
Spray Nozzle
Back Pressure
Throttle Lever
LP
Valve
Shut
DASHPOT THROTTLE
Start
Start Fuel
Open
Spray Nozzle
LP fuel
Servo pressure
HP
Shut-off valve
LP
Pump delivery (HP fuel)
Governor pressure
FUEL CONTROL UNIT
Throttle control pressure
Temperature trim signal
Throttle servo pressure
Air intake pressure
Throttle outlet pressure
Revised May 10   
Page 11 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 17 Proportional Flow Control System 
DISTRIBUTION PRESSURES
LP fuel
Hydro-Mechanical
Pump delivery (HP fuel)
Governor
Throttle inlet
Throttle outlet
Primary fuel
Main fuel
CONTROLLING FUEL PRESSURES
FUEL PUMP
Proportional
ACU servo
flow
Servo Piston
Servo control
Governor
CONTROLLING AIR PRESSURES
Proportioning Valve
Sensing Valve
Proportioning
Reduced compressor
Air intake
Altitude
Valve Unit
delivery
Sensing Unit
Compressor
Air switch
delivery
Idling Speed
Gas Temperature
Governor
Thermocouples
TEMPERATURE
CONTROL
SIGNAL AMPLIFIER
Restrictors
Pressure 
Drop
LP Shaft
Speed Signal
Control
Solenoid
FUEL SPRAY
Minimum Flow Valve
NOZZLES
Idling Valve
Throttle Valve and SOC
Distribution
Weights
Fuel Metering
Plunger
Throttle and Pressurizing
Power
Valve Unit
Limiter
Air Switch
Acceleration Control Unit
CASC Mechanical Fuel System 
17.  A  fully  mechanical  fuel  control  system,  known  as  a  Combined  Acceleration  and  Speed  Control 
(CASC)  was  developed  to  overcome  problems  with  earlier  hydro-mechanical  systems  by  eliminating 
small orifices prone to dirt blockage.  Fig 18 shows a simplified form of the main components within a 
CASC system. 
Revised May 10   
Page 12 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 18 Combined Acceleration and Speed Control System 
18.  Description.  The principle fuel-metering device is a variable metering orifice (VMO) which consists 
of a triangular hole cut in a rotating hollow sleeve.  The sleeve also slides under the control of a capsule 
stack  subjected  to  split  HP  compressor  delivery  pressure  (P3)  varying  the  effective  area  of  the  VMO 
through which the main fuel flow passes.  A non-rotating outer sleeve fits over the VMO and slides back 
and forth under the control of the speed governor.  Downstream of the VMO, the fuel passes through the 
pressure  drop  governor  variable  orifice,  whose  position  is  determined  by  the  pressure  drop  across  the 
VMO  and  engine  speed,  then  through  the  LP  shaft  governor  to  the  burners.    Fuel  pump  output  is 
controlled by variations in burner pressure, which is used as pump servo pressure. 
19.  Operation
a. 
Throttle  Movement.    When  the  pilot  opens  his  throttle,  a  spring  is  compressed  which 
causes  the  outer  sleeve  to  slide  against  the  speed  control  governor  force.    The  VMO  area  is 
increased, the pressure drop across it is reduced, and so the pressure drop across the pressure 
drop  control  valve  also  reduces.    The  pressure  drop  control  orifice  area  increases,  burner 
pressure increases and so pump stroke increases.  The increase in engine speed then increases 
the  governor  forces,  which  arrest  the  movement  of  the  outer  VMO  and  pressure  drop  control 
sleeves. 
b. 
Acceleration  Control.    If  the  pilot  opens  his  throttle  rapidly,  the  outer  VMO  sleeve  is 
restricted  by  a  fixed  acceleration  stop  which  prevents  excessive  overfuelling.    As  the  engine 
responds  to  the  limited  overfuelling,  the  capsule  stack  contracts,  pulling  down  the  inner  VMO 
sleeve, increasing VMO area, and thus increasing fuel flow. 
c. 
Barometric  Control.    Barometric  control  is  effected  by  means  of  the  capsule  stack  that 
controls acceleration.  Changes in air mass flow will affect split P3 and so move the VMO sleeve, 
automatically trimming fuel flow to maintain constant engine speed at constant throttle setting. 
d. 
Governors.    HP  shaft  speed  is  controlled  by  the  speed  governor  in  the  fuel  flow  regulator, 
which reduces VMO size by moving the outer sleeve if maximum HP speed is reached.  The LP 
shaft  governor  operates  by  overcoming  a  spring  force  once  maximum  LP  rpm  is  reached;  this 
Revised May 10   
Page 13 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
increases  the  pressure  drop  across  the  governor-controlled  orifice  and  so  reduces  pump  servo 
pressure, thus reducing fuel flow. 
e. 
Temperature  Control.    If  maximum  turbine  entry  temperature  is  reached,  an  electro-
mechanical  device  repositions  a  fulcrum  in  the  throttle  linkage.    This  has  the  same  effect  as 
closing the throttle manually. 
ELECTRONIC FUEL CONTROL 
Introduction 
20.  Electronic  fuel  control  is  increasingly  used  for  engine  management,  allowing  the  engine  to 
achieve its maximum potential under all operating conditions, with fewer design and weight penalties 
on  the  overall  aircraft  structure.    With  electronic  control,  all  throttle  movements  are  transmitted  by 
electrical cable (fly-by-wire), although some single-engine aircraft may additionally have a mechanical 
control system as back-up.  Engines with electronic fuel control still require an HP fuel system which 
actually  regulates  the  fuel  flow  to  the  burners,  but  the  entire  process  is  controlled  by  an  Electronic 
Engine Control Unit (EECU), which is basically an analogue or digital computer situated between the 
throttle control and the engine (Fig 19). 
3-11 Fig 19 Simplified Layout of Electronic Engine Control System 
Pressure
N
N
T
TBT
L
H
1
Relief
Valve
Gun Firing
Lane 1
Engine
P−S
Control
Lane 2
Pa
Unit
P2 
Lane 1
I
Acceleration
P
Control
2
Lane 2
Overboard
Throt
Variable
Fuel T
Main
Metering
Pump
Orifice
Pressure
Shut
From
Dump
Raising
-off
Filter
Valve
Valve
Cock
To
Vaporizers
Check
NH
Valve
Pressure
Recirculation
Drop
To Starter
Valve
Unit
Jets
Control
NH
Emergency
Emergency
N
Lectric
L
Information
Spill
Pressure
N
Valve
H
Control
Mechanical
See Table 1 for Key
21.  State-of-the-art  hydro-mechanical  controls  are  very  reliable,  and  failures  are  rarely 
catastrophic.    On  the  other  hand,  electronic  controls  either  work  or  do  not  work,  and  impending 
failure cannot be detected by physical inspection.  Any catastrophic failure tendency of electronic 
control  systems  can  be  ameliorated  by  improved  hardware,  software,  quality  control,  built-in  test 
equipment  (BITE)  checks,  and  reversion  to  an  alternate  back-up  system.    The  addition  of  an 
Revised May 10   
Page 14 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
alternate back-up system (or lane) allows the system to continue critical and vital functions in the 
presence of faults. 
System Layout and Control Principle 
22.  Description.    An  electronic  fuel  control  system  may  consist  of  three  main  parts:  an  engine-
mounted  HP  pump  (see  para  9)  and  fuel  flow  regulator  (FFR)  with  an  engine  or  airframe-mounted 
EECU.  The system described is based on the Tornado engine.  The HP fuel pump performs the same 
task as on the previous fuel systems but being of the gear type, is designed to provide a greater flow 
rate for a given rpm than required,  with  the excess diverted  back to the  inlet side of the  pump.  The 
fuel flow regulator comprises a fuel metering unit, shut-off cock, pressure raising valve and emergency 
fuel spill valve.  All control functions such as acceleration, altitude and flight conditions are carried out 
by the EECU. 
23.  Fuel  Metering  Control.    Fuel  metering  control  is  carried  out  by  the  variable  metering  orifice 
(VMO) and the  pressure drop unit (PDU).  The  VMO  (Fig 20) consists  of a piston, kinetic  valve, and 
two opposing bellows.  The piston is subjected to HP pump pressure on one side and servo pressure 
on  the  other.    The  kinetic  valve  is  attached  to  the  piston  by  a  spring  whose  tension  varies  with  the 
position  of  the  piston.    Two  opposing  bellows,  subjected  to  compressor  delivery  pressures,  are 
connected to the kinetic valve in order to control acceleration rates.  The Pressure Drop Relief Valve 
(PDR)  varies  the  amount  of  HP  fuel  passed  back  to  the  LP  side  of  the  pump  depending  on  the 
pressure drop across the VMO piston. 
3-11 Fig 20 Variable Metering Orifice and Pressure Drop Control Unit 
Main Pump
Damping
Inlet Pressure
Bellows
KP
HP Pump Pressure
2
Relief Valve
Capsules
Kinetic
Valve
VMO
HP 
From Filter
P
Pump
2 I
To Burners
Servo
HP Pressure
Pressure
Piston
Variable
Pressure
Metering
VMO Downstream
Drop Control
HP Fuel
Orifice
Pressure
To Main
Pump Inlet
Modified Downstream
Pressure
Revised May 10   
Page 15 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
24.  Shut-off Cock.  The shut-off cock consists of a shuttle valve, the position of which is determined 
by  the  control  of  two  solenoid  valves  that  vary  the  fuel  pressure  at  the  two  ends  of  the  valve.    The 
sequence of operation is shown in Fig 21. 
3-11 Fig 21 Opening and Closing Sequence of Fuel Shut-off Cock 
To Main
Closing
Pump Inlet
Solenoid
From Main
Pump
To Burners
To Burners
From Main
Pump
From 
From 
Pressure
Pressure
Raising 
Raising 
Shut-off Cock
Valve
Valve
From
From
To Main
Variable
Variable
Pump
Metering
Metering
Orifice
Orifice
Solenoid
Opening
To Starter Jets
To Starter Jets
Purging
Flow
De-energized
During Starting Cycle
During Starting Cycle
Steady Running
Shut-down
Below 25% N
Above 25% N
H
H
25.  Pressure Raising Valve.  This is a valve situated downstream of the VMO and is placed there to 
maintain  a  minimum  pressure  to  the  burners  under  low  flow  conditions.    Fig  22  shows  the  full  FFR 
system. 
Revised May 10   
Page 16 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 22 Fuel Flow Regulator 
Acceleration
Controller
Closing
Solenoid
Valve
Elliot Flowmeter
Shut-off
To Atmosphere
Cock
Pressure Raising Valve
Dump
Emergency
Emergency
Valve
Spill Valve
LPC
Opening
Solenoid
Valve
Check
Valve
To Main Pump Inlet
To Main Pump Inlet
26.  Electronic Engine Control Unit (EECU).  The EECU is an analogue or digital computer situated 
between the throttle and FFR.  It continually monitors throttle movement and various engine and flight 
parameters,  and  signals  a  programmed  response  to  the  FFR  to  increase  or  reduce  fuel  flow 
accordingly.  As it may receive conflicting information, the control unit uses a 'Lowest Fuel Wins' filter 
circuit  before  sending  a  signal  to  the  FFR.    The  lowest  fuel  wins  circuit  receives  all  the  control  and 
limitation  signals  that  govern  the  engine  performance,  its  task  being  to  compare  all  the  information 
concerning  the  flight  conditions  of  the  engine  and  allow  only  those  demands  that  do  not  exceed  its 
performance  limitations.    Thus,  a  demand  for  more  fuel  will  be  countermanded  if  the  increase  will 
exceed engine limitations - hence the term 'lowest fuel wins'. 
27.  Control Principle.  The main interface between the FFR and the EECU is an acceleration control 
unit.  This unit, which is a solenoid operated control valve, controls the compressor delivery pressure 
in the VMO bellows and thus the pressure drop across the piston.  Signals to the solenoid are split into 
two or more separate lanes to enable a certain amount of redundancy to be tolerated by the system.  
The  system  described  relies  on  a  'low  volts  high  fuel  flow'  response  which  will  cause  uncontrolled 
acceleration of the engine should there be a power failure.  On some systems, there is no mechanical 
back-up to limit engine over-speed, so complete power failure will result in severe engine damage. 
Engine Control 
28.  Operation. 
a. 
Throttle Movement.  The pilot’s throttle lever is connected to a demand unit which produces 
an electrical signal inversely proportional to the lever angle.  This signal is conditioned by the EECU 
and fed to an error unit (EU), which also receives a signal from the engine speed generator.  The 
Revised May 10   
Page 17 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
EU  compares  the  two  signals  and  if  a  difference  exists,  sends  a  signal  to  the  FFR  acceleration 
control solenoid via the 'Lowest Fuel Wins' circuit (Fig 23). 
3-11 Fig 23 Engine Throttle Control 
Governor
Shaper
EU
'Lowest
Fuel
Wins'
LPC Coil
Pulse Probe
Circuit
N
Frequency (f) to
H
DC Converter
b. 
Acceleration  Control.    The  rate  of  acceleration  is  controlled  by  limiting  movement  of  the 
VMO  so  that  fuel  flow  is  a  function  of  the  compressor  pressure  ratio.    The  kinetic  valve  is 
operated by two bellows (Fig 24), one open to HP compressor inlet pressure P2I, and the other to 
a modified compressor outlet pressure KP2.  KP2 is affected by two fixed restrictors and a variable 
restrictor, the size of which is controlled by a plate valve.  The plate valve is attached to a beam 
whose  position  is  varied  by  the  acceleration  control  solenoid.   When  an  acceleration  demand  is 
sensed,  the  beam  and  the  plate  valve  reduce  the  air  bleed  from  the  variable  restrictor.    This  in 
turn  causes  a  pressure  rise  in  the  KP2  bellows  which  deflects  the  kinetic  valve  upwards 
increasing  the  fuel  spill  from  the  servo  side  of  the  piston,  thus  increasing  the  pressure  drop 
across the piston (see Fig 20).  The rate of acceleration is further limited by a function called NH
dot.    This  parameter  compares  the  free  stream  total  pressure  (Po)  and  varies  the  rate  of 
acceleration  accordingly.    There  is  a  separate  EECU  control  function,  called  –NH  dot,  which 
controls the rate of deceleration. 
3-11 Fig 24 Acceleration Control 
Deceleration Stop
Acceleration Stop
Lane 1
Plate Valve
Lane 2
Fixed Restrictors
Acceleration
P2p
Control
KP =   Artificial Value
2
P
Solenoid
   of P   from EECU
2
2
KP2
Kinetic Valve
Venturi
Control Beam
P2I
c. 
Environmental  Control.    Changes  in  atmospheric  pressure,  temperature  and  Mach  number, 
are accounted for by the EECU and the output sent to the VMO via the lowest fuel wins circuit. 
d. 
Control  Limits.    Turbine  Blade  Temperature  (TBT)  limit  is  again  controlled  by  the  EECU, 
however, compressor speed limits, on this example, are controlled by a separate control system 
which  signals  a  separate  coil  on  the  FFR  to  bleed  fuel  flow  from  the  burner  feed  back  to  LP 
should the compressor speeds exceed their pre-determined limit (Fig 25). 
Revised May 10   
Page 18 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
3-11 Fig 25 Emergency Compressor Overspeed Control 
N
f-dc
EU1
H
Converter
NH
Datum
Highest
Emergency
% RPM
Lectric Pressure
Control Driver
NL
Wins
Datum
Emergency
LPC Coil
N
f-dc
L
Converter
EU2
29.  Complete Electronic Engine Control System.  Fig 26 shows an example of a complete EECU 
system.  The operation of some of the circuits have been described in the preceding paragraphs.  It will 
be seen that from a multitude of input signals to the EECU there is only one output signal to the FFR.  
This  type  of  arrangement  allows  a  relatively  simple  engine  HP  fuel  system  whilst  at  the  same  time 
enabling  a  comprehensive  and  flexible  control  system.    As  there  is  no  direct  link  between  the  pilot’s 
lever,  and  since  all  signals  are  fed  into  the  EECU,  if  the  pilot’s  demands  exceed  the  performance 
limitations  as  programmed  into  the  EECU,  the  EECU  will  override  or  modify  the  input.    The  EECU 
example in Fig 26 also controls the operation of the compressor bleed valves thus controlling all aspects 
of  engine  performance  -  this  type  is  termed  a  Full  Authority  Digital  Engine  Control  (FADEC).    Another 
system,  the  Full  Authority  Fuel  Control  (FAFC),  controls  the  engine  fuel  system  only;  existing  engine 
control functions manage compressor airflow control. 
3-11 Fig 26 Schematic Diagram of EECU 
Rating
Datum Selector
Switch
TBT
Temperature
1
T
Low
EU 1
Function
0
P
Generator
Min. Idle
Combat
Datum
Governor
Highest
Highest
Shaper
Fuel Wins
Fuel Wins
P−S (Dynamic)
EU 2
Idle Function
Pa (Ambient)
Generator
1
T
−N   Dot Datum
H
EU 3
NH
f-dc Converter
P
 N   Dot Datum
0
H
EU 4
LPC Coil
1
L
EU 5
f-dc Converter
IP
N
L
L
Blow-off Valve
EU 6
f-dc Converter
Coil
N
IP  Blow-off
H
Valve Driver
X-Drive
HP 6 Blow-off 
Valve Driver
Gun Firing
P0
HP 6
−N Dot
LPC
 N Dot
H
H
Blow-off Valve
Ignition
Auto Ignition
Coil
Circuit
N
Logic Circuit
P
See Table 1 for Key
H
0
Revised May 10   
Page 19 of 20 

