This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456 RAF Manual'.



AP3456 - 2-1 - The Effect of Variation in Specific Gravity of Fuels 
 on Range and Endurance 
CHAPTER 1 - THE EFFECT OF VARIATION IN SPECIFIC GRAVITY OF FUELS 
ON RANGE AND ENDURANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
Fuels in current Service use are permitted to have a wide variation in specific gravity (SG) in order 
to allow the oil industry to obtain fuel from many sources.  However, it is emphasized that the industry 
makes every effort to maintain the 'normal' SG of fuel supplied and values of SG at the wider limits of 
the  permitted  range  are  seldom  encountered.    Variations  in  SG  can  have  a  significant  effect  on  the 
range  and  endurance  of  pure  jet  and  turboprop  engines,  but  are  normally  disregarded  in  the  case  of 
piston engines.  This chapter discusses jet engine fuels only. 
2. 
The range and endurance per gallon of fuel depends on the number of heat units (kilojoules) per 
gallon of the fuel used.  The number of kilojoules per kilogram of all approved fuels does not vary by 
more than 3% and for practical purposes may be considered a constant.  Thus the output of a fuel may 
be considered in relationship to its SG, which depends on: 
a. 
The basic SG at normal temperature (15 °C) of the fuel used. 
b. 
The fuel temperature in the aircraft’s tanks at the time. 
3. 
The performance tables in Aircrew Manuals and Operating Data Manuals (ODMs) of all aircraft are 
based on a specified fuel of 'normal' SG, unless otherwise indicated.  Aircrew Manuals also give a list of 
fuels  approved  for  use  in  the  aircraft  and  the  reference  numbers  and  NATO  code  numbers.    Similarly, 
tank capacities, in kg of fuel, are usually shown for both AVTUR and AVTAG.  Where the SG of the fuel in 
use varies substantially from that of the reference fuel, range corrections may be necessary. 
Approved Fuels for Jet Engines 
4. 
Information on fuels approved for in-Service use in a particular aircraft type should be obtained from 
the  'Release  to  Service'  document,  Aircrew  Manuals  or  Flight  Reference  Cards  (see  also  Volume  3, 
Chapter 19).  The following are available for use in jet engines. 
a. 
AVTUR  -  an  aviation  kerosene  having  a 'normal' SG of 0.8 at 15 °C, but a permitted range 
between 0.775 and 0.825, at 15 °C. 
b. 
AVTAG -  a  wide-cut  gasoline  fuel  having  a  'normal'  SG  of  0.770  at  15  °C,  but  a  permitted 
range between 0.751 and 0.802, at 15 °C. 
c. 
AVCAT - a kerosene-type fuel similar to AVTUR but with a higher flash-point, normally used 
by RN carrier-borne aircraft.  AVCAT has a 'normal' SG of 0.817 at 15 °C, but a permitted range 
between 0.788 and 0.845, at 15 °C. 
d. 
AVGAS - a quality gasoline designed for piston engines.  The standard RAF fuel is known as 
100/130  grade  and  has  a  SG  of  0.69.    Use  of  AVGAS  in  jet  engines  has  been  approved  in 
emergency only and such clearance is shown in Aircrew Manuals. 
Range of Specific Gravity 
5. 
The extreme range of SG of those fuels which could be used in jet engines varies between 0.69 
(100/130  grade)  and  0.845  (upper  limit  of  AVCAT),  at  15  °C.    However,  the  range  of  SG  of  fuels 
normally used by RAF aircraft varies between 0.751 (lower limit of AVTAG) and 0.825  (upper limit of 
AVTUR),  at  15  °C,  but  variations  of  temperature  between  +40  °C  and  –30  °C  have  the  effect  of 
increasing the extremes to 0.732 (AVTAG with basic SG of 0.751, at +40 °C) and 0.856 (AVTUR with 
basic SG of 0.825, at –30 °C). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 - 2-1 - The Effect of Variation in Specific Gravity of Fuels 
 on Range and Endurance 
Flight Planning 
6. 
As stated earlier, every effort is made to maintain the SG of fuels at the 'normal' values, i.e. 0.8 
and  0.77  for  AVTUR  and  AVTAG  respectively.    Flight  planning  data  and  performance  tables  in 
Aircrew  Manuals  and  ODMs  are  based  on  AVTUR  at  the  'normal'  SG  for  temperate  conditions, 
unless otherwise stated.  To avoid ambiguity, the SG of the reference fuel is usually given where this 
differs  from  'normal'  values,  eg  "based  on  AVTUR  SG  0.78".    Therefore,  corrections  to  the  flight 
planning  data  are  not  normally  required  when  making  approximate  computations  of  range  in 
temperate conditions. 
7. 
The most important aspect of the variation of SG of fuels is that of safety, ie the prime concern 
is  the  possibility  of  failing  to  achieve  the  range  anticipated.    It  will  be  appreciated  that  variations  in 
SG  are  most  important  when  considering  an  aircraft  where  tanks  are  normally  filled  to  capacity,  ie 
when the volume of fuel is a fixed amount and only the SG, and thus the weight, of fuel varies.  In 
cases  where  the  aircraft’s  tanks  are  not  filled  to  capacity,  i.e. where  fuel  load  is  offset  against 
payload, the weight of fuel required for a given range is virtually constant (see para 2) and variations 
in  SG  merely  result  in  variation  of  the  volume  of  fuel  required;  hence  range  corrections  are 
unnecessary.  The following paragraphs should be read in this light. 
8. 
In temperate conditions, the use of AVTUR with flight planning data based on 'normal' AVTAG will 
result  in  better  range  and  endurance  than  that  deduced  from  the  performance  data;  the  increased 
performance being related directly to the variation in SG between the fuel used and the reference fuel. 
9. 
When using AVTAG with flight planning data based on 'normal' AVTUR, in temperate conditions, 
in the interests of safety a reduction of 7% should be made in the range and endurance derived from 
such  data  if  the  SG  is  known  to  be  at  the  low  limit  of  AVTAG,  ie  0.751.    If  the  SG  is  known  to  be 
between  0.76  and  0.785,  a  5%  deduction  should  be  made.    The  above  factors  are  useful  'rules  of 
thumb'  and  provide  adequate  safety  margins.    If  the  precise  SG  of  fuel  used  is  known,  then  the 
variations  in  range  and endurance may be determined by equating the SG of the fuel used to that of 
the reference fuel, using the formula given at para 12. 
10.  If  AVCAT  has  to  be  used  (see para  4c),  in  temperate  conditions,  an  increase  in  range  and 
endurance will result from the use of flight planning data based on AVTAG.  The same will apply in the 
case of AVTUR except when the AVCAT is known to have a SG of less than 0.8 ('normal' AVTUR) and 
is to be used with data based on 'normal' AVTUR.  However, in this case the reduction in range would 
be about 2%. 
11. If, in an emergency, it is necessary to use AVGAS 100/130 grade (see para 4d), with data based 
on 'normal' AVTUR, a reduction in range of about 22% should be allowed for; or 16% if using 'normal' 
AVTAG data.  It will be appreciated that with most aircraft the emergency use of AVGAS carries other 
severe restrictions, particularly on the maximum height to fly, and the reduction throughout the whole 
range of the aircraft’s performance must be considered most carefully. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 - 2-1 - The Effect of Variation in Specific Gravity of Fuels 
 on Range and Endurance 
Computing the Variation in Range 
12.  When the SG of the fuel used differs considerably from the SG of the reference fuel on which the 
planning data is based, a computation of the range loss or gain can be calculated from the formula: 
t − r
FD
R =
×
r
C
where: 
R
=  Range loss or gain in nautical miles 

=  SG of the fuel used 

=  SG  of  the  reference  fuel,  ie  the  SG  used  for  performance  data 
calculations  (either  given  specifically  or  'normal'  values, 
 ie AVTUR = 0.8 or AVTAG = 0.77) 
F  =  Total fuel available in kilograms weight (kg) 
D
=  Distance  covered  on  cruise  in  nautical  miles  (as  found  from  the 
Aircrew Manual performance charts). 
C
=  Fuel  used  for  cruise  in  kilograms  weight  (as  found  from  the 
Aircrew Manual performance charts). 
D
An examination of this formula shows that the term 
gives the fuel consumption in kg/nm as defined 
C
in  the  Aircrew  Manual.    If  this  is  then  multiplied  by  the  total  fuel  available  for  the  cruise  (F)  then  we 
t − r
have an expression for the range under reference conditions.  The term 
 is the factor by which the 
r
SG of the fuel used differs from the SG of the reference fuel. 
Example: 
From the ODM, an aircraft uses 470 kg of fuel (C) for a cruise distance of 750 nm (D).  Consumption is 
therefore  
D
750
=
= .
1 6  kg/nm. 
C
470
If the total fuel available for the cruise is 1,200 kg (F), then the reference range is 1,200 × 1.6 = 1,920 nm. 
If the performance data was calculated using a fuel with an SG of 0.8 (r), but the SG of the actual fuel 
to be used is 0.78 (t), then 
t − r
78
.
0
− .
0 8
=
= − .
0 025
r
8
.
0
and R = –0.025 × 1,920 = – 48 nm 
This  means  that  using  a  fuel  with  an  SG  of  0.78  instead  of  0.8  results  in  a  reduction  in  the  range 
achievable  of  48  nm.    In  general,  if  (t  –  r)  is  negative,  ie  if  the  fuel  used  has  a  lower  SG  than  the 
reference fuel, then there will be a reduction in range.  Conversely, using a fuel with a higher SG than 
the reference fuel will give an increase in range. 
13.  Fuel Required.  To determine the quantity of fuel of known SG needed to achieve a given range, 
r
multiply the quantity of the reference fuel required by  t
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 - 2-1 - The Effect of Variation in Specific Gravity of Fuels 
 on Range and Endurance 
Example: 
From the ODM, an aircraft uses 470 kg of fuel with an SG of 0.8 for a cruise distance of 750 nm.  If the 
fuel to be used has an SG of 0.78, then the amount of fuel needed will be: 
.
0 8
470 ×
= 482  kg 
78
.
0
14.  Contents  Gauges.    Fuel  contents  gauges  are  normally  calibrated  in  kilograms,  but  actually 
measure  the  amount  of  fuel  by  volume,  i.e.  litres.    Therefore,  the  gauge  will  only  show  the  correct 
weight  of  fuel  in  the  tanks  when  it  is  calibrated  to  the  same  SG  as  the  fuel  in  use.    In  some  aircraft, 
such as the VC10, fuel gauges are compensated for SG. 
15.  Fuel Gauge Readings.  In order to calculate the fuel gauge reading when the fuel in the tanks has 
a different SG to the fuel for which the gauges are calibrated, the following formula may be used: 
g
Fuel gauge reading (kg) = Fuel in tanks (kg) ×
t
where: 
g = SG of fuel for which the gauge is calibrated 
t = SG of fuel in tanks 
Example: 
Weight of fuel in tanks   
 
 
 
 
= 8,000 kg 
SG of fuel for which the gauges are calibrated  = 0.78 
SG of fuel in tanks  
 
 
 
 
 
= 0.8 
0.78
Fuel indicated on gauges 
 
 
 
 
= 8,000  × 0 8.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
= 7,800 kg 
Although this situation may be confusing in that the actual amount of fuel is greater than that indicated, 
at least the error is on the side of safety.  The more dangerous situation arises when the SG of the fuel 
in the tanks is less than the SG of the fuel used to calibrate the gauges.  In this case, the gauge would 
indicate that there is more fuel in the tanks than there actually is. 
16.  Fuel  Weight.    On  aircraft  which  normally  operate  with  full  tanks,  the  actual  weight  of  fuel 
carried can be calculated from a knowledge of the capacity of the tanks (ie their volume) and the SG 
of the fuel used.  For example, fuel with an SG of 0.8 has a density of 800 kg/m3.  If the capacity of 
the tanks is 2 cubic metres, then the total weight of fuel is 1,600 kg.  The reading indicated on the 
gauges with full tanks can then be calculated from the formula in para 15. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-2 - Jet Range 
CHAPTER 2 - JET RANGE 
Introduction 
1. 
The  turbojet  engine  consists  of  five  distinct  components;  air  intake,  compressor,  combustion 
chamber,  turbine  and  exhaust  nozzle,  see  Fig  1.    The  core  of  the  engine,  comprising  compressor, 
combustion  chamber  and  turbine  may  be  termed  the  gas  generator.      Because  of  external 
compression,  air  enters  the  intake  (0-1)  at  a  lower  velocity  than  the  flight  speed,  and  is  then  further 
slowed (1-2) before the compressor causes a substantial rise in both pressure and temperature (2-3).  
In  the  combustion  chamber  heat  energy  of  fuel  is  added  to  the  airflow,  providing  a  very  high  turbine 
entry temperature (3-4).  To keep the gas temperature within acceptable limits, and to provide the large 
mass  flow  needed  to  achieve  a  high  thrust,  much  more  air  is  used  than  is  required  for  combustion.  
The turbine (4-5) extracts energy from the gas flow in order to drive the compressor, resulting in a drop 
in pressure and temperature at the turbine.  The remaining energy from the gas generator is expanded 
in the nozzle and exhausted as a high velocity jet (5-6). 
2-2 Fig 1 Layout of a Typical Turbojet 
Gas Generator
Compression
Heat Input
Expansion
Combustion
Intake
Compressor
Nozzle
Chamber
Turbine
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
Pressure
Velocity
Temperature
Flight
Jet
Velocity
Velocity
2. 
The thrust produced by a turbojet engine can be expressed thus: 
Thrust = mass flow of air × (jet pipe speed – intake speed). 
ENGINE CONSIDERATIONS 
Thrust 
3. 
From the expression for thrust it follows that any factor which affects the mass flow, the jet pipe 
speed or the intake speed must affect the output of the engine.  The variable factors are engine rpm, 
temperature, altitude and true airspeed: 
a. 
RPM.  With an increase in rpm the mass flow and acceleration of the flow will increase and 
this  will  produce  an  increase  in  thrust.    Component  efficiencies  are  such  that  thrust  outputs 
required in flight are obtained using between 50% and 95% of maximum rpm. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-2 - Jet Range 
b. 
Temperature.    As  temperature  decreases  air  density  increases  and  this  results  in  an 
increase in air mass flow and therefore an increase in thrust. 
c. 
Altitude.    As  altitude  is  increased,  at  a  constant  rpm,  there  is  a  decrease  in  density  and 
therefore a decrease in mass flow which leads to a reduction in thrust.  Decreasing temperature 
slightly offsets this. 
d. 
Speed.    An  increase  in  TAS  gives  an  increase  in  intake  speed.    Because  jet  pipe speed is 
limited by the maximum permissible jet pipe temperature, the acceleration given to the airflow by 
the  engine  is  decreased.    However,  as  speed  increases,  the  action  of  the  compressor  is 
supplemented  by  ram  effect  which  increases  the  mass  flow.    These  two  effects,  one  trying  to 
increase,  the  other  trying  to  decrease  thrust  tend  to  nullify  one  another  and  the  thrust  of  a  jet 
engine is not significantly affected by forward speed. 
Specific Fuel Consumption 
4. 
Specific fuel consumption (SFC) is the ratio between thrust and gross fuel consumption (GFC): 
GFC
SFC =  Thrust
5. 
SFC is measured in units of fuel per hour per unit of thrust and is therefore affected by the same 
variables that determine the output of the engine: 
a. 
RPM.    Turbojet  engines  are  designed  to  operate  at  a  low  SFC  in  an  optimum  rpm  band 
around  90%  of  maximum.    The  optimum  rpm  is  sometimes  known  as the design rpm.  Engines 
using an axial flow compressor have a fairly wide band of rpm giving almost optimum SFC, this is 
illustrated in Fig 2. 
2-2 Fig 2 SFC and rpm 
Given:
Engine
Optimum
ISA 
rpm
Sea Level
C
F
S
Optimum Band
50
60
70
80
90
100
% rpm
b. 
Temperature.    The  temperature  rise  through  an  engine  is  a  measure  of  thermal  efficiency.  
The  upper  temperature  is  limited  by  maximum  permitted  jet  pipe  temperature  but  a  decrease  in 
intake temperature will improve thermal efficiency and SFC will be reduced. 
c. 
Altitude.    At  low  altitudes  the  required  amount  of  thrust  for  cruising  flight  is  achieved  at 
relatively  low  rpm  where  SFC  is  poor.    The  higher  air  temperatures  also  reduce  the  engine’s 
thermal efficiency.  At higher altitudes rpm have to be increased to obtain the required thrust and 
eventually  the  rpm  will  enter  the  optimum  band,  and  at  the  same  time  the  lower  ambient 
temperature will increase the thermal efficiency of the engine.  At very high altitude the rpm may 
need  to  be  increased  to  beyond  the  optimum  and  the  rarefied  air  may  cause  inefficient 
combustion.    It  can  be  seen  that  although  altitude  has  practically  no  direct  effect  on  SFC  the 
secondary effects of altitude require careful consideration. 
d. 
Speed.    Speed  has  an  insignificant  effect  upon  SFC  compared  with  the  increase  in  rpm 
required to achieve it. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-2 - Jet Range 
Summary 
6. 
In summary, the effects of variations in engine rpm, temperature, altitude and speed are: 
a. 
Thrust
(1)  Increases with rpm 
(2)  Increases with decreasing temperature 
(3)  Decreases with increasing altitude 
b. 
SFC
(1)  Reduces with rpm up to the optimum band 
(2)  Reduces with decreasing temperature 
c. 
Speed.  Over the cruising speed range aircraft speed does not significantly affect thrust or SFC. 
AIRFRAME CONSIDERATIONS 
Efficiency 
7. 
The  efficient  operation  of  an  aircraft  requires  that  it  be  flown  in  a  manner  which  achieves  the 
delivery of the maximum weight (payload) over the maximum range using minimum fuel. 
Work Out
Drag × Distance
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Efficiency = 
 = 
Work In
GFC
Thrust × TAS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 = 
GFC
Specific Air Range 
8. 
The distance travelled per unit of fuel is the specific air range (SAR). 
Distance Travelled
TAS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SAR = 
 

Fuel Used
GFC
TAS
 
 
but GFC = Thrust  ×  SFC 
 
 
       therefore SAR =  Thrust ×SFC
TAS
In level unaccelerated flight, thrust is equal to drag so:  
 