AP3456 -3-11 - Engine Control and Fuel Systems 
Table 1 Key to Abbreviations and Symbols 
P0
Free Stream Total Pressure 
NH
HP Compressor RPM 
P1
Intake Total Pressure 
NL
LP Compressor RPM 
P2
LP Compressor Output Pressure (HP 
NH dot 
Acceleration Control Parameter 
Compressor Input Pressure) 
P2I
HP Compressor Input Pressure 
–NH dot 
Deceleration Control Parameter 
KP2
Artificial value of P2 for acceleration 
T1
Exhaust Gas Temperature 
control 
Split P2
Reduced LP Compressor Output 
ACU 
Acceleration Control Unit 
Pressure 
P3
HP Compressor Output Pressure 
CASC 
Combined Acceleration and Speed 
Control 
Pa
Ambient Pressure 
EECU 
Electronic Engine Control Unit 
PB
Burner Pressure 
EU 
Error Unit 
PP
Pump Pressure 
FCU 
Fuel Control Unit 
PS
Servo Pressure 
FFR 
Fuel Flow Regulator 
P-S 
Dynamic Pressure (D+S)–S) 
LPC 
Lectric Pressure Control 
Revised May 10   
Page 20 of 20 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
CHAPTER 12 - COOLING AND LUBRICATION 
ENGINE COOLING AND SEALING 
Introduction 
1. 
The  internal  operating  temperatures  of  a  gas  turbine  are  very  high  so  that,  if  no  cooling  was 
provided,  excessive  heat  would  be  transmitted  to  engine  components  and,  in  some  instances,  to 
external accessories.  Cooling of internal components is by the use of air taken from the compressor 
and the use of lubricating oil.  When air is used, it is directed to flow around the components and, as it 
is under pressure, it is also used to provide internal oil seals and pressurization for the engine bearing 
housing and drive shafts.  External heat shields are used to prevent excessive heat being transmitted 
to external accessories. 
Internal Cooling 
2. 
Various  methods  are  used  to  cool  components  and,  in  some  cases,  the  same  system  may  be 
required to cool more than one component. 
3. 
Combustion  Chamber  Components.    The  combustion  chamber  entry  wall  and  the  flame  tube 
are cooled by imposing a layer of air between the parts to be cooled and the hot gases.  The outer wall 
of the combustion chamber is cooled by taking a proportion of the cooler compressor delivery air and 
ducting  it between the outer wall and flame tube.  The flame tube itself is protected from the burning 
gases  by  compressor  delivery  air  being  progressively  admitted  through  a  series  of  annular  slots 
throughout the length of the tube.  Further reference to combustion chamber cooling can be found in 
Volume 3, Chapter 7. 
4. 
Turbine  Assembly.    The  turbine  entry  temperature  (TET)  is  the  limiting  factor  on  gas  turbine 
output.    With  more  advanced  cooling  techniques  of  the  turbine  components,  allowing  higher TETs to 
be  accepted,  a  greater  power  output  is  achieved.    The  methods  of  cooling  turbine  components  are 
covered in Volume 3, Chapter 8. 
5. 
Main Shaft and Main Bearings.  Main shafts are cooled by LP compressor air or by-pass air fed 
through  the  bearing  housing  and  into  the  hollow  shaft.    Main  bearings  are  cooled  by  lubricating  oil.  
Fig 11 in Volume 3, Chapter 8 clearly shows the general cooling air flows. 
6. 
Accessories, Accessory Drives and Reduction Gears.  Excess heat due to friction in gears is 
normally  conducted  away  by  the  lubricating  oil.    However,  some  of  the  engine-mounted  accessories 
(notably  the  electrical  generator)  produce  considerable  heat  and  usually  require  their  own  cooling 
systems.    Atmospheric  air,  ducted  through  intake  louvres,  is  often  used  for  this  purpose,  or  air  may  be 
tapped  from  the  compressor.    In  the  case  of  an  accessory  being  cooled  by  atmospheric  air,  provision 
must  be  made  for  cooling  during  ground  running.    An  induced  airflow  can  be  provided  either  by 
connecting  an  external  rig  to  the  component,  or  by  designing  the  engine  system  to  eject  compressor 
delivery air through nozzles situated in the cooling air outlet duct of the accessory.  This high velocity air 
exhausting through the nozzles creates a low-pressure area at the outlet duct, therefore, inducing a flow 
into the intake louvres and through the cooling system.  Fig 1 shows a typical generator cooling system. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
3-12 Fig 1 Generator Cooling System 
Pressure
Control Valve
Air Tapping
From Compressor
Generator
From
Intake
Louvres
Ejector
Outlet Duct
7. 
Lubricating Oil.  In older types of engine, particularly those using a total loss system of oil feed to 
the  rear  main  bearing,  it  was  found  unnecessary  to  incorporate  an  oil  cooler.    Modern  engines, 
however, require the use of an oil cooler to cope with the higher peak temperature employed and the 
use  of  the  full  flow  oil  supply  to  the  rear  bearing.    The  problem  is  also  aggravated  by  the  increasing 
number of accessory drive gears used on modern engines. 
External Cooling 
8. 
The  engine  bay  and  pod  can  usually  be  cooled  sufficiently  by  atmospheric  air  which  is  ducted 
around  the  engine  and  then  vented  back  to  the  atmosphere.    Convection  cooling  of  the  engine  bay 
during ground running can be achieved by using an internal cooling outlet vent as an ejector system as 
described in para 6.  A typical cooling system for an engine pod installation is shown in Fig 2. 
3-12 Fig 2 Typical Cooling and Ventilation System 
Zone 1
Fireproof Bulkhead
Zone 2
9. 
The  cooling  airflow  also  serves  to  purge  the  engine  bay  or  pod  of  flammable  vapours  which 
otherwise accumulate there.  The airflow must, however, be kept to a minimum commensurate with the 
quantity of fire extinguishant.  Too high an airflow will remove the extinguishant before it has had time 
to be effective. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
10.  Fire-proof  bulkheads  (Fig  2)  are  built  into  engine  compartments  to  divide  them  into  various 
temperature zones.  The 'cool' zone houses the fuel, oil, hydraulic and electrical components, together 
with  as  much  of  their  associated  systems  as  is  possible.    The  zones  can  be  maintained  at  different 
pressures to prevent the spread of any fire from the 'hot' zone. 
11.  A high by-pass ratio turbofan engine requires a more complicated cooling system.  In the example 
shown  in  Fig  3,  cooling  air  is  taken  from  both  the  intake  duct  (light  blue)  and  the  fan  (dark blue)  to 
provide multi-zone cooling. 
3-12 Fig 3 Turbofan Cooling and Ventilation 
Internal Sealing 
12.  Cooling air is used to provide internal sealing of the lubrication system.  The air, under pressure, is 
directed inwards towards the bearings or oil supply, thus preventing the escape of oil from the bearing 
surface.  Various types of oil and air seals are used; thread and continuous groove type also known as 
labyrinth seals, are most commonly found, with others such as ring, hydraulic and carbon seals used 
for particular situations.  The latest type of seal to be used is the brush seal which comprises a static 
ring of wire bristles bearing against a hard ceramic coating on the rotating shaft.  Fig 4 illustrates the 
various methods of sealing.  As the oil seal reduces the working clearances between rotating and static 
members, it is essential that the rotating items run true and that the clearance is maintained throughout 
the operating range of temperatures. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
3-12 Fig 4 Air and Oil Seals 
a  Fluid and Abradable Lined Labrinth Seal
b  Continuous Groove Interstage (Labyrinth) 
Air Seal
Abradable Lining
Rotating Annulus of Oil
c  Thread-type (Labyrinth) Oil Seal
d  Ring-type Oil Seal
e  Intershaft Hydraulic Seal
f  Carbon Seal
Spring
Carbon
g Sea  
l Brush
Sealing Air
Oil
Rotating Assemblies
Ceramic Coating
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
LUBRICATION 
Introduction 
13.  There is always friction when two surfaces are in contact and moving, for even apparently smooth 
surfaces  have  small  undulations,  minute  projections  and  depressions,  and  actually  touch  at  only  a 
comparatively  few  points.    Motion  makes  the  small  projections  catch  on  each  other  and,  even  at  low 
speeds  when  the  surface  as  a  whole  is  cool,  intense  local  heat  may  develop  leading  to  localized 
welding,  and  subsequent  damage  as  the  two  surfaces  are  torn  apart.    At  higher  speeds,  and  over 
longer  periods,  intense  heat  may  develop  and  cause  expansion  and  subsequent  deformation  of  the 
entire surface; in extreme cases, large areas may be melted by the heat, causing the metal surfaces to 
weld together. 
Lubrication Theory 
14.  There are two basic phases of lubrication; Hydrodynamic (or film) lubrication where the surfaces 
concerned  are  separated  by  a  substantial  quantity  of  oil,  and  Boundary  lubrication,  where  the  oil  film 
may be only a few molecules thick.  Before describing the two methods, it is necessary to explain the 
term 'Viscosity'. 
15.  Viscosity.  The resistance to flow of a fluid is due to molecular cohesion, which results in a shearing 
action as layers of the fluid slide relative to each other.  This resistance to shear stress is a measure of 
the viscosity of the fluid.  Viscosity is dependent on the type and temperature of a fluid; thus oil is more 
viscous than water and its viscosity falls as the temperature rises.  The Viscosity Index (VI) of a fluid is an 
empirical measure of its change of viscosity with temperature, so that an oil with a high VI is preferable to 
one with a low VI. 
16.  Hydro-dynamic or Fluid Film Lubrication.  Fluid film lubrication is the most common phase of 
lubrication.  It occurs when the rubbing surfaces are copiously supplied with oil and there is a relatively 
thick  layer  of  oil  between  the  surfaces  (may  be  up  to  100,000  oil  molecules  thick).    The  oil  has  the 
effect  of  keeping  the  two  surfaces  apart.    Under  these  conditions,  the  coefficient  of  friction  is  very 
small.  The lubrication of a simple bearing, such as supports a rotating shaft, is a good example of fluid 
film lubrication and is shown in Fig 5. 
3-12 Fig 5 Lubrication of a Simple Bearing 
Oil
Entry
Shaft
Area of 
Increased Pressure
Narrowing
Wedge of Oil
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
The rotating shaft carries oil around with it by adhesion, and successive layers of oil are carried along 
by  fluid  friction.    As  the  shaft  rotates  it  moves  off-centre  resulting  in  a  wedge  of  oil  within  which  the 
pressure  increases  as  it  narrows.    For  efficient  lubrication,  this  wedge,  along  with  the  increase  in 
pressure,  is  essential  to  keep  the  surfaces  apart.    If  this  steady  pressure  increase  breaks  down, film 
lubrication gives way to boundary lubrication. 
17.  Boundary  Lubrication.    If  a  shaft  carries  an  appreciable  load  and  rotates  very  slowly  it  will  not 
carry  round  sufficient  oil  to  give  a  continuous  film  and  boundary  lubrication  will  occur  in  which  the 
friction is many times greater than in fluid film lubrication.  Boundary lubrication occurs when the oil film 
is  exceedingly  thin  and  may  be  caused  by  high  bearing  loads,  inadequate  viscosity,  oil  starvation  or 
loss of oil pressure.  Boundary lubrication is not a desirable phase as rupture of the thin film increases 
wear,  bearing  surface  temperature  and  the  possibility  of  seizure,  however,  boundary  lubrication often 
occurs  during  starting  conditions.    There  is  no  precise  division  between  boundary  and  fluid  film 
lubrication although each is quite distinct in the way in which lubrication is achieved.  In practice, both 
phases occur at some time giving mixed film lubrication. 
Turbine Engine Lubrication 
18.  The  gas  turbine  engine  is  designed  to  function  over  a  wider  flight  envelope  and  under  different 
operating  conditions  than  its  piston  engine  equivalent,  and  therefore  special  lubricants  have  been 
developed  to  cope  with  the  higher  rpms  and  the  rapid  bearing  temperature  increases  when  starting.  
However, certain advantages can be claimed such as fewer bearings, which are of the rolling contact 
type thus requiring a lower oil feed pressure; no reciprocating loads; fewer gear trains; no lubrication of 
parts  heated  by  combustion  therefore  reducing  oil  consumption.    Turboprop  engine  lubrication 
requirements are more severe than those of a turbojet engine because of the heavily loaded reduction 
gears and the need for a high-pressure oil supply to operate the propeller pitch control mechanism. 
Bearings 
19.  The early gas turbines employed pressure lubricated plain bearings but it was soon realized that 
friction  losses  were  too  high,  and  that  the  provision  of  adequate  lubrication  of  these  bearings  over  a 
wide range of temperatures and loads encountered was more difficult than for piston engine bearings. 
20.  As  a  result,  plain  bearings  were  abandoned  in  favour  of  the  rolling  contact  type  as  the  latter 
offered the following advantages: 
a. 
Lower friction at starting and low rpm. 
b. 
Less susceptibility to momentary cessation of oil flow. 
c. 
The cooling problem is eased because less heat is generated at high rpm. 
d. 
The rotor can be easily aligned. 
e. 
The bearings can be made fairly small and compact. 
f. 
The bearings are relatively lightly loaded because of the absence of power impulses. 
g. 
Oil of low viscosity may be used to maintain flow under a wide range of conditions, and no oil 
dilution or preheating is necessary. 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
21.  The  main  bearings  are  those  which  support  the  turbine  and  compressor  assemblies.    In  the 
simplest  case,  these  usually  consist  of  a  roller  bearing  at  the  front  of  the  compressor  and  another in 
front of the turbine assembly, with a ball bearing behind the compressor to take the axial thrust on the 
main shaft.  On many engines, a 'squeeze film' type bearing is used.  In this type of bearing, pressure 
oil  is  fed  to  a  small  annular  space  between  the  bearing  outer  track  and  the  housing    (Fig  6).    The 
bearing will therefore 'float' in pressure oil which will damp out much of the vibration. 
3-12 Fig 6 Squeeze Film Bearing 
Oil Feed
Squeeze Film
To Bearing
Lubrication
Bearing 
Outer 
Race
22.  Fig 7 shows the bearing arrangement for a three-shaft turbofan whilst Fig 8 shows that for a twin-
spool turboprop engine.  In addition to the main bearings, lubrication will also be required for the wheel 
case, tacho-generator, CSDU, alternator, starter and fuel pump drives. 
3-12 Fig 7 Three-shaft Turbofan Bearing Arrangement 
a  Front and Intermediate Chambers
b  Rear Chamber
Gear Drive
Compensating Shaft
(connected to Shaft 3)
Shaft 3
Shaft 2
Shaft 1
B1
B2
B6
B5
B3
B7
B4
B8
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
3-12 Fig 8 Twin-spool Turboprop Bearing Arrangement 
Planet Gears
LP Compressor
LP Intershaft
HP Turbine Bearing
Front Bearing
Location Bearing
Propeller Shaft
HP Compressor
Thrust Bearing
Propeller
Location Bearing
Shaft
Turbine
Rear
LP Compressor
Tail Bearing
Bearing
Rear Bearing
Propeller Shaft
LP Turbine
Front Bearing
Front Bearing
Propeller
Shaft
Fixed
Annulus
LP Compressor
HP Compressor
LP Turbine
High Speed
Pinion Shaft
Rotating
HP Compressor
HP Turbine
Bearing
Planet Carrier
Front Bearing
Lubrication System 
23.  There are two types of lubrication system at present in use in gas turbines: 
a. 
Recirculatory.  In this system, oil is distributed and returned to the oil tank by pumps.  There 
are two types of recirculatory system: 
(1)  Pressure relief valve system. 
(2)  Full flow system. 
b. 
Expendable.  The expendable or total loss system is used on some small gas turbines, such 
as those used in starting systems and missile engines, in which the oil is burnt in the jet pipe or 
spilled overboard. 
Pressure Relief Valve Recirculatory System 
24.  In  the  pressure  relief  valve  type  of  recirculatory  lubrication  system,  the  flow  of  oil  to  the  various 
bearings is controlled by the relief valve which limits the maximum pressure in the feed line.  As the oil 
pump  is  directly  driven  by  the  engine  (by  the  HP  spool  in  the  case  of  a  multi-spool  engine),  the 
pressure  will  rise  with  spool  speed.    Above  a  predetermined  speed  the  feed  oil  pressure  opens  the 
system relief valve allowing excess oil to spill back to the tank, thus ensuring a constant oil pressure at 
the higher engine speeds.  A relief valve type of recirculatory lubrication used with a turboprop engine 
is shown in Fig 9.  The oil system for a turbojet is similar but, as there is no propeller control system, it 
is less complicated. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
3-12 Fig 9 Recirculatory Turboprop Lubrication System 
Pressure Relief
Valve
De-aerator Tray
Centrifugal
Breather
Pressure
Filter
Strainer
Feed Oil
Oil Pump Pack
Return Oil
Torquemeter Pump
From
Breather Oil/Air Mist
Oil Tank
Torquemeter Oil
Air-cooled
Oil Cooler
Full Flow Lubrication System 
25.  The  full  flow  lubrication  system  differs  from  the  pressure  relief  type  in  that  it  dispenses  with  the 
pressure  relief  valve  allowing  pressure  pump  delivery  to  supply  the  bearing  oil  feeds  directly.    This 
system allows the use of smaller pumps designed to supply sufficient oil at maximum engine rpm.  A 
diagram of a full flow oil system is shown in Fig 10. 
3-12 Fig 10 Full Flow Recirculatory Oil System 
Fuel-cooled Oil Cooler
Air-cooled Oil Cooler
Oil Pressure Transmitter and Low
Pressure Warning Switch
De-aerator Tray
Metered Spill
to Tank
Centrifugal Breather
Oil Pump Pack
Feed Oil
Return Oil
Pressure
Filter
Vent Air
Relief Valve
Oil Differential
From Oil Tank
Pressure Switch
Revised May 10   
Page 9 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
Oil System Components 
26.  The  oil  supply  is  usually  contained  in  a  combined  tank  and  sump,  sometimes  formed  as  part  of 
the  external  wheel  case.    In  a  turboprop,  the  oil  tank  can  be  integral  with  the  air  intake  casing.    Oil 
passes via the suction filter to the pressure pump which pumps it through the fuel-cooled oil cooler to 
the pressure filter.  Both indications of oil pressure and temperature are transmitted to the cockpit.  The 
oil flows through pipes and passages to lubricate the main shaft bearings and wheel cases.  The main 
shaft bearings are normally lubricated by oil jets, as are some of the heavier loaded gears in the wheel 
cases, while remaining gears and bearings receive splash lubrication.  An additional relief valve is fitted 
across  the  pump  in  the  lubricating  system  of  some  engines  to  return  oil  to  pump  inlet  if  the  system 
becomes blocked.  The main components of both a pressure relief and full flow system are: 
a. 
Oil Tank.  The oil tank (Fig 11) is sometimes part of the external wheel case or it may be a 
separate unit.  It may have a sight glass or dipstick for measuring the quantity of oil in the system. 
3-12 Fig 11 Oil Tank 
Sight Glass
De-aerator Tray
Oil Pressure
Transmitter
Pressure
Filler Inlet
Vent to
Gearbox
To Engine
Bearings
From Cooler
From Engine
Bearings
Strainer
To Gearbox
Feed Oil
To Pressure
Filter By-pass Valve
Oil Pump
Filter Element
Return Oil
Drain Plug
Air and Oil Mist
System Relief Valve Filter Drain Valve
b. 
Pumps.  Oil pumps are normally of the twin gear type and are driven through reduction gears 
from  the  external  wheel  case.    They  are  usually  mounted  in  a  'pack'  containing  one  pressure 
pump and several scavenge pumps (Fig 12).  The scavenge pumps have a greater capacity than 
the  pressure  pump  to  ensure  complete  scavenging  of  the  bearings  (they  have  to  pump  an 
increased  volume  due  to  air  leakage  into  the bearing housing).  This means that a considerable 
quantity  of  air  is  returned  to  the  sump  by  the  scavenge  pumps  and  this  is  the  main  reason  for 
sump venting. 
Revised May 10   
Page 10 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
3-12 Fig 12 Oil Pump Unit 
From Rear
Bearing
From Hydraulic
Pumps Drive
From Internal
Gearbox
Wheelcase
To De-aerator
To Oil Cooler
Feed to Driving
Gear Journal
Feed Into Hollow
Idler Gear Spindle
Feed Oil
From Fuel Pump From Front
Inlet From
Return Oil   
Gear Housing
Bearing
Sump
c. 
Oil Cooler.  Turboprop aircraft use air-cooled oil coolers, but this type is impractical in high 
speed aircraft because of the drag penalty incurred and therefore a fuel-cooled oil cooler (FCOC) 
is  required  (Fig  13).    A  spring-loaded  by-pass  valve  connected  in  parallel  across  the  FCOC 
protects the matrix from excessive pressure build-up due to high viscosity during cold starting.  A 
similar device is fitted across the pressure filter. 
3-12 Fig 13 Fuel-cooled Oil Cooler 
Fuel Outlet
Baffle Plate
LP Fuel
Feed Oil   
Matrix
Assembly
Fuel Inlet
Oil By-pass Valve
Oil Temperature
Oil Inlet
Transmitter
Oil Outlet
Revised May 10   
Page 11 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
d. 
Pressure Relief Valve.  A relief valve in the outlet gallery from the pressure pump controls 
oil pressure to a preset value; pressure in excess of this value opens the valve and passes oil to 
the return system until the pressure is reduced and the valve closed.  In some turboprops, a twin 
relief valve assembly provides a nominal pressure of 24 kPa for engine lubrication, and 48 kPa for 
propeller pitch change operation. 
e. 
Oil  Filters.    A  number  of  filters  and  strainers  are  fitted  in  the  oil  system  to  prevent  foreign 
matter continuously circulating around the system.  A fine pressure filter is fitted on the outlet side of 
the  pump  to  remove  fine  particles  of  matter  that  could  block  the  oil  feed  ways.    A  thread  type, 
perforated  plate  or  gauze  filter  is  employed  just  before  the  oil  jet  to  filter-out  any  matter  that  might 
have been picked up from the oil ways.  Finally, a scavenge filter is fitted in each return line prior to 
the  pumps  to  remove  any  matter  from  the  oil  that  may  have  been  picked  up  from  the  bearing 
chambers or gearbox (see Fig 14). 
3-12 Fig 14 Oil Filters 
Fig 14a Typical Pressure and Scavenge Filters 
Pleated Wire
Mesh Filter
Wire Mesh
Support
Resin
Impregnated
With Fibre
Fig 14b Thread Type Oil Filter 
Revised May 10   
Page 12 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
f. 
Breather.  A substantial amount of air is mixed with the oil returning to the tank and this air 
must be removed from the oil before it can be recirculated.  The returned oil/air mixture is fed into 
a de-aerator where partial separation occurs.  For final separation, the air and oil must then pass 
into the centrifugal breather which is driven from the wheel case (Fig 15). 
3-12 Fig 15 Centrifugal Breather 
Gear Shaft Air 
Outlet Slots
De-aerator
Air to 
Segments
Atmosphere
Air/Oil Mist
Entry Holes
Driven
Gear
Air to Atmosphere
Return Oil 
Oil to Gearbox
to Gearbox
Air/Oil Mist
g. 
Magnetic  Chip  Detectors.    Magnetic  chip  detectors  are  fitted  in  the  oil  scavenge  line  to 
collect  any  ferrous  debris  from  the  bearing  chamber.    They  are  basically  permanent  magnets 
inserted in the oil flow and are retained in self-sealing valve housings (Fig 16). 
3-12 Fig 16 Magnetic Chip Detector and Housing Bearing Lubrication 
Return Oil
Chip
Detector
Self-sealing 
Housing
Permanent
Magnet
They  are  usually  removed  at  set  intervals  and  sent  for  analysis,  where  a  record  is  kept  of  the 
performance of each bearing by measuring and recording the amount of ferrous metal present at each 
period.    Engines  can  be  fairly  accurately  assessed  when  a  bearing  failure  is  likely  to  occur  and  the 
engine removed before any serious damage is caused.  Magnetic chip detectors can also be fitted in 
the  pressure  line.    An  automatic  method  of  detecting  ferrous  matter  is  sometimes  fitted  where  two 
electrodes are fitted in the plug with a set gap between them.  When a piece of ferrous metal bridges 
the gap, it completes an electrical circuit, thus putting on a warning light in the cockpit. 
Revised May 10   
Page 13 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-12 - Cooling and Lubrication 
Expendable System 
27.  An  expendable  system  is  generally  used  on  small  engines  running  for  periods  of  short  duration, 
such as gas producers for engine starting or missile engines.  The advantages of this system are that it 
is  simple,  cheap  and  offers  an  appreciable  saving  in  weight  as  it  requires  no  oil  cooler  or  scavenge 
system.  Oil can be fed to the bearing either by pump, tank pressurization or metered.  After lubrication, 
the  oil  can  either  be  vented  overboard  through  dump  pipes,  or  leaked  from  the  centre bearing to the 
rear bearing after which it is flung onto the turbine and burnt. 
Bearing Lubrication 
28.  Irrespective  of  the  lubrication  system  the  two  main  methods  of  lubricating  and  cooling  the  main 
bearing are: 
a. 
Oil Mist.  Compressed air is used to atomize the oil at nozzles adjacent to the bearing; the 
air  will  assist  in  the  cooling  of  the  bearing.    The  air  can  later  be  separated  from  the  oil  as 
described  in  para  26f.    However,  engines  running  at  higher  loadings,  and  thus  with  higher 
bearing  temperatures,  will  require  more  air  and,  as  it  is  then  not  possible  to recover all the oil 
from  the  return  mist  supply,  a  higher  oil  consumption  will  result.    In  addition,  this  lubrication 
method has lost favour owing to the fire hazards involved. 
b. 
Oil  Jet.    Oil  jets  are  placed  close  to  the  bearings  and  directed  into  the  clearance  spaces.  
They are protected against blockage by thread type filters.  This method is easily controllable and 
reliable,  and  it  is  possible  to  regulate  the  oil  quantity  and  pressure  to  provide  for  any  amount  of 
bearing cooling and lubrication over a wide range of temperatures.  Bearings at the hot end of the 
engine will, of course, receive the maximum oil flow. 
Revised May 10   
Page 14 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-14 - Engine Handling 
CHAPTER 14 - ENGINE HANDLING 
Introduction 
1. 
The wide variety of gas turbines in service, each having certain engine characteristics, means that 
the information in this chapter must be of a general nature only.  Aircrew Manuals give precise details 
of  engine  handling  for  a  particular  aircraft  and  engine  installation  and  cover  both  normal  and 
emergency operation. 
STARTING AND GROUND RUNNING 
Precautions 
2. 
Whenever  possible  the  aircraft  should  be  headed  into  wind  for  all  ground  running.    During 
prolonged  ground  running  the  aircraft  should  never  stand  tail  to  wind  as  hot  gases  may  enter  the  air 
intakes  and lead to overheating.  Furthermore, standing tail into wind causes a back pressure, which 
slows  the  gas  stream  and  can  also  lead  to  overheating.    Starting  tail  into  wind  should  normally  be 
avoided.    On  some  aircraft  there  may  be  a  limiting  tail  wind  component  for  starting,  or  a  particular 
starting procedure may be required if there is a tail wind.  With some multi-spool engines, a tail wind 
can  cause  the LP compressor to rotate in the opposite direction which will cause starting problems if 