SAR = 
× 1
Drag
SFC
TAS/Drag Ratio 
9. 
The TAS/Drag ratio depends upon the aircraft’s speed, altitude and weight.  Temperature is also a 
factor, but this will be considered when airframe and engine considerations are brought together. 
10.  Altitude.  At a constant IAS the TAS increases with altitude and therefore the TAS/Drag ratio also 
increases as shown in Fig 3.  The maximum TAS/Drag ratio occurs at the tangent to the appropriate 
altitude  curve  drawn  from  the  origin  of  the  graph.      This  speed  is    1.32  ×  the  minimum  drag  speed 
(VIMD)  for  each  curve  and  therefore  represents  a  particular  IAS  and  angle  of  attack.    As  altitude  is 
increased  compressibility  becomes  significant  as  1.32  VIMD  approaches  the  critical  Mach  number 
(MCRIT) for the angle of attack which this speed represents.  At MCRIT the drag rise changes the slope of 
the TAS/Drag curve and the maximum TAS/Drag ratio will no longer be achieved at 1.32 VIMD.  If the 
MCRIT is maintained, allowing the IAS to decrease, the TAS/Drag ratio will continue to increase but at a 
reduced rate until it reaches its optimum value. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-2 - Jet Range 
TAS
2-2 Fig 3
 Ratio at Various Altitudes 
Drag
Critical
Given:
Drag Rise
Aircraft Weight
ft
ISA
evel
ft
L
)
N
ea
1.32  I
V MD
S
15,000
27,000
(k
g
ra
MCrit
D
TAS/Drag Ratio Increasing
100
200
300
400
500
TAS (knots)
11.  Optimum  Altitude.    The  optimum  altitude  is  reached  when  VIMD  coincides  with  MCRIT.    In  this 
situation,  the  TAS  is  limited  by  compressibility  and  the  drag  has  been  reduced  to  a  minimum.    It 
should  be  recognized  that  as  the  IAS  is  allowed  to  fall  towards  VIMD  the  aircraft’s  angle  of  attack  will 
gradually  increase  from  its  1.32  value.    The  increased  angle  of  attack  results  in a reduction in MCRIT; 
however,  the  Mach  number  appropriate  to  1.32  VIMD  should  be  maintained  to  achieve  the  optimum 
TAS/Drag ratio.  This can be seen in Fig 4 where a reduction in MCRIT gives a TAS/Drag ratio which is 
slightly less than maximum.  At this Mach number the TAS will fall as altitude is increased. 
12.  Optimum  Mach  Number.    In  practice  the  optimum  Mach  number  may  vary  slightly with altitude 
and  is  in  fact  found  by  flight  testing.    Nevertheless  the  pattern  of  near  constant  Mach  number  and 
reducing IAS to achieve optimum TAS/Drag ratio with increasing altitude holds good. 
13.  Reducing  Weight.    As  weight  reduces,  VIMD  and  drag  reduce.    The  method  used  to maintain the 
optimum TAS/Drag ratio is to climb the aircraft at a constant Mach number and angle of attack at a fixed 
throttle setting.  As the aircraft gently climbs the thrust reduces at the right rate to balance the drag which 
is reducing because at a constant angle of attack the IAS is reducing. 
2-2 Fig 4 Optimum TAS/Drag Ratio 
Given:
Aircraft Weight
ISA
TAS 444 KT
Altitude
IAS 195 KT
Drag 36 kN
)
TAS/Drag 0.0123
N
Mcrit = 0.76
(k
g
ra
D
M = 0.79
TAS 454 KT
IAS 200 KT (V     )
IMD
Drag 36.5 kN
TAS/Drag 0.0124
TAS
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-2 - Jet Range 
Summary 
14.  Turbojet airframe efficiency can be summarized as follows: 
a. 
The aircraft should be flown for the maximum value of TAS/Drag. 
b. 
At low altitudes the maximum TAS/Drag ratio is achieved at 1.32 VIMD. 
c. 
Above  the  altitude  where  1.32  VIMD  is  equivalent  to  MCRIT  maximum  TAS/Drag  ratio  is 
achieved at an optimum Mach number determined by flight testing. 
d. 
TAS/Drag ratio improves with altitude to its maximum value, which is obtained at a pressure 
altitude where VIMD is equivalent to a particular Mach number which is slightly in excess of MCRIT
e. 
As weight reduces the aircraft should be flown in a cruise climb at a constant Mach number 
and angle of attack. 
ENGINE AND AIRFRAME COMBINATION 
Altitude 
15.  RPM and Thermal Efficiency.  At a constant IAS the TAS/Drag ratio increases with altitude.  For 
best SAR at low altitude, airframe considerations require that the aircraft should be flown at 1.32 VIMD
but,  at  this  speed  only  low  rpm  are  required  and  SFC  is  poor.    There  is  also  a  penalty  to  be  paid  in 
engine thermal efficiency because of the high ambient air temperatures.  As altitude is increased thrust 
reduces and rpm need to be increased towards the optimum band where SFC improves; the thermal 
efficiency  also  increases  as  the  temperature  falls.    Thus,  in  general  SAR  improves  with  increasing 
altitude. 
16.  Optimum  Altitude.    The  increase  in  TAS/Drag  ratio  as  altitude  is  increased  is  halted  by  the 
formation of shockwaves.  In addition, as altitude is increased thrust begins to fall, and eventually the 
rpm have to be increased beyond the optimum value, resulting in reduced efficiency.  An altitude will be 
reached at which, due to compressibility and engine limitations, the SAR starts to fall.  For maximum 
range  a  turbojet  engine  aircraft  should  therefore  be  flown  at  a  particular  Mach  number  which  is 
governed by compressibility.  Since at the same time the airframe factor of SAR requires the aircraft to 
be  flown  at  the  IAS  for  minimum  drag,  the  optimum  altitude  is  the  pressure  altitude  at  which  these 
conditions coincide. 
17.  Optimum  Range  Speed.    Assuming  ISA  temperatures,  particular  values  of  rpm  are  required  to 
provide the necessary thrust which, by design, should be contained within the optimum band.  The rpm 
required  to  maintain  optimum  range  speed  will  also  increase  with  altitude.    Actual  values  of  rpm  and 
Mach number can only be obtained by flight testing, but Fig 5 provides an example of the speed and 
rpm relationship for a maximum SAR performance curve. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-2 - Jet Range 
2-2 Fig 5 Example of Speed and Rpm Relationships for Maximum SAR 
.06
M 0.79
M 0.79
.05
IAS. 200kt
M 0.79
(V im
    d  )
R
rpm 7,400
A
S
IAS 180 kt
.04
(0.9 x  i
V m
   d
  )
IAS 263 kt
rpm 7,900
(1.316 x V i   
m  
d)
M 0.71
rpm 6,700
.03
IAS 360 kt
(1.8 x V
.02
im
   d  )
rpm 6,000
0 10 20
30
40
50
Altitude (ft x 1,000)
The Cruise Climb 
18.  Effect of Reducing Weight.  VIMD is proportional to the square root of the aircraft weight.  Thus, 
weight
to  ensure  maximum  performance  as  weight  changes,  altitude  must  change,  i.e.  the  relative pressure
ratio must remain constant.  As weight falls the reducing VIMD is equivalent to the Mach number at an 
increasing altitude (falling relative pressure).  Hence the cruise-climb technique for jet aircraft. 
19.  Engine Rpm.  As long as the temperature remains constant the rpm set at one weight will ensure 
the  correct  rate  of  climb  for  the  cruise-climb.    If  the  temperature  falls  the  thrust  increases  and  rpm 
should  be  reduced.    The  ratio  of  rpm  (N)  to  the  square  root  of  the  relative  temperature  (t)  should  be 
(N)
constant, ie 
 is constant. 
t
20.  Effect of Changing Temperature
a. 
Altitude.  The altitude is governed by the IAS/Mach number relationship which is not affected 
by temperature.  However, in very hot temperatures the engine may be unable to provide the rpm 
(N)
demanded by 
.  In this event a lower altitude may have to be flown at reduced efficiency. 
t
b. 
Thrust.  At low temperatures the rpm must be reduced and at high temperatures they must 
be  increased.    The  rpm  should  remain  in  the  optimum  band  to  ensure  that  the  SFC  does  not 
adversely affect SAR. 
c. 
SAR.  An increase in temperature will lead to an increase in TAS but there will be a similar 
increase  in  GFC  through  SFC  increasing  because  of  poorer  thermal  efficiency,  so  that  SAR 
remains unchanged. 
Effect of Wind 
21.  It  is  important  to  note  that  whenever  range  flying  is  mentioned  in  Aircrew  Manuals  it  invariably 
refers to still-air range.  A head wind will have a detrimental effect on SAR and, conversely, a tail wind 
will increase SAR .  It is therefore sound practice to examine the winds at various altitudes while flight 
planning to determine the best height to fly. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-2 - Jet Range 
22.  The basic requirements for maximum range in a turbojet aircraft have been shown to be minimum 
SFC  and  maximum  TAS/Drag  ratio.    Broadly  speaking,  to  fulfil  these  requirements  and  achieve  the 
best still-air range jet aircraft normally fly as high and fast as possible, the range speed being governed 
by  that  at  which  compressibility  effects  start  to  degrade  the  TAS/Drag  ratio.    If  a  strong  head  wind 
component  is  encountered  in  any  jet  aircraft  the  best  solution  lies  in  seeking  a  flight  level  where  the 
effect  of  the  head  wind  is  minimized,  bearing  in  mind  the  other  factors  affecting  range.    In  high 
performance aircraft, increasing speed into a head wind is unlikely to be of benefit since the TAS/Drag 
ratio will be adversely affected by compressibility effects.  In low performance aircraft increasing speed 
may be worthwhile since compressibility effects will be of no consequence. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-3 - Jet Endurance 
CHAPTER 3 - JET ENDURANCE 
Introduction 
1.
Flying  for  endurance  implies  flying  in  conditions  which  realize  the  minimum  fuel  flow  and  so  the 
longest  possible  time  in  the  air  on  the  fuel  available.    The  need  for  maximum  endurance  arises  less 
frequently than that for maximum range, but circumstances can arise which require aircraft to loiter or 
stand-off  for  varying  periods  of  time  during  which  fuel  must  be  conserved.    Whereas  range  flying  is 
more  closely  concerned  with  specific  fuel  consumption  (SFC)  and  air  nautical  miles  per  kilogram  of 
fuel,  endurance  flying  is  concerned  with  the  gross  fuel  consumption  (GFC),  i.e. the  weight  of  fuel 
consumed per hour. 
Principles 
2. 
Broadly,  since  fuel  flow  is  proportional  to  thrust,  fuel  flow  is  least  when  thrust  is  least;  therefore 
maximum level flight endurance is obtained when the aircraft is flying at the Indicated Airspeed (IAS) 
for minimum drag (VIMD), because in level flight thrust is equal to drag. 
3. 
Maximum  endurance  is  obtained  at  an  altitude  which  is  governed  by  engine  considerations.  
Although  for  a  given  set  of  conditions  the  IAS  for  minimum  drag  remains  virtually  constant  at  all 
altitudes, the engine efficiency varies with altitude and is lowest at the lowest altitudes where rpm must 
be severely reduced to provide the low thrust required. 
4. 
To  obtain  the  required  amount  of  thrust  most  economically,  the  engine  must  be  run  at  maximum 
continuous  rpm.    Therefore  maximum  endurance  is  obtained  by  flying  at  such  an  altitude  that,  with  the 
engine(s)  running at or near optimum cruising rpm, just enough thrust is provided to realize the speed for 
minimum drag, or MCRIT, whichever is the lower.  Above the optimum altitude little, if any, additional benefit is 
obtained,  and  in  some  cases  there  may  be  a  slight  reduction  because  burner  efficiency  decreases  at  or 
about the highest altitude at which level flight is possible at VIMD.  In general, optimum endurance is obtained 
by  remaining  between  20,000  ft  and  the  tropopause  at  the  recommended  IAS  and  appropriate  rpm.  The 
greater the power/weight ratio of the aircraft, the greater will be the optimum height.  With aircraft having high 
power/weight ratios, maximum endurance is obtained at the tropopause. 
5. 
Altitude should only be changed to that for maximum endurance if the aircraft is above or near the 
endurance ceiling, otherwise if the aircraft is climbed from a much lower altitude, a considerably higher 
fuel flow will be required on the climb thereby reducing overall endurance. 
6. 
On engines having variable swirl vanes, the consumption increases markedly if the rpm are so 
low that the swirl vanes are closed.  If the altitude is low enough to cause the swirl vanes to close at 
the  rpm  required  for  VIMD,  the  aircraft  should  either  be  climbed  to  the  lowest  altitude  at  which  VIMD
can  be  obtained  with  the  swirl  vanes  open,  or  the  rpm  increased  to  the  point  at  which  the  vanes 
open, accepting the higher IAS. 
Effect of Weight 
7. 
Drag  and  thrust  at  the  optimum  IAS  are  functions  of  the  all-up  weight;  the  lower  the  weight  the 
lower the thrust and fuel flow.  Endurance varies inversely as the weight and not as the square root of 
the weight as in range flying because in pure endurance flying the TAS has no importance. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-3 - Jet Endurance 
Effect of Temperature 
8. 
In  general,  the  lower  the  ambient  air  temperature,  the  higher  the  endurance,  due  to  increased 
thermal  efficiency,  and  vice  versa.    However,  the  effect  is  not  marked  unless  the  temperature  differs 
considerably  from the standard temperature for the altitude.  In any case, the captain can do nothing 
but accept the difference, since any set of circumstances requiring flying for endurance usually ties the 
aircraft to a particular area and height band. 
Twin and Multi-engine Aircraft 
9. 
When flying for endurance in twin or multi-engine aircraft at medium and low altitude, endurance can 
be  improved  by  shutting  down  one  or  more  engines.    In  this  way,  the  live  engine(s)  can  be  run  at  rpm 
closer to the optimum for the thrust required to fly at VIMD, thus improving GFC.  Provided that the correct 
number of engines are used for the height, altitude has virtually no effect on the endurance achieved. 
Use of the Fuel Flowmeter 
10.  The fuel flowmeter is a useful aid when flying for endurance.  If the endurance speed is unknown, 
the throttle(s) should be set at the rpm which give the lowest indicated rate of fuel flow in level flight for 
the particular altitude. 
Reporting Procedure - Aircraft Endurance 
11.  Whenever reporting aircraft endurance, the time for which the aircraft can remain airborne should 
be  given.    It  is  confusing  and  dangerous  to  report  endurance  in  terms  of  amount  of  fuel  remaining 
because of the possibility of misinterpretation. 
Conclusions 
12.  Maximum  endurance  is  achieved  by  flying  at  an  altitude  where  optimum  rpm  give  the  minimum 
drag speed.  It will rarely pay to climb to a higher altitude unless the commencing altitude is very low; in 
any  event,  the  instruction  or  need  to  fly  for  endurance  may  preclude  this.    At  the  lower  altitudes, 
maximum  endurance  may  be  obtained  either  by  flaming-out  engines  to  use  optimum  rpm  on  the 
remainder, or by using near-optimum rpm to give VIMD.  It should be remembered that: 
a. 
The  importance  of  flying  at  VIMD  outweighs  engine  considerations,  always  assuming that an 
engine, or engines, will be stopped in the low level case. 
b. 
At  lower  altitudes,  there  will  be  a  slight  decrease  in  endurance  due  to  the  higher  ambient 
temperature reducing engine thermal efficiency. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-4- Jet Cruise Control 
CHAPTER 4 - JET CRUISE CONTROL 
Introduction 
1.
Previous  chapters  of  this  section  have  set  out  the  pattern  of  turbojet  aircraft  performance.    This 
chapter presents the most simple, but at the same time, most efficient means of flying these aircraft for 
maximum  range  in  various  roles.    The  most  commonly  used  procedures  are  studied  under  various 
headings, each one being more efficient than its predecessor. 
Low Altitude 
2. 
At low level, the efficiency of the engine (rpm within the optimum band) outweighs the efficiency of 
the  airframe  (1.32  ×  VIMD).    Normally,  a  high  IAS,  approximately  2.0 × VIMD, is flown using rpm which 
are reduced as weight decreases.  Range is about 30% to 40% of maximum. 
Medium Altitude 
3. 
At medium altitude, a reducing IAS (1.32 × VIMD) is flown using reducing rpm contained within the 
lower half of the optimum band.  Range is about 50% to 70% of maximum. 
High Altitude 
4. 
Constant  Altitude.    To  take  maximum  advantage  of  decreasing  weight,  an  optimum  Mach 
number  (set  by  compressibility)  is  initially  flown  at  an  altitude  where  near  maximum  cruising  rpm  are 
required.    As  weight  reduces,  so  the  speed  and  rpm  are  reduced  to  maintain  a  constant  angle  of 
TAS
attack.    The  advantage  to  the 
  ratio  is  that  although  the  TAS  is  reduced,  because  the  angle  of 
drag
attack is being maintained at a constant, drag is reducing as the square of the speed, thus resulting in 
TAS
an overall increase in the 
 ratio.  The required decrease in rpm will have little effect on the  1
drag
SFC
ratio, as the engine will still be operating within the optimum rpm range.  However, on long flights, this 
method does lead to problems in flight planning because of the changing speed, and so an alternative 
and more practical method is to maintain the originally selected Mach number by slightly reducing rpm 
TAS
as weight decreases.  An improvement in the 
 ratio is thus obtained as TAS is now constant, and 
drag
drag is reducing as weight decreases.  Range is about 80% to 90% of maximum. 
5. 
Stepped Climb.  An optimum Mach number is flown at an altitude approximately 1,000 ft above the 
weight
ideal  starting  altitude  set  by  the  optimum 
  value  (see  Volume  2,  Chapter  2,  Para  18).  
relative pressure
Level cruise is flown by reducing rpm until the aircraft is 3,000 ft below the ideal cruise climb altitude.  A 
climb is then made to the next semi-circular height 1,000 ft above the ideal altitude, and so on.  Range is 
about 95 % of maximum. 
6. 
Cruise  Climb.    An  optimum  Mach  number  is  flown  starting  at  an  altitude  determined  by  the 
weight
N
optimum 
  using  an  rpm  setting  determined  by  the  optimum 
  value.    Range  is 
relative pressure
t
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-4- Jet Cruise Control 
weight
maximum.  However, in very hot conditions, a lower 
 value (lower altitude) may have to 
relative pressure
N
be accepted with a lower 
 value (lower rpm) to avoid exceeding maximum cruising rpm. 
t
Fast Cruise 
7. 
Turbojet aircraft should never be flown at slower speeds than those outlined above except when 
endurance  is  required.    Frequently,  faster  speeds  are  flown  in  the  interests  of  time  economy  at  the 
expense of fuel economy.  The performance penalties are obviously progressive. 
Summary 
8. 
In  Fig  1,  the  profile  of  each  type  of  cruise  procedure  is  shown  with  an  indication  of  the  range 
achieved. 
2-4 Fig 1 Profiles of Turbojet Aircraft Control Procedures 
50
Cruise Climb
)
0
High:
0
High: Stepped Climb
,0
1
40
x
(ft
High Altitude: Constant Altitude
e
d
ltitu
Optimum Mach No Flown
A
30
re
IAS Flown
u
s
Medium Altitude: 1.32
×
s
IMD 
 V
re
20
P
Low Altitude: Max IAS
10
0
20
40
60
80
100
% of Maximum Range
9. 
The  tables  below  relate  to  a  typical  four-jet  aircraft  and  indicate  the  advantage  in  SAR  (range) 
given  by  a  cruise  climb  as  opposed  to  a  level  cruise.    For  this  aircraft,  the  cruise  climb  should  be 
started at flight level (FL) 420.  Using the cruise climb technique, ie rpm constant within the optimum 
band,  at  a  constant  indicated  Mach  number  (IMN)  and  climbing  as weight is reduced, it can be seen 
that the SAR improves from 0.0267 to 0.0325, whilst weight is reduced by 10,000 kg and the aircraft is 
climbed through 4,000 ft.  In the level cruise case, the cruise is started 1,000 ft higher at FL 430 and 
SAR is slightly worse than in the cruise climb case.  At an all-up weight (AUW) of 51,000 kg the SAR, 
height  and  rpm  are  all  equal  for  both  techniques.    However,  by  the  time  the  AUW  has  reduced  to 
44,000  kg,  the  SAR  in  the  case  of  the  level  cruise  is  1.85%  worse  than  in  the  climbing  case,  and  the 
disparity would continue to increase as weight is reduced.  If air traffic regulations preclude the use of the 
cruise climb technique, the aircraft using the level cruise should now be climbed through 4,000 ft, ie to the 
next appropriate semi-circular height and the cruise continued. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-4- Jet Cruise Control 
CRUISE CLIMB 
SAR 
Wt 
FL 
rpm 
(anmpkg) 
54,000 
420 
0.0267 
7,050 
51,000 
430 
0.0281 
7,050 
44,000 
460 
0.0325 
7,050 
LEVEL CRUISE 
SAR 
Wt 
FL 
Rpm 
(anmpkg) 
54,000 
430 
0.0266 
7,130 
51,000 
430 
0.0281 
7,050 
44,000 
430 
0.0319 
6,700 
10.  It  is  apparent  from  this  study  of  turbojet  engine  aircraft  performance  that,  by  virtue  of  their 
engines,  these  aircraft  operate  best  at  a  high  altitude  in  a  cruise  climb,  because  of  the  considerable 
reduction in weight which occurs during flight.  Their speed is limited by compressibility to a particular 
Mach number whose value depends upon design. 
CLIMB, DESCENT AND EMERGENCIES 
Climb 
11.  Since flying at high altitudes is all-important for a high SAR, it is essential that the initial cruising 
altitude  is  reached  as  quickly  as  possible.    This  results  in  the  use  of  the  highest  possible  rpm  and 
therefore a high GFC, but it is the most economical method of reaching the required altitude.  Thus, the 
climb is made at maximum permitted climbing (intermediate) rpm and at the correct climbing speeds.  
If there is a time limit on the use of intermediate power, and the time for the climb exceeds this, then a 
quicker climb is achieved by using maximum continuous rpm initially, and intermediate (climbing) rpm, 
for the full time period allowed, during the latter period of the climb. 
Descent 
12.  The most economical method of descending is to start before the destination is reached, at a rate 
that allows the aircraft to arrive over the destination at the required altitude.  In this way altitude is most 
efficiently converted into distance. 
13.  There are two practical methods of descending: either a cruise descent with the aircraft clean and 
the throttles closed as far as possible, bearing in mind the need to maintain pressurization and aircraft 
services; or a rapid descent, using maximum drag devices and a higher speed, with throttles set as for 
the cruise descent.  The fuel used in the rapid descent is less than in the cruise descent, but since the 
distance covered is also less a true comparison between the two methods can only be made by taking 
into account the extra fuel used at altitude before starting the rapid descent.  In practice, the method of 
descent  used  will  vary  with  aircraft  type  and  role  and  is  normally  governed  by  techniques 
recommended in Aircrew Manuals and procedures laid down by the operating authority. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-4- Jet Cruise Control 
Emergencies 
14.  Engine Failure.  If one or more engines fail when flying for range at high altitude the reduced thrust 
will cause the aircraft to lose height and range will be reduced.  The loss in range depends on the amount 
of  height  lost;  the  height  loss  being  governed  by  the  reserve  of  thrust  (rpm)  available  from  the  live 
engines.  Maximum range will be achieved by flying the aircraft at the best range speed and highest rpm 
available  (maximum  continuous).    The  technique  for  range  flying  after  engine  failure  is  to  assume  the 
correct  range  speed  for  the  condition  (available  in  the  ODM)  and  set  maximum  continuous  rpm.    The 
aircraft  will  then  drift  down  until  the  increase  in  thrust  enables  height  to  be  stabilized.    For  maximum 
range, the aircraft should then be cruise climbed from this new height, maintaining the IMN achieved at 
the stabilized height.  When engine failure occurs, the range will be less than is possible with all engines 
operating.  For example, by using the correct technique, the loss of remaining range for a typical four-jet 
aircraft is approximately 6% for loss of one engine and 20 % for loss of two engines. 
15.  Cabin Pressure Failure If cabin pressure is lost and the aircraft is forced to descend rapidly, the 
cruise should be resumed at a height limited by the type of oxygen equipment carried.  Best range will 
then be achieved by adopting a cruise at a constant altitude and the recommended range speed for the 
height.    As  AUW  is  reduced,  the  range  speed  will  also  reduce  and  this  can  be  achieved  by  either 
throttling back, or, if possible, flaming-out an engine.  If, for operational purposes or in the interests of 
navigation,  the  speed  is  kept  constant,  the  resulting  loss  in  range  is  not  great.    If  the  recommended 
landing reserve of fuel is available, a constant speed can be justified in most cases. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
CHAPTER 5 - TURBOPROP RANGE AND ENDURANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
Turboprop engines combine the efficiency of the propeller with the power output of the gas turbine 
to gain an advantage in power/weight ratio over jet engines at speeds up to about 350 kt.  The Range, 
Endurance,  and  other  performance  aspects  of  turboprop  aircraft  can  be  examined  against  the  same 
engine and airframe factors that were considered for jets in Volume 2, Chapter 1. 
ENGINE CONSIDERATIONS 
General 
2. 
The  turboprop  engine  consists  of  a  gas  turbine  engine  driving  a  propeller.    There  are  two  main 
types of these engines depending on the arrangement of the compressors and propellers in relation to 
the turbine: 
a. 
Direct  Drive  Turbine.    In  the  direct  drive  turbine  engine  the  compressor  and  the  propeller 
are driven on a common shaft by the turbine, the power being transmitted to the propeller through 
a reduction gear (Fig 1). 
2-5 Fig 1 Direct Drive Turboprop Engine 
Reduction Gear
Compressor
Turbine
b. 
Free Power Turbine In the free power turbine engine, the compressor is connected to the 
high  pressure  turbine.    The  free  power  turbine  is  coupled  independently  to  the  propeller  via  the 
reduction gear (Fig 2a). 
2-5 Fig 2 Free Power Turbine Engine/ Compound Engine 
Fig 2a Free Power Turbine Engine 
Compressor
Free Power
Reduction Gear
HP Turbine
Turbine
c. 
Compound Engine.  The compound engine is a two-spool engine, with the propeller driven 
by the low-pressure spool (Fig 2b). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
Fig 2b  Compound Engine 
Reduction Gear
HP Spool
LP Spool
Power Utilization 
3. 