the  counter-rpm  is  too  high.    To  avoid  this  the  starting  circuit  will  be  isolated  until  the  counter-rpm  is 
within acceptable limits.  The aircraft should be positioned so that the jet wake will not cause damage 
to  other  aircraft,  equipment,  personnel,  or  buildings  in  the  vicinity.    Care  should  be  taken  to  avoid 
congested areas or regions of loose, stony soil. 
3. 
Most airfields have specially designated ground running pans with a purpose built noise attenuator 
or ‘hush house’.  These are used for all major ground running needs.  Aircraft hardened shelters (HAS) 
may also be used for limited ground running.  However, additional safety precautions have to be taken 
with  regard  to  vibration  as  this  can  cause  severe  internal  injuries  to  people  within  the  HAS  whilst 
ground running is in operation. 
4. 
The surface of the ground ahead of the intake should be free of loose objects and equipment, and 
all personnel should be well clear of the intakes.  Wherever possible, engine intake guards should be 
fitted to minimize the ingestion risk. 
5. 
If the ground beneath the jet pipe or starter exhausts becomes saturated with fuel or starter fluid, 
the  aircraft  must  be  moved  to  a  new  site  before  a  start  is  attempted,  to  reduce  the  risk  of  fire.    Fire 
extinguishers  should  always  be  close  at  hand.    Ground  power  sets  should  be  used,  where  available, 
rather than the aircraft batteries. 
Starting 
6. 
Aircraft  starting  sequences  are  fully  automatic  and  only  require  the  pilot  to  switch  on  engine 
services  and  initiate  the  start  cycle.    To  reduce  the  time  taken  for  engine  starting,  many  aircraft  are 
fitted  with  rapid  start  systems  where  the  pilot  makes  one  selection  and  all  the  required  services  are 
activated  for  engine  start  (Fig  1).    The  booster  pumps  and  LP  fuel  cocks  are  normally  selected  by 
separate  switches  or  by  the  rapid  start  system,  whilst  the  HP fuel cock is generally incorporated with 
the throttle control. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-14 - Engine Handling 
3-14 Fig 1 Rapid Start Panel 
Bat t
Fuel  Boost  Pumps
Mst r
Fr ont
Rear
R
a
p
Pit ot
W/Scr een A.P.U. Bl eedF
i
Heat er s
Heat er
Cl osed
l
d
i
g
T
h
a
t
k
e
O
f
O
Ignit ion
T.I. Pr obes
FLT Inst
f
f
f
7. 
If  the  engine  fails  to  start  or  the  engine  temperature  exceeds  the  allowed  start-up  limit,  the  HP 
cock should be closed immediately.  The Aircrew Manual gives guidance on the number of starts that 
may be attempted, and the time interval between them, before it is necessary to investigate the fault. 
After Starting 
8. 
Idle  running  checks  vary  from  aircraft  to  aircraft,  but  usually  include  checks  for  fire,  normal  gas 
temperatures (e.g. JPT, TGT, TBT etc), rpm, and normal oil pressure.  Operation of ancillary services 
is sometimes included. 
Turboprop Engines 
9. 
The  basic  starting  procedures  are  the  same  as  those  for  turbojet  or  turbofan  engines.    The 
propeller must always be in the ground fine pitch setting for the start, otherwise the load on the starter 
motor will be excessive. 
TAXIING 
Engine Considerations 
10.  Throttle handling should be smooth and considered.  Rapid and frequent opening of the throttle is to 
be  avoided.    The  initial  response  of  particularly  a  heavy  aircraft  to  throttle  movement  may  be  slow  and 
considerable power may be necessary to start the aircraft moving.  Once underway, idling rpm is usually 
sufficient to maintain momentum.  In some cases, idling rpm is more than sufficient and the aircraft speed 
may  slowly  increase.    To  overcome  this  problem  and  reduce  brake  wear  some  engines  are  fitted  with 
variable exhaust nozzles which can be adjusted to reduce thrust when taxiing at idling rpm. 
11.  Directional  control  whilst  taxiing  is  by  the  use  of  differential  brakes  and/or  nosewheel  steering.  
Differential throttle may also be effective in manoeuvring multi-engine aircraft but allowance should be 
made for poor engine acceleration. 
12.  The idling thrust of a turboprop engine is high and once the aircraft is moving it is possible to taxi 
with the throttle at the ground idling position.  Throttle movements should be made slowly and a careful 
watch maintained on the engine temperature during prolonged periods of taxiing. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-14 - Engine Handling 
TAKE-OFF 
Engine Considerations 
13.  When  conditions  dictate  a  short  take-off  run  the  throttle  should  be  smoothly  opened  to  take-off 
power against the brakes, then the brakes released.  On many aircraft, the brakes will not hold at take-
off  power  in  which  case  they  should  be  released  at  the  recommended  rpm  and  the  remainder  of the 
power applied during the initial take-off run. 
14.  Some  axial  flow  engines  may  tend  to  stall  or  surge  under  crosswind  conditions,  because  of  the 
uneven  airflow  into  the  intake.    If  this  happens  the  throttle  should  be  closed  and  if  necessary,  the 
aircraft should be turned into wind until the engine responds satisfactorily to throttle movement. 
15.  Aircrew  Manuals  state  certain  conditions  to  rpm,  gas  temperature,  and/or  torque  that  should  be 
achieved at take-off power to indicate if the engine is producing full thrust.  These indications are the 
‘placard’  figures  and  are  worked  out  on  engine  installation,  and  are  used  to  determine  the  thrust 
degradation  of  an  engine  during  its  installed  life.    Similarly, the Aircrew Manuals for some aircraft lay 
down certain requirements in respect of the correct operation of variable nozzles. 
CLIMBING 
General 
16.  The  aircraft  should  be  climbed  at  the  recommended  speed.    If  the correct climbing speed is not 
used then the rate of climb will be reduced.  Engine indications should always be monitored, particular 
care  being  taken  where  gas  temperature  and  rpm  controllers  are  inoperative.    If  it  is  not  essential  to 
climb at maximum permitted power a lesser setting should be used at the same recommended speed. 
17.  In  spite  of  the  FCU,  the  rpm  for  a  given  throttle  setting  may  tend  to  increase  with  altitude.    The 
throttle may therefore have to be closed progressively to maintain constant rpm. 
GENERAL HANDLING 
Introduction 
18.  The principles of gas turbine handling are determined by the fact that this type of engine is designed 
to produce maximum thrust and efficiency at one rpm - usually 100%.  Malfunction of the engine is often 
associated  with  acceleration,  or  with  operating  conditions  that  differ  widely  from  the  optimum.    Devices 
such as the ACU, FCU, swirl vanes etc, are incorporated primarily to assist the pilot to change the thrust 
conditions.  A malfunction of these devices should not prevent successful control of the engine provided 
that greater attention is paid to throttle handling and the preservation of a good flow into the compressor. 
19.  In  some  cases,  flame  out  can  occur  if  the  throttle  is  opened  too  rapidly.    The  aircraft  Aircrew 
Manual gives the detailed procedure to be followed after such an event.  The normal starting system, 
using the engine starter is not normally used when relighting, as the engine will be turning sufficiently 
fast due to the forward speed of the aircraft. 
20.  Surge.    High  altitude  surge  may  occur  above  40,000  ft  when  flying  at  a  low  IAS  and  high  rpm 
under very low temperature conditions.  Similarly, surge can occur at high g and high altitude.  If this 
occurs, there may be a substantial bang, fluctuating rpm, a higher than normal gas temperature, and a 
considerable  loss  of  thrust.    Closing  the  throttle  and  increasing  the  IAS  by  diving  effects  a  return  to 
stable conditions.  Surge is discussed in greater depth in Volume 3, Chapter 6. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-14 - Engine Handling 
Mechanical Failure in Flight 
21.  If  the  engine  fails  because  of  an  obvious  mechanical  defect,  the  immediate  action  should  be  to 
shut down the engine following the specific procedures given in the appropriate Aircrew Manual. 
Booster Pump Failure 
22.  If  the  booster  pump  fails  through  either  a  pump  malfunction  or  an  electrical  failure,  a  bypass 
system allows fuel to flow from tanks by gravity, or by suction from the engine driven pumps.  However, 
since the purpose of a booster pump is to prevent vapour locking and cavitation of fuel, and to maintain 
a  satisfactory  supply  of  low  pressure  fuel  to  the  engine  driven  pumps,  certain  handling  precautions 
should be taken. 
23.  At high throttle settings and high ambient temperatures, rpm may fluctuate and a flame-out could 
occur; at high level an immediate flame-out is possible, and this possibility is increased with AVTAG if it 
was  at  high  temperature  on  take-off  (note:  the  use  of  AVTAG  and  related  fuels  has  declined 
considerably).    Detailed  procedures  for  individual  aircraft  may  be  found  in  the  aircrew  manual,  but 
general precautions are: 
a. 
Reduce  rpm,  this  will  reduce  the  chance  of  damage  to  the  engine  driven  pump  because  of 
fuel starvation, and will reduce the chance of cavitation. 
b. 
Avoid negative g, because the fuel is gravity fed. 
c. 
Descend; this reduces fuel boiling and chance of vapour locks. 
d. 
If  a  flame-out  has  occurred  a  successful  relight  is  not  likely  at  high  levels,  and  an  attempt 
should not be made until the level quoted in the Aircrew Manual is achieved. 
ENGINE ICING 
Note:    The  following  paragraphs  must  be  read  in  conjunction  with  the  information  contained  in  the 
relevant Aircrew Manual. 
Centrifugal and Axial Flow Engines 
24.  Centrifugal  compressor  engines  are  relatively  insensitive  to  moderate  icing  conditions.    The 
combination  of  centrifugal  force,  temperature  rise,  and  rugged  construction  found  in  these 
compressors is effective in dealing with all but severe engine icing. 
25.  Axial  flow  compressors  are  seriously  affected  by  the  same  atmospheric  conditions  that  cause 
airframe  icing.    Ice  forms  on  the  inlet  guide  vanes  causing  a  restricted  and  turbulent  airflow  with 
consequent  loss  in  thrust  and  rise  in  gas  temperature.    Heavy  icing  can  cause  an  excessive  gas 
temperature leading to turbine and engine failure, and the breaking off of ice can cause engine surge and 
mechanical  damage.    (Although  turbofan  engines  do  not  have  stationary  inlet  guide  vanes  or  support 
struts, they may still suffer from icing on the intake cowls, with the attendant risk of ice ingestion.) 
Effect of RPM on the Rate of Icing 
26.  For a given icing intensity, the closer the spacing of the inlet guide vanes, the more serious is the effect 
of icing.  For a given engine, the rate of ice accumulation is roughly proportional to the icing intensity and the 
mass airflow through the engine, i.e. to engine rpm.  The rate of engine icing, therefore, can be reduced by 
decreasing the rpm. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-14 - Engine Handling 
Effect of TAS on the Rate of Icing 
27.  It is known that the rate of engine icing for a given index is virtually constant up to about 250 kt TAS.  At 
higher speeds, the rate of icing increases rapidly with increasing TAS.  This phenomenon can be explained 
because the rate of engine icing is directly proportional to the liquid water content of the air in the intakes.  
But  the  water  content  of  the  air  intakes  is  not  necessarily  the  same  as  that  of  the  free  airstream.    At  low 
speeds, air is sucked into the intakes and at high speeds, it is rammed in.  The transition speed, at which the 
pressure and temperature in the intake are still atmospheric, is about 250 kt TAS. 
28.  During  the  suction  period,  the  concentration  of  water  content  is  virtually  unchanged  from  that  of 
the free air stream.  At higher speeds, above 250 kt, most of the suspended water droplets ahead of 
the projected area of the intake tend to pass into the intake while some of the air in this same projected 
area  is  deflected  round  the  intakes.    The  inertia  of  the  water  droplets  prevents  them  from  being 
deflected and so the water content of the air in the intake is increased.  Therefore, a reduction of TAS 
to 250 kt will reduce the rate of jet engine icing. 
29.  The  reduced  pressure  caused  by  the  compressor  sucking  action is at its lowest at zero speed.  The 
pressure  drop  also  increases  with  a  rise  in  rpm.    The  pressure  drop  is,  of  course,  accompanied  by  a 
temperature drop.  On the ground, or at very low speeds and high rpm, air at ambient temperature will be 
reduced  to  sub-freezing  temperatures  as  it  enters  the  intakes.    Any  water  content  would  therefore  freeze 
onto the inlet guide vanes.  The suction temperature drop which occurs is of the order of 5 ºC to 10 ºC.  This 
temperature drop occurs at high rpm at the lowest altitude and decreases with decreasing rpm or increasing 
TAS.    Under  these  conditions,  visible  moisture  is  needed  to  form  icing.    Therefore,  take-off  in  fog,  at 
temperatures slightly above freezing can result in engine icing. 
Warning Function of Airframe Icing 
30.  Except  for  the  suction  icing  characteristics  which  will  rarely  be  encountered,  jet  engine  icing  will 
occur  in  the  same  conditions  as  airframe  icing  and  in  about  the  same  proportion  for  a  given  icing 
density.  There will be little chance of engine icing in flight unless visible airframe icing is experienced. 
Indications of the Rate of Icing 
31.  Although  the  rate  of  icing  is  roughly  proportional  to  the  rate  of  airframe  icing  for  a  given  icing 
intensity, the ratio of the rates varies considerably for changing icing intensities.  The rate of airframe 
icing depends on both the water content and the size of the droplets.  Engine icing depends primarily 
on the water content and is almost independent of the size of the droplets. 
32.  This is caused by the fact that very small droplets tend to follow the deflected air round the leading 
edge  of  the  wing  or  any  surface  of  a  large  radius.    Larger  droplets  because  of  greater  inertia  cannot 
change their position rapidly enough and tend to impact the leading edge.  The leading edge radius of 
the  intake  guide  vanes  is  so  small  that  the  size  of  the  droplets  is  immaterial.    Therefore,  for  a  given 
concentration of atmospheric water and for a given TAS and rpm, the engine icing rate is constant but 
the airframe icing rate will be lower for small droplets and higher for large droplets. 
33.  Because  of  the  same  phenomenon,  wing  icing  tends  to  be  heavier  on  the  outer  sections  of  the 
span where the leading edge is sharper.  The most reliable visible indication of the rate of engine icing 
is  obtained  by  watching  projecting  objects  having  the  smallest  radius  or  curvature,  e.g.  aerials,  since 
the rate of accumulation of these items more nearly approximate that on the inlet guide vanes. 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-14 - Engine Handling 
Effect of Speed on the Indications of Icing 
34.  Although  the  rate  of  engine  icing  is  almost  constant  at  speeds  below  about  250  kt,  the  rate  of 
airframe  icing  decreases  rapidly  with  decreasing  airspeed.    This  characteristic  can  cause  a  false 
interpretation  of  the  rate  of  engine  icing  if  the  evidence  of  the  airframe  icing  is  taken to indicate engine 
conditions.  For example, consider two aircraft in the same icing conditions, one flying at 150 kt and the 
other  at  250  kt.    The  aircraft  at  150  kt  would  experience  fairly  heavy  airframe  icing.    The  rate  of  ice 
accumulation at the lower speed is less than at the higher speed although the icing intensity is the same.  
The engine icing rate would have been the same in both cases.  Low airspeed is highly desirable for flight 
in icing conditions because of the extended duration of trouble-free operation, but the pilot should not be 
misled by the rapid reduction of airframe icing rate achieved by a reduction in airspeed. 
35.  The concept that the adiabatic temperature rise, caused by ram effects, prevents icing, is dangerous.  
The common theory of ram temperature rise is a simplification of the basic theory and applies only under dry 
conditions.  The presence of free water droplets nullifies the simplified law.  When free moisture is present, 
much  of  the  energy  (heat rise) due to ram is absorbed by the evaporation of water, with the result that at 
moderate airspeeds there may be an actual reduction of airframe temperature.  The airspeed needs to be 
very high to generate sufficient ram energy simultaneously to evaporate the free moisture and raise the wing 
surface temperature above freezing.  At speeds of about 400 kt an extremely serious form of airframe icing, 
leading to severe control difficulties can be encountered. 
Avoiding or Clearing Icing Regions 
36.  It can be stated that in stratus (layer type) clouds the actual icing region is seldom more than 3000 
ft in depth, the average depth being of the order of 1000 ft.  In cumulus (heap type) cloud, the depth of 
the  icing  layer  may  be  considerable  but  the  horizontal  area  is  rarely  more  than  3  nm  in  diameter.  
However, the icing intensity in cumulus cloud is usually greater than in stratus type.  High performance 
jet aircraft usually fly clear of icing regions before the engine or airframe is seriously affected, but low 
performance  jet  aircraft  may  be  unable  to  do  this  and  particular  care  should  be  taken.    The  general 
rules are: change altitude (climb or descend) in stratus cloud icing, and change heading appropriately 
to avoid cumulus cloud icing. 
Engine Anti-icing Equipment 
37.  If engine anti-icing equipment is fitted, this can be switched on at any time when icing conditions 
are  suspected  or  when  an  unaccountable  rise  in  gas  temperature  or  drop  in  rpm  occurs  under 
conditions suitable for engine icing.  There are several engine anti-icing systems, all of which, with the 
exception  of  methanol  injection,  involve  a  higher  fuel  consumption  and  so  a  reduced  range.    Further 
details are given in Volume 4, Chapter 9. 
RELIGHTING 
Flame Extinction 
38.  Flame  extinction  may  be  caused  by  overfuelling,  underfuelling,  interruption  of  the  fuel  flow,  or 
insufficient  idling  speed.    Whatever  the  cause  of  the  flame  out,  however,  the  Aircrew  Manual  for  the 
type details the action to be taken following flame extinction. 
39.  Relighting  is  practical  with  some  turbojet  engines  as  high  as  40,000  ft  but  lower  altitudes  are 
usually recommended to ensure a definite relight on the first attempt, and generally speaking, the lower 
the  altitude  the  greater  the  chance  of  successful  relight.    If  the  engine  failure  is  noticed  immediately 
and  clearly  is  not  due  to  mechanical  failure,  a  hot  relight  should  be  attempted.    The  relight  button 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-14 - Engine Handling 
should be pressed with the HP cock open, and with the throttle either closed or left in the open position 
in which failure occurred, depending on the advice given in the Aircrew Manual.  If a hot relight is not 
successful, the engine must be shut down and the normal cold relight drill carried out as detailed in the 
Aircrew Manual. 
40.  Where  there  are  indications  of  obvious  mechanical  damage  or  where  an  engine  fire  has  been 
successfully extinguished no attempt to relight is to be made. 
APPROACH AND LANDING 
Turbojet/Turbofan Engines 
41.  A  powered  approach  is  necessary  on  turbojet  aircraft  to  ensure  a  quicker  thrust  response  if  it 
becomes  necessary  to  adjust  the  glide  path  by  use  of  the  throttle.    The  Aircrew  Manual  will  give  a 
power  setting  for  each  engine  installation  for  use  in  the  approach  configuration.    The  rpm  should  be 
kept at or above this figure until it is certain that the runway can be reached.  When going round again 
from  a  powered  approach  the  throttle  should  be  opened  smoothly  to  the  required  power  to  prevent 
engine surge. 
42.  If the decision to go round again has been made after touch-down, or just before, when the rpm 
have  fallen  below  the  minimum  approach  figure,  the  throttle  must  be  opened  very  carefully  until  the 
rpm  reach  the  minimum  approach  figure,  otherwise  the  engine  may  surge.    When  opening  up  under 
these  conditions  the  engine  takes  longer  to  accelerate  to  full  power.    Engines  that  are  controlled 
electronically are independent of the rate of throttle movement, as the engine will only react depending 
on  the  signal  from  the  control  unit,  which  in  turn  will  only  accelerate  the  engine  at  a  rate  dictated  by 
flight conditions. 
Turboprop Engines 
43.  Engine  response  can  be  poor  in  an  approach  configuration,  and  early  corrective  action  must  be 
taken  if  under-shooting.    There  may  be  little  or  no  immediate  impression  of  increase  of  power,  and 
reference should be made to the torque-meter, if fitted.  To ensure the maximum response when going 
round  again,  it  is  advisable  to  maintain  at  least  the  minimum  torque-meter  reading  or  power  setting 
given  in  the  Aircrew  Manual.    Unless  landing  on  long  runways,  there  should  be  no  undue  delay  in 
closing the throttle to the ground idle position. 
44.  Rapid  closing  of  the  throttle  to  the  ground  idle  position  causes  an  equally  rapid  fining-off  of 
the  propeller  with  a  sudden  large  increase  in  drag.    While  this  is  useful  for  rapid  deceleration  in 
the initial stages of the landing run, the discing effect of the very fine pitch is to blank the rudder 
and  elevator,  greatly  decreasing  their  effectiveness;  thus  any  drift  at  touch-down  is  accentuated 
and  a  swing  may  easily  develop,  requiring  early  and  careful  use  of  the  brakes.    The  throttle 
should therefore be closed slowly and smoothly to the ground idle position.  Power should not be 
used to check a swing, as the engine response is slow and the rapid throttle movement required 
may cause the engine to stall or surge.  During the landing run, once the throttle has been closed 
to the ground idle position, the reverse torque light may blink occasionally. 
45.  If the decision to go round again is made after touch-down and the throttle has been moved to the 
ground  idle  position,  the  throttle  must  be  opened  slowly  to  avoid  stalling  or  surging  the  engine;  initial 
acceleration is very poor, and the decision to go round again should normally be made before cutting to 
the ground idle position. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-14 - Engine Handling 
STOPPING THE ENGINE 
General 
46.  After  landing,  the  engine  can  usually  be  shut  down  immediately  upon  the  aircraft  reaching  its 
parking position.  A check should be made to ensure that the gas temperature and rpm have stabilized 
before following the shut down procedure detailed in the Aircrew Manual for type. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-15 - Lift/Propulsion Engines 
CHAPTER 15 - LIFT/PROPULSION ENGINES 
Introduction 
1. 
Lift/Propulsion engines are used in various configurations to power the family of aircraft that use vertical 
or  short  take-off  and  landing  techniques  (V/STOL).    The  ability  of  aircraft  to  do  so  has  interested  military 
strategists and aircraft designers for many years, and despite the research and development work expended 
by many countries, there are as yet only two fixed wing aircraft in operational service in the world that can 
operate in the vertical take off and landing role, the Harrier powered by the Pegasus and the Yak 38 powered 
by two Koliesov ZM lift engines and one Lyulka AL-21F lift/cruise engine.  Despite the ability of these aircraft 
to operate in the VTOL role, to reduce engine fatigue and increase take-off weight, the aircraft can employ a 
short take-off vertical landing (STOVL) method of operating. 
2. 
The  provision  of  a  powerplant  for  a  V/STOL  aircraft  presents  the  designer  with  a  number  of 
special  problems,  the  solutions  to  which  will  vary  according  to  the  type  and  performance  required.  
However there are certain considerations that must be taken into account: 
a. 
Static  thrust  for  vertical  take-off  must  exceed  the  all-up  weight  of  the  aircraft.    However,  a 
'rolling'  or  short  take-off  can  allow  the  all-up  weight  to  be  increased  because  of  the  extra  lift 
generated by the wing. 
b. 
In  VTOL  operations,  a  means  must  be  provided  to  control  the  aircraft  attitude,  since 
conventional  aircraft  control  requires  airflow  over  the  control  surfaces.    Control  for  VTOL  is 
provided by tapping air from the engine and using small jets at the extremities of the aircraft 
to control the aircraft during low speed handling. 
c. 
The powerplant thrust distribution must be around the centre of gravity of the aircraft. 
POWERPLANT ARRANGEMENTS 
General 
3. 
Although both the Harrier and Yak aircraft are designed to operate in the V/STOL role, the powerplant 
arrangement differs quite considerably.  The Pegasus engine fitted to the Harrier is a turbofan engine using 
nozzle  vectoring  to  alter  the  direction  of  the  thrust  line,  whilst  the  Yak  38  has  two  dedicated  lift  turbojet 
engines  with  a  further  turbojet  as  a lift/propulsion engine, using a vectoring nozzle arrangement.  The two 
distinct engine configurations are known as Vectored Thrust and Composite. 
Vectored Thrust 
4. 
The  vectored  thrust  system,  in  which  the  thrust  can be varied from the vertical to the horizontal, 
enables the same engine to provide for both vertical take-off and forward flight (Fig 1).  Ground running 
the  engine  with  the  nozzles  directed  down  can  cause  ground  erosion  and  ingestion  of  debris,  which 
may cause engine damage, and hot gases which can cause thrust loss.  This can be minimized with 
nozzle  vectoring  because  ground  running  and  pre  take-off  engine  running  can  be  done  with  the 
exhaust directed horizontally. 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 - 3-15 - Lift/Propulsion Engines 
3-15 Fig 1 Vectored Thrust Principle 
a Nozzles in Propulsion Position
b Nozzles Deflected For Vertical Lift
5. 
Because all the thrust developed by the engine is available for take-off, this installation permits the 
minimum  thrust  requirement  compatible  with  VTOL.    The  flexibility  of  the  nozzle  vectoring  system 
allows  the  aircraft  to  perform  manoeuvres  that  have  been  available  to  helicopters  such  as  hovering, 
turning on the spot, and reversing whilst in flight allowing a completely new approach to combat flying. 
6. 
Although the nozzle vectoring system has distinct and clear advantages over other systems, there 
is however, one disadvantage in that there is a performance loss because the exhaust gases are being 