The energy produced by burning fuel in the engine is used in two ways.  Over 90% of the energy 
is extracted by the turbines to drive the compressor(s) and the propeller; the remaining energy appears 
in the jet exhaust as thrust.  The following figures show the utilization and amount of power output in a 
typical turboprop engine: 
Turbine produces 
7300 kW 
Compressor uses 
4100 kW 
Loss through reduction gear and ancillary equipment 
75 kW 
Total power available for propulsion 
3125 kW 
Jet thrust 
230 kW 
Factors Affecting Power Output 
4. 
RPM.    For  practical  purposes,  the  power  output  from  a  turboprop  engine  varies  directly  as  the 
rpm.  In cruising flight however, the engine is run as follows: 
a. 
Direct Drive Turbine The rpm are maintained at the maximum continuous setting (MCrpm). 
b.
Free Power Turbine.  The low pressure system is kept at MCrpm but the high pressure side 
may be throttled if required; however, this reduces efficiency and therefore increases the specific 
fuel consumption (SFC). 
5. 
Temperature An increase in intake temperature will reduce power output because the mass flow 
through the engine will be reduced due to reduced air density. 
6. 
Altitude At a constant TAS, power output falls with increase in altitude due to the decrease in air 
density,  but  the  rate  of  reduction  of  power  is  mitigated  by  the  fall  in  air  temperature,  up  to  the 
Tropopause  above  which  it  reduces  more  sharply  (see  Fig  3  which  shows  the  generalized  effects  of 
altitude on turboprop performance). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
2-5 Fig 3 Effect of Altitude on Turboprop Performance 
r
n
e
l
e
w
tio
ft
u
o
p
a
p
F
m
h
e
s
u
S
s
rs
s
o
ro
n
o
H
G
C
t
s
ru
h
T
t
e
J
t
e
N
7. 
Forward  Speed.    As  forward  speed  increases,  ram  effect  supplements  the  pressure  at  the 
intake,  thus  augmenting  the  action  of  the  compressor  and  thereby  increasing  power  output.  
However, propeller efficiency begins to fall at about 300 kt TAS and the gain due to the ram effect 
is  progressively  degraded  until,  at  about  450  kt  TAS,  reducing  propeller  efficiency  completely 
offsets the increasing ram effect.  Generally, the effects of propeller efficiency and ram pressure 
can  be  ignored  in  the  cruising  range  of  current  turboprop  aircraft  (see  Fig  4  which  shows  the 
generalized effects of speed on turboprop performance). 
2-5 Fig 4 Effect of Speed on Turboprop Performance 
r
n
e
l
e
tio
ft
w
u
o
p
a
F
m
h
p
e
s
u
S
s
rs
s
o
ro
n
o
H
G
C
t
s
l
n
e
ru
u
h
tio
F
p
T
t
m
e
ific
u
J
c
s
t
e
n
e
p
o
N
S
C
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
Specific Fuel Consumption (SFC) 
8. 
The  gross  fuel  consumption  (GFC)  of  an  engine,  measured  in  quantity  per  unit  time,  gives  no 
indication  of  the  operating  efficiency  except  in  a  very  general  way.    This  would  be  analogous  with 
comparing  miles  per  gallon  achieved  on  one  car  journey  with  another,  along  a  possibly  quite  dissimilar 
route.    Comparisons  of  fuel  consumption  between  vehicles  with  different  capacity  engines  would  be 
meaningless.  If, however, the fuel used is related to power produced, then a means exists of assessing 
how  efficiently  the  fuel  is  used  and  comparisons  can  be  made  between  different  power  plants.    The 
measurement  of  fuel  used/hr/kW  is called the specific fuel consumption.  The term, fuel used/hr, is the 
GFC, therefore SFC = GFC/kW.  The factors affecting power output also affect the SFC. 
9. 
RPM  Turboprop  engines  are  designed  to  operate  most  efficiently  at  one  particular  rpm  setting, 
known  as  maximum  continuous  rpm  (MCrpm).    Therefore,  for  the  best  (minimum)  value  of  SFC  the 
engine should be operated at MCrpm at all times. 
10.  Temperature.  SFC improves in cold air because of the increased thermal efficiency of the engine. 
11.  Altitude.  Altitude has no direct effect on SFC.  As altitude increases, power decreases with reducing 
air  density  but  GFC  is  reduced  automatically  by  the  fuel  control  unit  (FCU)  within  the  engine  to  keep  the 
fuel/air  ratio  constant.    However,  SFC  does  improve  because  of  lowering  temperatures  with  increasing 
altitude up to the point where propeller efficiency begins to fall due to reducing air density (see Fig 3). 
12.  Forward Speed Shaft power increases with speed because of the improved mass flow through 
the  engine.    The  GFC  will  be  higher,  with  shaft  power the dominant factor, up to the point where the 
FCU power-limiter prevents any further fuel flow, to avoid over-stressing.  The shaft power will continue 
to rise due to the ram-ratio improvement.  However, the increased shaft power is converted to thrust by 
a propeller which loses efficiency at high forward speed, thereby losing thrust.  In comparison with the 
pure  jet  engine,  which  shows  a  straightforward  increase in SFC with increasing speed, the turboprop 
would, in general, show an improving (lower) SFC at increasing speed up to the point where propeller 
losses bring about a rapid deterioration (see Fig 4).
Summary 
13.  In order to achieve maximum efficiency (low SFC), the turboprop engine should be operated: 
a. 
At MCrpm. 
b. 
At high altitude (better thermal efficiency in colder air). 
c. 
At a TAS between 300 kt and 400 kt, so that advantage may be taken of ram effect while the 
propeller efficiency is still high. 
AIRFRAME CONSIDERATIONS 
Flying for Range 
14.  An aircraft is flown for range in such a way that a maximum weight of payload is delivered over a 
maximum distance using minimum fuel.  This aim can be expressed as: 
work out
weight × distance
Efficiency =
=
work in
fuel used
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
15.  Specific  air  range  (SAR)  is  defined  as  air distance travelled per unit quantity of fuel, i.e. nautical 
miles per kilogram of fuel.  Thus: 
distance travelled
SAR =
fuel used
16.  If the above expression is divided, top and bottom, by time, then: 
distance travelled
time
×
TAS
=
time
fuel used
GFC
17.  It was shown in para 8 that the efficiency of a turboprop engine is the ratio of GFC to power output, i.e.: 
GFC
SFC =
∴GFC = power ×SFC
Power
Substituting 'power  ×  SFC' for GFC in the equation for SAR at para 16: 
TAS
1
SAR =
×
power
SFC
18.  Therefore,  at  a  particular  weight,  in  still  air,  a  turboprop  aircraft  should  be  flown  for  a  maximum 
product of airframe efficiency, TAS/power and engine efficiency, 1/SFC to achieve maximum SAR. 
19.  Fig 5 shows how a graph of TAS against power required has been evolved from a TAS/drag curve 
by  multiplying  each  value  of  drag  by  the  appropriate  TAS  and  converting  to  kilowatts.    Note  that  the 
lowest  point  on  the  TAS/power  curve,  known  as  the  minimum  power  speed  (VMP),  is  slower  than  the 
indicated minimum drag speed (VIMD).  Also that the maximum value of the TAS/power ratio is found at 
a  point  where  the  tangent  from  the  origin  touches  the  curve.    This  speed  coincides  with  VIMD  for  the 
following reason. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
2-5 Fig 5 Derivation of TAS / Power 
40
30
)
N
(k
g
I
V MD
ra
20
D
10
4.0
100
200
300
)
0
TAS (kt)
0
3.0
0
1
x
W
(k
d
2.0
ire
u
q
e
V
R
r
e
w
1.0
o
P
0
TAS (kt)
Given: Aircraft Weight; ISA; Sea Level
Power required is a product of drag and TAS, thus:- 
Power = drag × TAS
TAS
1
=
power
drag
i.e.,  maximum  TAS/power  ratio  occurs  at  the  minimum  drag  or  maximum  1/drag  speed.    Note  that 
Fig 5 is drawn for sea level conditions where TAS = EAS. 
20.  Effect of Altitude.  An aircraft flying at VIMD experiences a constant drag at any altitude, because 
VIMD  is  an  indicated  airspeed.    This  ignores  compressibility  which  is  unlikely  to  affect  the  airframe 
performance.    However,  as  altitude  increases,  the  TAS  for  a  given  EAS  increases,  but  the  power 
required  also  increases  by  the  amount  (power  required  =  drag  ×  TAS).    Thus  the  ratio  TAS/power  is 
unaffected.  Fig 6 shows how power required increases with altitude, whilst airframe efficiency remains 
unchanged. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
2-5 Fig 6 Effect of Altitude on TAS/Power Ratio 
4.0
l
ve
e
t
1000)
L
e
x
a
fe
3.0
e
0
S
0
,0
7
(Kw
2
2.0
erRequired
Pow
1.0
100
200
300
TAS (kt)
Given: Aircraft Weight; ISA
21.  Effect of Wind Velocity Range should properly be an expression of ground distance divided by 
fuel  used.    thus  in  place  of  TAS/power,  ground  speed/power  should  be  studied.    In  Fig  7  a  normal 
TAS/power curve has been given 3 horizontal axes. 
2-5 Fig 7 Effect of Wind Component 
3.0
)
0
0
0
1
x
2.0
W
(k
d
ire
u
q
e
C
R
r
A
e
1.0
B
w
o
P
P
O
Q
W
V
X
100
200
TAS (kt) (Ground Speed no wind)
0
100
200
Ground Speed (50 kt Tailwind)
0
100
Ground Speed (50 kt Headwind)
Given: Aircraft Weight; ISA; Sea Level
Revised Mar 10   
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
a. 
In  still  air,  a  tangent  from  the  origin  O  indicates  a  minimum  drag  speed  V  and  the  specific 
range is OV/AV. 
ground speed
PV
b. 
With  a  50  kt  tail  wind,  the 
  ratio  at  this  speed  V  would  be 
.    To  obtain  a 
power
AV
ground speed
maximum 
 ratio in these conditions a slightly slower speed W is flown, where PB is 
power
PW
the tangent from P to the curve, and 
 represents the maximum possible efficiency. 
BW
ground speed
c. 
Similarly,  with  a  50  kt  headwind,  the 
  ratio  is  maximum  at  a  slightly  higher 
power
QX
speed  X,  where  QC  is  the  tangent from the false origin Q to the curve, and 
 represents the 
CX
maximum efficiency. 
22.  Air  Speed  Adjustments.    The  effects  of  head  and  tail  winds  on  range  speed  are  small  and 
depend upon their numerical relationship to the TAS.  Unless a headwind exceeds 25% of TAS, or a 
tailwind 33% of TAS, air speed adjustments need not be made. 
23.  Recommended Range Speed (RRS) In practice, aircraft are flown for range at a speed slightly 
faster than VIMD for two reasons: 
TAS
a. 
The variation of 
 at speeds near VIMD is negligible and a slightly higher speed will allow 
power
a faster flight without undue loss of range. 
b. 
When flying at VIMD, any turbulence or manoeuvres will cause a loss of lift and height.  This 
height  can  only  be  regained  by  the  application  of  more  power  and  consequent  fuel  wastage.    A 
higher speed ensures a margin for such events. 
24.  Turboprop aircraft are, therefore, normally flown at the recommended range speed which is some 
10% to 20% higher than VIMD. 
25.  Effect  of  Weight.    As  VIMD  is  proportional  to  the  square  root of the all-up weight, so also is RRS.  
The power required at RRS depends upon the drag and the TAS.  Drag depends upon the lift/drag ratio at 
the angle of attack represented by this airframe speed, and the weight.  As the TAS depends upon the 
value of RRS (an indicated airspeed), altitude and temperature, it is possible to predict the power required 
by an airframe flown at RRS for a whole spectrum of weights and altitudes (Fig 8). 
2-5 Fig 8 Power Required at Various Altitudes and Weights 
auw - kg
15,000
(ft)
e
d
ltitu
10,000
A
re
0
0
0
u
0
0
0
s
,0
,0
,0
s
4
7
0
1
1
2
re
5,000
P
500
1000
1500
Power Required (kW)
Given: Aircraft RRS; V
 + 10%; ISA
imd
Revised Mar 10   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-5 - Turboprop Range and Endurance 
26. Altitude to Fly.  Because the TAS/power ratio achieved at RRS is independent of altitude, the altitude 
to fly is determined by engine considerations.  At sea level more power will be developed by the engines at 
the  MCrpm  setting  than  is  required,  but  this  reduces  with  height.    Therefore,  at  some  particular  altitude, 
power output will equal the power required to drive the airframe at the RRS for that altitude, and this is the 
altitude  to  start  the  cruise  for  range.    Fig  8  showed  the  power  required  to  propel  an  airframe  at  RRS  at 
various weights against altitude.  Fig 9 gives an example of the weight/power relationship. 
2-5 Fig 9 Derivation of Flight Level for Maximum Range 
Power Required
Power Available
400
l
Tropopause
e
v
e
S
S
L
IA
t
IA
S
Shaft Power
h
kt
kt
kt IA
2300 kW
lig
74
93
F
200
11
; 1
kg
kg; 1
0
kg; 2
5,00
,000
5
70
2,0 00
8
uw
uw
w
a
a
au
1000
2000
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
ep (kW)
Given: Aircraft Engines; MCrpm; ISA
Endurance 
27.  For maximum endurance, minimum fuel flow is required and this is achieved when the product of 
power required and SFC is a minimum.  The airframe demands least power at minimum power speed, 
plus about 10 kt for control, at as low an altitude as possible.  The engines are most efficient at MCrpm 
at  a  high  altitude  (cold  temperature)  and  a  fairly  high  TAS  (around  300 kt).    Due  to  these  conflicting 
requirements a compromise is achieved at a medium altitude where an airframe speed in the region of 
VIMD is maintained by throttling the engines.  The actual altitude chosen is not unduly critical as there 
are  almost  equally  good  reasons  for  flying  higher  (increased  engine  efficiency)  or  lower  (less  power 
required). 
SUMMARY 
Turboprop Range and Endurance 
28.  Maximum range for a turboprop aircraft is achieved in the following manner: 
a. 
Maximum range is achieved in a cruise climb using MCrpm and an IAS slightly above VIMD. 
b. 
In this cruise climb, TAS varies around a mean  
value; SAR improves as both drag and SFC fall. 
c. 
Temperatures colder than ISA cause: 
(1)  The aircraft to fly higher. 
(2)  A slight increase in TAS. 
(3)  An increase in SAR. 
29.  Maximum endurance is achieved at a medium altitude where the engines are throttled to produce 
an IAS of about VIMD. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-6 - Turboprop Cruise Control 
CHAPTER 6 - TURBOPROP CRUISE CONTROL 
Introduction 
1. 
Due to operational and Air Traffic Control (ATC) requirements, turboprop engine aircraft are more 
commonly  flown  lower  and  faster  than  the  heights  and  speeds  that  would  be  determined  solely  by 
range  and  endurance  considerations.    Cruise  control  techniques  can  achieve  time  economy  at 
reasonable expense of fuel economy and, under certain conditions of wind velocity, the range may be 
little affected.  A stepped cruise may be flown to approximate the advantages of the cruise climb within 
any limitations imposed by ATC. 
Low Speed Cruises 
2. 
Cruise  Climb.    It  was  seen  in  the  previous  chapter  that  maximum  ranges  will  be  achieved  in 
turboprop aircraft when it is cruise climbed near VIMD using MCrpm.  The initial height to start the cruise 
will  depend  on  weight  and  temperature.    Ideally,  the  Indicated  Airspeed  (IAS)  should  be  reduced 
continuously  as weight reduces, but in practice a half-hourly adjustment to the IAS is sufficient.  This 
cruise is referred to in Operating Data Manuals (ODMs) as the constant CL cruise. 
3. 
Stepped  Cruise.    When  ATC  procedures  do  not  allow  a  cruise  climb,  a  stepped  cruise  will 
achieve  near  maximum  range.    A  level  cruise  is  started  at  the  nearest  quadrantal  height  below  the 
ideal stabilizing altitude, using MCrpm.  The speed is allowed to build up until the weight has reduced 
to  a  point  where  it  is  possible  to  accept  the  next  higher  quadrantal  or  semi-circular  height  where  the 
IAS will be at, or near, RRS.  The procedure is repeated as often as required. 
High Speed Cruises 
4. 
When it is not essential to obtain the maximum range for the fuel carried, turboprop aircraft may 
be cruised at speeds in excess of the best range speed; range, of course, will be less than maximum.  
However,  when  flying  a  high  speed  cruise,  a  certain  IAS,  called  VNO  (normal  operating  speed),  or 
indicated Mach number, called MNO (normal operating Mach number), should not be exceeded, since 
these indicated speeds are imposed by airframe structural limitations. 
5. 
Cruise Climb.  In the cruise climb at VNO the aircraft is climbed to its stabilizing altitude (which is 
lower than for the maximum range low speed cruise) with MCrpm set on the engines and the IAS kept 
at  VNO.    As  weight  reduces,  the  aircraft  will  gradually  climb,  the  TAS  will  increase  and  so  will  the 
indicated Mach number (IMN).  When MNO is reached, the aircraft is then flown at this IMN.  During the 
ensuing climb, IAS will reduce and, up to the tropopause, so will TAS. 
6. 
Stepped Cruise.  Where ATC rules prevent a cruise climb, quadrantal heights will have to be flown.  
When  VNO  has  been  reached  in  the  level  cruise,  the  engines  would  have  to  be  throttled    (which  is 
undesirable) to prevent VNO being exceeded, or the aircraft climbed, using MCrpm.  In the stepped cruise 
technique,  a  level  cruise  at  the  nearest  quadrantal  above  the  VNO  stabilizing  altitude  is  flown  using 
MCrpm.  When the speed reaches VNO, the aircraft is climbed to the nearest quadrantal or semi-circular 
height where the IAS will be less than VNO.  Steps are made each time the speed reaches VNO or MNO. 
Wind Shear 
7. 
Turboprop  performance  is  considerably  affected  when  there  is  a  wind  shear  with  height  and  to 
obtain  maximum  economy  it  is  better  to  fly  the  aircraft  lower  than  optimum  altitude  in  a  high  speed 
cruise.    Usually,  unless  the  shear  is  greater  than  3  kt  per  1000  ft,  it  is  ignored.    Where  a  shear  in 
excess of this is experienced, information in the ODM for the aircraft gives the optimum altitudes to fly. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-6 - Turboprop Cruise Control 
Cruise Grid 
8. 
Cruise grids similar to that in Fig 1 are sometimes provided in ODMs.  These grids are produced from 
flight trials.  It will be noted that it is for a particular temperature condition and a whole set of graphs would be 
produced for temperature variations above and below ISA conditions.  The diagram shows variation in SAR 
against TAS for changes in weight and associated altitudes.  From such diagrams the range performance of 
a turboprop aircraft can be determined for a large number of cruise conditions. 
2-6 Fig 1 Cruise Grid 
35,000 kg
.26
40,000
Given : 
40,000
         Aircraft 
         MCrpm
.24
         ISA
45,000
.22
35,000
e
g
n
)
a
g
R
k
p
Altitude (ft)
.20
55,000
ific
m
c
n
e
(a
30,000
p
S
AUW (kg)
.18
65,000
25,000
.16
75,000
20,000
85,000
.14
M  = 0.6
NO
V  = 258 kt
NO
300
320
340
360
400
TAS (kt)
Climb and Descent 
9. 
Climb.    The  turboprop  aircraft,  unlike  the  pure  jet  aircraft,  is  not  climbed  at  the  maximum  rate 
possible to achieve the best range.  The aircraft is climbed at a speed which is a compromise between 
those which give the best rate of climb at the best range, and is one which gives good fuel ratio.  The 
correct climb speed for a particular aircraft type can be obtained from the appropriate ODM. 
10.  Descent.  The principle for the turboprop descent is similar to that for the pure jet, i.e. the cruising 
altitude is maintained for as long as possible followed by a rapid descent with the engines at minimum 
power, aiming to arrive over the destination airfield at a height from which a circuit and landing can be 
made.    In  practice,  the  rate  of  descent  may  be  limited  by  such  considerations  as  ATC  restrictions, 
passenger comfort and use of sufficient engine rpm to maintain aircraft services. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
CHAPTER 7 - PISTON RANGE AND ENDURANCE 
FLYING FOR RANGE 
Introduction 
1. 
To  cover  the  greatest  air  distance  on  the  fuel  available,  the  airframe,  engine  and  propeller  of  a 
piston engine aircraft must all operate at their most efficient settings.  Since an aircraft is rarely flown to 
its  limit  of  range,  the  term  'flying  for  range'  is  normally  used  to  indicate  maximum  fuel  economy over 
any  flight  stage.    Although  financial  economy  is  desirable,  the  main  requirement  is  that  of  maximum 
fuel reserve at the end of a flight stage for use during possible holds or diversions. 
2. 
For every aircraft there is an Indicated Airspeed (IAS) at which the total drag, and the power required 
from the engine to counteract this drag, is least.  The propeller converts power into thrust (equal to total drag) 
but always with some conversion losses which are at a minimum when the propeller is operating at its best 
setting.  When these requirements are satisfied, the maximum number of air nautical miles per kg of fuel is 
obtained. 
3. 
For reasons outlined later in this chapter, the pilot may be unable to achieve this ideal condition, and 
may not, therefore, be able to obtain maximum fuel economy.  However, guidance is given in the Aircrew 
Manual or Operating Data Manual (ODM) on handling each type of aircraft.  Graphs or tables are supplied 
from which the best speed, height and engine settings for the particular sortie can be determined. 
Derivation of Range Speed 
4. 
The  greatest  fuel  economy  is  not  obtained  by  flying  as  slowly  as  possible,  since  high  power  is 
needed to fly at very low air speeds owing to the large amount of lift dependent drag.  The level flight 
speed  produced  by  using  minimum  power  is  also  unsuitable  since  the  resulting  low  speed  is 
uneconomical in terms of distance travelled per kg of fuel used. 
5. 
It will be shown that maximum range in level flight at a certain all-up-weight (AUW) is obtained at 
the  IAS  at  which  the  total  drag  is  least  (provided  that  the  correct  engine  and  propeller  settings  are 
used).  On a given flight, assuming that the fuel consumption depends on the power setting to obtain 
the desired IAS, and the time during which this setting is used, then for a given IAS: 
Fuel used per hour ∝ Drag × TAS 
Therefore, for a given distance (time) total fuel used can be expressed as: 
Power × Time ∝ Drag × TAS × Time 
∴  Power × Time ∝ Drag × Distance 
Thus, the less the drag the less the fuel used for a given distance and, also, the greater the distance flown 
on  a  fixed  quantity  of  fuel.    Since  the  total  drag  depends  on  the  TAS  there  is  only  one  speed  at  which 
minimum drag is realized in level flight - this is the speed for maximum range. 
Airframe Considerations 
6. 
Variation of Total Drag.  The total drag for a particular aircraft configuration varies with air speed 
and  angle  of  attack.    These  are  interrelated  as  shown  in  Fig  1  (sea  level  total  drag  curve  for  a 
hypothetical  aircraft,  plotted  against  TAS  which,  in  this  case,  is  also  IAS).    Minimum  total  drag  is 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
obtained at an IAS of 150 kt which is, therefore, the optimum range speed for this aircraft.  Below this 
speed  the  lift  dependent  drag  associated  with  the  high  angle  of  attack  increases  the  total  drag;  at  a 
higher speed zero lift drag rises steeply, despite the smaller angle of attack. 
2-7 Fig 1 Derivation of Range Speed 
g
ra
lD
ta
o
T
VIMD
100
150
250
TAS (IAS) kts
Angle of Attack
L
L
L
L Ratio
D++
D
D
D++
D
Range Speed 150 kts
Lift
7. 
Ratio.    Assuming  that  the  AUW  remains  constant,  the  lift  in  level  flight  follows  suit.  
Drag
Although  the  lift  remains  constant,  the  manner  in  which  it  is  obtained  changes  with  speed.    At  low 
Lift  L 
speeds  the  angle  of  attack  is  increased,  drag  rises  and  produces  a  poor  value  of 
  , a ratio 
Drag  D 
which  gives  a  direct  indication  of  the  aerodynamic  efficiency  of  the  airframe.    The  ratio  also 
deteriorates  at  high  speeds  and,  in  consequence,  maximum  range  is  obtained  at  the  angle  of  attack 
L
L
giving  the  best  ratio  of 
.    In  flight,  the  pilot  is  unlikely  to  know  the 
  ratio  but,  by  flying  at  the 
D
D
L
recommended IAS for best 
 ratio the ideal flight condition is achieved.  This is VIMD. 
D
8. 
Recommended Range Speed.  In practice, a piston-engine aircraft is flown for range at a speed 
slightly faster than VIMD for two reasons: 
a. 
Because  of  the  shallow  slope  of  the  total  drag  curve  in  the  region  of  minimum  drag,  the 
TAS
variation  in 
  (inversely  ∝  drag,  see  para  5)  at  speeds  close  to  VIMD  is  negligible  and  a 
Power
slightly higher speed will allow a faster flight with no appreciable loss of range. 
b. 
When flying at VIMD, any turbulence or manoeuvre will result in loss of lift and height.  This loss 
can  only  be  regained  by  the  application  of  more  power  and  consequent  fuel  wastage.    A  slightly 
higher speed ensures a margin for such events. 
Piston-engine  aircraft  are,  therefore,  normally  flown  at  a  recommended  range  speed  which  is  some 
10% higher than VIMD. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
9. 
Effect  of  Altitude  on  Drag.    By  plotting  the  total  drag  against  TAS  for  various  altitudes,  curves 
similar to those in Fig 2 are obtained.  For the comparatively low performance of piston-engine aircraft 
(ie neglecting compressibility drag) it can be accepted that for a given IAS, the drag remains the same 
at  all  altitudes,  although  the  TAS  corresponding  to  this  IAS  increases  progressively.    As  far  as  the 
airframe  is  concerned,  the  recommended  range  IAS  holds  good  at  any  altitude  and,  while  the  higher 
TAS results in more air miles for a given time at high altitude than at sea level, this advantage is not 
gained without cost.  The power required for a given IAS increases with altitude.  From para 5, it can 
be deduced that: 
Power Required ∝ Total Drag × TAS 
Accordingly, since the drag at the equivalent IAS remains constant with altitude, any increase in TAS 
can only be obtained by increasing the power output. 
2-7 Fig 2 Variation of Total Drag with Altitude 
Sea Level
10,000 ft
20,000 ft
g
ra
D
l
ta
o
T
TAS (IAS) kts
TAS
150kt  175kt
210kt
IAS
150kt  150kt
150kt
Range Speed
150 kts
10.  Effect  of  Wind.    For  any  aircraft  flying  at  the  recommended  range  speed,  the  greater  range  for 
the  fuel  available  will  be  achieved  by  flying  downwind.    However,  it  is  rare  that  the  wind  is  blowing 
consistently in the direction required.  During an 'out and home' flight in given wind conditions, the total 
fuel used is greater than that used on the same flight in still air.  This is due to the greater number of air 
miles  flown.    This  is  explained  in  Table  1  by  reference  to  the  'out  and  home'  flight  of  a  hypothetical 
aircraft with the following operating data: 
TAS at Range IAS  
 
 
 
130 kt 
Flight Distance 
 
 
 
 
2 × 100 nm 
Fuel Consumption (Range Speed) 
150 kg/hr 
Flight Conditions:   
 
 
a. 
Still Air 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
b. 
50 kt Headwind 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
c. 
50 kt Tailwind 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
Table 1 Effect of Wind 
a.  Still Air (out and home)
Flight Distance 
200 nm total 
Ground Speed 
130 kt 
Flight Time 
92 mins (1.54 hrs) 
Fuel Used 
231 kg 
Air Miles Covered 
200 nm (130 × 1.54) 
b.  Into 50 kt Headwind (Outbound)
Flight Distance 
100 nm 
Ground Speed 
80 kt 
Flight Time 
75 mins (1.25 hrs) 
Fuel Used 
187.5 kg 
Air Miles Covered 
162.5 nm (130 × 1.25) 
c.  In 50 kt Tailwind (Inbound)
Flight Distance 
100 nm 
Ground Speed 
180 kt 
Flight Time 
33 mins (0.55 hrs) 
Fuel Used 
82.5 kg 
Air Miles Covered 
71.5 nm (130 × 0.55) 
Thus,  234  air  miles  will  be  flown  on  the  round  trip  in  windy  weather  against  200  air  miles  in  still 
conditions with the attendant increase in fuel consumption.  In this simple example the added distance 
translates into the consumption of an additional 39 kg of fuel. 
11.  Practical  Adjustments  for  Wind.    Nevertheless,  the  difference  due  to  wind  is  quite  small.  
Unless a headwind consistently exceeds 25% of the TAS or a tailwind 33% of TAS, no adjustment to 
range  speed  should  be  made.    If  the  Aircrew  Manual  gives  no  advice  to  the  contrary  and  range  is 
critical, it may be beneficial to increase the recommended range speed by 5% in headwinds above 50 
kt and reduce the speed by 5% in tailwinds over 50 kt.  Any greater increase in speed also increases 
drag  and  the  fuel  consumption  disproportionately.    Any  greater  decrease  brings  manoeuvrability 
difficulties which are described in para 8b. 
12.  Effect of Changes in All-up Weight.  An increase in AUW requires a corresponding increase in 
CL  to  maintain  level  flight.    This  imposes  a  similar  change  in  the  lift  dependent  drag.    Since  this 
component of total drag varies with C 2
L  (or weight2 ) (see Volume 1, Chapter 5), a change in AUW will 
alter the point where the lift dependent and zero lift drag curves cross and so change VIMD.  Thus, an 
increase in AUW reduces the range and, more importantly, any reduction in AUW will improve range. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
2-7 Fig 3 Effect of Weight on Drag Curves 
Lift Dependent
Drag High Weight
Total
Total
Drag
Drag
High
Low
Weight
Weight
g
ra
Zero Lift
D
Drag
Lift Dependent
Drag Low Weight
V
VIMD
IAS
IMD
1
W
2
W
Summary of Airframe Considerations 
13.  Airframe considerations can be summarized as follows: 
a. 
Maximum range is obtained at the IAS for minimum drag. 
b. 
Total drag at a given IAS is constant at all altitudes. 
c. 
The TAS corresponding to the range IAS increases with altitude. 
d. 
The power required for a given IAS increases with altitude. 
L
e. 
The IAS is the pilot’s guide to the attitude giving the best angle of attack and 
 ratio. 
D
Engine Considerations 
14.  Power.    The  power  output  of  a  piston  engine  is  normally  measured  in  kilowatts  (kW)  although 
references  will  still  be  seen  to  the  earlier  term,  brake-horse-power  (BHP)  (1  BHP  =  746  watts).    The 
power delivered depends upon the weight of fuel consumed.  This weight is largely dependent on: 
a. 
The pressure of fuel/air mixture fed to the engine, known as manifold air pressure (MAP). 
b. 
The rate at which this mixture flows into the engine.  This rate is governed by the crankshaft 
speed (RPM). 
15.  Full Throttle Height.  With  increasing  altitude  the  power  available  falls  steadily.    At  the  same 
time,  power  required  has  been  rising  steadily  with  altitude  owing  to  the  factors  outlined  in  para  9.  
Eventually,  an  altitude  is  reached  at  which  the  power  available  is  just  equal  to  the  power  required  to 
give  range  IAS.    For  the  set  engine  and  speed  conditions,  this  is  called  the  full-throttle  height  and 
produces the best range. 
16.  Fuel Economy.  Fuel consumption may be measured in 2 ways: 
a.
Gross Fuel Consumption (GFC) (kg fuel used per hour) The GFC varies with the power 
output  and,  therefore,  for  a  fixed-pitch  propeller,  with  RPM.    The  case  of  the  constant-speed 
propeller  is  more  involved,  since  the  power  output  depends  on  both  throttle  and  propeller  pitch 
setting.  In general, for a given throttle setting, the power output is proportional to the RPM.  A certain 
power output may be obtained, for instance, by using: 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
(1)  High RPM, low MAP and, hence, a small throttle opening. 
(2)  Medium RPM and MAP giving a larger throttle opening. 
(3)  Low RPM, high MAP and full throttle. 
The  best  fuel  economy  would  result  from  the  last  case  owing  to  the  reduced  number  of  engine 
working  strokes  per  minute,  associated  with  the  higher  volumetric  efficiency  gained  from  a  high 
MAP.    Other  mechanical  considerations,  such  as  a  possibly  improved  propeller  efficiency  at  low 
RPM, add to this effect. 
b. 
Specific  Fuel Consumption (SFC) (kg fuel used per kW of engine power per hour).  If 
the power output of an engine were always constant then its efficiency could be measured purely 
by  observing  its  GFC.    However,  the  power  output  of  an  aircraft  varies  considerably  as,  for 
example, when the weight, and hence the drag, reduce in flight.  So, another term, which relates 
the  power  output  to  the  fuel  used,  has  to  be  found.    The  term  for  this  ratio  is  specific  fuel 
consumption (SFC) and, for a piston engine, is given by: 
GFC
SFC = Power
SFC is best at a minimum and is dependent upon the following factors: 
(1)  MAP and RPM.  As mentioned in para 16a, there is a choice of MAP and RPM settings 
which  can  provide  the  same  power  output.    High  MAP  and  low  RPM  give  minimum  SFC 
because: 
(a)  Friction and inertia losses are low. 
(b)  Engine driven services absorb minimum power. 
(c)  Volumetric efficiency is better. 
(2)  Altitude.    As  altitude  increases  up  to  full  throttle  height,  the  SFC  falls  (improves)  for 
three reasons: 
(a)  Progressively less throttling of the engine is needed. 
(b)  Progressively  less  useful  power  is  expended  in  exhausting  the  spent  mixture 
against the ambient air pressure. 
(c)  The colder air contributes to a greater rise in temperature within the engine, which 
is a measure of thermal efficiency. 
(3)  Temperature.    In  cold air, at a particular altitude, the RPM may be reduced to provide 
the power required because: 
(a)  The power available from the engine is greater. 
(b)   The power required to propel the airframe in cold air is less. 
The colder the temperature, therefore, the lower will be the SFC because the power absorbed 
(wasted) at the lower temperature is reduced and the thermal efficiency is increased. 
(4)  Other  Factors.    The  use  of  carburettor  or  induction  warm  air  (decreased  air  density) 
and/or selection of induction air filtration (because the change in ram effect decreases MAP) 
will both increase (worsen) SFC. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
Summary of Engine Considerations 
17.  A piston aero-engine is able to produce the most efficient power output required in flight under the 
following conditions: 
a. 
Not more than maximum weak mixture MAP is set. 
b. 
Minimum RPM used. 
c. 
Aircraft at full throttle height. 
d. 
Carburettor intake or induction air to 'COLD' and air filter 'OUT'. 
Airframe/Engine Combination 
18.  Specific  Air  Range.    Specific  Air  Range  (SAR)  is  defined  as  air  distance  travelled  per  unit 
quantity of fuel, ie air nm per kg of fuel.  Thus: 
distance travelled
SAR =
fuel used
Clearly,  the  greater  the  SAR  the  greater  the  range.    Now,  if  the  above  expression  is  divided  top  and 
bottom by 'time', then: 
distance travelled
time
TAS
SAR =
×
=
time
fuel used
GFC . 
From para 16b , GFC  = Power × SFC, so: 
TAS
1
SAR =
×
Power
SFC
Therefore,  for  SAR  to  be  greatest  (best  range),  at  a  particular  weight,  in  still  air,  a  piston-engine  aircraft 
 TAS 
 1 
should be flown for a maximum product of airframe efficiency  
  and engine efficiency  
 . 
 Power 
 SFC 
19.  Design  Features.    By  calculating  the  total  drag  at  the  minimum  drag  speed  the  designer  can 
determine  the  power  (measured  in  kW)  required  to  obtain  this  speed.    A  propeller  is  then  selected 
which  absorbs  least  power  from  the  engine  in  producing  the  power  required  but,  even  under  ideal 
conditions,  the  propeller  efficiency  rarely  exceeds  about  80%.    Next,  the  designer  selects  an  engine 
which gives: 
a. 
Sufficient power for the take-off and the flight performance required. 
b. 
The required power for range speed, when using full throttle and minimum RPM. 
c. 
The lowest SFC when using range power. 
The  airframe  and  engine  are  carefully  matched  to  provide  the  best  combination  possible.  
Nevertheless, a compromise may have to be made on certain aircraft with specific roles. 
20.  Best  Altitude  for  Maximum  Range.    The  two  factors  concerned  with  the  determination  of  best 
altitude to obtain maximum range are: 
a. 
The power required at range IAS. 
b. 
The power available, at various altitudes, using full throttle and minimum RPM. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 7 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
Since,  with  increasing  altitude  the  power  available  falls,  an  altitude  is  found  at  which  the  power 
available is just equal to the power required to give range IAS, as explained in para 15 - this is the 
full  throttle  height  for  the  power  required  to  give  the  recommended range speed using minimum 
RPM and weak mixture and is called the Range Height. 
21.  Effect on Range of Varying the Cruising Altitude.
a. 
Flight  above  Recommended  AltitudeAs  altitude  increases  above  the  maximum  weak 
mixture MAP full throttle height for maximum range, the power required can only be achieved by 
increasing RPM.  In this case, the SFC will increase (deteriorate) because more useful power is 
absorbed within the engine. 
b. 
Flight  below  Recommended  Altitude.    Descending  from  the  recommended  altitude,  the 
power  available  increases.    Power  required,  on the other hand, falls steadily resulting in a growing 
power  surplus.    The  pilot  may  accept  the  higher  speed  obtained  (together  with  the  increased drag 
Lift
and deteriorating 
ratio) or close the throttle to maintain the recommended range IAS.  The first 
Drag
is much more acceptable since, not only is a higher cruising speed obtained, but the loss in range 
experienced is far less than that which would result from running the engine for a longer period at a 
severely throttled, and therefore uneconomical, setting. 
Procedure to Obtain Maximum Fuel Economy 
22.  Summarized  Procedure.    The  procedure  for  setting  a  piston-engine  aircraft  to  fly  for  maximum 
range by ensuring maximum fuel economy may be summarized as follows: 
a. 
Climb to the recommended altitude as described in the Aircrew Manual. 
b. 
Set the throttle fully open. 
c. 
Reduce the RPM until the recommended range IAS is obtained. 
d. 
If necessary, adjust the speed for prevailing wind conditions. 
e. 
Use weak mixture whenever possible. 
f. 
Use carburettor or induction cold air with filtration off. 
g. 
Reduce  drag  to  a  minimum  by  trimming  the  aircraft  correctly  after  ensuring  that  flaps, 
undercarriage or spoilers etc are retracted. 
FLYING FOR ENDURANCE 
Introduction 
23.  To keep an aircraft airborne for as long as possible on the fuel available, the IAS should be that at 
which the engine consumes least fuel.  Endurance (measured in hours) is obtained by dividing the fuel 
available (in kilograms) by the gross fuel consumption (GFC) (in kilograms per hour).  Since the GFC 
is  assumed  to  be  proportional  to  the  power  output,  maximum  fuel  economy  is  obtained  by  using  the 
level flight speed corresponding to the lowest power output of the engine. 
24.  This  speed  is  determined  by  the  aerodynamic  characteristics  of  the  airframe,  the  SFC  of  the 
engine at the power output required, the propeller efficiency and the AUW.  In practice, the speed may 
be modified by handling considerations. 
25.  The  actual  endurance,  being  a  function  of  AUW,  depends  on  the  altitude,  the  outside  air 
temperature and the external condition of the aircraft itself.  Wind has no effect on endurance. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 8 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
Derivation of Endurance Speed 
26.  By  gradually  reducing  the  power  during  level  flight,  a  speed  and  power  is  eventually  reached  at 
which  the  aircraft  can  just  maintain  a  height  at  which  there  is  no  margin  of  control  for  handling 
purposes.    If  the  total  drag  and  TAS  are  known,  this  minimum  power  may  easily  be  calculated  since 
power = total drag × TAS.  Assuming the fuel consumption in kilograms per hour to be proportional to 
the power output, the speed for minimum power gives maximum endurance. 
27.  It is interesting to note that at this low speed the drag is greater than when flying at range speed 
(which  is  higher),  while  the  power  output  is  less.    This  is because the power depends on two factors 
(drag and airspeed) which alter when power is reduced, but not in proportion.  It can be seen from Fig 
4 that an appreciable reduction can be made in the speed for minimum drag (ie the ideal range speed) 
without incurring any large increase in drag.  The overall effect is a reduction in the product of the two 
factors, although drag has increased and speed decreased. 
2-7 Fig 4 Variation of Total Drag with Speed 
g
ra
D
l
ta
o
T
TAS (kt)
28.  Although  the  theory  is  sound,  flight  at  the  speed  for  minimum  power  is  less  than  practicable 
since all ability to manoeuvre disappears and engine handling problems arise.  For these reasons a 
margin  of  speed  is  added  to  improve  manoeuvrability,  resulting  in  a  slightly  higher  recommended 
endurance  speed  which  should  be  maintained  within  plus  or  minus  five  knots.    Endurance  speed 
may be defined as: 
The  level  flight  speed  produced  by  the  use  of  minimum  power,  plus  a  margin  for  control  and 
manoeuvre. 
29.  From  the  power  required  curve  for  a  typical  aircraft  shown  at  Fig  5,  the  best  endurance  speed 
would appear to be 100 kt.  However, the recommended endurance speed would be some 10 kt above 
this speed. 
2-7 Fig 5 Derivation of Endurance Speed 
)
Given:
W
(k
Aircraft Weight
d
Sea Level
ire
ISA
u
eq
R
r
Recommended
e
Endurance
w
o
Speed
P
Min Pow er R equired
Min
Min
Pow er
D rag
Speed
Speed
50
100
150
200
250
TAS (kt)
Revised Mar 10   
Page 9 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
30.  It  should  be  recognized  that  the  recommended  IAS  for  endurance  is  considerably  higher  than  the 
minimum possible flight IAS.  There is a large rate of drag increase at the lower speeds as shown in Fig 4.  
To  overcome  this  drag,  flight  at  very  low  airspeeds  entails  the  use  of  power  much  higher  than  that 
required for maximum endurance.  Indeed, level flight is possible on some aircraft at speeds well below 
the power-off stalling speed. 
Factors Affecting Endurance 
31  Variation  in  AUW.    Since  speed  changes  are  obtained  by  varying  the  power,  it  follows  that  less 
power  is  required  for  the  reduced  IAS  associated  with  lower  weight  and  that  fuel  consumption  will  be 
proportional  to  the  weight  of  the  aircraft..    As  a  rule  of  thumb,  a  10%  reduction  in  AUW  increases 
endurance by about 7%. 
32.  Effect  of  Altitude.    In  level  flight,  maximum  endurance  decreases  with  increasing  altitude.  
Assuming  the  fuel  used  per  hour  to  be  proportional  to  the  power  used,  this  can  be  expressed  in  the 
following manner: 
Power Used = total drag × TAS 
For a given IAS the drag is the same at all altitudes but the corresponding TAS increases with height.  
It follows that the power required to maintain endurance speed increases with altitude, as does the fuel 
consumption, and endurance is therefore reduced.  Although maximum endurance is obtained at sea 
level, flight at this height is impractical particularly because safety height and other airspace rules have 
to be observed.  Nevertheless, the lowest practical altitude possible is recommended for endurance. 
33.  Effect  of  Additional  Drag.
Since  the  recommended  speed  must  be  maintained  to  provide 
adequate control and manoeuvrability, more power must be used to counteract extra drag arising from 
the carriage of external stores.  Endurance will be improved by any measures taken to ensure that the 
aircraft is aerodynamically clean; however, if such an increase in drag must be accepted, the best IAS 
is obtainable only at a higher power setting, thus reducing endurance. 
34.  Effect of Temperature Variation.  At high atmospheric temperatures the air density, the weight 
of the induction charge and, therefore, the power output, are all reduced.  To maintain a given IAS, an 
increase in MAP and/or RPM is necessary and there may be a considerable loss of endurance. 
Technique for Endurance Flying 
35.  The technique for endurance flying is as follows: 
a. 
Fly at the lowest, safe, practicable altitude. 
b. 
Adjust  the  throttle  and  RPM  to  give  the  recommended  endurance  speed  for  the  AUW  and 
maintain this speed within 5 knots. 
c. 
Use weak mixture, carburettor or injector cold air and air filter out of operation. 
d. 
Trim the aircraft correctly and reduce all possible drag such as that caused by flaps, stores 
etc. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 10 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
Comparison of Range and Endurance Speeds 
36.  Since  endurance  implies  minimum  power  and  range  implies  minimum  drag,  comparison  of  the 
two  recommended  speed  is  not  easy.    However,  both  speeds  may  be  identified  by  referring  to  Fig  6 
which  plots  power  required  against  TAS  for  a  given  aircraft.    The  endurance  speed,  ie  that  requiring 
minimum power, is found at the base of the power curve.  The range speed is that giving the highest 
TAS
ratio of 
 and may be found by drawing a tangent from the origin of the graph to the power curve.  
Power
The range speed occurs at the point of tangency. 
2-7 Fig 6 Relationship between Range and Endurance Speeds 
)
W
(k
d
ire
u
q
e
R
r
e
w
o
P
Endurance
Range
Speed
Speed
TAS (kt)
37.  It should be remembered that the recommended speeds for an aircraft are unlikely to match the 
ideal  because  they  take  account  of  individual  aircraft  characteristics,  manoeuvrability  requirements, 
altitude  considerations  and  the  like.    That  said,  in  general,  the  endurance  speed is about 80% of the 
range speed. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 11 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-7 - Piston Range and Endurance 
SUMMARY 
Piston Engine Range and Endurance Flying 
38.  Table 2 gives a summary of the factors affecting range and endurance in piston-engine aircraft. 
Table 2 Summary of Range and Endurance Flying - Piston-engine Aircraft 
RANGE
ENDURANCE
ON RANGE 
ENDURANCE 
ENDURANCE 
EFFECT OF
ON RANGE OBTAINED 
SPEED 
SPEED 
OBTAINED 
Maximum at Recommended 
Maximum at Sea 
ALTITUDE 
No effect. 
Range Height.  Reduced above 
No effect. 
Level. 
and below. 
Increase 5% in 
Reduced economy on round 
headwinds and 
flight into and downwind 
WIND 
decrease 5% in 
No effect. 
No effect. 
compared with round flight in still 
tailwinds over 
air. 
50 kt. 
Speed must be 
Reduced in 
Reduced in 
ADDITIONAL 
Reduced in proportion to drag 
maintained, even if 
cases of large 
proportion to 
DRAG 
increase. 
extra power is 
drag increment. 
additional drag. 
necessary. 
Range reduced in increased 
Endurance 
ATMOSPHERIC 
outside temperatures but offset 
reduced in 
No effect. 
No effect. 
TEMPERATURE 
by increased TAS owing to 
increased outside 
reduction in density. 
temperatures. 
The lower the 
The lower the 
Endurance 
VARIATION IN 
AUW, the lower 
Range increased as AUW is 
AUW, the lower the 
increased as 
ALL-UP WEIGHT  the Range 
reduced. 
Endurance Speed. 
AUW is reduced. 
Speed. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 12 of 12 