continuously  deflected  through  the  rotatable  nozzle,  thus  leading  to  an  increase  in  specific  fuel 
consumption. 
Composite 
7. 
In a composite powerplant, the separation of the lifting and propulsion functions enables each type 
of engine to be highly specialized (Fig 2).  The lifting engines for example, are likely to run for only a 
short  period  at  the  beginning  and  end  of  each  flight  and  this  permits  the  use  of  design  techniques 
which  achieve  thrust/weight  ratios  of  the  order  of  16:1  for  a  bare  engine.    Nevertheless,  this 
arrangement results in a very high installed power requirement because the total thrust installed is the 
sum of the thrust required for both lift and propulsion. 
3-15 Fig 2 Composite Engine Arrangement as Fitted to the Yak 38 
Lift Engines
Propulsion Engine
8. 
Although  not  a  true  composite  arrangement  where  the  lift  and  propulsion  engines  perform  their  own 
tasks, the Yak 38 arrangement consists of separate lift and lift/propulsion engines.  The two lift engines are 
designed to operate only during take-off and landing, whilst the lift/propulsion engine is used for both VTOL 
and normal flight by adopting a vectoring nozzle arrangement. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 - 3-15 - Lift/Propulsion Engines 
9. 
The control system required for such an arrangement is quite complex, and the need to balance 
the thrust output from three separate powerplants to maintain aircraft stability is a fairly daunting task, 
and  in  the  case  of  the  Yak  38,  control  of  the  aircraft  take-off  and  landing  is  done  by  ship  or  ground 
based computers linked into the aircraft onboard computer to provide complete automatic control. 
10.  By adopting the composite engine arrangement it can be appreciated that other than take-off and 
landing, the two lift engines plus all their associated systems and controls are totally redundant for the 
majority of the flight, taking up valuable airframe space and increasing the aircraft weight. 
ENGINE TYPES 
Lifting Engines 
11.  Lifting engines are specialized; they must be small, simple, and cheap as they are used in relatively 
large numbers whilst being easily installed within the depth of the fuselage or pod.  They must also have 
the lowest possible engine-plus-fuel weight for short duration use at the required thrust. 
12.  Turbojets  are currently used as lifting engines and are often referred to as lift-jet engines.  They 
can  currently  attain  thrust/weight  ratios  of  20:1  with  still  higher  values  projected  for  the  future.    The 
engine  must  be  light  and  simple  thus  composite  materials  are  extensively  used  in  their  construction.  
The  fuel  and  oil  systems  are  simple  with  the  latter  employing  a  total  loss  method  thus  obviating  the 
need for an oil return system. 
Lift/Propulsion Engines 
13.  This type of engine is designed to provide vertical and horizontal thrust by employing two or four 
swivelling  nozzles.    The  Pegasus,  as  fitted  to  the  Harrier/AV-8,  uses  the  four-nozzle  arrangement 
shown in Fig 1.  This engine is basically a turbofan engine with the by-pass air being directed through 
the front nozzles, while the core flow is directed through the rear nozzles.  All four nozzles are linked 
together  in  such  a  way  so  that  there  is  a  smooth  transition  from  vertical  to  horizontal  thrust.    The 
Lyulka,  fitted  to  the  Yak  38,  uses  two  swivelling  nozzles  (Fig  3)  to  complement  the  two  lift  engines.  
This engine is a turbojet with the exhaust ending in a swivelling bifurcated nozzle. 
3-15 Fig 3 Twin Nozzle Deflector 
14.  The use of pure lift/propulsion engines as in the Pegasus, has clear and distinct advantages over 
other systems: 
a. 
As the engine must provide a VTOL thrust/weight greater than 1.0, acceleration and rate of 
climb are very high. 
b. 
With an orthodox forward facing intake, there is good efficiency throughout the performance 
range.    The  total  installed  thrust  is  such  that  whatever  the  angle  of  the  propelling  nozzle,  the 
resultant always passes through the aircraft’s centre of gravity. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 - 3-15 - Lift/Propulsion Engines 
c. 
The engine controls are conventional with the addition of a nozzle control lever, allowing the 
nozzles to be varied by the pilot throughout their range. 
d. 
All  engine  thrust  is  useful  thrust  throughout  the  operating  range;  there  is  no  redundancy  as 
with the use of pure lift engines. 
15.  One of the disadvantages of using a lift/propulsion engine is the problem of increasing the thrust 
without  increasing  the  size  of  the  engine.    Conventional  aircraft  achieve  this  with  the  use  of 
afterburning, but this has proved problematical in vectored thrust configurations and aircraft designers 
have concentrated on refining the airframe using an increasing amount of composite materials. 
OTHER LIFT/PROPULSION SYSTEMS 
General 
16.  Other lift / Propulsion arrangements include: 
a. 
Tilt-rotor systems. 
b. 
Tilt-wing systems. 
c. 
Partial and fully compounded systems. 
17.  Each of these is fully described, with diagrams in Volume 12, Chapter 8 and is briefly covered below. 
Tilt-rotor 
18.  The tilt-rotor system uses turboprop engines fitted into swivelling pods attached to the aircraft wing 
tips.  The engines drive two rotors which are interconnected in case of single engine failure.  With the 
engines in the vertical position for take-off and landing, the rotors act in the same way as a helicopter 
rotor.  When hover is achieved, the engine pods are rotated through 90º, translating the aircraft from 
vertical to forward flight.  Short rolling take-offs can also be made by setting the two engine pods at an 
intermediate position.  This type of aircraft brings together the flexibility of the helicopter with the speed 
of the turboprop aircraft in the small transport role. 
Tilt-wing 
19.  The  tilt-wing  design  operates  on  the  same  principle  as  the  tilt-rotor  with  the  difference  that  the 
whole wing tilts with the engine nacelles. 
Partial or Fully Compounded Systems 
20.  A compounded system is where the lift rotor is augmented by conventional wings and/or a forward 
propulsion system.  In forward flight the rotor is partially unloaded or in a state of autorotation.  Studies 
are at present directed to stopping, folding and stowing the rotors in flight, thus reducing drag. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 - 3-16 - Turboprop and Turboshaft Engines 
CHAPTER 16 - TURBOPROP AND TURBOSHAFT ENGINES 
Introduction 
1. 
The turboprop engine consists of a gas turbine engine driving a propeller.  In the turbojet engine the 
turbine extracts only sufficient energy from the gas flow to drive the compressor and engine accessories, 
leaving  the  remaining  energy  to  provide  the  high  velocity  propulsive  jet.    By  comparison,  the  turbine 
stages  of  the  turboprop  engine  absorb  the  majority  of  the  gas  energy  because  of  the  additional  power 
required to drive the propeller, leaving only a small residual jet thrust at the propelling nozzle. 
2. 
Turboshaft engines work on identical principles, except that all the useful gas energy is absorbed 
by  the  turbine  to  produce  rotary  shaft  power  and  the  residual  thrust  is  negligible;  such  engines  find 
particular applications in helicopters and hovercraft.  The lack of a significant propulsive jet means that 
these  engines  can  be  mounted  in  any  position  in  the  airframe,  and  this  flexibility  is  increased  by  the 
very compact design and layout of a modern turboshaft engine. 
3. 
Because  the  propeller  wastes  less  kinetic  energy  in  its  slipstream  than  a  turbojet  through  its 
exhaust, the turboprop is the most efficient method of using the gas turbine cycle at low and medium 
altitudes,  and  at  speeds  up  to  approximately  350  kt.   At higher speeds and altitudes the efficiency of 
the  propeller  deteriorates  rapidly  because  of  the  development  of  shock  waves  on  the  blade  tips.  
Advanced  propeller  technology  has  produced  multi-bladed  designs  that  operate  with  tip  speeds  in 
excess of Mach 1, without loss of propeller efficiency, achieving aircraft speeds in excess of 500 kt. 
Types of Turboprop Engines 
4. 
Current turboprop engines can be categorized according to the method used to achieve propeller 
drive; these categories are: 
a. 
Coupled Power Turbine. 
b. 
Free Power Turbine. 
c. 
Compounded Engine. 
5. 
Coupled Power Turbine.  The coupled power turbine engine is the simplest adaptation from the 
turbojet engine.  In this configuration, the gas flow is fully expanded across a turbine which drives the 
compressor, the surplus power developed being transmitted to the propeller by a common drive shaft 
via suitable reduction gearing.  This arrangement is shown diagrammatically in Fig 1. 
3-16 Fig 1 Coupled Power Turbine Arrangement 
Compressor
Reduction Gear
Turbine
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-16 - Turboprop and Turboshaft Engines 
6. 
Free Power Turbine.  In this arrangement, a gas turbine acts simply as a gas generator to supply 
high  energy  gases  to  an  independent  free  power  turbine.    The  gases  are  expanded  across  the  free 
turbine which is connected to the propeller drive shaft via reduction gearing.  The layout of a free power 
turbine engine is shown in Fig 2.  The free turbine arrangement is very flexible; it is easy to start due to 
the absence of propeller drag, and the propeller and gas generator shafts can assume their optimum 
speeds independently. 
3-16 Fig 2 Free Power Turbine 
Compressor
HP Turbine
Reduction Gear
Free Power Turbine
7. 
Compounded  Engine.    The  compounded  engine  arrangement  features  a  two-spool  engine,  with 
the propeller drive directly connected to the low pressure spool (Fig 3). 
3-16 Fig 3 Compounded Engine 
HP Spool
LP Spool
Reduction Gear
Types of Turboshaft Engines 
8. 
Turboshaft  engines  are  usually  of  the  free  power  turbine  arrangement.    The  free  turbine  can  be 
regarded  as  a  fluid  coupling  and  this  is  particularly  useful  for  helicopter  applications  where  the 
requirement for a mechanical clutch in the transmission for start-up and autorotation is eliminated.  The 
general arrangement of a turboshaft engine is shown in Fig 4. 
3-16 Fig 4 Turboshaft Engine 
Free Power Turbine
Reduction Gear
Compressor
Reduction Gearing 
9. 
The  power  turbine  shaft  of  a  turboprop  engine  normally  rotates  at  around  8,000  to  10,000  rpm, 
although  rpm  of  over  40,000  are  found  in  some  engines  of  small  diameter.    However,  the  rotational 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-16 - Turboprop and Turboshaft Engines 
speed of the propeller is dictated by the limiting tip velocity.  A large reduction of shaft speed must be 
provided  in  order  to  match  the  power  turbine  to  the  propeller.    The  reduction  gearing  (Fig  5)  must 
provide  a  propeller  shaft  speed  which  can  be  utilized  effectively  by  the  propeller;  gearing  ratios  of 
between 6 and 20:1 are typical. 
3-16 Fig 5 Typical Turboprop Reduction Gear 
In  the  direct-coupled  power  turbine  and  compounded  engines,  the  shaft  bearing  the  compressor  and 
turbine  assemblies  drives  the  propeller  directly  through  a  reduction  gearbox.    In  the  free  turbine 
arrangement  reduction  gearing  on  the  turbine  shaft  is  still  necessary;  this  is  because  the  turbine 
operates at high speed for maximum efficiency.  The reduction gearing accounts for a large proportion 
(up to 25%) of the total weight of a turboprop engine and also increases its complexity; power losses of 
the order of 3 to 4% are incurred in the gearing (eg on a turboprop producing 4,500 kW some 150 kW 
is lost through the gearing). 
Turboprop Performance 
10.  Fig 9 in Volume 3, Chapter 1 shows that the propeller has a higher propulsive efficiency than the 
turbojet up to speeds of approximately 500 kt, and higher than a turbofan engine up to approximately 
450 kt.  Compared with the piston engine of equivalent power, the turboprop has a higher power/weight 
ratio,  and  a  greater  fatigue  life  because  of  the  reduced  vibration  level  from  the  gas  turbine  rotating 
assemblies. 
11.  Effect  of  Aircraft  Speed  on  Turboprop  Performance.    Fig  4  in  Volume  2,  Chapter  5  shows  the 
effect of aircraft speed on shaft power, thrust and specific fuel consumption. 
12.  Effect of Altitude on Turboprop Performance. Fig 3 in Volume 2, Chapter 5 shows the effect of 
altitude on shaft power and specific fuel consumption. 
Engine Control 
13.  As mentioned in para 9, the gas generator element of the turboprop engine operates at high rpm 
for  maximum  efficiency;  any  reduction  in  rpm  reduces  the  pressure  ratio  across  the  compressor  and 
therefore adversely affects the sfc.  In practice, most turboprop engines have gas generators which run 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-16 - Turboprop and Turboshaft Engines 
at or near 100% rpm and three main methods are used to control the rpm and power absorption of the 
propeller throughout the normal flight ranges.  These are: 
a. 
Integrated control of both blade angle and fuel flow. 
b. 
Direct control of gas generator fuel flow. 
c. 
Direct control of propeller blade angle. 
14.  Integrated Control of Blade Angle and Fuel Flow.  The integrated control system is suitable for 
a  coupled  turboprop  engine.    In  this  system  blade  angle  and  fuel  flow  are  altered  simultaneously  by 
movement  of  the  power  lever.    As  the  power  lever  is  advanced,  fuel  flow  and  blade  angle  are 
increased.    However,  the  fuel  input  is  more  than  is  required  to  provide  the  additional  torque,  thus 
engine rpm will increase in addition to the blade angle increase.  At maximum rpm further power can 
be obtained by increasing fuel flow; the propeller constant speed unit (CSU) will increase blade angle 
to absorb the additional power without a change in engine rpm. 
15.  Direct Control of Fuel Flow (Alpha Control).  The direct control of fuel flow is suitable for use in 
a free power turbine engine.  In this system, the gas generator is controlled in the same manner as a 
turbojet  and  the  power  available  to  the  free  turbine  assembly  is  governed  by  the  fuel  flow.    Through 
reduction gearing, the free turbine turns the propeller which is maintained at constant rpm by the CSU, 
altering the blade angle. 
16.  Direct  Control  of  Blade  Angle  (Beta  Control).    This  control  system  can  be  used  for  any 
turboprop  engine.    In  this  system,  the  cockpit  power  lever  simply  selects  a  blade  angle  and  various 
automatic systems are used to maintain the propeller rpm by adjusting the fuel flow (e.g. by a governor 
in  the  fuel  control  system).    As  the  propeller  blade  angle  is  changed,  the  propeller  speed  governor 
adjusts the fuel flow to maintain constant propeller rpm (and thus constant engine rpm).  All helicopter 
turboshaft engines operate in this manner.  The blade angle is selected by the collective lever and the 
output of the gas generator is automatically adjusted to maintain the rotor rpm within fine limits. 
17.  Control  Outside  Normal  Flight  Range.    Outside  the  normal  flight  range,  and  particularly  in 
reverse thrust range, the engine/propeller combination is normally controlled by the beta system, i.e. by 
direct  control  of  propeller  blade  angle.    The  transition  point  between  the  control  systems  is  usually 
indicated by a stop or detent in the throttle lever quadrant. 
Propeller Control 
18.  The main propeller controls found on the majority of turboprop engines are as follows: 
a. 
Constant speed unit. 
b. 
Manual and automatic feathering controls. 
c. 
Fixed and removable stops. 
d. 
Synchronization and synchrophasing units. 
e. 
Reverse thrust control. 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-16 - Turboprop and Turboshaft Engines 
19.  Constant Speed Unit.  In the normal flight range, the main control of the propeller is exercised by 
the  CSU,  sometimes  referred  to  as  the  propeller  control  unit  (PCU).    The  operation  of  this  unit  is 
described in Volume 3, Chapter 18. 
20.  Manual and Automatic Feathering Controls.  All turboprop aircraft are fitted with some form of 
manual feathering control.  In some cases this control is integral with the HP cock for the associated 
engine;  in  others,  the  feathering  control  is  operated  through  the  fire  protection  system  which  also 
closes  the  HP  cock.    Automatic  feathering  control  is  fitted  to  many  turboprop  engines  to  avoid 
excessive  drag  following  an  engine  failure.    The  automatic  system  receives  signals  from  the  engine 
torquemeters and reacts to unscheduled loss of torquemeter oil pressure by feathering the appropriate 
propeller.    On  twin-engine  turboprop  aircraft,  the  operation  of  the  autofeather  system  on  one  engine 
automatically  inhibits  the  same  operation  on  the  other  engine,  while  still  allowing  the  latter  to  be 
feathered manually. 
21.  Fixed  and  Removable  Stops.    A  number  of  stops  or  latches  are  incorporated  in  the  propeller 
control system; their purpose is to confine the angular movement of the blades within limits appropriate 
to  the  phase  of  flight  or  ground  handling.    The  most  common  stops  are  described  below  and  typical 
values are given for the corresponding blade angles (see Fig 6). 
3-16 Fig 6 Power Quadrant and Associated Typical Blade Angles 
o
Flight Cruise Pitch Stop (+27  )
Flight Fine
Coarse Pitch Stop (+50  
o )
Pitch Stop (+14  
o )
Ground Fine
Pitch Stop (–1  
o )
Feather
Stop (+85  
o )
Reverse
Braking
o
Stop (–15  )
Flight Range
Ta
R
xi
ange Br
Feathering
a
Range
R
k
a
in
n
g
ge
a. 
Feather  and  Reverse  Braking  Stops.    These  two  fixed  stops  define  the  full  range  within 
which the propeller angle may be varied (+85º to –15º). 
b. 
Ground  Fine  Pitch  Stop.  This is a removable stop (–1º) which is provided for starting the 
engine and maintaining minimum constant rpm; the stop also prevents the propeller from entering 
the reverse pitch range. 
c. 
Flight  Fine  Pitch  Stop.    This  is  a  removable  stop  (+14º)  which  prevents  the  blade  angle 
from fining off below its preset value.  Its purpose is to prevent propeller overspeeding after a CSU 
failure.    It  also  limits  the  amount  of  windmilling  drag  on  the  final  approach.  The  stop  is  usually 
engaged automatically as the pitch is increased above its setting; removal of the stop is, however, 
usually by switch selection. 
d. 
Flight  Cruise  Pitch  Stop.    This  is  a  removable  stop  (+27º)  which  is fitted to prevent excessive 
drag  or  overspeeding  in  the  event  of  a  PCU  failure.    The  stop  engages  automatically  as  the  pitch  is 
increased above its setting, and is also withdrawn automatically as the pitch is decreased towards flight 
idle provided that two or more of the propellers fine off at the same time.  Variations on this type of stop 
include automatic drag limiters (ADL) and a beta follow-up system.  In the first of these, the stop is in the 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-16 - Turboprop and Turboshaft Engines 
form of a variable pitch datum which is sensitive to torque pressure.  If the propeller torque falls below 
the datum value, the pitch of the propeller is automatically increased.  The pitch value at which the ADL 
is set is varied by the position of the power lever. Thus, as the power is reduced, the ADL torque datum 
value  is  also  reduced  so  that  the  necessary  approach  and  landing  drag  may  be  attained,  while 
simultaneously limiting the drag to a safe maximum value. The beta follow-up stop uses the beta control 
(i.e.  direct  selection  of  blade  angle  for  ground  handling)  to  select  a  blade  angle  just  below  the  value 
controlled by the PCU.  In the event of a PCU failure, the propeller can only fine off by a few degrees 
before it is prevented from further movement in that direction by the beta follow-up stop.  In the flight 
range, the position of this stop always remains below the minimum normal blade angle and so does not 
interfere with the PCU governing. 
e. 
Coarse  Pitch  Stop.    This  stop  (+50º)  limits  the  maximum  coarse  pitch  obtainable  in  the 
normal flight range.  A feathering selection normally over-rides this stop. 
Propeller Synchronization and Synchrophasing 
22.  Propeller  Synchronization.    All  multi-engine,  propeller-driven  aircraft  suffer  from  propeller  beat 
noise which induces vibration in the airframe, and irritation and fatigue in crew and passengers.  This 
noise  is  produced  by  propellers  rotating  at  different  rpm,  each  propeller  producing  its  own  audible 
frequency which beats with the frequencies of other propellers nearby.  The noise and vibration levels 
rise and fall according to the degree of rpm difference; this undulation can be eliminated by running all 
the propellers at precisely the same rpm, ie synchronizing the rpm. 
23.  Propeller  Synchrophasing.    Although  the  beat  noise  is  eliminated  by  synchronizing  the 
propellers,  it  may  not  have  a  very  significant  effect  on  the  actual  noise  and  vibration  levels.    The 
majority of the remaining propeller noise is caused by the interaction between the blades of adjacent 
propellers, being a maximum when adjacent blade tips are directly opposite each other.  It has been 
found  that  there  are  optimum  combinations  of  angular  differences  (ie  phase  difference)  between 
adjacent propeller blades which reduce this interference noise to a minimum (see Fig 7). 
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-16 - Turboprop and Turboshaft Engines 
3-16 Fig 7 Optimum Blade Angle Relationships 
10  
o Lead
Master
20  
o Lag
22  
o Lead
1
1
1
1
No 1 Blade
No 1 Propeller
No 2 Propeller
No 3 Propeller
No 4 Propeller
30  
o Lead
20  
o Lead
Master
42  
o Lead
1
1
1
1
No 1 Propeller
No 2 Propeller
No 3 Propeller
No 4 Propeller
The maintenance of these correct phase differences throughout the normal flight range is known as 
synchrophasing.    Fig  8  shows  the  noise  profiles  along  the  fuselage  of  a  multi-engine  transport 
aircraft both with and without synchrophasing. 
3-16 Fig 8 Effect of Syncrophasing on Noise Profile 
Without Synchrophasing
With Synchrophasing
l
e
v
e
L
e
is
o
N
24.  Synchronizing  and  Synchrophasing.    Propeller  synchronization  on  early  multi-engine  aircraft  was 
carried out manually, either by listening to the changing beat frequency or observing the strobe effect through 
adjacent  propellers.    This  was  a  time-consuming  and  potentially  distracting  method  and  required  frequent 
repetition as the propeller rpm drifted apart.  In current aircraft, synchronization is carried out automatically by 
using  one  engine  as  a  master  reference  and  slaving  the  remaining  engines  to  it.    A  synchroscope  in  the 
cockpit gives a visual check on the automatic system and enables manual synchronization to be carried out if 
necessary.    On  aircraft  fitted  with  synchrophasing  equipment,  the  effect  is  achieved  by  electronic  control 
which also includes throttle anticipation and speed stabilization functions.  The control is only operative in the 
flight  range.    Each  propeller  drives  a  pulse  generator  which  provides  one  pulse  per  revolution.    With  the 
propeller controls set to normal flight range, the pulse signals of the master engine selected are compared 
with those of the slaved engines.  The signals are analysed and discrepancies between master and slave 
pulses are eliminated by a control system which, by influencing the appropriate PCU, adjusts the speed and 
phase to the correct relationship with the master engine. 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 - 3-17 - Bypass Engines 
CHAPTER 17 - BYPASS ENGINES 
Introduction 
1. 
The  turbofan  is  the  most  common  derivative  of  the  gas  turbine  engine  for  aircraft  propulsion.    It  is  a 
'by-pass' engine, where part of the air (core flow) is compressed fully to the cycle pressure ratio and passes 
into the combustion chamber, whilst the remainder is compressed to a lesser extent (the fan pressure ratio) 
and ducted around the core section.  This by-pass flow is either directed to atmosphere through a separate 
nozzle or it rejoins the hot flow downstream of the turbine in the main exhaust.  In both cases, the result is 
reduced overall jet velocity, giving better propulsive efficiency at lower aircraft speeds.  In addition, because 
of the relatively low temperature of the by-pass air it may be used for cooling. 
By-pass Ratio 
2. 
The ratio of the by-pass flow to the core or gas generator flow is termed the by-pass ratio (BPR) 
and  is  explained  in  Volume  3, Chapter 1, Para 8.  Fig 1 shows these flows in relationship.  It can be 
seen from Fig 1 that: 
MFan
=  By-pass Ratio 
MCore
Where  MFan  and  MCore  represent  the  mass  flow  rate  of  air  through  the  fan  duct  and  through  the  core 
engine  respectively.    As  an  example,  if  the  total  mass  flow  into  an  engine  is  six  units  and  two  units 
pass into the core, whilst four units are ducted past the core, the engine is said to have a by-pass ratio 
of 4/2 = 2.  Typical ranges of BPR are 0.15 (leaky turbojet) to 9 (high by-pass). 
3-17 Fig 1 Core and Duct Flow - Turbofan Engine 
Design 
3. 
An important point to be considered in the design of a turbofan by-pass engine is whether to mix 
the cold and hot gas flows in the jet pipe or to exhaust the cold air through separate nozzles.  There is 
a performance advantage in mixing the gas streams if it can be accomplished without introducing too 
much turbulence when they meet.  There are also useful installation advantages as the single jet pipe 
is  less  complicated.    Further,  the  single  pipe  is  of  particular  advantage  when  afterburning  is  used  to 
increase  thrust  whether  a  deliberate  attempt  is  made  to  mix  the  streams  (forced  mixing)  or  not.    A 
particular case where the hot and cold streams are not mixed is the Pegasus.  This is to ensure that 
the thrust centre is approximately at the C of G during V/STOL operations. 
4. 
Reducing  the  BPR  reduces  the  frontal  area  of  the  engine  and  hence  the  drag,  enabling  higher 
speeds to be reached.  If the BPR is reduced at a given fan ratio, less work will be required in the fan 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 - 3-17 - Bypass Engines 
turbine  and  turbine  exit  pressure  increases.    If  it  is  required  to  mix  hot  and  cold  flows,  fan  pressure 
ratio must be increased to balance the pressure at the mixing plane.  This may require the number of 
fan stages to be increased.  Such an engine is termed a 'mixing by-pass' type. 
Propulsive Efficiency 
5. 
The propulsive efficiency of the turbofan engine is increased over the pure jet by converting more 
of  the  fuel  energy  into  pressure energy than into kinetic energy as in the pure jet.  The fan produces 
this  additional  force  or  thrust  without  increasing  fuel  flow.    Consider  the  derivation  of  propulsive 
efficiency.  Basically, the total energy in the jet is: 
 