AP3456 – 2-8 - Density Altitude Effects 
CHAPTER 8 - DENSITY ALTITUDE EFFECTS 
Air Density 
1. 
Density  Altitude.    The  International  Standard  Atmosphere  (ISA)  (see  Volume  1,  Chapter  1) 
includes  in  its  definition  a  mean  sea  level  air  density  of  1.225  kg/m3.    Since  temperature  as  well  as 
pressure  affects  air  density,  and  therefore  aircraft  performance,  a  suitable  method  of  measuring  air 
density is required.  Although engineers express air density in terms of kg/m3, for aircraft operations it is 
more  convenient  to  express  it  as  density  altitude.    Density  altitude  is  defined  as  that  height  (above  or 
below  mean  sea  level)  in  the  standard  atmosphere  to  which  the  actual  density  at  any  particular  point 
corresponds.    For  standard  conditions  of  temperature  and  pressure,  density  altitude  is  the  same  as 
pressure altitude. 
2. 
Calculation of Density Altitude.  Density altitude can be calculated by several methods which include: 
a. 
Using the density altitude graph (Fig 1). 
b. 
Using  a  simple  computer  which  is  normally  provided  by  aircraft  manufacturers  for  specific 
aircraft types. 
c. 
Using the simple formula: 
Density Altitude = Pressure altitude + (120t), 
where t is the difference between local air temperature at pressure altitude and the standard 
temperature  for  the  same  pressure  altitude.    If  the  air  temperature  is  higher  than  standard, 
then (120t) is added to pressure altitude, if it is lower, subtracted. 
Variations in Surface Density 
3. 
Low Density.  When atmospheric pressure is low or air temperature is high (or a combination of 
both), the density of air is reduced and the density altitude at sea level becomes high.  For example, in 
the  Persian  Gulf  on  a  day  when  surface  temperature  is  45  ºC  and  sea  level  pressure  1003  mb, 
pressure altitude at the surface is +300 ft (10 mb  ×  30 ft per mb (see Volume 1, Chapter 1)).  Entering 
the  density  altitude  graph  (Fig  1)  at  +300  ft  pressure  altitude  and  correcting  for  45  ºC  OAT,  gives  a 
density altitude of 3,900 ft at the surface. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-8 - Density Altitude Effects 
2-8 Fig 1 Density Altitude Graph 
16
S
18000
tan
14
d
16000
ard
12
A
14000
tmo
Pressure Altitude (Feet)
12000
s
10
p
t)
h
e
e
10000
r
fe
8
e
0
0
8000
0
6
(1
e
6000
d
4
3900
4000
ltitu
A
2
2000
ity
300
s
n
e
0
D
Sea Level
-2
- 2000
-300
-2700
-4
-4000
-6
-6000
-8000
-8-50 -40 -30 -20 -10-5 0
10
20
30
40 45 50
o
Outside Air Temperature -  C (in Free Air)
4. 
High  Density.    When  low  air  temperatures  are  combined  with  high  atmospheric  pressure,  the 
density of air increases; this gives rise to low density altitude at sea level.  For example, on a winter’s 
day  in  Scotland  where  the  surface  temperature  is  –5  ºC  and  sea  level  pressure  is  1023  mb,  then 
pressure  altitude  at  the  surface  will  be  -300  ft.    Using  the  chart  at  Fig  1  shows  that  this  pressure 
altitude, corrected for OAT of –5 ºC, gives a density altitude of –2,700 ft at the surface. 
Effects of Density Altitude on Performance 
5. 
Low Density Altitude.  The effects of low density altitudes on aircraft handling and performance are 
entirely advantageous.  At –3,000 ft density altitude, less collective pitch will be required than at sea level 
in the standard atmosphere and less power will be required to drive the rotor.  Because of the increased 
performance, a careful check must be kept on payload to ensure maximum AUW is not exceeded. 
6. 
High  Density  Altitude.  The effects of high density altitudes on aircraft handling and performance 
must be fully appreciated by pilots.  More collective pitch will be required at high density altitudes than at 
sea level in the standard atmosphere, and more power will be required to overcome the extra rotor drag 
resulting  from  the  increase  in  pitch.    The  engine  power  may  well  be  limited  under  high  temperature 
conditions so that payload may have to be reduced to maintain an adequate performance margin. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-9 - Introduction to Scheduled Performance 
CHAPTER 9 - INTRODUCTION TO SCHEDULED PERFORMANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
Scheduled  performance  is  the  calculated  performance  of  an  aircraft  that,  when  used  for  planning 
purposes, delivers an acceptable level of safety.  It comprises the certified performance data scheduled in the 
Aircraft Flight Manual (or equivalent) and the regulations that govern its use.  The principle conditions of these 
regulations are: 
a. 
Aircraft  are  required  to  be  certified  to  ensure  that  they  can  proceed  safely  from  their  departure 
airfield  to  a  destination  airfield  carrying  sufficient  fuel  reserves  to  divert  to  a  suitable  alternate  airfield 
should a landing at destination not be possible.  
b. 
Certain  categories  of  aircraft  are  required  to  be  capable  of  sustaining  flight  following  an  engine 
failure such that a return to the point of departure, diversion to a suitable take-off alternate or continued 
flight to the nominated destination is possible. 
While  military  aircraft  are  not  subject  to  civil  regulations  (see  Para  7b),  it  has  been  directed  that  wherever 
possible, performance criteria that at least match civil regulations, should be applied to UK military aircraft (see 
Para 7c).  Each aircraft type is certified to a particular regulation in force at the time, and this regulation remains 
the basis for scheduled performance throughout the life of the type (see Para 22).  Thus the MOD has aircraft 
with  scheduled  performance  criteria  based  on  different  regulations.    The  following  paragraphs  describe  the 
regulations and how they are applied. 
Regulators 
2. 
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).   
On  7  December  1944,  the  majority  of  the 
world's  nations  became  signatories  to  the  "Chicago  Convention",  the  aim  of  which  was  to  assure  the  safe, 
orderly and economic development of air transport.  ICAO sets out, in the terms of the convention, the rules, 
regulations and requirements to which each signatory must adhere. 
3. 
Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).  The Civil Aviation Act 1982 is the UK’s means of discharging its ICAO 
responsibilities.  This duty is undertaken by the CAA and the Department for Transport (DfT). 
4. 
Joint Aviation Authority (JAA).  The  JAA  was  an  associated  body  representing  the  civil  aviation 
regulatory  authorities  of  a  number  of  European  States  who  had  agreed  to  co-operate  in  developing  and 
implementing  common  safety  regulatory  standards  and  procedures.  It  was  not  strictly  a  regulatory  body, 
regulation  being  achieved  through  the member authorities (CAA for UK), but regulations were issued in the 
form of Joint Aviation Requirements (JARs).
5. 
European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). 
In  Sep  2003,  EASA  took  over  responsibility  for  the 
airworthiness  and  environmental  certification  of  all  aeronautical  products,  parts  and  appliances  designed, 
manufactured, maintained or used by persons under the regulatory oversight of European Union (EU) Member 
States.    All  aircraft  type  certificates  are  therefore  issued  by  EASA  and  are  valid  throughout  the  EU.    The 
establishment of EASA created a Europe wide regulatory authority which has absorbed most functions of the 
JAA.  EASA  devolves  the  administration  of  the  certification  process  to  national  aviation  authorities.    In  the  UK 
these authorities are the DfT and the CAA, who have historically fulfilled this role. 
6. 
Military Aviation Authority (MAA). 
 
The  responsibility  for  the  certification  of  new  military  air 
systems rests with the MAA which has full oversight of all Defence aviation activity (see Para 7c).  
Revised Jan 14   
Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-9 - Introduction to Scheduled Performance 
Regulations 
7. 
Airworthiness Regulations. 
  Aircraft  may  be  put  into  one  of  two  groups;  EASA  regulated  aircraft 
and nationally regulated aircraft.  Thus, both EASA and the CAA publish regulations for the certification and 
operation of aircraft.  Regulations for UK military aircraft are also issued by the MAA. 
a. 
EASA publishes regulations through documents known as EU-Ops which are further explained 
in Certification Specifications (CSs).  The EASA regulations do not apply to military aircraft unless the 
aircraft is of a type for which a design standard has been adopted by EASA.  JARs (see Para 4) were 
issued before the establishment of EASA and have been transformed into EU-Ops. 
b. 
The  CAA  publishes  regulations  in  the  CAP  393  Air  Navigation:  The  Order  and  Regulations, 
generally referred to as the Air Navigation Order (ANO).  The ANO is law and provides legal definitions.  
It is comprised of Articles, which are individual points of law and Schedules which are implementation 
lists for Articles.  Article 252 of the ANO states that, with some exceptions, the ANO does not apply to 
military aircraft.  The ANO defines the meaning of military aircraft in Article 255 as: 
i. 
The naval, military or air force aircraft of any country. 
ii. 
Any  aircraft  being  constructed  for  the  naval,  military  or  air  force  of  any  country  under  a 
contract entered into by the Secretary of State. 
iii. 
Any aircraft for which there is in force a certificate issued by the Secretary of State that the 
aircraft is to be treated for the purposes of this Order as a military aircraft. 
c. 
UK  Military  Flying  is  regulated  by  the  MAA.    MAA01,  The  Military  Aviation Authority Regulatory 
Policy, states that: 
The  authority  to  operate  and  regulate  registered  UK  military  aircraft  is  vested  in  the  Secretary  of 
State  (SofS).  Notwithstanding  the  fact  that  the  majority  of  provisions  of  the  ANO  do  not  apply  to 
military aircraft, the Crown could be liable in common law if it were to operate its aircraft negligently, 
and  cause  injury  or  damage  to  property.  SofS’  instruction  to  Defence  is  that  where  it  can  rely  on 
exemptions or derogations from either domestic or international law, it is to introduce standards and 
management arrangements that produce outcomes that are, so far as is reasonably practicable, at 
least as good as those required by legislation. 
Thus military aircraft are provided with scheduled performance data, and for normal operations adopt the 
equivalent civilian regulations. Where for reasons of military necessity these regulations are relaxed, the 
authorization to do so is held at an appropriate level. 
8. 
The CAA also issues: 
a.  British  Civil  Airworthiness  Requirements  (BCARs)(CAP  553)  which  are  not  law  in  themselves,  but 
do  provide  information on how to comply with UK requirements, which are law.  BCARs are split into 
two volumes, one (Section A) relating to aircraft types where the CAA has primary type responsibility, 
and the other (Section B) relates to aircraft types where EASA has primary type responsibility.  BCARs 
detail the process that an aircraft has to go through to receive a Certificate of Airworthiness from the 
CAA.  The process involves a series of flight tests and the determination of a performance group (see 
Para 17).  Where EASA has primary responsibility for type certification, a performance category for an 
aircraft is also determined. 
b.  CAP  747,  Mandatory  Requirements  for  Airworthiness  is  the  means  by  which  airworthiness 
requirements made mandatory by the CAA are notified, and gives further information on EASA aircraft 
Revised Jan 14   
Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-9 - Introduction to Scheduled Performance 
and non-EASA aircraft. 
9. 
Fig  1  diagramatically  summarizes  the  regulatory  process.    The  appropriate  Regulator  determines  the 
Regulations  which  the  aircraft  designer  and  manufacturer  follow  to  receive  certification.    The  operator 
adheres  to  the  Regulations  and  Directives  of  the  Regulator,  with  some  exceptions  in  the  case  of  military 
aircraft (see Paras 11 to 13). 
2-9 Fig 1 The Regulatory Process 
        REGULATOR
          REGULATIONS
Civil Aviation Authority (CAA)
British Civil Airworthiness Requirements (BCARs)
Military Aviation Authority (MAA)
MAA Regulatory Articles/Documents
FederalAviation Authority (FAA)
Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs)
Joint Aviation Authority (JAA)
Joint Aviation Regulatuions (JARs)
European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)
EU-Ops / EASA Ops
AIRCRAFT
OPERATOR
DESIGN and 
MANUFACTURE
Performance Planning 
10.  Before  a  flight,  aircrew  have  to  make  performance  calculations  to  ensure  that  their  flight  is 
achievable within the regulations that their aircraft  has been certified for. Operating Data Manuals 
(ODM)  (see  Volume  2,  Chapter  16)  or  their  electronic  equivalent  use  Performance  Graphs  and 
Charts  to  allow a maximum take off weight to be calculated for any given flight. These graphs and 
charts are derived in the following way: 
a.  Expected Performance.   
Wind  tunnel  tests  and  computer  predictions  are  used  to  check  if 
an aircraft meets its design specification in terms of its expected performance. 
b.  Measured Performance.  
Measured  performance  is  the  average  performance  of  an 
aeroplane or group of aeroplanes being tested by an acceptable method in specified conditions.
c.  Gross Performance
The gross performance is such that the performance of any aeroplane 
of the type, measured at any time, is at least as likely to exceed Gross Performance as not.
d.  Net Performance. 
This  represents  the  Gross  Performance  factored  by  the  amount  considered 
necessary to allow for various contingencies. These contingencies take into account: 
i.  Unavoidable variations in piloting technique (i.e. temporary below average performance). 
ii.  An aircraft performing below the fleet average. 
iii.  Unexpected need to manoeuvre from the planned flight profile (e.g. to avoid birds). 
e.  Safety Factor.  The difference between Net and Gross performance (the safety factor) may vary 
from 10% to 40% depending on the stage of flight and the statistical chance of an accident; 1 in 
10,000,000 is considered to be an acceptable risk. It is a legal requirement that all performance 
planning  should  be  conducted  to  net  performance  considerations  with  the  exception  of  Military 
Operating Standards (MOS) data (Para 13). 
Revised Jan 14   
Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-9 - Introduction to Scheduled Performance 
11.  Normal Operating Standard (NOS). When  military  flights  operate  within  the  bounds  of  Net 
Performance  as  laid  down  by  the  relevant  authority  they  are  considered  to  be  operating  to  NOS.    The 
aircraft ODM contains data relating to NOS. 
12.  Reduced Operating Standard (ROS).  Operators may in certain circumstances permit a flight that requires a 
reduction in the safety factor that net performance applies. The aircraft ODM may contain data relating to ROS. 
13.  Military Operating Standard (MOS).  
 
There may be instances when maintaining NOS or ROS safety 
measures  means  that  a  military  task  is  not  possible.  In  certain  circumstances,  and  only  for  operational 
reasons, Senior Commanders may authorise specific tasks to be conducted using a higher lever of risk than 
that  for  the  NOS.  In  the  extreme  case,  the  highest  level  of  risk  will  be  where  the  aircraft  is  authorized  to 
operate  to  Gross  Performance  limits  alone,  with  no  additional  safety  factorisation.  Depending  upon 
circumstances,  ROS  may  be  appropriate  instead  of  MOS;  here  the  level  of  acceptable  risk  would  be 
factored  to  lie  somewhere  between  Net  and  Gross  values.    The aircraft ODM may contain data relating to 
MOS. 
14.  Performance Data. Performance  data,  presented  mainly  in  graphical  form,  is  derived  from  a  statistical 
analysis of test flights made to determine Gross Performance for each of the four stages of flight under 
varying  conditions  of  weight,  temperature,  airfield  altitude,  runway  slope and wind. Analysis is made for 
one  or  two  power  unit  inoperative  cases.  Gross  Performance  is  then  suitably  factored  to  allow  for 
contingencies which cannot be accounted for operationally. 
15.  The Performance Plan.  The performance plan is part of any flight plan and is concerned solely with the safety 
of the aeroplane. It determines that the aircraft can: 
a.  Take  off  safely  within  the  runway  length  available  and  with  enough  distance  remaining  to 
abandon a take off if required. 
b.  Climb, after take off, to a safe height missing any obstacles by a prescribed horizontal or vertical 
margin. 
c.  Carry  enough  fuel  to  transit  to  the  destination  with  sufficient  fuel  reserves  to  divert  to  a  suitable 
alternate  airfield  should  a  landing  at  destination  not  be  possible.  For  long  distance  flights  the  fuel 
load  may  need  to  be  increased  by  an  additional  amount,  known  as  contingency  fuel,  to  cater  for 
unforeseen events such as weather avoidance. 
d.  Descend and land at the destination or alternate aerodrome coming to a complete halt within the 
runway distance available. 
16.  All of these factors will determine the maximum All Up Weight (AUW) at take off. 
Performance Groups 
17.  It is the duty of the licensing authority (EASA or CAA) to ensure that no aeroplane is granted a Certificate 
of Airworthiness (C of A) until it has been shown that it can satisfy the conditions laid down in the relevant 
regulations. 
Demonstration  of  performance  capability  allows  the  certification  of  an  aeroplane  type  into  one  of  several 
Performance  Groups.  Whilst  military  aircraft  are  not  subject  to  the  civil  regulations,  it  is  intended  that 
wherever possible, military aircraft should be operated to at least the same performance standards as civil 
aircraft (see Para 7c). 
Revised Jan 14   
Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-9 - Introduction to Scheduled Performance 
18.  Notwithstanding  the  above  statement,  situations  of  such  urgency  may  arise  that,  in  order  to  utilize 
medium sized and large military aeroplanes to their maximum potential, reduced safety margins are both 
necessary and acceptable (see Paras 11 to 13).  Combat aeroplanes are not operated to any scheduled 
performance  requirements  because  to  do  so  would  reduce  their  operational  efficiency.    An  element  of 
risk  is  acceptable  in  the  operation  of  these  aircraft  and  it  is  an  MAA  responsibility  to  define  and  apply 
appropriate safety margins.  
19.  The  EASA  performance  groups  are  described  in  the  following  sub-paragraphs  and  the  performance 
requirements that each aircraft are required to meet are detailed in the relevant EASA CS document.  CS 
25 details the requirements for large aircraft which are classified into either Performance Group A or C.  
CS  23  details  the  requirements  for  normal,  utility,  aerobatic  and  commuter  category  aircraft  which  are 
classified into Performance Group B. 
a.  Performance  Group  A.    Multi-engine  aeroplanes  powered  by  turbo  propeller  engines  with  a 
maximum  approved  passenger seating configuration of more than 9 or a maximum take-of mass 
exceeding  5,700  kg  (12,500  lb),  and all multi-engine turbojet powered aeroplanes.  Aircraft in this 
class can sustain an engine failure in any phase of flight between the commencement of the take 
off  run  and  the  end  of  the  landing  run  without  diminishing  safety  below  an  acceptable  level.    A 
forced landing should not be necessary because of performance considerations. 
b.  Performance  Group  B.    Propeller  driven  aeroplanes  with  a  maximum  approved  passenger 
seating configuration of 9 or less and a maximum take-off mass of 5,700 kg (12,500 lb) or less.  
Any  twin  engined  aircraft  in  this  class  that  cannot  attain  the  minimum  climb  standards  as 
specified in CS23 (see para 20) shall be treated as a single engined aeroplane. 
c.  Performance  Group  C.    Aeroplanes  powered  by  reciprocating  engines  with  a  maximum 
approved  passenger  seating  configuration  of  more  than  nine  or  a  maximum  take-off  mass 
exceeding  5,700  kg  (12,500  lb).    Aircraft  in  this  class  are  able  to  operate  from  contaminated 
surfaces  and  are  able  to  suffer  an  engine  failure  in any phase of flight without endangering the 
aeroplane. 
d.  Unclassified Aircraft. 
Where  full  compliance  with  the  requirements  of  the  appropriate 
regulations  cannot  be  shown  due  to  specific  design  characteristics  (e.g.  supersonic  aeroplanes 
or  seaplanes),  the  operator  shall  apply  approved  performance  standards  that  ensure  a  level  of 
safety equivalent to that of the appropriate regulations.  The manner in which a particular aircraft 
type is to be flown, the purpose for which it may be used and the absolute maximum TOW are 
specified  in  the  Flight  manual  and  ODM.    These  are  issued  as  part  of  the  Certificate  of 
Airworthiness. 
20.  The CAA also publishes the requirements for aircraft performance groups in Schedule 1 of Regulation 8 
in the ANO.  The ANO gives data for performance groups A, B, C, D, E, F, X and Z.  Groups A and B are 
combined and have the same requirements.  All aircraft of relevance to this chapter fit into either group A 
or C. 
a.  Performance Group A.  Aeroplanes  with  a  maximum  certificated  take  off  weight  exceeding 
5,700 kg (12,500 lb) and with a performance level such that at whatever time a power unit fails, a 
forced landing should not be necessary. 
b.  Performance Group C.  Aeroplanes with a maximum certificated take off weight not exceeding 
5,700  kg  (12,500  lb)  and  with  a  performance  level  such  that  a  forced  landing  should  not  be 
necessary if an engine fails after take off and initial climb. 
Revised Jan 14   
Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-9 - Introduction to Scheduled Performance 
Performance Planning Considerations 
21.  It  is  important  to  note  that  certification  regulations  are  subject  to  periodic  revision  in  the  light  of 
experience  and  improved  techniques,  but  it  is  not  always  possible  to  modify  aeroplane  performance 
capabilities  to  comply  with  such  amendments.    When  dealing  with  a  specific  aeroplane  type,  therefore, 
reference  must  be  made  to  the  ODM  to  ascertain  the  date  of  the  regulations  to  which  the  aeroplane  is 
certificated. For example, the Royal Air Force operates the King Air B200 Classic and King Air B200 GT 
aircraft, which are basically the same aircraft type with different flight deck instruments.  They also have 
different  engines,  but  with  the  same  power  output.    The  King  Air  B200  Classic  operates  to  CAA 
regulations  and  is  placed  in  Performance  Group  C.    The  King  Air  B200  GT,  which  was  introduced  into 
service some four years after the King Air B200 Classic, operates to EASA regulations and is placed in 
Performance Group B.  Once an aircraft has been certified, it cannot be re-certified.  As a result, the RAF 
King  Air  aircraft  types  operate  to  different  performance  group  requirements.    It  is  still  mandatory, 
however, to comply with the latest Air Navigation Regulations. 
22.  For the purpose of performance planning a flight is divided into four stages: 
a.  Take-off.  The take-off stage is from the commencement of the take-off run and includes initial 
climb up to a screen height of 35 ft (this can be 50 ft for aircraft not certified to Perf A). 
b.  Take-off Net Flight Path.  The take-off net flight path extends from a height of 35 ft (or 50 ft) to 
a height of 1,500 ft above the aerodrome. 
c.  En Route.  The en route stage extends from a height of 1,500 ft above the departure aerodrome 
to  a  height  of  1,500  ft  above  the  destination  or  alternate  aerodrome  or,  in  extreme  adverse 
circumstances, any suitable aerodrome. 
d.  Landing.    The  landing  stage  extends  from  a  height  of  1,500  ft  at  the  destination,  or  alternate 
aerodrome, to the point where the aeroplane comes to a stop after completing the landing run. 
23.  Aeroplane  operators  deduce  the  most  restrictive  take-off  weight  from  the  net  performance  data  after 
consideration of: 
a.  Structural limitation (C of A limit) for take-off and landing. 
b.  Weight, altitude and temperature (WAT) limit for take-off and landing. 
c.  Departure aerodrome criteria (runway lengths, slopes etc). 
d.  Take-off net flight path. 
e.  En route. 
f. 
Landing aerodrome criteria at destination or alternate aerodrome. 
Revised Jan 14   
Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-9 - Introduction to Scheduled Performance 
Table 1 
Performance Categories of Multi-engined Medium and Large Military Aircraft Operated by UK Forces. 
Performance 
Aircraft Type 
Regulator 
Regulations
Notes 
Category 
Atlas A-400M 
EASA 
EU Ops 

Military performance spec 
Air Seeker RJ 
FAA 
Boeing Mil Spec
MIL-M-007700 
similar to Perf A 
Aircraft originally certified  to 
Avenger T1 
MAA 
MARs 

FAA 14 CFR part 23 
Avro RJ100 
CAA 
BCARs 

BAe146-100 CCMk2 
CAA 
BCARs 

BAe146-200 QC Mk3 
CAA 
BCARs 

Military performance spec 
C17 
FAA 
Boeing Mil Spec
MDC S001/2 
similar to Perf A 
Defender BN2T 
CAA 
BCARs 

MAA  require  all  aircraft  to  be 
Hercules C130-J (Mk 4/5) 
MAA 
MARs 

certified to relevant DefStan. 
ROS / MOS outside of Perf A 
HS 125-700 CC Mk3 
CAA 
BCARs 