 
 
Total energy in jet  = Thrust × Flight Speed + Lost Kinetic Energy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
= (Vj − Va) × Va + ½ × (Vj − Va)2
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
= V
2
2
2
jVa – Va  + ½Vj  + ½Va  – VjVa
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
= ½ V 2
2
j  – ½Va
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
= ½ x (Vj – Va) x (Vj + Va) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Where Vj = Jet velocity 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Va = Flight speed 
Therefore, the ratio of useful power (thrust × flight speed) to total output, ie propulsive efficiency, 
(V − V ) × V
2V
j
a
a
=
a
=
1 ×

×
+
V + V
2
(V
V ) (V
V )
j
a
j
a
j
a
which is maximum when Vj = Va. 
Unfortunately, no thrust is then produced.  As an example: 
Va  = 200 m/s (flight speed) 
Vj 
= 600 m/s (turbojet) 
Vf 
= 400 m/s (turbofan) 
2 × 200
400
Then propulsive efficiency for the turbojet is 
 = 
 = 50% 
600 + 200
800
2 × 200
400
 
 
 
 and for the turbofan 
 
 
 = 
 = 66% 
400 + 200
600
6. 
The  emphasis  on  the  use  and  development  of  the  turbofan  engine  has  evolved  with  the  use  of 
transonic blading.  Transonic blading allows higher blade speeds (by definition) and hence higher rpm 
and  pressure  ratios  to  be  achieved.    This  results  in  a  more  fuel-efficient  engine  but  will  increase  the 
weight with no significant increase in thrust - thus reducing the thrust/weight ratio.  On some high by-
pass ratio engines, a reduction gear is used between the fan and the turbine, allowing better matching 
and reduced fan blade noise. 
Comparison of Turbojet, Turbofan, and Turboprop Engines 
7. 
By  converting  the  shaft  power  of  the  turboprop  into  units  of  thrust,  and  fuel  consumption  per  unit  of 
power  into  fuel  consumption  per  unit  of  thrust,  a  comparison  between  turbojet  and  turbofan  can  be 
assessed.  Assuming that the engines are equivalent in terms of compressor pressure ratio and turbine entry 
temperatures,  the  four  graphs  (Fig 2)  show  how  the  various  engines  compare  with  regard  to  thrust  and 
specific fuel consumption versus airspeed.  They indicate clearly that each engine type has its advantages 
and limitations. 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 - 3-17 - Bypass Engines 
3-17 Fig 2 Operating Parameters of the Turbojet, Turboprop, and Turbofan Engines 
TurboProp Take-off
                    Thrust
Turboprop
Turbofan
Take-off
Thrust
t
t
s
s
ru
ru
h
h
T
T
t
Turbojet
t
e
e
Turbofan
N
Take-off
N
Thrust
Turboprop
Turbojet
Turbofan
Turbojet
0
200
400
600
800
0
200
400
600
800
True Airspeed at Sea Level (kt)
True Airspeed at 30,000 ft (kt)
a  Thrust at Sea Level and 30,000 ft
Turbojet
Turbojet
n
Turbofan
n
tio
tio
p
p
m
m
u
u
s
s
n
n
o
o
C
C
l
l
Turbofan
e
e
u
u
F
F
ific
ific
c
c
e
e
p
Turboprop
p
S
S
t
t
s
s
ru
ru
h
h
T
T
Turboprop
0
200
400
600
800
0
200
400
600
800
True Airspeed at Sea Level (kt)
True Airspeed at 30,000 ft (kt)
b  Thrust Specific Fuel Consumption at Sea Level and 30,000 ft
8. 
Turbofan  engines  show  a  definite  superiority  over  the  pure  jet  at  low  speeds.    The  increased 
frontal  area  of  the  fan  engine  presents  a  problem  for  high-speed  aircraft,  which,  of  course,  require 
small  frontal  areas to reduce drag.  At high speeds, this increased drag may offset any advantage in 
efficiency produced.  The main characteristics and uses are as follows: 
a. 
Increased thrust at low forward speeds results in better take-off performance.  The turbofan 
thrust does not fall as quickly as the turboprop with increasing forward speed. 
b. 
The weight of the engine lies between the pure jet and turboprop. 
c. 
Ground clearances are greater than the turboprop, but not as good as the turbojet. 
d. 
Specific  fuel  consumption  and  specific  weight  lie  between  the  turbojet  and  turboprop.    This 
results in increased operating economy and range over the pure jet. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 - 3-17 - Bypass Engines 
e. 
Considerable  noise  level  reduction  of  around  20  db  to  25  db  over  the  turbojet  reduces 
acoustic  fatigue  in  surrounding  aircraft  parts,  and  reduces  the  need  for  jet  noise  suppression, 
particularly at high by-pass ratios although acoustic linings may still be required. 
These  advantages  make  the  turbofan  engine  suitable  for  long  range,  relatively  high-speed  flight,  but 
overall,  much  depends  on  the  operation  to  be  satisfied.    The  use  of  afterburning  further  complicates 
the issue.  For example, a turbojet using afterburning has a better augmented SFC than a turbofan and 
also  a  higher  dry  thrust  assuming  that  the  engines  are  sized  for  the  same  afterburning  thrust.    The 
whole  concept  tends  to  be  a  compromise  particularly  if  multi-role  operations  are  required.    If  the 
operation is of a very specific nature then the result of an optimization study is much easier to predict.  
For example, an off-the-ground intercept with little range requirement - using afterburning all the way - 
would require a turbojet or low by-pass ratio engine.  On the other hand, a long-range cruise with some 
use of afterburning at the target would show a medium by-pass engine to be best. 
Surge 
9.  A  turbofan  engine  is  designed  to  operate  at  one  particular  operating  condition  (design  point).  
When operated away from its design point the engine will be less efficient, and in some cases surge 
may result (see Volume 3, Chapter 6). 
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 4 


AP3456 - 3-18 - Propeller Operation 
CHAPTER 18 - PROPELLER OPERATION 
Introduction 
1. 
This chapter is concerned with the mechanism and handling of the propellers fitted to both piston 
and  turboprop  engines.    However,  as  there  are  relatively  few  piston-engine  types  in  service,  the 
description and operation of propellers will concentrate mainly on turboprop applications, with specific 
reference  to  piston  propellers  where  required.    The  theory  of  propeller  aerodynamics  is  contained  in 
Volume 1, Chapter 23. 
2. 
There are two principle types of propeller, fixed pitch and variable pitch: 
a. 
Fixed  Pitch.    The  fixed  pitch  propeller  is  the  simplest  type  of  propeller,  as  it  has  no  additional 
moving parts.  This type of propeller is used with low-powered piston engines fitted to single-engine light 
aircraft.  Engine rpm, and therefore power output, is controlled by the throttle.  The propeller converts 
engine power into thrust and is designed to avoid engine overspeed with maximum power set by using 
a pitch angle which is efficient at the normal maximum cruising speed. 
b. 
Variable  Pitch.    With  a  variable  pitch  propeller,  the  engine  is  governed  to  run  at  a set rpm 
throughout  the  flight  range.    The  propeller  governs  the  engine  at  this  set  rpm  by  the  use  of  a 
device  known  as  a  constant  speed  unit  (CSU).    Any  variations  in  engine  power  output,  which 
would otherwise produce a change in rpm, are sensed by the CSU which alters the propeller pitch 
angle to keep the rpm constant.  This type of propeller is fitted to higher-powered single and multi-
engine piston and turboprop engines. 
3. 
Power Measurement.  The power output from a piston engine to produce a given performance is 
obtained  by  setting  engine  rpm  and  manifold/boost  pressure  (see  Volume  3,  Chapter  2).    However, 
turboprop  engines  have  a  much  greater  range  of  power  available,  and  the  power  output  being 
developed  at  any  given  time  is  measured  from the actual torque transmitted by the drive shaft to the 
reduction  gearbox.    A  cockpit  gauge  (graduated  in  units  of  torque  or  horsepower)  gives  the  pilot  an 
indication of the power being developed (see Fig 1). 
3-18 Fig 1 Torquemeter and Cockpit Gauge 
Propeller Shaft
Tie Strut
Power Plant
(1,020 rpm)
(13,820 RPM)
Reduction Safety
Exhaust
Gearbox Coupling
Driveshaft
Torquemeter
Cockpit
Gauge
Constant Speed Unit (CSU) 
4. 
The  CSU  (see  Fig  2) is a mechanical device that senses changes in engine speed caused by a 
change  in  power  output,  by  means  of  a  flyweight  governor.    This governor controls a hydraulic servo 
system feeding high-pressure oil, via a pilot valve, to a piston in the pitch change mechanism (PCM).  
The CSU works on the principle of balancing a spring pressure against the centrifugal force of rotating 
governor  flyweights,  driven  directly  from  the  engine  or  reduction  gearbox.    For  a  piston  engine,  the 
Revised May 10   
Page 1 of 8 



AP3456 - 3-18 - Propeller Operation 
governor flyweights are tensioned by a speeder spring, which is controlled from the cockpit by setting 
the  rpm  lever.    For  a  turboprop,  the  most  efficient  engine  rpm  is  maintained  by  pre-tensioning  the 
speeder spring to give 100% engine rpm at all times. 
3-18 Fig 2 Diagram of a Constant Speed Unit (CSU) and Pitch Change Mechanism (PCM) 
Pitch Change Mechanism (PCM)
Constant Speed Unit (CSU)
Propeller
Blade
Cam Follower
Cam
To Fine
To Coarse
Pitch
Pitch
RPM Selection
Controller
Bevel
Gears
Oil Return to
Speeder Engine/ Reservoir
Spring
Propeller Hub
Piston
Rotating
Governor
Housing
Flyweight
From Pilot Valve
Pressure
Propeller
Relief Valve
Blade
Oil Supply
CSU High Pressure Pump
Pilot
Valve
Oil Return to Engine/ Propeller
Oil Reservoir
5. 
Examining the PCM in more detail (Fig 3), it can be seen that the movement of the piston backwards 
and forwards moves a cam follower within the helical path in the cam, thereby changing linear movement 
to rotation.  As the cam rotates, the bevel gear on its end causes the bevel gears situated on each blade 
root to turn, thus changing the blade pitch angle. 
3-18 Fig 3 Detailed Schematic Diagram of a Simple Pitch Change Mechanism (PCM) 
Propeller
Blade
Cam
Piston
Cam
Follower
Bevel
Gears
Propeller
Blade
6. 
Engine  Underspeed.    When the engine speed falls below the set rpm (known as 'underspeeding'), 
the speeder spring tension overcomes the force of the governor flyweights and moves the pilot valve down, 
allowing high-pressure oil to flow to the rear of the piston (see Fig 4). 
Revised May 10   
Page 2 of 8 