Islander AL1 
CAA 
BCARs 

Islander CC2 
CAA 
BCARs 

KC-30 Voyager 
EASA 
EU Ops 

King Air B200 
CAA 
BCARs 

King Air B200-GT 
EASA 
EU Ops 

Sentinel R1 
FAA  
FARs 

FAR 25 
Military performance spec 
Sentry AEW Mk1 
FAA 
Boeing Mil Spec
MIL-M-7700B 
similar to Perf A 
Aircraft originally certified  to 
Shadow R1 
MAA 
MARs 

FAA 14 CFR part 23 
Subsidiary performance 
Tristar C Mk2 
CAA 
BCARS 

derived from  FAA and CAA 
data 
Subsidiary performance 
Tristar K Mk1 / KC Mk1  
CAA 
BCARS 

derived from  FAA and CAA 
data 
Revised Jan 14   
Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-10 - Definition of Terms 
CHAPTER 10 - DEFINITION OF TERMS 
Introduction 
1. 
Performance  planning  necessitates  the  introduction  of  certain  terms,  which  enable  the  aeroplane 
performance  to  be  related  to  such  factors  as  aerodrome  dimensions,  maximum  landing  and  take-off 
weights etc.  The definitions given below cover the terms used in this section on scheduled performance. 
Field Lengths 
2. 
Take-off Run Available (TORA).  TORA is the length of runway which is declared by the State to 
be  available  and  suitable  for  the  ground  run  of  an  aeroplane  taking  off.    This,  in  most  cases, 
corresponds to the physical length of the runway pavement (ICAO). 
3. 
Stopway.  Stopway is a defined rectangular area on the ground, at the end of a runway, in the direction 
of take-off, designated and prepared by the Competent Authority as a suitable area in which an aeroplane 
can be stopped in the case of an interrupted take-off (ICAO).  The width is the same as the runway. 
4. 
Accelerate  Stop  Distance  Available  (ASDA).    ASDA  is  the  length  of  the  take-off  run  available 
plus  the  length  of  stopway  available  (if  stopway  is  provided)  (ICAO).    Older ODMs may use the term 
Emergency Distance Available (EMDA). 
5. 
Clearway.    Clearway  is  a  defined  rectangular  area,  300  ft  or  90  metres  either  side  of  the 
centreline,  on  the  ground  or  water  at  the  end  of  the  runway,  in  the  direction  of  take-off  and  under 
control  of  the  Competent  Authority,  selected  or  prepared  as  a  suitable area over which an aeroplane 
may make a portion of its initial climb to a specified height (ICAO). 
6. 
Take-off Distance Available (TODA).  TODA is the length of the take-off run available plus the 
length of the clearway available (if clearway is provided) (ICAO).  TODA is not to exceed 1.5 × TORA. 
7. 
Balanced  Field  Length.    When  the  ASDA  is  equal  to  the  TODA,  this  is  known  as  a  'balanced 
field'.    Some  early  ODMs  have  simplified  graphs  to  solve the take-off problem when a balanced field 
exists.  If these graphs are used to solve an unbalanced field (by reducing TODA to equal ASDA) then 
a weight penalty will be incurred. 
8. 
Unbalanced Field Length.  When the ASDA and TODA are different lengths, this is known as an 
'unbalanced  field'.    By  taking  into  account  the  varying  amounts  of  stopway  and  clearway,  the  highest 
possible take-off weight for field length considerations will be obtained. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-10 - Definition of Terms 
2-10 Fig 1 Take-off Performance Terminology 
V
V
1
R
V2
One Power Unit
Inoperative
35 ft
All Engines
TORA
ASDA
TODA
(Max 1.5    TORA)
Clearway
90 m
Runway
Stopway
90 m
Speeds 
9. 
Indicated Air Speed (IAS) IAS is the reading on the pitot-static airspeed indicator installed in the 
aeroplane, corrected only for instrument error. 
10.  Calibrated  Air  Speed  (CAS).    CAS  is  IAS  corrected  for  pressure  error.    The  pressure  error 
correction (PEC) can be obtained from the ODM for the type. 
11.  Equivalent Air Speed (EAS).  EAS is CAS corrected for compressibility. 
12.  True Air Speed (TAS).  TAS is the true airspeed of the aircraft relative to the undisturbed air.  It is 
obtained by correcting the EAS for density. 
13.  Decision  Speed  (V1).    V1  is  a  speed  above  which,  in  the  event  of  a  power  unit  failure,  take-off 
must  be  continued,  and  below  which  take-off  must  be  abandoned.    V1  depends  on  weight  and 
aerodrome  dimensions  and  is  the  most  important  product  of  performance  planning.    Its  calculation 
before every flight ensures that, in the event of a power unit failure, the pilot’s decision to abandon or 
continue  take-off  is  completely  objective.  (Note:  V1  must  not  be  less  than  VMCG  (see  para  21),  not 
greater than VR and not greater than VMBE (see para 26)). 
14.  Rotation Speed (VR).  VR is a speed used in the determination of take-off performance at which 
the pilot initiates a change in the attitude of the aeroplane with the intention of leaving the ground.  It is 
normally  a  function  of  aeroplane  weight  and  flap  setting,  but  it  can  vary  with  pressure  altitude  and 
temperature in some aeroplanes. 
15.  Unstick  Speed (VUS).  VUS is the speed that the main wheels leave the ground if the aircraft is 
rotated  about  its  lateral  axis  at  VR.    This  speed  is  a  function  of  flap  setting and aircraft weight and is 
sometimes known in civilian aviation circles as Lift-off Speed (VLOF). 
16.  Take-off Safety Speed (V2).  V2 is a speed used in the determination of take-off performance.  It 
is  a  legal  requirement  that  at  least  this  speed  should  be  attained  on  one  power  unit  inoperative 
performance  by  the  time  the  aeroplane  has  reached  a  height  of  35  ft.    It  is  a  function  of  weight, 
temperature and flap setting. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-10 - Definition of Terms 
17.  All  Engines  Screen  Speed  (V3).    V3  is  the  speed  at  which  the  aeroplane  is  assumed  to  pass 
through the screen height with all engines operating on take-off. 
18.  Steady Initial Climb Speed (V4).  V4 is a speed, with all engines operating, used in the scheduled 
take-off climb technique.  It should be attained by a height of 400 ft. 
19.  Target  Threshold  Speed  (VAT).    VAT  is  the  speed  at  which  the  pilot  should  aim  to  cross  the 
runway threshold for landing in relatively favourable conditions.  The speeds at the threshold are: 
a. 
VAT0 - all engines operating. 
b. 
VAT1 - a critical engine inoperative. 
20.  Maximum Threshold Speed (VTMAX).  VTMAX is the speed at the threshold above which the risk of 
exceeding the scheduled landing field length is unacceptably high; normally assumed to be VAT  + 15 knots. 
0
21.  Power  Failure  Speed  Ratio  (V1  /VR  ).    The  power  failure  speed  ratio  for  a  given  aeroplane 
weight  and  aerodrome  dimensions  is  defined  as  the  ratio  V1/VR.    The  ratio  is  introduced  into 
performance  planning  for  convenience,  as  graphical  presentation  of  aeroplane  performance  data  is 
simplified  when  presented  in  terms  of  V1/VR  rather  than  in  terms  of  V1  alone.    VR  depends  on  the 
aeroplane  weight  and  flap  setting  (some  also  consider  pressure  altitude  and  temperature).    It  is  a 
simple matter to calculate V1 once the aeroplane weight and V1/VR ratio has been determined. 
22.  Ground Minimum Control Speed (VMCG).  VMCG is the minimum speed on the ground at which 
it  is  possible  to  suffer  a  critical  power  unit  failure  on  take-off  and  maintain  control  of  the  aeroplane 
within defined limits. 
23.  Air Minimum Control Speed (VMCA).  VMCA is the minimum control speed in the air in a take-off 
configuration  at  which  it  is  possible  to  suffer  a  critical  power  unit  failure  and  maintain  control  of  the 
aeroplane within defined limits. 
24.  Minimum Measured Unstick Speed (VMU) VMU is the minimum demonstrated unstick speed; 
the minimum speed at which it is possible to leave the ground, all power units operating and climb 
without undue hazard. 
25. Minimum Speed in the Stall (VMS).  VMS is the minimum speed achieved in the stall manoeuvre: 
a. 
VMS1 - with the aeroplane in the configuration appropriate to the case under consideration (EAS). 
b. 
VMS0 - with the wing flaps in the landing setting (EAS). 
26.  The  Minimum  Control  Speed,  Approach  and  Landing  (VMCL).    VMCL  is  the  minimum  control 
speed  in  the  air  in  an  approach  or  landing  configuration;  the  minimum  speed  at  which  it  is  possible, 
with one power unit inoperative to maintain control of the aeroplane within defined limits while applying 
maximum variations of power. 
27.  Maximum Brake Energy Speed (VMBE).  VMBE is the maximum speed on the ground from which 
a stop can be accomplished within the energy capabilities of the brakes. 
Temperature 
28.  International Standard Atmosphere (ISA).  ISA is an atmosphere defined as follows: 
The temperature at sea level is 15 °C; the pressure at sea level is 1013.2 mb (29.92 in Hg); the 
temperature gradient from sea level to an altitude (36,090 ft) at which the temperature becomes  –
56.5 °C is 1.98 °C per 1,000 ft. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-10 - Definition of Terms 
29.  Outside Air or Static Temperature (OAT or SAT).  OAT (or SAT) is the free air static (ambient) 
temperature. 
30.  Indicated Air or Total Air Temperature (IAT or TAT).  IAT (or TAT) is the static air temperature 
plus adiabatic compression rise as indicated on the Total Air Temperature Indicator. 
31.  Declared Temperature.  The appropriate average monthly temperature plus half the associated 
standard deviation is called the 'declared temperature'. 
Altitude and Height 
32.  Pressure  Altitude.    Pressure  Altitude  is  the  expression  of  atmospheric  pressure  in  terms  of 
altitude,  according  to  the  inter-relation  of  these  factors  in  the  ISA.    It  is  obtained  by  setting  the  sub-
scale of an accurate pressure type altimeter to 1013.2mb. 
33.  Height.  Height is the true vertical clearance distance between the lowest part of the aeroplane in 
an unbanked attitude with landing gear extended and the relevant datum. 
34.  Gross  Height.    Gross  Height  is  the  true  height  attained  at  any  point  on  the  take-off  flight  path 
using gross climb performance. 
35.  Net Height.  The net height is the true height attained at any point on the take-off flight path using 
net climb performance. 
36.  Screen  Height.    Screen  Height  is  the  height  of  an  imaginary  screen  which  the  aeroplane would 
just clear when taking off or landing, in an unbanked attitude and with the landing gear extended.  
Performance 
37.  Measured Performance.  Measured Performance is the average performance of an aeroplane or 
group of aeroplanes being tested by an acceptable method in the specified conditions. 
38.  Gross  Performance.    Gross  performance  is  the  average  performance  which  a  fleet  of  aircraft 
should achieve if satisfactorily maintained and flown in accordance with the techniques described in the 
Aircrew Manual. 
39.  Net Performance.  Net performance represents the gross performance diminished by the amount 
considered necessary to allow for various contingencies, eg variations in piloting technique, temporary 
below  average  aircraft  performance  etc.    It  is  expected  that  the  net  performance  will  be  achieved  in 
operation, provided the aircraft is flown in accordance with the recommended techniques. 
40.  Gradient and Slope.  For deriving and applying Flight Manual information, gradient is the tangent 
of the angle of climb expressed as a percentage.  The term 'slope' is used in place of 'gradient' when 
referring to aerodrome surfaces and obstacle profile.  The ratio, in the same units and expressed as a 
percentage of: 
Change i He

ight
Horizontal Distance Travelled
Aerodrome Surface Characteristics 
41.  Braking Coefficient of Friction Braking Coefficient of Friction is the tangential force applied by 
an  aerodrome  surface  (expressed  as  a  proportion  of  the  normal  force)  upon  an  appropriately  loaded 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-10 - Definition of Terms 
smooth tyred aeroplane main wheel when it is being propelled across the surface, in a direction parallel 
to the plane of the wheel, when the speed of slip over the area of contact with the aerodrome surface is 
close to the speed of the aeroplane across that surface. 
42.  Reference  Wet  Hard  Surface.    A  Reference  Wet  Hard  Surface  is  a  hard  surface  for  which  the 
relationship between aeroplane ground speed and the braking coefficient of friction is as given in Fig 2. 
2-10 Fig 2 Reference Wet Hard Surface 
1.0
0.8
n
tio
ric 0.6
F
f
o
t
n
ie 0.4
ffic
e
o
C
g 0.2
in
k
ra
B
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
Sliding Speed (kt)
Weights 
43.  Aircraft Prepared for Service Weight (APS Weight).  APS Weight describes the weight of a fully 
equipped operational aeroplane - but empty i.e. without crew, fuel or payload. 
44.  Maximum Zero Fuel Weight (Max ZFW) Max ZFW is the weight of the aeroplane above which 
all  the  weight  must  consist  of  fuel.    This  limitation  is  always  determined  by  the  structural  loading 
airworthiness requirements; unlike the other weight limitations, it is not associated with any handling or 
performance qualities. 
45.  Take-off Weight (TOW).  TOW is the gross weight including everything and everyone carried in 
or on it at the commencement of the take-off run. 
46.  Landing Weight.  Landing Weight is the weight of the aeroplane at the estimated time of landing 
allowing for the weight of the fuel and oil expected to be used on the flight to the aerodrome at which it 
is intended to land or alternate aerodrome, as the case may be. 
47.  Weight,  Altitude  and  Temperature  Limit  (WAT).    The  highest  weight  at  which  the  relevant 
airworthiness climb minima are met is termed WAT.  The expressions 'altitude' and 'temperature' refer to 
the assumed pressure altitude and assumed atmosphere temperature for the take-off or landing surface. 
Miscellaneous 
48.  Critical  Power  Unit.    The  Critical  Power  Unit  is  the  power  unit,  failure  of  which  gives  the  most 
adverse effect on the aeroplane characteristics relative to the case immediately under consideration. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-10 - Definition of Terms 
49.  Power Unit Failure Point.  For determination of take-off performance, the power-unit failure point 
is that point at which a sudden complete failure of a power unit is assumed to occur. 
50.  Decision  Point.    For  the  determination  of  take-off  performance,  the  decision  point  is  the  latest 
point at which, as a result of power unit failure, the pilot is assumed to decide to discontinue a take-off. 
51.  Power Unit Restarting Altitude.  Power Unit Restarting Altitude describes an altitude up to which 
it has been demonstrated to be possible safely and reliably to restart a power unit in flight. 
52.  Engine Pressure Ratio (EPR).  EPR is a ratio of pressures, usually the maximum cycle pressure 
(compressor  delivery  pressure)  to  air  intake  pressure  or  ambient  pressure  (depending  on  specific 
applications) which is an important turbine engine parameter and can be displayed to the pilot. 
53.  Bleed Air.  Air which has been compressed in the main engine compressor and utilized for cabin 
pressurization and the driving of various services is termed 'Bleed Air'.  
Notes: 
1. 
By distinguishing between power unit failure point and decision point, account is taken of the 
delay which occurs before a power unit failure can be detected. 
2. 
An airspeed indicator reading is commonly used as a decision point criterion. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
CHAPTER 11 - TAKE-OFF PERFORMANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
In  the  planning  for  take-off  it  is  assumed  that,  although  the  aeroplane  has  all  power  units 
operating at the start point, one power unit will fail after commencement of the take-off run and before 
take-off is complete.  Analysis of the take-off plan is therefore conducted on 'all power units operating' 
net  performance  up  to  the  time  of  supposed  power  unit  failure  and  thereafter  on  'one  power  unit 
inoperative'  net  performance.    However,  it  is  possible  in  certain  instances  that  a  limiting  factor  in 
calculation  of  maximum  take-off  weight  within  the  regulations  can  be  imposed  when  all  power  units 
continue to operate throughout take-off.  In the event of an actual power unit failure during take-off, the 
captain  must  decide  whether  to  abandon  or  continue  take-off.    Performance  planning  ensures, 
amongst other considerations, that this decision is always completely objective. 
Take-off Planning Considerations 
2. 
Maximum permissible take-off weight for any flight will be the least weight obtained after considering: 
a. 
C of A limit. 
b. 
WAT limit for take-off. 
c. 
Field length requirements. 
d. 
Take-off net flight path. 
e. 
En route terrain clearance. 
f. 
WAT limit for landing. 
g. 
Landing distance requirements. 
3. 
C of A Limit.  The C of A specifies the manner in which the aeroplane may be flown and purpose 
for  which  it  may  be  used.    It  also  specifies  maximum  structural  take-off  weight  for  the  type  of 
aeroplane.  This weight, which is normally listed in the aeroplane ODM under 'Limitations', is absolute 
and must not be exceeded. 
4. 
WAT  Limit.    Air  Navigation  (General)  Regulation  requires  "that  weight  does  not  exceed  the 
maximum take-off weight specified for the altitude and the air temperature at the aerodrome at which 
the take-off is to be made".  This is the weight, altitude and temperature (WAT) limit, which is designed 
to  ensure  compliance  with  positive  gradients  of  climb  from  take-off  to  a  height  of  1,500  ft  above  the 
take-off surface, as specified in British Civil Airworthiness Requirements (BCARs), with one power unit 
inoperative and all power units operating.  The WAT limit in the ODM is normally presented as a single 
graph which is based on the most limiting of the climb requirements for the aeroplane type and is, in 
most  cases,  the  one  engine  inoperative  second  segment  climb  requirement.    This  limit  is  readily 
obtained entering with arguments of airfield altitude and temperature, then extracting maximum weight 
for these conditions.  Individual WAT limit graphs are published to account for different variables (such 
as  varying  flap  positions,  and  cases where engine power output can be augmented).  The WAT limit 
graphs take no account of field length. 
5. 
Field Length Requirements.  Air Navigation (General) Regulation requires that: "the take-off run, 
take-off distance and the accelerate stop distance respectively required for take-off, specified as being 
appropriate to: 
a. 
The weight of the aeroplane at the commencement of take-off run. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
b. 
The altitude at the aerodrome. 
c. 
The air temperature at the aerodrome. 
d. 
The condition of the surface of the runway from which the take-off will be made. 
e. 
The  slope  of  the  surface  of  the  aerodrome  in  the  direction  of  take-off  over  the  TORA,  the 
TODA and the ASDA, respectively, and 
f. 
Not  more  than  50%  of  the  reported  wind  component  opposite  to  the  direction  of  take-off  or 
not less than 150% of the reported wind component in the direction of take-off. 
do not exceed the take-off run, the take-off distance and the accelerate stop distance, respectively, at 
the aerodrome at which the take-off is to be made". 
6. 
Decision  Speeds.    In  addition,  the  regulations  require  that  the  decision point (normally decision 
speed, V1) at which the pilot is assumed to decide to continue or discontinue the take-off in the event of 
a  power  unit  failure,  must  be  common  to  all  3  distance  requirements  and  satisfy  each  individually.  
Some ODMs contain additional decision speed information for use in wet runway conditions.  The use 
of  the  'wet'  decision  speed  will  enhance  the  ability  to  stop  on  a  wet  surface  and  is,  on  average,  5  kt 
to10  kt  less  than  the  'dry'  decision  speed  usable  with  the  same  regulated  take-off  weight  using  dry 
accelerate  stop  distance.    However,  in  such  conditions  there  will  be  a  short  risk  period  of  up  to  4 
seconds, following V1 WET, during which, should a power unit failure occur on take-off, the aeroplane 
will  not  achieve  the  screen  height  of  35  ft  at  the  end  of  TODR.    The  minimum  height  which  will  be 
reached will be 15 ft, but in most cases will be more. 
7. 
Procedures.    In  determining  field  length  requirement  each  critical  aspect  of  TORA,  ASDA  and 
TODA  must  be  considered,  regardless  of  whatever  method  of  presentation  (D  and  X  or  D  and  R 
graphs etc) is used. 
Take-off Field Length Requirements 
8. 
The  regulations  specify  distinct  minimum  requirements  for  take-off  field  length,  some  of  which 
may  be  more  limiting  than  others.    The  take-off  weight  and  V1  speed  must  be  such  that  the  most 
severe  of  these  requirements  is  covered.    The  requirements  under  BCARs  are  described  within  this 
section.  The JAR regulations are similar in concept, but vary slightly in detail.  The aircraft ODM will 
take account of the appropriate requirements. 
9. 
Take-off Run Required (TORR).  The TORR shall be the greatest of: 
a. 
All Power Units Operating.  This is 1.15 × the sum of the gross distance from the starting 
point  to  the  point  where  the  aeroplane  becomes  airborne  (VUS)  and  1/3  of  the  gross  distance 
between VUS and the point at which it attains a screen height of 35 ft (see Fig 1). 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
2-11 Fig 1 TORR - All Power Units Operating 
1
1
1
V
3rd
3rd
3rd
3
(V  +)
2
Al  Power Units operative
35 '
Start
V1
VR
V US
TORA
Runway
a
b
Net TORR = (a + b)    
× 1.15
Note: Net TORR must not 
exceed TORA
b. 
One Power Unit Inoperative.  This is the gross distance from the starting point to the point 
where  the  aeroplane  becomes  airborne  (VUS)  plus  1/3  the  gross  distance  between  VUS  and  the 
point at which it attains a screen height of 35 ft.  The power unit fail point shall be such that failure 
would be recognized at the decision point (V1) appropriate to a dry runway (see Fig 2). 
2-11 Fig 2 TORR - One Power Unit Inoperative 
1
1
1
V  +
3rd
3rd
3rd
2
All PUs
1 PU Inop
35 '
VR
VUS
TORA
Start
V1
Net TORR 
Note: Net TORR must not 
exceed TORA
c. 
One  Power  Unit  Inoperative  -  Wet  Runway.    This  is  the  gross  distance  from  the  starting 
point  to  the  point  where  the  aeroplane  becomes  airborne  (VUS)  to  effect  a  transition  to  climbing 
flight  to  attain  a  screen  height  of  15  ft  at  the  end  of  TODA,  in  a  manner  consistent  with  the 
achievement of a speed not less than V2 at 35 ft.  The power unit failure point shall be such that 
failure would be recognized at the decision point (V1) appropriate to a wet runway (see Fig 3). 
2-11 Fig 3 TORR - One Power Unit Inoperative (Wet Runway) 
V 2
All PUs
1 PU Inop
35 ft
Start
V (Wet)
V
1
R
V US
15 ft
Runway
Net TORR (Wet)
TORA
Note: Net TORR (Wet) must not exceed TORA
10.  TORR  Compliance.  In order to comply with Air Navigation (General) Regulation 7(2) therefore, 
TORR should be the greatest of sub-paras 9a, b or c and must not exceed TORA. 
11.  TORR Analysis.  In take-off run analysis there are 2 variables: V1 and aircraft weight.  If the aircraft 
is  light,  then  it  is  possible  to  lose  a  power  unit  earlier  during  the  take-off  run  than  if  it  is  heavy  and  still 
comply with the regulations.  Thus, ignoring all other considerations, V1 depends on aeroplane weight and 
increases as weight increases.  There is a further consideration which must be taken into account.  If all 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
power units continue to operate throughout the whole take-off, then there is an upper weight limit imposed 
as  by  sub-para  9a.    A typical graph is shown in Fig 4, the vertical portion of the graph is due to the 'all 
power units operating' limitation. 
2-11 Fig 4 Take-off Run Analysis 
TORR (All engines)
Aeroplane would not comply
with TORR - All Power Units
Operating
V / V
1
R
TORR 1 PU Inoperative
Aeroplane would not comply
with TORR - 1 PU Inoperative
Aeroplane Take-off Weight
12.  Accelerate Stop Distance Required (ASDR).  The ASDR shall be the greatest of: 
a. 
The sum of the gross distance to accelerate with all power units operating from the starting 
point to the decision point (V1) appropriate to a dry runway and the gross distance to stop with the 
critical  power  unit  inoperative  from  the  decision  point  on  a  dry  hard  surface  using  all  available 
means of retardation (see Fig 5). 
2-11 Fig 5 ASDR 
1PU Inop
Using full retardation:
Braking + anti-skid
(Wet) V1 (Dry)
Start
Stop
Reverse thrust (asymm)
All PUs
Spoilers / Airbrakes
Gross ASDR
Accounting For :
Acceleration :  Guaranteed Power
Deceleration :  Guaranteed Power
Asymmetric thrust
Net ASDR = Gross
Note:  Net ASDR must not exceed ASDA
b. 
The sum of the gross distance to accelerate with all power units operating from the starting 
point to the decision point (V1) appropriate to a wet runway and the gross distance to stop with the 
critical power unit inoperative from the decision point on the reference wet hard surface using all 
available means of retardation (see Fig 5). 
13.  ASDR  Compliance.    In  order  to  comply with Air Navigation (General) Regulation 7(2) therefore, 
the ASDR should be the greatest of sub-paras 12a or b and must not exceed ASDA. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
14.  ASDR  Analysis.    In  accelerate  stop  distance  analysis  there  are  2  variables,  V1  and  weight,  but 
this time, if the aeroplane is light, then a power unit can be lost later during the take-off run than if the 
aeroplane  is  heavy.    Thus,  with  accelerate  stop  distance  (and  ignoring  all  other  considerations),  V1
depends on aeroplane weight and decreases as aeroplane weight increases.  A typical graph is shown 
in Fig 6. 
2-11 Fig 6 Accelerate Stop Distance Analysis 
Aeroplane would not
stop within ASDA
A
V / V
S
1
R
DR
Aeroplane Take-off Weight
15.  Take-off Distance Required (TODR).  The TODR shall be the greatest of: 
a. 
All  Power  Units  Operating.    This  is  1.15  times  the  gross  distance  to  accelerate  with  all 
power  units  operating  from  the  starting  point  to  the  Rotation  Speed  (VR),  to  effect  a transition to 
climbing flight and attain a screen height of 35 ft; the speed at 35 ft shall not be less than take-off 
safety  speed  (V2)  and  shall  be  consistent  with  the  achievement  of  a  smooth  transition  to  the 
steady initial climb speed (V4) at a height of 400 ft (see Fig 7). 
2-11 Fig 7 TODR - All Power Units Operating 
(V +)
2
V  
4
V 3
at 400'
35'
V
V
Start
1
R
V
US
Clearway
TORA
Stopway
Distance (D)
Net TODR = D × 1.15
TODA
Note: Net TODR must not exceed TODA
b. 
One  Power  Unit  Inoperative.    This  is  the  gross  distance to accelerate with all power units 
operating  from  the  starting  point  to  the  decision  point  (V1),  appropriate  to  a  dry  runway,  then  to 
accelerate with the critical power unit inoperative to the rotation speed (VR) and thereafter to effect 
a transition to climbing flight and attain a screen height of 35 ft at a speed not less than take-off 
safety speed (V2) (see Fig 8). 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
2-11 Fig 8 TODR - One Power Unit Inoperative 
V2
1 PU Inop
35 '
V
Start
1
V  (Dry)
R
V
US
Clearway
TORA
Stopway
Net TODR
TODA
Note: Net TODR must not exceed TODA
c. 
One Power Unit Inoperative - Wet Runway.  This is the gross distance to accelerate with all 
power  units  operating  from  the  starting  point  to  the  decision  point  (V1),  appropriate  to  the  rotation 
speed (VR) and thereafter to effect a transition to climbing flight and attain a screen height of 15 ft in 
a manner consistent with the achievement of a speed not less than take-off safety speed (V2) at 35 
ft, the failure of the power unit being recognized at V1 appropriate to a wet runway (see Fig 9). 
2-11 Fig 9 TODR - One Power Unit Inoperative (Wet Runway) 
V2
1 PU Inop
35'
15'
V
Start
1
V  (Wet)
R
V
US
TODA
Net TODR
Note: Net TODR must not exceed TODA
16.  TODR  Compliance.  In order to comply with Air Navigation (General) Regulation 7(2) therefore, 
the TODR should be the greatest of sub-paras 15a, b or c and must not exceed the TODA. 
17.  TODR Analysis.  In take-off distance analysis there are the same 2 variables as before, ie V1 and 
aeroplane weight. If the aeroplane is light, a power unit can be lost earlier than if the aeroplane is heavy.  
Thus with take-off distance and ignoring all other considerations, V1 depends on weight and increases as 
weight increases.  As in the case of take-off run, a further consideration must be taken into account.  If all 
power  units  continue  to  operate  throughout  the  whole  take-off,  this  simply  places  an  upper  limit  on  the 
aeroplane  weight  just  as  the  similar  requirement  did  in  the  case  of  take-off  run.    A  typical  graph  of  the 
limiting value of weight is shown in Fig 10. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
2-11 Fig 10 Take-off Distance Analysis 
TODR 
(All Engines)
Aeroplane would
V / V
1
R
not reach 35 ft
within TODA
TODR 1 PU Inop
Aeroplane Take-off Weight
Final Take-off Analysis 
18.  If the analysis of the 3 field length requirements (Figs 4, 6 and 10) are plotted on a common axis, 
the composite graph of Fig 11 results.  This will provide maximum permissible take-off weight and its 
associated  V1  speed  which  completely  satisfies  the  regulations  with  reference  to  the  field  length 
requirements. 
2-11 Fig 11 Final Take-off Analysis 
)
s
e
)
V / V
s
in
1
R
e
g
n
in
g
E
n
ll
E
(A
ll
R
(A
R
R
O
D
T
O
V / V
T
1
R
for max
TOW
AS
TORR
DR
1 PU Inop
TODR
1 PU Inop
Max TOW
Aeroplane TOW
19.  The disposition of the 3 graphs depends entirely on the airfield dimensions and, although in Fig 11 
maximum permissible take-off weight and V1/ VR ratio were determined by the take-off run 'one power 
unit inoperative' case, they might equally well have been determined by either of the take-off distance 
limitations. 
20.  There  will  be  a  range  of  V1/  VR  values (see Fig 12) in those cases where maximum permissible 
take-off weight is limited by: 
a. 
WAT limitation. 
b. 
Take-off run, all engines operating. 
c. 
Take-off distance, all engines operating. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 7 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
2-11 Fig 12 Range of V1 Values - All Power Units Operating Limited 
V / V
V / V
1
R
1
R
R
R
R
D
O
R
O
R
T
D
T
R
O
O
T
T
Range
Range
A
of
of
SD
A
R
V / V
SD
V / V
1
R
1
R
R
Max TOW
Aeroplane TOW
Max TOW Aeroplane TOW
There will also be a range when the actual take-off weight is less than the maximum permissible (see 
Fig  13).    The  decision  to  use  high  or  low  V1  depends  upon  the  aeroplane  type  and  operating 
techniques. 
2-11 Fig 13 Range of V1 Values - Weight Below Maximum Permissible 
V / V
1
R
R
D
O
T
ASDR
Single V / V
Range of
1
R
for Max TOW
    