AP3456 - 3-18 - Propeller Operation 
3-18 Fig 4 Engine 'Underspeed' Correction 
HP Oil
LP Oil
Decrease (Fine)
Pitch
PRV is closed
The resulting piston movement decreases the blade pitch angle of the propeller.  Because of the decreased 
propeller rotational drag, the engine accelerates, and the flyweights produce more centrifugal force, until they 
balance the speeder spring force again.  This action closes the pilot valve and the propeller pitch is locked 
hydraulically to retain the engine 'on speed' (see Fig 5). 
3-18 Fig 5 Engine 'On Speed' 
Equal Hydraulic Pressure
gives 'Hydraulic Lock'
PRV opens to regulate
pressure output from
CSU HP Pump
Pi
P lo
l t 
o V
t  a
V l
a ve
Cl
C o
l se
s d
e
7. 
Engine  Overspeed.    If  the  engine  'overspeeds',  the  increased  centrifugal  force  from  the 
flyweights lifts the pilot valve and high-pressure oil is fed to the front of the piston (see Fig 6).  The 
resulting piston movement increases the blade pitch angle of the propeller.  The increased rotational 
drag  from  the  propeller  now  slows  down  the  engine,  the  speeder  spring  force  then  balances  the 
flyweights,  and  the  pilot  valve  closes  again  to  achieve  the  'on  speed'  rpm  (see  Fig  5).    A  propeller 
that  can  be  adjusted  to  both  fine  pitch  and  coarse  pitch  by  hydraulic  pressure  is  termed 
'double-acting'. 
Revised May 10   
Page 3 of 8 



AP3456 - 3-18 - Propeller Operation 
3-18 Fig 6 Engine 'Overspeed' Correction 
To Coarse
Pitch
PRV is closed
8. 
Piston-engine  Aircraft.    For  most  single-engine  piston  aircraft  with  variable-pitch  propellers,  the 
propeller  blades  are  moved  to  fine  pitch  by  hydraulic  pressure  and  to  coarse  pitch  by  centrifugal  twisting 
moment  (CTM)  (see  Volume  1,  Chapter  23).    Such  a  propeller  is  termed  'single-acting'.    Because  these 
aircraft are not normally fitted with a feathering mechanism (see para 14), they rely on CTM to coarsen off 
the  propeller  blades,  with  counterweights  ensuring  that  the  propeller  moves  correctly.    In  the  case  of  an 
engine  failure,  and  subsequent  low  propeller  rpm,  the  movement  of  the  piston  towards  the  coarse  pitch 
position is sometimes assisted by a large spring within the propeller hub. 
Propeller Pitch Range Control 
9. 
Modern turboprop engines produce very high-power output in flight.  The propeller, through the CSU, 
controls this power output by varying the propeller blade pitch angle to maintain engine rpm.  The large range 
of  blade  pitch  angle  required  in  flight  is  referred  to  as  the  alpha  (α)  control  range.    However,  whilst 
manoeuvring on the ground, the power output required from a turboprop engine is comparatively low.  On 
the ground, the blade pitch angle (and therefore the thrust produced) is controlled directly by the pilot.  This 
ground range of blade pitch angle is referred to as the beta (β) control range. 
10.  Turboprop engines normally have two pilot-operated controls: 
a. 
Power Lever The power lever is used to control the power plant during all normal flight and 
ground operations.  As shown by Fig 7, the lever covers both the alpha and beta control ranges.   
3-18 Fig 7 Turboprop Power Lever 
Forward
β Range
α Range
Ground Idle
Max Reverse
Detent
Flight
Idle
Max Power
Note: Power Lever has to be lifted
to travel from α t
  o β range
Revised May 10   
Page 4 of 8 




AP3456 - 3-18 - Propeller Operation 
The alpha range controls the power plant during all normal flight conditions by adjusting the engine fuel flow, 
with the CSU adjusting propeller blade angle to maintain 100% engine rpm (Fig 8). 
3-18 Fig 8 Alpha Control 
Propeller CSU
α
Gearbox
Variable
Throttle
Fuel
Power
Pitch
Valve
Lever
Propeller
In  the  beta  range,  the  pilot  controls  the  propeller  pitch  directly,  overriding  the  CSU.    In  the  beta  range,  a 
separate engine rpm governor on the engine adjusts fuel flow to maintain engine rpm (Fig 9). 
3-18 Fig 9 Beta Control 
Engine RPM
Governor
β
b.
Condition Lever.  The condition lever is a complex electro-mechanical device that controls 
several  functions.    As  shown  by  Fig  10,  the  various  positions  of  the  lever  are  either  located  by 
'stops'  (sometimes  referred  to  as  'detents')  or  are  only  selectable  on  application  of  pressure 
against a spring. 
3-18 Fig 10 Condition Lever 
Forward
Roller
Ground Stop
Run
Detent
Air Start
Detent
Feather
Position
Detent
The four functions shown in Fig 10 are: 
(1)  Ground  Stop.    The  Ground  Stop  position  is  located  by  a  detent.    When  the  condition 
lever is in this position, the HP fuel cock is closed. 
(2)  Run.    The  Run  position  is  where  the  condition  lever  will  be  during  normal  engine 
running. 
(3)  Air Start.  To reach the Air Start position, the lever must be held against spring tension.  
This position is only used while re-starting the engine in flight. 
Revised May 10   
Page 5 of 8 


AP3456 - 3-18 - Propeller Operation 
(4)  Feather.  When the lever is moved to the Feather position, fuel is mechanically shut off 
and the electrical feathering pump is operated (see sub-para 13f). 
11.  Piston-engine  Aircraft.    On  piston-engine  aircraft,  the  engine  rpm  and  power  are  set  by  two 
different controls: 
a. 
Rpm Lever.  Engine rpm is set by the rpm lever, which controls the CSU directly. 
b. 
Throttle.  Engine power is changed by adjusting manifold/boost pressure with the throttle. 
During take-off, climb and cruise (i.e. flight conditions where the power setting is high), once an rpm has 
been set with the rpm lever, it will be maintained by the CSU, regardless of throttle movement.  However, 
at low or idle power settings, such as those used for descent and landing, the engine may not produce 
sufficient power to maintain the set rpm. 
Propeller Safety Devices 
12.  Various  safety  devices  are  fitted  to  propellers  to  override  the  CSU  system  in  case  of 
malfunction.    The  most  serious  result  of  loss  of  control  of  propeller  rpm  is  an  'overspeed',  during 
which  the  propeller  blades  rapidly  move to fine pitch because of the effect of CTM.  The effects of 
the propeller rapidly moving to fine pitch are: 
a. 
The  engine  torque  being  used  to  drive  the  propeller  blades  is  replaced  by  a  windmilling 
(negative)  torque  from  the  propeller,  which  tries  to  drive  the  engine.    If  this  effect  is  unchecked, 
both propeller and engine overspeed will occur. 
b. 
The wind milling propeller causes a very high drag force to be applied to the aircraft.  This is 
particularly  dangerous  in  multi-engine  aircraft,  as  it  gives  rise  to  a  severe  asymmetric  thrust 
condition. 
13.  Examples of some of the safety devices fitted to propeller systems are discussed in the following 
sub-paragraphs  and  illustrated  in  Fig  11.    It  should  be  noted,  however,  that  not  all  are  fitted  to  every 
propeller system: 
3-18 Fig 11 Propeller Safety Devices 
d.  Mechanical
Pitch Lock
To Fine
To Coarse
Pitch
Pitch
To Pitch
Change
Mechanism
c.  Hydraulic Pitch
Lock stops piston
moving towards Fine
b.  Fine Pitch Stop
positively limits
minimum pitch in flight
a.  Negative Signal from
Torquemeter results in
Feathering Pump pushing
Blades to Coarse Pitch
Revised May 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-18 - Propeller Operation 
a. 
Negative Torque System (NTS).  When the torquemeter fitted to the engine drive shaft senses 
that  the  propeller  is  driving  the  engine,  ie  trying  to  overspeed  the  engine,  a  signal  is  sent  to  the 
feathering pump (see sub-para f) to coarsen the blades.  The negative torque can be caused by engine 
failure, loss of power or an unusual flight regime (such as high TAS with low power selected).  When 
the  torquemeter  senses  positive  torque  again,  the  signal  is  cancelled,  and  the  propeller  operates 
normally. 
b. 
Fine Pitch Stop.  The fine pitch stop is fitted in the piston assembly to provide a mechanical 
limit  to  the  minimum  degree  of  pitch  that  can  be  obtained  in  the  flight  regime.    For  ground 
operations,  the  fine  pitch  stop  is  withdrawn  hydraulically,  but  is  automatically  re-engaged 
mechanically by spring force when the power lever is moved past the flight idle position. 
c. 
Hydraulic  Pitch  Lock.    If  oil  pressure  loss  is  sensed,  the  hydraulic  pitch  lock  operates 
instantaneously.    A  valve  closes,  trapping  the  oil  on  the  increase-pitch  side  of  the  piston, 
preventing the blades from moving towards fine. 
d. 
Mechanical  Pitch  Lock.    Some  propeller  systems  also  include  a  mechanical  pitch  lock 
which  operates  when  oil  pressure  is  lost,  or  propeller  overspeed  is  sensed.    The  pitch  lock  is  a 
ratchet  lock  which  mechanically  prevents  the  propeller  blades  from  moving  to  fine  pitch.    It  still 
allows them to move towards the coarse position, or feather, if required. 
e. 
Engine  Safety  Coupling  System.    Aircraft  with  NTS  often  incorporate  a  safety  coupling 
(see Fig 1), which decouples the engine from the propeller reduction gearbox if a severe negative 
torque is sensed, ie after engine failure.  Decoupling has two beneficial effects: 
(1)  It removes the drag caused by the propeller trying to rotate the failed engine and allows 
other propeller protection devices to operate. 
(2)  It prevents further damage to the failed engine. 
f. 
Feathering Pump.  The oil pump for normal propeller control is usually driven directly from 
the  engine  for  piston  engines,  and  from  the  reduction  gearbox  for  turboprops.    However,  a 
separate  electrically-driven  oil  pump  is  usually  incorporated  in  both  types  to  complete  the 
feathering  operation  whilst  the  propeller  is  slowing  down  or  has  stopped.    The  'feathering  pump' 
also enables the propeller to be un-feathered during an engine re-start sequence. 
Propeller Operations 
14.  Feathering.    Feathering  of  the  propeller  is  normally  carried  out  when  the  engine  is  shut  down 
during  flight.    When  feathered,  the  propeller  blade  is  presented  with  its  leading  edge  facing  into  the 
direction of the relative airflow, thus reducing drag (see Fig 12). 
Revised May 10   
Page 7 of 8 


AP3456 - 3-18 - Propeller Operation 
3-18 Fig 12 Range of Movement of a Typical Propeller 
Feather
92.5°
Flight Constant Speeding
α Range
23°
Flight Idle
Ground
β

 Range
Ground Idle

Max Reverse
-7°
15.  Reverse Pitch.  Reverse pitch can be used both for braking after touchdown and for manoeuvring 
on the ground.  When reverse pitch is selected, the fine pitch stops are disengaged, and the propeller 
blades are allowed to move past the flight fine position and into reverse pitch.  This function is selected 
by the pilot using the power lever (see Fig 7).  The pilot has direct control of propeller pitch angle, while 
the engine speed is control ed by the engine rpm governor (β range). 
16.  Ground Idle.  To reduce propeller drag, and hence the load on the engine, when starting on the 
ground the propeller blades should be at the ground idle blade angle.  This is achieved by placing the 
power lever in the ground idle detent before engine (see Fig 7). 
17.  FADEC.  Full Authority Digital Engine Control (FADEC) systems (see Volume 3, Chapter 11) are 
fitted to some piston and most turboprop aircraft.  Engine control is exercised through a single power 
lever rather than the two mentioned in para 10.  The various mechanical speed sensors fitted to control 
the  engine  and  propeller  are  replaced  by  electrical  pulse  generators.    An  associated  computer  then 
controls  the  speed  of  the  engine,  propeller  pitch  operation  and  fuel  flow  in  both  the  alpha  and  beta 
ranges.    The  mechanical  CSU  is  replaced  with  an  electronically  controlled  Propeller  Control  Unit 
(PCU), which controls the flow of oil to the pitch change mechanism in response to the FADEC signals.  
The  propeller  safety  devices  explained  in  para  13  are  still  fitted  but  are  triggered  by  electrical  inputs, 
rather than mechanical ones. 
Revised May 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
CHAPTER 19 - AVIATION FUELS 
Introduction 
Piston Engines 
1. 
Aviation piston engines are reciprocating engines, similar to motor car engines, and use aviation 
gasoline  as  a  fuel.    However,  as  failure  of  an  aircraft  engine  through  fuel  problems  is  potentially 
disastrous, safety dictates that aviation gasoline must conform to very rigid specifications. 
2. 
Gasoline  is  a  refined  petroleum  distillate,  although  production  is  considerably  augmented  by 
synthetic  processes.    The  composition  of  gasoline  is  suitable  for  use  as  a  fuel  in  spark  ignition  internal 
combustion engines.  Aviation gasoline is prepared from various selected grades of gasoline, blended to 
give high anti-knock ratings (see para 29), high stability, a low freezing point, and an acceptable volatility.  
The UK Joint Services Designation (JSD) for aviation gasoline is AVGAS. 
3. 
AVGAS consists of approximately 85% carbon and 15% hydrogen, and the atoms are linked together in 
a  form  which  characterizes  the  type  of  substances  known  as  hydrocarbons.    When  mixed  with  air  and 
burned,  the  hydrogen  and  carbon  combine  with  the  oxygen  in  the  air  to  form  carbon  dioxide  and  water 
vapour.    The  nitrogen  in  the  air,  being  an  inert  gas,  does  not  burn  or  change  chemically,  and  serves  to 
regulate combustion.  It also helps in maintaining a reasonable temperature during combustion. 
Gas Turbine Engines 
4. 
Some  early  gas  turbine  (jet)  engines  used  aviation  gasoline,  but  Whittle  based  his  jet  design  on 
kerosene (paraffin). 
a. 
Kerosene.    The  production  of  kerosene  (spelt  'kerosine'  in  scientific  circles)  is  limited  to 
that obtained by normal distillation.  It soon became regarded as the most suitable fuel for gas 
turbines, commending itself on the grounds of cost, calorific value, burning characteristics and 
low  fire  hazard.    The  UK  JSD  for  kerosene  is  AVTUR.    AVTUR,  depending  on  type,  has  a 
typical boiling range of 150 °C to 280 °C and a freezing point not higher than –47 °C.  The US 
Service equivalent fuel is JP-8. 
b. 
'Wide-cut' Fuels.  The quantity of kerosene that can be distilled from a given amount of crude 
oil is limited, and this caused initial production limitations.  As the jet engine has proved to be not as 
fastidious  as  a  piston  engine,  and  capable  of  operating  from  any  clean  burning  fuel,  a  wider 
distillation range of fuel was developed (known as 'wide-cut' fuels).  These distillates are produced by 
combining gasoline and kerosene fractions.  The only wide-cut aviation fuel now approved in the UK 
is given the JSD AVTAG.  AVTAG has a wider boiling range than AVTUR and a freezing point below 
–58  °C.    AVTAG  is  interchangeable  with  the  US  designated  fuel  JP-4.    Wide-cut  fuels  present  a 
greater fire hazard than kerosene, due to lower temperature range of flammability, and higher vapour 
pressure.  AVTAG has, therefore, ceased to be used by most operators and is now primarily limited 
to emergency military use and use in very cold climatic conditions (freezing point of AVTAG is lower 
than AVTUR). 
c
High Flash Kerosene.  Naval carrier operations produced a special requirement for avoidance 
of  vapour  build-up  within  confined  spaces.    Higher  density  kerosene  with  a  high  flash  point (61 °C 
compared to 38 ºC for normal density kerosene) was specified (UK JSD AVCAT). 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
d. 
Other  Special  Requirements.    Special  performance  aircraft  have  created  requirements  for 
matching  variants  of  jet  fuel.    Such  cases  include  high  speed/very  high-altitude  aircraft  and  fuels 
needing exceptional thermal stability. 
Fuel Specification and Handling 
5. 
Specifications.    The  specification  of  an  aviation  fuel  is  a  statement  of its handling, storage and 
distribution characteristics, and the requirements for the engine.  The UK and the USA have published 
independent  specifications  to  meet  their  own  fuel  quality  demands.    In  the  UK,  responsibility  for  fuel 
requirements  (military  and  civil)  lies  with  the  Ministry  of  Defence,  Defence  Procurement  Agency, 
Directorate of Future Systems (Air). 
6. 
Designations.  Fuel (and oil) products may be identified by: 
a. 
National Designations eg Defence Standards (Def Stan) 91-90. 
b. 
NATO Code Numbers eg F-34. 
The more common gas turbine fuel specifications and designations are listed in Table 1. 
Table 1 Aviation Fuel Data 
NATO Code No 
UK 
 
Joint 
Service  UK Specification 
US Designation 
US Specification 
Designation 
Piston Engine Aircraft 
F-18 (1)                    
A   
V   
GAS 100LL 
Def Stan (2) 91-90 
 
MIL-G-5572F 
Gas Turbine Powered Aircraft 
Approved Fuels : The following fuel may be used without flight or maintenance restrictions. 
F-34 
AVTUR/FSII 
Def Stan 91-87 
JP-8 
MIL-DTL-
83133E 
F-40 
AVTAG/FSII 
Def Stan 91-88 
JP-4 
MIL-DTL-5624T 
Alternative Fuels : The following fuels may be used only if the approved fuels are not available.  (3). 
F-35 (4) 
AVTUR 
Def Stan 91-91 
Jet A-1 (ex 
ASTM D 1655 
F-44  
AVCAT/FSII 
Def Stan 91-86 
JP1) 
MIL-DTL-5624T 
JP-5 
Emergency Fuels : The following fuels may be used in an emergency situation.  (3). 
F-18 (1) 
AVGAS 100LL 
Def Stan 91-90 
MIL-G-5572F 
F-46 
COMBAT GAS 
Def Stan 91-13/2 
MIL-G-3056D 
F-54 
REGULAR (47/0 DIESO) 
Def Stan 91-13/2 
DF-2 
VV-F-8006 
Notes 
1. 
The NATO Designator for AVGAS (F-18) is now obsolescent. 
2. 
Defence Standard. 
3. 
This table illustrates some potential alternative fuels.  Those fuels listed as ‘Alternative’ or ‘Emergency’ may 
be used only in accordance with the relevant aircraft type Aircrew Manuals. 
4. 
This fuel does not contain AL48 (see para 72c) therefore: 
a. 
Operation on this fuel is limited to 14 elapsed days to limit fungal growth, and is to be followed by an 
equal  number  of  days  on  a  fuel  containing  FSII.    This  limit  applies  whether  or  not  flying  takes  place.    All 
uplifts of non-FSII fuel are to be recorded in the MOD Form 700. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
b. 
Operational  commanders  should  note  the  possibility  of  LP  filter  blockage  with  ice  if  the  fuel 
temperature falls below 0 ºC. 
c. 
Water  drain  checks  are  particularly  important  when  operating  on  this  fuel,  especially  if  refuelling  at 
high  ambient  temperature,  when  the  maximum  possible  time  should  be  allowed  between  refuelling  and 
drain checks. 
7. 
Visual  Identification  of  Fuels  and  Petroleum  Products.    Standard  colour  codings  and 
identification markings are used on all RAF fuel installations and vehicles to aid visual identification of 
fuel types and other petroleum products (see Figs 1 and 2). 
3-19 Fig 1 Examples of Fuel Identification Markings 
8. 
Fuel  Storage.    Aviation  fuels  have  special  characteristics  and  therefore  must  be  stored  in 
specially  constructed  bulk  fuel  installations  (BFIs)  on  the  ground.    These  BFIs  are  designed  to  keep 
risks  to  a  minimum,  and  to  maintain  the  quality  of  the  product.    Storage  in  aircraft  fuel  tanks  is 
described in this volume, at Volume 4, Chapter 10, Para 3. 
9. 
Transfer of Fuel to Aircraft.  Aviation fuel is transferred from the BFI to the aircraft by either: 
a. 
Refuelling vehicles (see Fig 2). 
b. 
Underground pipes direct to refuelling hydrants at aircraft dispersal points. 
Refuelling procedures are described in Volume 8, Chapter 3. 
10.  Environmental  Protection.    Spillage  of  aviation  fuel  has  a  potential  environmental  effect  and 
therefore presents a 'duty of care' under the Environmental Protection Act 1990. 
Density 
11.  The  density  of  a  substance  is  defined  as  its  mass  per  unit  volume.    This  gives  rise  to  the 
expression: 
Mass of a substance
Density =  Volume occupied by the substance
12.  Density gives a measure of the concentration of matter in a material.  It is measured, using System 
Internationale (SI) units, in kilograms per cubic metre. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
13.  Fuel  oils,  which  are  mixtures,  will  have  varying  densities  depending  on  how  much  of  each 
constituent is present in the mixture.  Some typical density values are: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   Water:-1,000 kg per cubic metre 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Paraffin:-   800 kg per cubic metre 
Specific Gravity 
14.  The specific gravity (SG), or relative density of a substance is the ratio of its density compared 
to that of water.  So, for a given substance, the expression used is: 
Density of substance
Specific gravity   =
Density of water
Using the figures in paragraph 13, the specific gravity of paraffin is: 
800 kg per m3
SG paraffin  =
= 0.80
,
1 000 kg per m3
15.  A knowledge of density and specific gravity is useful as it relates a given volume of a substance 
to  its  mass  without  actually  having  to  weigh  it.    For  example,  AVGAS  has  a  typical  density  of  720 
kg/m3 (this equals a specific gravity of 0.72), and if a tank holds 2 cubic metre, the mass of fuel will 
be 720 × 2 kg = 1,440 kg. 
16.  A  more  common  use  for  SG  is  to  convert  volume  to  mass,  especially  when  refuelling  at  other 
bases, whose refuelling vehicles are calibrated in different units eg litres, US galls or Imperial galls.  By 
knowing the specific gravity of the fuel and one unit of volume, the mass can be worked out by use of 
the  conversion  tables  in  the  Flight  Information  Handbook.    For  example,  if  you  were  refuelled  with 
3,000 litres of an AVTUR with 0.80 SG, this would equate to 5,300 lbs or 2,400 kg of fuel. 
17.  The effect of varying SG is that: 
a. 
To refuel to a specified mass fuel load will require a greater volume of a low SG fuel than of a 
high SG fuel. 
b. 
If replenishing fuel tanks to full, then the loading of a low SG fuel will result in a lower mass of 
fuel, and therefore a reduced cruise range for that flight, than if a high SG fuel had been used. 
Temperature and Specific Gravity 
18  SG varies inversely with temperature, but as fuel is loaded by mass this will only be significant if 
full  tanks  are  required.    Should  an  aircraft  be  refuelled  to  ‘tanks  full’  with  cold  fuel,  and  then  be 
allowed  to  stand  in  high  temperatures,  the  expansion  of  the  fuel  will  result  in  fuel  being  spilled 
overboard, through a venting system. 
FUEL ICING 
Freezing Point 
19.  As  jet  fuel  cools,  the  process  will  reach  a  stage  where  it  will  initially  generate  a  growth  of  wax 
crystals.  Continued cooling will take the fuel to a frozen solid state.  Should the temperature rise, the 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
process  will  reverse.    The  freezing  point  of  a  jet  fuel  relates  to  one  point  in  this  waxing  process; 
specifically that temperature, in the 'warming up' process, at which waxy precipitates disappear. 
Water in Fuel 
20.  A  certain  amount  of  water  is  present  in  all  fuels;  the  amount  will  vary  depending  on  the 
efficiency  of  the  manufacturer’s  quality  control  and  the  preventative  and  removal  measures  taken 
during transportation and storage. 
21.  Some refuelling procedures require that, post-refuelling, fuel is allowed to stand in order that water 
droplets can settle.  The water gathers in the base of the tank, and can be drained off through a water 
drain valve. 
22.  As fuel cools, the amount of dissolved water the fuel can hold is reduced.  Water droplets are then 
formed, and as the temperature is further decreased, these form ice crystals which can block fuel system 
components. 
23.  In  large  aircraft,  the  threat  of  ice  build-up  on  fuel  filters  can  be  solved  by  using  fuel  heaters.    In 
most  military  aircraft,  and  certain  civil  aircraft  the  icing  threat  is  solved  by  using  di-ethylene  glycol 
monomethyl ether (di-EGME), a Fuel System Icing Inhibitor (FSII) (see paras 70 to 73). 
FUEL AND FIRE HAZARDS 
Sources of Fire Hazard 
24.  With aviation fuels, there are three main sources of fire hazard.  These arise from: 
a. 
Fuel spillage with subsequent ignition of vapour from a spark, etc. 
b. 
Fuel spillage on to a hot surface causing self-ignition. 
c. 
The existence of flammable or explosive mixtures in the aircraft tanks. 
25.  Volatility.  The first hazard depends on the volatility of the fuel.  The lower the flash point, the greater 
the chance of fire through this cause.  It is more difficult to ignite kerosene than to ignite gasoline in this way. 
26.  Spontaneous Ignition.  The second hazard depends on the spontaneous ignition temperature of 
the fuel.  In this respect, gasoline has a higher spontaneous ignition temperature than kerosene, but if 
a fire does occur the rate of spread is much slower in kerosene owing to its lower volatility. 
27.  Fuel Vapour/Air Mix.  The third hazard depends upon the temperature and pressure in the tank 
and  the  volatility  of  the  fuel.    Therefore,  at  any  given  pressure  (or  altitude),  for  any  fuel  there  are 
definite  temperature  ranges  within  which  a  flammable  fuel  vapour/air  mixture  will  exist.    If  the 
temperature falls below the lower limit, the mixture will be too weak to burn, while if the temperature 
rises  above  the  upper  limit,  the  mixture  is  too  rich  to  burn.    These  ranges  vary  with  the  chemical 
constitution  of  the  fuel,  and  reduce  with  altitude,  so  a  general  rule  of  thumb  cannot  be  given.    In 
terms  of  combination  of  fuel/air  vapour  mixture,  a  half-empty  fuel  tank  presents  a  greater  hazard 
than a full tank. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
PISTON ENGINE FUELS 
Properties of Aviation Gasoline 
28.  The  five  most  significant  properties  of  aviation  gasoline  which  influence  engine  design  are  as 
follows: 
a. 
Anti-knock value. 
b. 
Volatility. 
c. 
Vapour locking tendency. 
d. 
Stability. 
e. 
Solvent and corrosion properties. 
Anti-knock Value 
29.  The  anti-knock  value  of  a  fuel  is  defined  as  the  resistance  the  fuel  has  to  detonation.    It  is 
essentially  a  comparative  and  not  an  absolute  figure,  as  the  engine  conditions  under  which  the 
detonation takes place are very important.  A fuel which has a good anti-knock value is one that has 
good  detonation-resisting  qualities  compared  with  several  other  fuels  being  used  under  exactly  the 
same operating conditions.  
30.  Detonation.  After ignition, the flame normally travels smoothly through the combustion chamber 
until  the  charge  is  completely  burnt.    The  rate  of  burning  may  be  as  high  as  18  metres  per  second 
(m/s),  which  may  seem  very  fast  in  view  of  the  size  of  the  cylinder  but,  nevertheless,  it  is  steady.  
Combustion  is  comparatively  quiet,  with  a  regular  pressure  rise  and  a  steady  push  on  the  piston.  
When  detonation  occurs,  combustion  begins  normally,  but  at  an  early  stage  the  temperature  of  the 
unburned part of the mixture may be so high that it ignites spontaneously, with a flame velocity in the 
neighbourhood of 300 m/s.  The cylinder walls and piston receive a hammer-like blow (knocking) giving 
rise  to  the  characteristic  pinking  noise,  familiar  to  motorists  though  not  audible  in  the  air  because  of 
propeller and other noises.  The rate of pressure rise is too great to be accommodated by movement 
of  the  piston,  so  that  much  of  the  chemical  energy  released  is  wasted  as  heat,  instead  of  being 
transformed into mechanical power. 
31.  Knock  Rating  of  Fuels.    Depending  on  their  composition,  fuels  differ  considerably  in  their 
resistance to detonation.  Highly rated fuels allow: 
a. 
An  increase  in  compression  ratio  and  hence  in  thermal  efficiency,  with  a  resultant  gain  in 
economy and at the same time slightly increased power. 
b. 
An increase in permissible manifold air pressure (MAP) and therefore increased power.  (The 
power output of an engine is almost directly proportional to the weight of air consumed in a given 
time and a higher MAP increases this weight). 
It should be understood that these improvements apply only if the engine is designed or modified to 
take advantage of the higher-grade fuel.  Such a fuel used in a low performance engine will not give 
more  power  or  greater  economy  but  may,  on  the  other  hand,  cause  fouling  of  the  cylinders  and 
eventual mechanical failure. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 6 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
32.  Anti-knock Additives.  The anti-knock value of fuels can be raised by the addition of anti-knock 
substances.  The best known and most powerful of these is tetra-ethyl lead (TEL).  This is added to the 
fuel together with small amounts of an inhibitor (against gum formation) and ethylene dibromide.  The 
use  of  ethylene  dibromide  prevents  the  formation  of  deposits  of  lead  oxide  on  the  combustion 
chamber, valves and sparking plugs. 
Octane Numbering and Fuel Grading 
33.  Before  the  advent  of  the  more  highly  supercharged  engines,  the  resistance  to  detonation  of  an 
aviation  fuel  was  expressed  by  its  octane  number.    This  rating  system  was  based  on  the  widely 
different  knock  resistance  of  two  pure  spirits,  iso-octane  (excellent)  and  heptane  (very  poor).    By 
degrading  iso-octane  with  heptane  until  the  blend  detonated  in  a  variable  compression  engine  under 
the same standard conditions as the fuel under test, it was possible to classify that fuel by a number 
representing  the  percentage  of  iso-octane  in  the  test  blend.    Thus,  87-octane  fuel  corresponded to a 
mixture of 87% iso-octane and 13% heptane. 
34.  This  system,  however,  took  no  account  of  the  increase  in  knock  resistance  at  high  mixture 
strengths, and for a very good reason.  Although engines are supplied with a much weaker mixture 
under  cruising  conditions  than  when  developing  high  power  outputs  (for  reasons  to  be  discussed 
later),  those  using  lower  grade  fuels  do  not  have  to  cope  with  markedly  increased  combustion 
pressure  at  a  maximum  output.    Consequently,  the  margin  between  the  operating  power  of  such 
engines, and the power as limited by detonation, is smallest at weak mixtures and increases as the 
mixture is richened.  The octane system, therefore, specified weak mixture knock ratings only.  With 
highly  supercharged  engines,  however,  combustion  pressures  at  maximum  output  are  well  above 
those  at  cruising  powers,  and  it  has  become  necessary  to  specify  knock  rating  for  both  rich  and 
weak  mixture  conditions.    Furthermore,  as  fuel  with  knock  ratings  superior  to  iso-octane  are  now 
available,  the  rating  of  these  fuels  has  become  more  involved,  necessitating  the  addition  of  tetra-
ethyl lead to the reference fuels. 
35.  Only  one  grade  of  piston  engine  fuel  is  presently  available  on  general  distribution,  AVGAS  100LL 
(LL stands for 'Low Lead' - an unleaded version of AVGAS with anti-knock properties suitable for modern 
piston-engine aircraft has yet to be introduced).  Other grades of piston engine fuel may be encountered 
in some locations.  These are categorized by grade name consisting of two numbers; the first being the 
knock  rating  for  weak  mixture  conditions,  and  the  second  for  rich  mixture,  eg  Grade  100/130.    Whilst 
weak  mixture  ratings  are  still  measured  in  the  same  way  as  octane  numbers,  rich  mixture  ratings  are 
related to the maximum MAP that can be applied without detonation. 
Volatility 
36.  A volatile liquid is one capable of readily changing from liquid to the vapour state by the application 
of  heat  or  by  contact  with  a  gas  into  which  it  can  evaporate.    The  following  properties  of  a  fuel  are 
related  to  volatility:  efficiency  of  distribution,  oil  dilution,  ease  of  starting,  carburettor  icing  and vapour 
locking  tendencies.    Some  of  these  factors  depend  on  the  presence  of  low  boiling and others on the 
presence of high boiling fractions.  Thus, fuel volatility cannot be expressed as a single figure. 
Vapour Pressure 
37.  The vapour pressure of a liquid is a measure of its tendency to evaporate.  The saturated vapour 
pressure (SVP) of a liquid (ie the pressure exerted by vapour in contact with the surface of the liquid) 
increases  with  increasing  temperature.    When  the  SVP  equals  the  pressure  acting  on  the  surface  of 
the  liquid,  the  liquid  boils.    Thus,  the  boiling  point  of  a  liquid  depends  on  a  combination  of  SVP,  the 
pressure acting on its surface and its temperature. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 7 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
38.  The SVP of aviation gasoline (AVGAS) at a temperature of +20 ºC is about 27 kPa absolute.  It 
follows, therefore, that this fuel boils at +20 ºC when the atmospheric pressure falls to 27 kPa.  This 
occurs at an altitude of about 35,000 feet (10,668 metres).  If the temperature of the fuel is higher, it 
will boil at a lower altitude.  All liquids have a vapour pressure although in some it is extremely small.  
These small vapour pressures, however, become important at high altitudes. 
39.  Reid Vapour Pressure.  The standard adopted for the measurement of vapour pressure of fuels is 
the Reid Vapour Pressure (RVP).  This is the absolute pressure determined in a special apparatus when 
the  liquid  is  at  a  temperature  of  37.8 ºC.  The maximum RVP allowed in the specification of AVGAS is 
48 kPa.    This  is  designated  a  high  vapour pressure fuel.  Fuels with an RVP of 14 kPa or less are low 
vapour pressure fuels (AVTUR has an RVP of approximately 0.7 kPa). 
Storage Stability 
40.  The  property  of  the  fuel  which  is  of  interest  here  is  its  tendency  to  form  'gummy'  products  in 
storage.    The  term  ‘gum’  here  is  applied  to  a  colourless  or  yellowish  sticky  deposit  which  is 
sometimes left as a residue when gasoline is completely evaporated.  It may cause deposits in the 
intake  manifold  and  cause  sticking  of  the  inlet  valves  and  any  moving  parts  in  the  fuel  system.  
Aviation  gasoline  fresh  from  the  refinery  usually  contains  negligible  amounts  of  gum,  but  when  the 
gasoline  is  stored,  gum  may  form.    The  degree  of  gum  formation  depends  on  the  nature  of  the 
gasoline and the conditions of storage.  High atmospheric temperatures and exposure to air hasten 
gum formation.  Exposure to light may also cause gum to form more rapidly.  Once gum formation 
starts  it  proceeds  quickly.    Poor  storage  stability  may  also  manifest  itself  with  the  precipitation  of 
white  compounds  in  the  fuel.    This  is  not  gum,  but  a  lead compound from TEL.  So long as this is 
not  excessive  it  is  not  in  itself  dangerous,  but  it  usually  indicates  that  something  else  is  wrong.  
Therefore,  when  lead  precipitation  takes  place  the  fuel  should  be  viewed  with  suspicion,  and  none 
used until it has been tested. 
Solvent Properties 
41.  Unsaturated  hydrocarbons  are  powerful  solvents  of  rubber  and  some  rubber-like  compounds.  
They  also  cause  swelling  of  rubber,  with  resultant  blockingof  fuel  lines,  etc.    Fuel  pipes  and systems 
must therefore be manufactured from materials that can resist the solvent properties of gasoline. 
Corrosive Properties 
42.  A small amount of sulphur is present in aviation gasoline, and can cause corrosion as described in 
sub-para 53b. 
GAS TURBINE FUELS 
Properties of Aviation Gas Turbine Fuels 
43.  A gas turbine fuel should have the following properties: 
a. 
Ease of flow under all operating conditions (including low temperature). 
b. 
Quick starting of the engine. 
c. 
Complete combustion under all conditions. 
d. 
A high calorific value. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 8 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
e. 
Non-corrosive. 
f. 
The  by-products  of  combustion  should  have  no  harmful  effect  on  the  flame  tubes,  turbine 
blades, etc. 
g. 
Minimum fire hazards. 
h. 
Provide lubrication of the moving parts of the fuel system. 
Ease of Flow 
44.  The ease of flow of a fuel is mainly a question of viscosity, but the existence of ice, dust, wax etc, 
may cause blockage in filters and in the fuel system generally. 
45.  Most liquid petroleum fuels dissolve small quantities of water and if the temperature of the fuel is 
reduced  enough,  water  or  ice  crystals  are  deposited  from  the  fuel.    Adequate  filtration  is  therefore 
necessary  in  the  fuel  system.    The  filters  may  have  to  be  heated,  or  a  fuel  de-icing  system  fitted,  to 
prevent ice crystals blocking the filters.  Solids may also be deposited from the fuel itself, if the fuel is 
cooled enough, due to the precipitation of waxes or other high molecular weight hydrocarbons. 
Ease of Starting 
46.  The  speed  and  ease  of  starting  of  gas  turbines  depends  on  the  ease  of  ignition  of  an  atomized 
spray of fuel, assuming that the turbine is turned at the required speed.  This ease of ignition depends 
on the quality of the fuel in two ways: 
a. 
The volatility of the fuel at starting temperatures. 
b. 
The degree of atomization, which depends on the viscosity of the fuel as well as the design of 
the atomizer. 
47.  The viscosity of fuel is important because of its effect on the pattern of the liquid spray from the 
burner orifice, and because it has an important effect on the starting process.  Since the engine should 
be capable of starting readily under all conditions of service, the atomized spray of fuel must be readily 
ignitable at low temperatures.  Ease of starting also depends on volatility, but in practice, the viscosity 
is  found  to  be  the  more  critical  requirement.    In  general,  the  lower  the  viscosity,  and  the  higher  the 
volatility, the easier it is to achieve efficient atomization. 
Complete Combustion 
48.  The  exact  proportion  of  air  to  fuel  required  for  complete  combustion  is  called  the  theoretical 
mixture  and  is  expressed  by  weight.    There  are  only  small  differences  in  ignition  limits  for 
hydrocarbons,  the  rich  limit  in  fuels  of  the  kerosene  range  being  5:1  air/fuel  ratio  by  weight,  and  the 
weak limit about 25:1 by weight. 
49.  Flammable air/fuel ratios each have a characteristic rate of travel for the flame which depends on 
the temperature, pressure, and the shape of the combustion chamber.  Flame speeds of hydrocarbon 
fuels  are  very  low,  and  range  from  0.3  to  0.6  m/s  under  laminar  flow  conditions.    These  low  values 
necessitate  the  provision  of  a  region  of  low  air  velocity within the flame tube, in which a stable flame 
and continuous burning are ensured. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 9 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
50.  Flame  temperature  does  not  appear  to  be  directly  influenced  by  the  type  of  fuel,  except  in  a 
secondary  manner  as  a  result  of  carbon  formation,  or  of  poor  atomization  resulting  from  a  localized 
over-rich  mixture.    The  maximum  flame  temperature  for hydrocarbon fuels is roughly 2,000 ºC.  This 
temperature occurs at a mixture strength slightly richer than the theoretical ratio, owing to dissociation 
(breaking-down)  of  the  molecular  products  of  combustion  which  occurs  at  this  mixture.    Dissociation 
occurs above about 1,400 ºC, and reduces the energy available for temperature rise. 
51.  Flame extinction in normal flight is rare in an otherwise serviceable engine.  Most extinctions are 
the result of engine mishandling or through excursions outside the permitted flight envelope.  The type 
of fuel used is of relatively minor importance.  However, the wide-cut fuels (AVTAG) are more resistant 
to extinction than the kerosene (AVTUR) and engines are easier to relight using AVTAG.  This is due 
to the higher vapour pressure of AVTAG. 
Calorific Value 
52.  The  calorific  value  is  a  measure  of  the  heat  potential  of  a  fuel.    It  is  of  great  importance  in  the 
choice  of  fuel,  because  the  primary  purpose  of  the  combustion  system  is  to  provide  the  maximum 
amount  of  heat  with  the  minimum  expenditure  of  fuel.    The  calorific  value  of  liquid  fuels  is  usually 
expressed in megajoules (MJ) per kg.  When considering calorific value, it should be noted that there 
are two values which can be quoted for every fuel, the gross value and the net value.  The gross value 
includes  the  latent  heat  of  vaporization,  whilst  the  net  value  excludes  it.    The  net  value  is  the 
quantity  generally  used.    The  calorific  value  of  a  petroleum  fuel  is  related  to  its  specific  gravity.  
With increasing specific gravity (heavier density) there is an increase in calorific value per litre but 
a  reduction  in  calorific  value  per  kilogram.    Thus  for  a  given  volume  of  fuel,  kerosene  gives  an 
increased  aircraft  range  when  compared  with  gasoline,  but  weighs  more.    If  the  limiting  factor  is 
the volume of the fuel tank capacity, a high calorific value by volume is more important. 
Corrosive Properties 
53.  The tendency of a turbine fuel to corrode the aircraft’s fuel system is affected by: 
a. 
Water.    Salts  within  water  can  cause  corrosion.    Dissolved  water  in  fuel  is  described  in 
paras 22  and  45.    Salts  can  lead  to  corrosion  of  the  fuel  system,  which  is  particularly  important 
with regard to the sticking of sliding parts, especially those with small clearances and only small or 
occasional movement. 
b. 
Sulphur  Compounds.    Removal  of  sulphur  involves  increased  refining  costs;  therefore, 
some sulphur presence is permitted.  Sulphur can cause corrosion in two ways: 
(1)  Corrosive  Sulphur.    The  corrosive  sulphur  consists  of  sulphur  compounds  such  as 
mercaptans, sulphides, free sulphur, etc, which corrode the parts of the fuel system, eg tanks, 
fuel lines, pumps, etc.  It is detected in the laboratory by the corrosive effect of the fuel. 
(2)  Combustion of Sulphur.  Sulphur and sulphur compounds, when burnt in air, react with 
oxygen to form sulphur dioxide and this, with water, forms an acidic species. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 10 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
Effects of Combustion By-products 
54.  Carbon deposits in the combustion system indicate imperfect combustion, and may lead to: 
a. 
A  lowering  of  the  surface  temperature  on  which  it  is  deposited,  resulting  in  buckled  flame 
tubes because of the thermal stresses set up by the temperature gradients. 
b. 
Damage to turbine blades caused by lumps of carbon breaking off and striking them. 
c. 
Disruption of the airflow through the turbine creating turbulence, back pressure, and possible 
choking of the turbine, resulting in loss of efficiency. 
Fire Hazards 
55.  Fire  hazards  were  covered  in  paras  24  to  27.    As  a  general  rule,  kerosene  needs  to  be  at  a 
relatively high temperature to burn, and thus in cold climates is regarded as safer than gasoline, which 
has a lower temperature range of flammability. 
Fuel Lubricity 
56.  Aircraft  not  fitted  with  gear-type,  carbon-lined  or  silver-lined  pumps  require  the  addition  of  a 
lubricity  agent  to  the  fuel.    Details  of  such  a  fuel  additive  are  given  in  para  72b.    If  fuel  containing  a 
lubricity agent is not available, aircraft which are not fitted with the pumps listed above may use other 
fuels up to a maximum flying time of 50 hours.  The duration of each flight on non-lubricating fuel is to 
be recorded in the aircraft F700 and when the accumulated total of 50 hours is reached by a fuel pump 
it is to be replaced and returned to the manufacturer for overhaul. 
Vapour Pressure 
57.  The vapour pressure of a liquid is a measure of its tendency to evaporate.  This subject has been 
covered in detail for AVGAS in paras 37 to 39. 
58.  All  liquids  have  a  vapour  pressure  although  in  some  it  is  extremely  small.    These  small  vapour 
pressures, however, become important at high altitudes. 
59.  A typical AVTUR has a Reid Vapour Pressure (RVP) of approximately 0.7 kPa and as such is a 
low vapour pressure fuel.  Wide-cut fuels classed as AVTAG have a RVP of around 14 to 21 kPa, and 
are therefore high vapour pressure fuels. 
Fuel Boiling and Evaporation Losses 
60.  At high rates of climb, fuel boiling and evaporation is a problem which is not easily overcome.  
A  low  rate  of  climb  permits  the  fuel  in  the  tanks  to  cool  and  thus  reduce  its  vapour  pressure  as 
the atmospheric pressure falls off.  However, the rate of climb of many aircraft is so high that the 
fuel retains its ground temperatures, so that on reaching a certain altitude the fuel begins to boil.  
In  practice,  this  boiling  has  proved  to  be  so  violent  that  the  loss  is  not  confined to vapour alone.  
Layers of bubbles form and are swept through the tank vents with the vapour stream.  This loss is 
analogous to a saucepan boiling over and is sometimes referred to as slugging. 
61.  The amount of fuel lost from evaporation depends on several factors: 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 11 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
a. 
Vapour pressure of the fuel. 
b. 
Fuel temperature on take-off. 
c. 
Rate of climb. 
d. 
Final altitude of the aircraft. 
Fuel losses as high as 20% of the tank contents have been recorded through boiling and evaporation. 
Methods of Reducing or Eliminating Fuel Losses 
62.  Possible methods of reducing or eliminating losses by evaporation are: 
a. 
Reduction of the rate of climb. 
b. 
Ground cooling of the fuel. 
c. 
Flight cooling of the fuel. 
d. 
Recovery of liquid fuel and vapour in flight. 
e. 
Redesign of the fuel tank vent system. 
f. 
Pressurization of the fuel tanks. 
g. 
Using a fuel of low RVP. 
63.  Reduction of the Rate of Climb.  Reducing the rate of climb imposes an unacceptable restriction 
on the aircraft and does not solve the problem of evaporation loss.  This method is, therefore, not used. 
64.  Ground  Cooling  of  the  Fuel.    This  is  not  considered  a  practical  solution,  but  in  hot  climates, 
every effort should be made to shade refuelling vehicles and the tanks of parked aircraft. 
65.  Flight Cooling of the Fuel.  The use of a heat exchanger, through which the fuel is circulated 
to reduce the temperature sufficiently to prevent boiling, is possible.  High rates of climb, however, 
would not allow enough time to cool the fuel without the aid of heavy or bulky equipment.  At a high 
TAS,  the  rise  in  airframe  temperature  due  to  skin  friction  increases  the  difficulty  of  using  this 
method.  On small high-speed aircraft the weight and bulk of the coolers becomes prohibitive. 
66.  Recovery  of  Liquid  Fuel  in  Flight.    This  method  would  probably  entail  bulky  equipment  and 
therefore is unacceptable.  Another method would be to convey the vapour to the engines and burn it 
to produce thrust, but the complications of so doing would entail severe problems. 
67.  Redesign of the Fuel Tank Vent System.  The loss of liquid fuel could be largely eliminated by 
redesigning the vents, but the evaporation losses would remain.  However, improved venting systems 
may well provide a more complete solution to the problem. 
68.  Pressurization of the Fuel Tanks.  There are two ways in which fuel tanks can be pressurized: 
a. 
Complete  Pressurization.    Keeping  the  absolute  pressure  in  the  tanks  greater  than  the 
vapour pressure at the maximum fuel temperature likely to be encountered eliminates all losses.  
However,  with  gasoline  type  fuels,  a  pressure  of  about  55  kPa  absolute  would  have  to  be 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 12 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
maintained  at  altitude  and  the  tanks  would  be  subjected  to  a  pressure  differential  of  45  kPa  at 
50,000  feet.    The  disadvantage  is  that  this  would  involve  stronger  and  heavier  tanks,  and  a 
strengthened structure to hold them. 
b. 
Partial  Pressurization.    This  prevents  all  liquid  loss  and  reduces  the  evaporation  loss.    It 
also involves strengthening the tanks and structure, and the fitting of relief valves. 
69.  Use of a Fuel of Low RVP.  The disadvantage of kerosene lies chiefly in its limitations at low 
temperatures.    At  temperatures  below  –47 ºC, the waxes in the fuel begin to crystallize and may 
lead to blockage of filters unless remedial measures such as fuel heating are introduced.  Starting 
difficulties under very cold conditions would also have to be solved. 
Fuel System Icing Inhibitor 
70.  All service turbine-powered aircraft should use fuel containing FSII to inhibit fuel system icing.  If 
fuel  containing  FSII  is  not  available,  aircrew  should  follow  local  instructions.    In  general,  operation  is 
usually permitted for a limited period, provided that: 
a. 
The maximum period on fuel not containing FSII does not exceed 14 days, and is followed by 
an equivalent period on inhibited fuel. 
b. 
The risk of ice formation is acceptable to the operational commander. 
c. 
Uplifts of non-inhibited fuel are recorded in the aircraft F700. 
71.  Present in all turbine fuels is a microbiological fungus called Cladasporium Resinae.  This fungus 
can grow rapidly in the presence of water and warmth, forming long green filaments which can block 
fuel  system  components.    The  waste  products  of  the  fungus  can  be  corrosive,  especially  to  the  fuel 
tank sealing components.  The inclusion of FSII in fuel suppresses fungal growth. 
Aviation Turbine Fuel Additives 
72.  Aircrew should be aware of the following important fuel additives: 
a. 
AL 41.  AL 41 is an FSII additive. 
b
AL 61.  AL 61 is an additive which enhances lubricity.  In addition, AL 61 will prevent pipeline 
corrosion (AVTUR has its own in-built anti-corrosive agents). 
c. 
AL 48.  AL 48 is an additive which is present in all turbine fuels obtained from RAF sources.  
Its purpose is to inhibit fuel system icing, prevent fungal growth, and add to the lubricity of the fuel.  
It is a blend of AL 41 and AL 61.  If it is not possible to obtain fuel containing AL 48, the additive 
can be mixed with the fuel (in correct proportions) prior to refuelling.  If that is not possible, then 
the limitations stated in paras 56 and 70 apply. 
73.  AL 48 may be held at some units in a ready-blended state.  Some foreign countries do not allow 
this ready-blended mix to be stored.  In such circumstances, if aircrew are offered AL 41 plus AL 61, 
this equates to AL 48 when blended in the correct proportions. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 13 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-19 - Aviation Fuels 
74.  During  distillation  and  early  stages  of  transportation,  F35  and  F34  are  the  same.    At  some  point 
during delivery to military users, AL 48 (or AL 41 plus AL 61) is blended with F35 to transform it into F34. 
Approved Types of Gas Turbine Fuel 
75.  Information on the fuels approved (both normal fuel and emergency substitutes) for a particular in-
service  aircraft  type  should  be  obtained  from  the  'Release  to  Service'  ('Deviations  from  the  Military 
Aircraft  Release'  for  RN  aircraft),  the  Aircrew  Manual,  or  from  the  Service  engineering  sponsor,  as 
appropriate.  Refer to Table 1 for examples of some types of fuel that are available and to Volume 8, 
Chapter 4 for details on airworthiness and aircrew documentation. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 14 of 14 