V   /    
V   at
1
R
Actual TOW
Max TOW
Actual TOW
Aeroplane TOW
21.  When field lengths are unbalanced it is necessary to consider individually take-off run, accelerate 
stop distance and take-off distance available.  If, however, ASDA and TODA are of the same length, or 
assumed  to  be  so,  then  the  field  is  said  to  be  'balanced'  and  compliance  with  these  2  distance 
requirements can be achieved simultaneously for the case of power unit failure at V1.  From a balanced 
field chart it is possible, in one step, to determine: 
a. 
Maximum  take-off  weight  to  comply  with  accelerate  stop  distance  with  one  power  unit 
inoperative. 
b. 
The  V1/VR  ratio  appropriate  to  this  weight  and  common  to  the  2  distances.    It  is  now  only 
necessary  to  check  the  required  take-off  run  for  this  weight  and  the  V1/VR  ratio  with  the  take-off 
distance 'all power units operating' to ensure they are not limiting. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-11- Take-Off Performance 
22.  When TORA, ASDA and TODA are all equal, then take-off run can never be the limiting factor, but 
it still remains necessary to check take-off distance 'all power units operating'.  If 'clearway' does exist 
and the balanced field length graphs are used, a penalty in take-off weight will be imposed.  This may 
be justified, however, by the speed and simplicity of using this method. 
23.  Performance  planning  for  the  take-off  stage  is  now  completed  by  selection  of  the  most  limiting 
weight from the factors considered so far, ie: 
a. 
C of A limit. 
b. 
WAT limit (take-off). 
c. 
Field length requirements. 
d. 
Other factors to be considered that may affect the aircraft weight are: 
(1)   
Brake heating limitations. 
(2)   
Tyre speed and pressure limitations. 
(3)   
Crosswind limitations. 
(4)   
Use of air bleeds for anti-icing or air conditioning systems. 
(5)   
Reduced performance due to slush, snow or standing water on the runway. 
(6)   
Noise abatement regulations. 
(7)   
Aerodrome pavement strength. 
(8)   
Anti-skid system inoperative. 
(9)   
Reverse thrust inoperative. 
(10)  
Flap settings. 
(11)  
Use of water injection or water methanol. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 9 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-12 - Net Take-off Flight Path 
CHAPTER 12 - NET TAKE-OFF FLIGHT PATH 
Introduction 
1.  The  take-off  stage  of  performance  planning  (Volume  2,  Chapter  11)  is  complete  at  the  end  of  the 
take-off  distance  required  (TODR),  at  which  point  the  aircraft  is  35  ft  above  the  datum  surface  level,  in 
take-off  configuration.    The  net  take-off  flight  path  segment  extends  from  this  point,  to  a  safe  height  of 
1,500  ft  above  the  same  datum.    During  this  phase  of  flight,  the  aircraft  must  change  to  en  route 
configuration, and all obstacles must be cleared by stipulated safety margins. 
2.  Air  Navigation  (General)  Regulation  requires  the  aeroplane  to  clear  all  obstacles  in  its  path  by  a 
vertical  interval  of  at  least  35  ft.    The  net  take-off  climb,  like  all  other  portions  of  scheduled 
performance, is planned on the net performance with one power unit inoperative. 
3.  Turns in the climb path are legal, but regulatory limitations and restrictions must be observed.  The 
Operating  Data  Manual  (ODM)  will  provide  scheduling  for  such  turns.    The  obstacle  domain  will  curve 
accordingly.  If it is intended that the aeroplane shall change its direction of flight by more than 15º, the 
vertical  interval  is  increased  to  give  at  least  50  ft  clearance  from  any  obstacle  encountered  during  the 
change  of  direction.    Turns  must  only  be  planned  within  climbing  segments,  since  the  radius  of  turn 
cannot be calculated for those segments where the aeroplane is accelerating. 
4.  Unless  obstacle  height requires further extension of the take-off flight path, the net take-off flight 
path  is  completed  when  a  height  of  1,500  ft  has  been  attained,  and  transition  to  the  en  route 
configuration completed. 
5.  In  determining  the  net  take-off  flight  path  with  one  power  unit  inoperative,  the  following  factors 
must be considered: 
a. 
The  weight  of  the  aeroplane  at  the  commencement  of  the  take-off  run.    This  weight  is 
referred to as the take-off weight (TOW). 
b. 
The altitude of the aerodrome. 
c. 
The air temperature at the aerodrome. 
d. 
The average slope of the take-off distance available (when appropriate). 
e. 
Not  more  than  50%  of  the  reported  wind  component  opposite  to  the  direction  of  take-off  or 
not less than 150% of the reported wind component in the direction of take-off. 
f. 
The height of an obstacle (when appropriate). 
g.  The distance to an obstacle (when appropriate).
Legal Definition of an Obstacle 
6.  To  comply  with  para  2,  an  obstacle  shall  be  deemed  to  be  in  the  path  of  the  aeroplane  if  the 
distance  from  the  obstacle  to  the  nearest  point  on  the  ground  below  the  intended  line  of  flight  of  the 
aeroplane does not exceed the lesser of the following: 
a. 
A distance equal to 60 m, plus half the wing-span of the aeroplane, plus one eighth of the distance 
from that point to the end of the TODA, measured along the intended line of flight (see Fig 1). 
b. 
900 m.  
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-12 - Net Take-off Flight Path 
2-12 Fig 1 The Obstacle Domain (Performance Group A) 
60 m
Wing-span
D
(200 ft) +
+
Intended Line
60 m
Wing-span
2
8
(200 ft)+
2
of Flight
Runway
Max 900 m
Distance (D)
(3000 ft)
End of
TODA
Height
(Height 35 ft)
1500 ft
7.  The domain within which an object can be considered a legal obstacle can therefore be plotted for 
a  straight  take-off  as  in  Fig  1.    If  the  aeroplane  changes  its  direction  of  flight  by  more  than  15º,  the 
obstacle domain maintains the same dimensions but curves with the curved intended line of flight. 
Use of Net Climb Performance 
8.  Having ascertained that an obstacle is within legal bounds, it is necessary to establish that the required 
clearance  is  obtained  using  net  climb  performance  with  one  power  unit  inoperative.    This  is  obtained  by 
using the gross climb performance, reduced by a safety margin as specified in BCARs.  The net flight path 
will therefore be below that achieved on gross power (Fig 2). 
2-12 Fig 2 Comparison of Gross and Net Flight Paths 
1500 ft
Height
GRO SS FLIGHT PATH
above
Reference
Requir ed
Z ero
Vertical 
Clear ance
N ET FLIGHT PATH
O bstacle
35 ft
Reference Zero
Distance
The Net Take-off Flight Path Profile 
9.  The net take-off flight path is divided into a series of segments (maximum 6 - some aircraft use a 
smaller number of segments). 
10.  A Typical 4-segment Profile.  A typical 4-segment net flight path is illustrated in Fig 3.  Some ODMs 
may use speed and power settings that differ from those stated. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-12 - Net Take-off Flight Path 
2-12 Fig 3 Net Take-off Flight Path Segments (One Power Unit Inoperative) 
1500 ft
Height
N ot Below 400 ft above Take-off Surface
35 ft
Reference
Zer o
1st Segment
2nd Segment
3rd Segment
4th Segment
Distance
From 35'
From u/c up to
Level. Flaps retracted
Climbing to 1500 ft
to u/c
height chosen
within this segment.
up
for flap r etraction
Accelerating to the Final
Take-off Safety Speed (V  )
Final Segment Climb Speed
2
Segment Climb Speed
Maximum Continuous
Take-off Thrust
Thrust
a. 
Reference Zero.  Reference Zero is the point 35 ft directly below the aeroplane at the end of 
TODR.  It is the datum to which the co-ordinates of the various points in the take-off flight path are 
referred. 
b.  First Segment This segment extends from the 35 ft point, to the point where the landing gear is 
fully  retracted  and  (if  applicable)  the  propeller  of  the  failed  power  unit  is  feathered.    This  segment  is 
flown at, or above, the Take-off Safety Speed (V2).
c. 
Second Segment.  This segment is flown at a minimum of V2 and extends from the end of the 
first  segment  to  the  height  chosen  for  the  initiation  of  flap  retraction.    The  height  chosen  for  flap 
retraction depends on the aeroplane.  The ODM will give one of the following as the preferred height: 
(1)  The attainment of a minimum height of 400 ft.  
(2)  The  attainment  of  the  maximum  level-off  height  (MLOH).    The  MLOH  results  from  any 
limitation  if  flap  retraction  is  delayed  in  order  to  achieve  clearance  of  obstacles  close  to 
Reference Zero. 
(3)  The attainment of the maximum height that can be reached within the time limit imposed 
by use of take-off thrust (typically 5 minutes after brake release).  
(4)  The attainment of a height of 1,500 ft. 
d. 
Third  Segment.    This  segment  assumes  a  period  of  level  flight  at  take-off  thrust,  during 
which  the  aircraft  accelerates,  and  the  flaps  are  retracted  in  accordance  with  the  recommended 
speed schedule. 
e. 
Fourth (or Final) Segment.  This segment extends from the level-off height to a net height 
of  1,500  ft  or  more.    This  segment  is  flown  at  the  final  segment  climb  speed  using  maximum 
continuous thrust. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-12 - Net Take-off Flight Path 
Obstacle Datums 
11.  It is essential to use a common datum in horizontal and vertical planes when comparing obstacle 
location and elevation with runway data.  In the UK AIP, obstacles are listed by latitude and longitude, 
with  height  above  mean  sea  level.    In  other  sources,  obstacle  location  may  be  given  in  alternate 
formats,  for  example,  as  a  distance  and  height  relative  to  the  start  of  the  take-off  run  (known  as  the 
Brake  Release  Point  (BRP)).    The  operator  must  take  extreme  care,  and  if  necessary  reduce  the 
position of reference zero and that of any obstacles to a common datum. 
12.  Runways with Zero Slope.  If the average slope of the take-off distance is zero, then the relative 
heights of BRP, reference zero and any obstacles will remain constant.   Only the horizontal distance 
between  them  alters with a change of take-off distance required (TODR).  In Fig 4, the first calculation is 
made  at  maximum  permitted  TOW,  resulting  in  the  first  take-off  distance  required  (TODR  1)  and  its 
associated net flight path (NFP 1).  As this gives insufficient vertical clearance from the plotted obstacle, a 
second calculation is made, based upon a reduced TOW (TODR 2).  The reference zero is now at a greater 
horizontal distance from the obstacle, and NFP 2 will result in an increased vertical clearance.  If the vertical 
clearance is still insufficient, then the process is repeated at a third, further reduced TOW, and so forth, until 
sufficient clearance is achieved. 
2-12 Fig 4 Reference Zero - Take-off Distance with Zero Slope 
N FP 2
N FP 1 gives
Relative
N FP 1
Insufficient
Height
Clear ance
Constant
O bstacle
BRP
Level Runway
Ref 
Ref 
Zero 2
Zero 1
Hor izontal
TO DR 1
Distance 1
TO DR 2
Hor izontal Distance 2
13.  Runways with a Slope.  When a slope exists in the take-off distance, either up or down, not only 
will the horizontal distance vary, but also the relative heights of the obstacles and reference zero will need 
careful consideration (see Figs 5 and 6) 
2-12 Fig 5 Reference Zero - Take-off Distance with Uphill Slope 
Insufficient
N FP 2
Clear ance
Varying
Relative
N FP 1
O bstacle
Heights
Ref Zer o 1
O bstacle relative
height IN CREASED
Ref Zer o 2
BRP
Uphill Runway
Hor izontal
TO DR 1
Distance 1
TO DR 2
Hor izontal Distance 2
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-12 - Net Take-off Flight Path 
2-12 Fig 6 Reference Zero - Take-off Distance with Downhill Slope 
N FP 2
Varying
BRP
Insufficient
Relative
Clear ance
N FP 1
Heights
Downh
O bstacle
ill Runway
O bstacle relative
Ref Zer o 2
height DECREASED
Ref Zer o 1
Hor izontal
TO DR 1
Distance 1
TO DR 2
Hor izontal Distance 2
Determination of Obstacle Clearance 
14.  The initial calculation for the net flight path, to determine positive vertical clearance (35 ft or 50 ft) 
from obstacles, is based on the maximum permitted TOW determined from the take-off performance 
calculation  (see  Volume  2,  Chapter  11).    If,  on  using  this  weight,  the  required  vertical  obstacle 
clearance is obtained, then the net take-off flight path imposes no limitations. 
15.  If  the  required  obstacle  clearance  is  not  obtained  on  the  initial  calculation,  then  in  general,  the 
climb gradient will need to be increased, and this is achieved by a reduction in the TOW.  
16.  The net take-off flight path segment calculations can be determined by one of 2 methods: 
a. 
Scale Plot of Net Take-off Flight Path.  A scale plot of the aeroplane net take-off flight path 
can be constructed (see Volume 2, Chapter 13) showing aeroplane net height against horizontal 
distance  travelled,  measured  along  the  intended  line  of  flight,  either  straight  or  curved.    Any 
obstacle  within  the  obstacle  domain  is  drawn  on  this  scale  plot  at  the  appropriate  height  and 
horizontal  distance,  in  order  to  assess  the  vertical  clearance.    If,  on  the  scale  plot,  the  legal 
clearance  is  not  achieved,  then  the  TOW  must  be  reduced,  and  a  new  scale  plot  constructed 
using  a  lower  weight.    This  procedure  must  be  repeated  until  the  legal  vertical  clearance  is 
obtained. 
b. 
Obstacle  Clearance  Charts.    In  some  ODMs,  clearance  is  determined  by  using  Obstacle 
Clearance  Charts,  which  show  net  flight  path  profiles,  reduced by 35 ft, as a function of take-off 
climb gross gradient at 400 ft.  Knowing the distance and height difference between an obstacle 
and reference zero, these dimensions can be plotted on the appropriate obstacle clearance chart 
to  find  the  required  climb  gradient.    If  the  climb  gradient  for  the  planned  TOW  is  insufficient  to 
clear the obstacle, the TOW must be reduced to produce the required gradient.  Alternatively, in 
some  ODMs,  use  may  be  made  of  the  'increased  V2  speed'  method.    This  method  uses  all  or 
some of the excess field length to increase the take-off speed and thus improve the climb gradient 
achievable. 
17.  Allowances  for  fuel  burn-off  and  performance  change  with  height  are  accounted  for  in  ODM  net 
flight path charts.  Therefore, the weight input for charts will be TOW. 
18.  Scale Plot - Redefining Reference Zero.  Where further scale plots are constructed, as per para 
16a,  reference  zero  will  be  redefined  at  each  TOW,  at  the  end  of  TODR.    Having  repositioned 
reference zero, it will also be necessary to re-adjust obstacles horizontally and vertically as applicable. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-12 - Net Take-off Flight Path 
19.  Scale  Plot  -  Determining  Precise  TOW.    With  small  adjustments  of  TOW,  the  relationship 
between  reduced  TOW  and  increased  obstacle  clearance  can  be  assumed  to  be  linear.    In  order  to 
determine the maximum TOW with precision, a graph showing vertical clearance can be plotted for 2 
or 3 flight paths at different TOWs.  The axes of the graph will show TOW against clearance.  In the 
example in Fig 7, clearances have been determined for TOWs of 169,000 lb, 165,000 lb and 162,000 
lb  (NFP  1  to  3  respectively).    Interpolation  shows  that  the  maximum  permitted  TOW  to  achieve  35  ft 
vertical clearance is 162,700 lb. 
2-12 Fig 7 Graph for Determination of Maximum TOW 
+80
+40
NFP 3
(ft)
Required Clearance = 35 ft
ce
0
NFP 2
aran
le
C -40
NFP 1
TOW for 35 ft Clearance
-80
162
164
166
168
170
Take-off  Weight (x 1000 lb)
Increase in Height of Final Segment 
20.   If  it  is  necessary,  or  desired,  to  demonstrate  obstacle  clearance  after  take-off  to  a  height  in 
excess of 1,500 ft, then the final climb segment may be scheduled to a greater height, or alternatively 
the normal en route one power unit inoperative net data can be used from the 1,500 ft point onwards. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-13 - Construction of Net Take-Off Flight Path Scale Plot 
CHAPTER 13 - CONSTRUCTION OF NET TAKE-OFF FLIGHT PATH SCALE 
PLOT 
 Introduction 
1. 
The  more  modern  flight  manuals  contain  obstacle  clearance  charts  which  do  not  require  the 
construction of a net take-off flight path scale plot to calculate the maximum take-off weight to ensure 
legal  obstacle  clearance.    However,  there  are  many  ODMs  in  current  use  which  do  not  contain 
obstacle clearance charts. 
2. 
There are various methods of constructing the scale plot of the take-off net flight path and the choice of 
method used is open to the operator, but the following is suggested as being the simplest.  Before this or any 
other method is used, the basic principles described in Volume 2, Chapter 12 must be understood. 
Construction Sequence 
3. 
Position obstacles in relation to the 'brakes-off' point as regards both distance and height (runway 
obstruction  data  is  normally  quoted  in  relation  to  the  'brakes-off'  point).    Both  net  flight  path  and 
obstacles can now be plotted from the origin of the graph, i.e. 'brakes-off'.   The method of plotting the 
net flight path is explained below with reference to Fig 1. 
2-13 Fig 1 Construction of Net Take-off Flight Path 
1600
G
1400
1200
1000
800
(ft)
t
h 600
ig
e
E
F
400
H
D
200
C
1
2
3
4
A
B
0
10,000
20,000
30,000
40,000
50,000
60,000
Distance (ft)
4. 
Plot  the  TODR  (A-B)  using  the  runway  slope  to  calculate  the  height  gained/lost  by  the  end  of 
TODR in relation to the 'brakes-off' point. 
5. 
The aeroplane will have achieved a 35 ft screen height at the end of the TODR.  Add 35 ft to the 
height at point B and plot point C. 
6. 
From the graphs, determine segment 1 gradient (if applicable). 
7. 
From the graphs, determine the height gained during segment 1. 
8. 
From paras 6 and 7, calculate the horizontal distance travelled during segment 1, unless obtained 
directly from a graph. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-13 - Construction of Net Take-Off Flight Path Scale Plot 
9. 
Add  the  values  of  height  gained  and  horizontal  distance  travelled  in  segment  1  to  the  values  of 
height and distance at the end of the TODR segment.  This gives the total height gained and distance 
travelled since 'brakes-off'. 
10.  Plot these values on the graph (point D) and join this point to the end of the TODR segment (point 
C).  The TODR and segment 1 are now accurately depicted on the graph. 
11.  From the graphs determine the segment 2  gradient. 
12.  From the graphs determine height gained during segment 2. 
13.  From paras 11 and 12 calculate the horizontal distance travelled during segment 2, ie: 
Change in Height ×100
Distance travelled = 
Gradient %
14.  Add the values obtained in paras 12 and 13 to the previous total values of height and distance to 
obtain total height and distance from the 'brakes-off' point at the end of segment 2. 
15.  Plot these values on the graph (point E) and join this point to the end of segment 1 (point D).  The 
graph is now complete to the end of segment 2. 
16.  From the graphs, determine the distance travelled in segment 3. 
17.  Add  this  value  to  the  previous  total  to  obtain  the  total  distance  travelled    (the  height  remains 
unchanged). 
18.  Plot these values on the graph (point F) and join this point to the end of segment 2 (point E). 
19.  From the graphs, determine the segment 4  gradient. 
20.  From the graphs, determine the height of the end of the fourth segment which will be either 1,500 
ft above the end of TODR (in which case the net flight path is complete) or a lesser height determined 
by the 5 minute power point. 
21.  From paras 19 and 20, calculate the distance travelled during segment 4. 
22.  Add  this  value  to  the  previous  total  value  to  obtain  the  total  distance  travelled  since  'brakes-off' 
and plot point G. 
23.  If  segment  5  is  required,  gradient  will  be  determined,  height  and  distance  increments  calculated 
and summed as for previous segments to obtain total values. 
24.  If segment 6 is required to reach 1,500 ft, establish the segment 6 height increment and gradient 
and calculate the height increment as before. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-14 - En Route Performance 
CHAPTER 14 - EN ROUTE PERFORMANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
En route performance planning concerns the portion of the flight which starts at 1,500 ft, ie at the 
end of the net take-off flight path and ends at 1,500 ft above the landing surface. 
En Route Obstacle Clearance 
2. 
The  Air  Navigation  (General)  Regulation  requires  that,  in  the  event  of  power  unit  failure,  the 
aeroplane will clear all obstacles within 10 nm either side of the intended track by a vertical interval of 
at  least  2,000  ft  with  the  remaining  power  unit(s)  operating  at  maximum  continuous  power.    The 
intended  track  may  be  the  planned  route  or  on  any  planned  diversion  to  any  suitable  aerodrome  at 
which  the  aeroplane  can  comply  with  the  condition  in  the  Regulation  relating  to  an  alternate 
aerodrome.  On arrival over such an aerodrome, the gradient of the specified net flight path with one 
power unit inoperative shall not be less than zero at 1,500 ft above the aerodrome. 
3. 
For  aeroplanes  with  three  or  more  power  units,  the  Air  Navigation  (General)  Regulation  must  be 
complied  with  whenever  the  aeroplane  on  its  route  or  any  planned  diversion  therefrom  is  more  than  90 
minutes  flying  time  in still air at the 'all power units operating' economical cruising speed from the nearest 
aerodrome  at  which  it  can  comply  with  the  condition  in  the  Regulation  relating to an alternate aerodrome.  
This requires that the aeroplane, in the event of any two power units becoming inoperative, be capable of 
continuing flight with all other power unit(s) operating at maximum continuous power, clearing by a vertical 
interval  of  at  least  2,000  ft,  all  obstacles  within  10  nm  either  side  of  the  intended  track  to  a  suitable 
aerodrome.  On arrival over such an aerodrome, the gradient of the specified net flight path with two power 
units  inoperative  shall  not  be  less  than  zero  at  1,500  ft  above  the  aerodrome.    The  speed  to  be  used  for 
calculating 90 minutes flying time is that scheduled in the Operating Data Manual (ODM) for the application 
of the Air Navigation Regulations relating to flight over water. 
4. 
Provided that, where the operator of the aeroplane is satisfied, taking into account the navigation 
aids which can be made use of on the route, that tracking can be maintained within a margin of 5 nm, 
then 5 nm can be substituted for 10 nm in paras 2 and 3. 
5. 
In assessing the ability of the aeroplane to comply with en route obstacle clearance requirements, 
account  must  be  taken  of  meteorological  conditions  for  the  flight  and  the  aeroplane’s  ice  protection 
system  must  be assumed to be in use when appropriate.  Account may be taken of any reduction of 
the weight of the aeroplane which may be achieved after the failure of a power unit or power units by 
such jettisoning of fuel as is feasible and prudent in the circumstances of the flight and in accordance 
with the Flight Manual. 
6. 
Current  requirements  do  not  differentiate  between  those  cases  where  the  rules  are  met  by  a 
positive  performance  and  those  where  the  procedure  used  allows  the  aircraft  to  'drift  down'  to  the 
calculated  stabilizing  altitude.    In  the  latter  case,  the  legislation  permits  the  assumption  that  the  pilot 
always  knows  precisely  where  he  is  and  immediately  takes  the  appropriate  action  in  the  event  of 
engine failure. 
7. 
In  view  of  the  relative  infrequency  with  which  a  combination  of  engine  failure,  significant 
obstructions and inadequacy of navigational aids is likely to be met, it was considered unjustifiable to 
introduce specific accountability for the drift-down case into the Regulations.  However, information to 
cover drift-down is included in the Operations Manual.  One method of satisfying the requirement is to 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-14 - En Route Performance 
assume that the aeroplane passes over the critical obstruction with a clearance of not less than 2,000 
ft  after  an  engine  failure  occurs  no  closer  than  the  nearest fix from a radio or internal navigation aid.  
The take-off weight of the aeroplane may need to be adjusted in order to provide this capability. 
8. 
When compliance is met by 'drift-down' procedure, the maximum permissible altitude that can be 
assumed at the start of the drift down is the least of: 
a. 
Maximum permissible altitude for power unit restarting. 
b. 
The planned altitude to fly. 
9. 
Once  the  maximum  permissible  altitude  is  established,  the  drift-down  of  the  aeroplane  is  calculated 
using the en route net-gradient of climb 'one or two power units inoperative' as applicable.  This drift-down is 
plotted and the vertical clearance of 2,000 ft is checked against all obstacles defined in paras 2, 3 and 4.  If 
this  clearance  is  not  achieved,  either  the  aeroplane  weight  must  be  adjusted  until  the  required  clearance 
exists or, alternatively, the aeroplane must be re-routed to avoid critical obstacles.  It should be noted that, in 
certain circumstances, it is possible for the aeroplane to 'drift up'. 
10.  The  en  route  net  gradient  of  climb  graphs  in  the  ODM  are  entered  with  temperature  (ISA 
deviation),  aeroplane  altitude  (pressure)  and  weight  to  extract  a  percentage  gradient,  which  can  be 
positive or negative. 
11.  The  rules  governing  two-engine  aeroplanes  are  laid  down  in  the  Air  Navigation  Regulations  and 
are subject to frequent changes. 
Calculation of En Route Flight Path After Power Failure 
12.  The method used for calculating and plotting the en route flight path after power unit failure is to: 
a. 
Determine the maximum height from which the drift-down will commence (see para 8). 
b. 
Determine the required obstacle clearance. 
c. 
Select the vertical spacing to be used in the calculation e.g. 2,000 ft.  The number of points 
plotted should be sufficient to enable a smooth curve to be drawn. 
d. 
For  the  mid-height  of  the  band  chosen  and  associated  temperature,  obtain  from  the 
appropriate graph the en route net gradient. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-14 - En Route Performance 
e. 
Calculate the horizontal distance travelled during descent using the following formula: 
Change in H
  eight
100
 