AP3456 - 3-20 - Engine  Health Monitoring and Maintenance 
CHAPTER 20 - ENGINE HEALTH MONITORING AND MAINTENANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
The condition and, consequently, performance of aircraft engines deteriorates with their use, and 
such  deterioration  can  eventually  lead  to  failure.    Other  factors  such  as  fatigue  and  creep  can  also 
eventually lead to failure.  It is therefore necessary to carry out maintenance on engines, to ensure that 
failures  do  not  occur  and  that  airworthiness  and  performance  do  not  deteriorate  below  acceptable 
operational  levels.    The  maintenance  consists  of  routinely  monitoring  condition  and  performance, 
replacing components which have degraded to an unacceptable level and also replacing components 
which  are  nearing  the  end  of  their  safe  fatigue  lives.  Such maintenance must be carefully controlled 
both to optimize the operational availability of engines and to minimize costs.  This Chapter considers 
the factors affecting engine lifing and maintenance, and it covers the main techniques used to monitor 
engine  health  and  the  effectiveness of engine maintenance.  Maintenance and Health Monitoring are 
topics  which  apply  not  only  to  engines  but  also  to  airframe  systems  and  helicopter  transmissions.  
Therefore,  although  this  chapter  refers  only  to  the  gas  turbine  engine,  its  content  is  relevant  to  the 
majority of aircraft mechanical components. 
Factors Affecting Component Life and Engine Overhaul 
2. 
Fatigue  and  Creep.    Creep  is  a  phenomenon  which  occurs  in  most  materials  exposed  for  long 
periods to high temperature and high stresses.  A form of molecular distortion takes place which can 
eventually lead to failure.  It affects the components of the turbine operating at high temperatures and 
at high centrifugal and axial loads.  The adverse effects of creep occurring during normal operation of 
the  engine  are  avoided  by  careful  design.    Engine  components  are  also  subjected  to  three  different 
forms of fatigue.  Aerofoil sections within the engine are subjected to high cycle fatigue (HCF) caused 
by exposure to perturbations in the gas flow.  As with creep, the effects of HCF are avoided by careful 
design.    Thermal  cycles  occurring  in  the  engine  lead  to  thermal  fatigue  in  the  hot  section,  but  other 
causes of damage are invariably more significant in setting the safe lives of affected components.  The 
stresses caused by engine acceleration during start up and operation cause low cycle fatigue (LCF) in 
components  of  the  main  rotating  assembly.    Because  it  cannot  be  detected,  this  form  of  fatigue  is  a 
major factor in calculating engine life. 
3. 
Degradation.  During normal engine operation, a number of factors adversely affect the condition 
of  a  gas  turbine.    These  include  corrosion,  erosion  and  mechanical  wear,  the  effects  of  which  are 
normally  monitored  by  routine  inspection  or  testing.    Where  possible,  a  policy  of  condition-based 
maintenance  is  applied  to  engines.    That  is,  maintenance  is  only  carried  out  when  justified  by  the 
perceived  condition  of  the  engine.    Such  on  condition  maintenance  (OCM)  ensures  that  any  critical 
components which have deteriorated to the limits of acceptability are replaced. 
Engine Usage, Condition and Maintenance Systems (EUCAMS) 
4. 
Concepts To implement a condition-based maintenance policy, it is necessary to monitor engine 
usage,  condition  and  performance.    EUCAMS  therefore  record  life  cycles  consumed,  detect  incipient 
failures,  monitor  wear  and  corrosion,  and  measure  engine  performance  against  a  standard.    The 
majority  of  monitoring  techniques  are  able  to  detect  failure  or  imminent  failure  of  a  component,  and 
they  therefore  provide  essential  information  to  the  crew.    However,  equally  useful  is  their  ability  to 
provide  a  consistent  stream  of  incremental  data,  the  correlation  of  which allows trends in component 
condition to be observed.  Such trend analysis will reveal incipient failure of a component or its gradual 
loss of effectiveness.  A typical trend graph is shown at Fig 1. It depicts the rate of wear of a bearing in 
an  engine.    Remedial  action  will  be  initiated  when  the  trend  line  crosses  the  threshold  value  shown, 
and  the  observed  condition  of  the  engine  thus  justifies  deeper  maintenance  being  carried  out.    The 
monitoring  process  allows  OCM  to  be  carried  out  at  a  time  convenient  to  operational  commitments.  
Revised Jun 10   
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 - 3-20 - Engine  Health Monitoring and Maintenance 
Thus  little  loss  of  availability  is  incurred  and  costs  can  be  minimized.    Without  OCM,  at  best  the 
availability  of  the  aircraft  would  be  lost  to  allow  the  engine  to  be  removed  more  frequently  for  deep 
inspections  to  take  place,  or  at  worst  the  engine  bearing  would  fail  in  flight  with  no  obvious  prior 
symptoms of its state of distress. 
3-20 Fig 1 Trend Graph of Bearing Wear 
Failure
d
)
re
le
c
tu
y
p
c
te
a
c
n
a
tio
R
r
ris
c
Effective Safe Working Life
b
e
a
e
p
e
d
s
W
f
in
o
'Wear-in' Phase
'Wear-out' Phase
s
s
litre
a
r
e
(M
p
0
50
100
Engine Running Hours
(x 10,000)
5. 
Low  Cycle  Fatigue  Monitoring.    Counters  (LCFCs)  monitoring  low  cycle  fatigue  are  fitted  to 
most  major  engines.    They  are  analogous  to  airframe  fatigue  meters  and  continuously  calculate  and 
display LCF usage.  For engines not fitted with LCFCs, information from other instrumentation or from 
technical records must be analysed and factored to produce equivalent cycle consumption data. 
Engine Health Monitoring 
6. 
Optical Inspection Techniques.  The components which are continually washed by the gas flow 
through an engine are prone to corrosion and erosion.  Combustion chambers and turbine blades are 
usually  made  from  materials  resistant to these effects.  However, compressors and their casings are 
often  manufactured  from  aluminium  or  magnesium  alloys  which  are  very  susceptible  to  corrosion.  
Also,  the  ingestion  of  hard  foreign  objects  causes  erosion  and  can  cause  severe  damage  to  the 
compressor blades.  Even if such damage does not cause an immediate reduction in performance, it 
can,  if  not  repaired,  cause  subsequent  failure.    Routine  inspection  for  such  erosion,  corrosion  and 
damage  can  normally  be  carried  out  with  the  naked  eye  or  with  the  assistance  of  fibre  optic  viewers 
inserted into the compressor through ports in the casing. 
7. 
Magnetic  Particle  Detectors.    The  majority  of  engine  bearings  are  constructed  from  steel.    As 
the  bearings  wear,  ferrous  particles  are  washed  away  into  the  engine  lubrication  system.    Small 
magnetic  plugs  (mag-plugs)  placed  strategically  in  the  lubrication  system  trap  the  particles.  
Subsequent  analysis  of  this  debris  can  reveal  not  only  its  source  but also the rate of wear occurring.  
Fig  2  shows  a  debris  sample  captured  by  a  magnetic  plug positioned in an engine auxiliary gearbox.  
The  thin  spines  of  debris  are  typical  products  of  gear  tooth  wear.    Most  magnetic  plugs  incorporate 
electrical contacts which become bridged by any significant build-up of debris, thus closing the circuit 
and activating a warning caption in the cockpit. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 - 3-20 - Engine  Health Monitoring and Maintenance 
3-20 Fig 2 Magnetic Plug Debris 
Typical debris comprising minute particles and larger
slivers of material
Magnet
Bayonet Type
Lock Pin
Knurled
Handle
Oil Seal
8. 
Filter  Inspections.    Non-ferrous  debris  washed  into  the  lubrication  system  filters  can  provide 
similar information upon the location and rate of wear as does ferrous debris trapped by the magnetic 
particle  detectors.    Although  analysis  of  filter  debris  is  not  so  relevant  for  gas  turbine  engines  which 
have few non-ferrous components washed by the lubrication oil, the technique is an important tool for 
use in monitoring the health of piston engines and helicopter transmissions. 
9. 
Spectrometric  Oil  Analysis.    Magnetic  plugs  and  oil  filters  are  relatively  coarse  detection 
devices,  whereas  spectrometric  analysis  of  the  oil  will  reveal  even  minute  trace  materials.  
Spectrometric  oil  analysis  programmes  (SOAP)  are  used  to  monitor  samples  of  lubrication  oils  and 
hydraulic fluids taken from aircraft at periodic intervals.  The light spectra obtained when such samples 
are burned show the existence and quantity of trace elements, and this information can be related to 
the materials used in construction of the related systems.  The trend in levels of such trace elements is 
an indication of wear rates and, as with other monitoring techniques, this information set against action 
threshold values allows OCM to be undertaken well before system health becomes critical. 
10.  Vibration  Analysis.    The  rotating  components  in  a  gas  turbine  are  dynamically  balanced  on 
assembly to minimize vibration.  Any subsequent wear or damage to these components will lead to an 
increase in vibration of the engine.  By using suitable test equipment at routine intervals, it is possible 
to  detect  quite  small  changes  in  the  frequency  and  amplitude  of  such  vibrations,  and  the  changing 
vibration  signature  of  an  engine  can  be  used  as  a  health  monitoring  parameter.    Most  aircraft  types 
have  engine  vibration  analysis  equipment  permanently  installed.    If  vibration  levels  suddenly  exceed 
preset limits during flight, the crew can be alerted. 
11.  In-flight  Performance  Monitoring.    Monitoring  the  performance  of  engines  in  flight  offers  the 
considerable  advantage  of  observing  the  engine  in  its  designed-for  condition  whilst  avoiding  the  loss  of 
aircraft availability and the inadequacies of ground testing.  The automatic recording of engine parameters 
available  through  such  systems  as  Engine  Monitoring  System  (EMS)  and  Aircraft  Integrity  Monitoring 
System (AIMS) allows engine performance data to be recorded and performance figures computed.  The 
system  imposes  no  additional  work  load  upon  the  crew  and  does  not  require  specific  test  sorties  to  be 
flown.  Signals representing engine performance parameters, such as temperatures and pressures, fuel 
flows,  thrust  or  torque  and  air  temperatures,  air  speeds  and  pressure  altitudes,  are  picked  off  from  the 
aircraft  instrumentation.    Such  signals  are  computed  in  real  time  and  presented  as  performance 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 - 3-20 - Engine  Health Monitoring and Maintenance 
assurance to the crew.  They are also recorded to be down-loaded after completion of the flight and used 
for health trend analysis and condition monitoring. 
Engine Maintenance 
12.    The  scheduled  deep  routine  maintenance  of  engines  and  other  major  equipments  is  termed 
overhaul.  Those components which have degraded to the limit of acceptability and those nearing the 
end of their safe working lives are replaced at this point.  The overhaul periodicity is therefore dictated 
by the component with the shortest safe working life.  Engines based on a modular design avoid this 
restriction,  because  each  module  may  be  removed  and  replaced  without  necessitating    the  whole 
engine to be removed from service.  The majority of engines are either fully or semi-modular, and can 
therefore  be  repaired  and  reconditioned  by  module  replacement  at  unit  level.    In  addition,  many 
modules can themselves be repaired and overhauled at unit level. 
13.  Modular Design.  A modular engine comprises several major line replacement assemblies, each 
of  which  can  be  maintained  independent  of  the  others  at  differing  periodicities.    Fig  3  shows  the 
modules within a typical high by-pass gas turbine engine.  Although the repair of such engines at unit 
level  requires  additional  financial  outlay  in  tooling,  training  and  facilities,  it  affords  many  advantages 
including a reduction in the number of spare engines required, increased unit skill levels and better in-
service control of engine assets. 
3-20 Fig 3 A typical High Ratio By-pass Modular Engine 
Slots in Combustion Chamber
Fuel Injector/Igniter
Reverse Flow
Combustion Chamber
Gas Generator
Combustor Turbine
Fan Module
Module
Module
Fan
Fan Reduction
Gearing
Accesory
Gearbox
Module
14. Engine Testing.  After significant maintenance activities have been carried out on a gas turbine 
engine,  testing  is  required  to  ensure  that  required  performance  criteria  are  met.    The  tests  may  be 
carried  out  in  an  engine  test  facility  or  with  the  engine  installed  in  the  aircraft.    Unless  the  testing  is 
required  for  simple  diagnostic  purposes  or  is  necessary  to  confirm  system  integrity  after  installation, 
engine  testing  in  an  aircraft  is  rarely  cost  effective  and,  more  significantly,  removes  the  aircraft  from 
operational availability.  Most units are therefore equipped with uninstalled engine test facilities (UETF).  
These  consist  of  a  fixed  stand  with  a  gimbal  mounted  frame  into  which  the  engine  is  installed.  
Reaction  between  the  stand  and  the  frame  when  the  engine  is  running  allows  thrust  levels  to  be 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 - 3-20 - Engine  Health Monitoring and Maintenance 
measured.    The  whole  is  surrounded  by  an  acoustic enclosure fitted with noise attenuating air intake 
and  exhaust  systems.    An  adjacent  control  cabin  provides  adequate  environmental  protection  for  the 
testing  technicians,  and  it  includes  the  controls,  instrumentation  and  recording  equipment  necessary 
for detailed testing and diagnosis to take place. 
Revised Jun 10   
Page 5 of 5 

Document Outline