 
 
 
  Gradient % = 
×
Change in D
  istance
1
∴ Change in Distance =  Change in H
  eight 100
×
Gradient %
 
1

×
 Change in nautical miles   =  Change in H
  eight  100
Gradient × 6080 ft 

×
 For 1,000 ft vertical band  = 
1000 100
Gradient × 6080
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
=  16.44
Gradient
f. 
The horizontal distance travelled for each vertical band is plotted against the lower altitude of 
the band and not the mid-height.  A drift-down plot is shown in Fig 1. 
2-14 Fig 1 Plot of Drift Down En Route Flight Path 
Max
Relighting
Altitude
(ft)
e
d
Aircraft
Descent
ltitu
1st
A
Profile
Obstacle 2nd
Obstacle
Stabilizing
Altitude
Horizontal Distance from Power
Unit Failure (nm)
Effect of Wind on Drift Down Path 
13.  The  horizontal  distances  calculated  from  the  gradients  extracted  from  the  ODM  are,  in 
effect,  still  air  distances.    To  obtain  the  true  distance/gradient  the  forecast  wind  component 
must  be  applied;  a  head  component  decreases the distance travelled (increases the gradient), 
whilst a tail component will give an increased horizontal distance (decreased gradient): 
Example: 
Net gradient of climb 
= −3.0% 
TAS 
 
 
 
= 420 kt 
Headwind component  = 60 kt 
The ground speed is 360 kt; then the true gradient relative to the ground is given by: 
420
− .
3 0 ×
= 3

%
5
.
360
and  the  associated  change  in  horizontal  distance  would  then  be  calculated  by  using  a  new 
gradient of −3.5%. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-14 - En Route Performance 
An alternative method is not to adjust the gradient, but simply to adjust the horizontal distance: 
Calculated Distance × G/S
Corrected Distance =
TAS
This calculation can be solved on a DR computer (see Volume 9, Chapter 8).  Set Groundspeed on the 
outer scale against True Airspeed on the inner scale.  Set Calculated Distance on the inner scale and 
read off the Corrected Distance on the outer scale. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-15- Landing Requirements 
CHAPTER 15- LANDING REQUIREMENTS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  final  set  of  requirements  which  needs  investigation  concerns  landing  distance  criteria which 
deal  with  destination  and  alternate  aerodromes  separately.    The  landing  requirements  cover  the 
approach  and  landing  stage  of  performance  planning,  commencing  at  a  height  of  1,500  ft  above  the 
landing surface to coming to a stop on the runway. 
2. 
As with the take-off, requirements can be treated under similar headings, i.e.:
a. 
C of A limit (landing). 
b. 
WAT limit (landing). 
c. 
Landing distance requirements. 
Landing Planning Considerations 
3. 
C of A Limit.  The C of A limit specifies the maximum structural landing weight; it is absolute and 
must not be exceeded except in emergency.  This is normally listed in the aeroplane Operating Data 
Manual (ODM) under 'Limitations'. 
4. 
WAT  Limit.    Air  Navigation  (General)  Regulations  requires  that  "weight  will  not  exceed  the 
maximum  landing  weight  for  the  altitude  and  the  expected  air  temperature  for  the  estimated  time  of 
landing at the aerodrome of intended landing and at any alternative aerodrome".  This is the WAT limit, 
which is designed to ensure compliance with the minimum requirements specified in BCARs, which lay 
down  specified  gradients  of  climb  or  descent  with  one  power  unit  inoperative  or  all  power  units 
operating.  The aeroplane will be certificated under one of the following requirements: 
a. 
Continued approach - all power units operating. 
b. 
Continued approach - one power unit inoperative. 
c. 
Discontinued approach - one power unit inoperative. 
d. 
Balked landing - all power units operating. 
5. 
The  limit  is  readily  obtainable  from  a  single  graph  in  the  ODM,  entering  with  arguments  of 
aerodrome  pressure  altitude  and  temperature,  then  extracting  maximum  weight  for  these  conditions.  
The WAT limit graph takes no account of landing distance available. 
Landing Distance Requirements 
6. 
Air Navigation (General) Regulations states that landing distances required, respectively specified 
as  being  appropriate  to  aerodromes  of  destination  and  alternate  aerodromes,  do  not  exceed  at  the 
aerodrome at which the aircraft is intended to land or at any alternate aerodrome, as the case may be, 
the landing distance available, after taking into account the following factors: 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-15- Landing Requirements 
a. 
The landing weight. 
b. 
The altitude at the aerodrome. 
c. 
The  temperature  in  the  specified  international  standard  atmosphere  appropriate  to  the 
altitude at the aerodrome: 
d. 
A  level  surface  in  the  case  of  runways  usable  in  both  directions,  provided  that  the  landing 
distances available are the same in both directions. 
e. 
The  average  slope  of  the  runway  in  case  of  runways  usable  in  only  one  direction,  or  of 
differing landing distances. 
f. 
Still air conditions in the case of the most suitable runway for a landing in still air conditions. 
g. 
Not more than 50% of the forecast wind component opposite to the direction of landing or not 
less than 150% of the forecast wind component in the direction of landing in case of the runway 
that may be required for landing because of forecast wind conditions. 
7. 
Currently, an aeroplane’s landing distance performance may conform to one of 2 sets of landing 
distance required criteria known as Arbitrary Landing Distance and Reference Landing Distance.  The 
main  differences  between  these 2 requirements are to be found in the associated conditions and the 
safety  factors  to  be  applied.    The  set  of  requirements  to  which  the  particular  aeroplane  type  will 
operate, will be stated in the ODM. 
8. 
Arbitrary Landing Distance.  This is the gross horizontal distance required to land on a dry hard 
surface from a screen height of 50 ft and come to a complete stop, following a steady descent to the 
50 ft height point at a gradient of descent not greater than 5% (3º glide path) and at a constant speed 
of not less than the greatest of: 
a. 
1.3 × VMSO. 
b. 
VAT0. 
c. 
VAT1 – 5 kt. 
9. 
Arbitrary Landing Distance Required.  The landing distance required appropriate to destination 
aerodrome  shall  be  the  arbitrary  landing  distance  (determined  in  accordance  with  para  8)  ×  1.82  for 
aeroplanes having turbojet power units and not fitted with effective reverse thrust; × 1.67 for all other 
aeroplanes.    The  landing  distance  required  appropriate  to  alternate  aerodrome  shall  be  the  landing 
distance required appropriate to destination aerodrome multiplied by 0.95 (see Fig 1). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-15- Landing Requirements 
2-15 Fig 1 Arbitrary Landing Distance Required - Destination and Alternate Aerodromes 
Gradient 5%
Speed at Threshold
as per para 8
Stop
50 ft
Landing Distance
Destination Landing Distance Required
= (Landing Dist × 1.67 or 1.82)(see para 9)
Alternate Landing Distance Required
= (Destination Ldg Dist × .95)
10.  Reference  Landing  Distance.    This  is  the  gross  horizontal  distance  required  to  land  on  a 
reference wet hard surface from a height of 30 ft and come to a complete stop.  The speed at a height 
of 30 ft is the maximum threshold speed (VAT0 + 15 kt); touch down is at the Reference Touch Down 
Speed, after a steady gradient of descent to the 30 ft point of not greater than 5% (3º glide path) under 
limiting operational conditions of ceiling and visibility.
11.  Reference  Landing  Distances  Required.    The  landing  distance  required  appropriate  to  a 
destination aerodrome (Fig 2) shall be the greater of: 
a. 
The  reference  landing  distance  'all  power  units  operating'  (determined  in  accordance  with 
para 10) × the 'all power units operating' field length factor of: 
CDG
1.24 − 0.1
  or 1.11, whichever is the greater. 
CDA
b. 
The  reference  landing  distance  'one  power  unit  inoperative'  (determined in accordance with 
para 10) × the 'one power unit inoperative' field length factor of: 
CDG
1.19 − 0.2
  or 1.08, whichever is the greater. 
CDA
CDG  and  CDA  are  the  coefficients  of  drag  when  in  contact  with  the  ground  and  when  airborne 
respectively. 
2-15 Fig 2 Reference Landing Distances Required - Destination and Alternate Aerodromes 
Gradient 5%
VAT +15 kt
0
Stop
30 ft
Landing Distance
Destination or Alternate Landing Distance Required
= (Landing Dist × see para 11)
For propeller driven aircraft only. If Alternate nominated.
Alternate Landing Distance Required
= (Destination Ldg Dist × .95)
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-15- Landing Requirements 
12.  Limiting  Landing  Weight.    Paras  8  to  11  covered  the  landing  distance  requirements  for  the 
destination  and  alternate  aerodrome.    Each  must  be  considered  separately  and  the  most  limiting  will 
govern the maximum permissible landing weight (C of A and WAT limits apart).  When comparing the 
destination and alternate to obtain the limiting landing weight, allowance must be made for fuel burn-off 
between destination and alternate. 
13.  Calculation.  Procedure for determining the limiting landing weight is given below: 
a. 
Jet Aircraft - Destination Aerodrome
(1)  The  landing  distance  required  must  not  exceed  the  landing  distance  available  on  the 
runway most suitable for landing in still air conditions (using runway slope if required). 
(2)  The  landing  distance  required  must  not  exceed  the  landing  distance  available  on  the 
runway which may have to be used in forecast wind (factored) conditions (using runway slope 
if required). 
(3)  Compare the weights obtained in (1) and (2) above with those of the C of A and WAT limits; 
the least weight will be the maximum permissible landing weight for a destination aerodrome. 
b. 
Jet  Aircraft  -  Alternate  Aerodrome.    The  procedure  to  resolve  the  maximum  permissible 
landing weight at an alternate aerodrome is identical to that for the destination aerodrome. 
c. 
Propeller-driven Aircraft - Destination Aerodrome
(1)  The  landing  distance  required  must  not  exceed  the  landing  distance  available  (using 
destination scale) on the runway most suitable for landing in still air conditions (using runway 
slope if required). 
(2)  The  landing  distance  required  must  not  exceed  the  landing  distance  available  on  the 
runway  which  may  have  to  be  used  in  forecast  wind  (factored)  conditions  using  the 
destination scale if no alternate has been nominated in the flight plan, or the alternate scale if 
an alternate has been nominated (using runway slope if required). 
(3)  Compare the weights obtained in (1) and (2) above with those of the C of A and WAT limits; 
the least weight will be the maximum permissible landing weight for a destination aerodrome. 
d. 
Propeller-driven  Aircraft  -  Alternate  Aerodrome.    The  procedure  to  resolve  the  maximum 
permissible landing weight at an alternate aerodrome is identical to that for the destination aerodrome 
except that the landing distance required is calculated by use of the alternate scale throughout. 
14.  Multiple  Runways.    If  aerodromes  have  multiple  runways,  then  each  runway  will  need  to  be 
treated  individually,  unless  the  best  runway  can  be  determined  by  inspection.    Generally,  the  still  air 
case  will  always  be  the  more  limiting  unless  a  tail  wind  prevails,  or  in  the  multi-runway  case,  the 
forecast  wind  requires  that  a  shorter  runway  be  considered  (e.g.  if  the  crosswind  component  were 
outside the aeroplane limits for landing on the longest equivalent runway). 
Summary 
15.  Having now decided on the maximum permissible landing weight, this could impose a restriction 
on  take-off  weight  since  maximum  take-off  weight  can  never  exceed  maximum  landing  weight  plus 
burn-off fuel from departure to destination or alternate aerodrome. 
Note:    In  this  chapter  reference  has  been  made  to  landing  distance  required  or  the  maximum 
permissible landing weight; these 2 terms are complementary and amount to the same thing. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 -2-16- Operating Data Manual (ODM) 
CHAPTER 16- OPERATING DATA MANUAL (ODM) 
Introduction 
1. 
Traditionally  Scheduled  Performance  and  flight  planning  information  is  presented  to  UK  military 
aircrew  in  the  Operating  Data  Manual  (ODM),  Topic  16  of  the  Aircraft  Document  Set.  The  ODM  is 
issued  for  a  specific  aircraft  type,  fixed  or  rotary  wing.    It  is  used  in  conjunction  with  the  handling 
techniques  and  operating  procedures  in  the  Aircrew  Manual,  and  subject  to  the  overriding  limitations 
contained  in  the  Release  to  Service.  In  content  the  ODM  is  broadly  equivalent  to  the  performance 
section of a civilian Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) and is regulated by MAA Regulatory Article (RA) 1310. 
MOD  Handling  Squadron  provide  Subject  Matter  Expertise  for  the  provision  and  content  of  ODM 
together with performance advice. 
2. 
The  ODM  contains  all  the  performance  information  necessary  for  the  performance,  and  flight, 
planning  of  any  flight  the  aircraft  is  likely  to  be  required  to  undertake.  The  ODM  calculations  provide 
performance  limitations,  e.g.  the  maximum  weight  at  which  a  take-off  can  be  made  from  a  specific 
runway in the relevant ambient conditions, and these limitations must be considered mandatory.  
3. 
The ODM will typically state the regulatory basis for the data contained and many of the regulatory 
required  margins  will  already  be  applied  to  reduce  the  calculations required. The data represented in 
the  ODM  is  to  the  Normal  Operating  Standard  (NOS)  (Volume  2,  Chapter  9).  NOS  is  broadly 
equivalent  to  civilian  standards  and  provides  an  equivalent  standard  of  safety.  For  some  types, 
particularly  fast-jets,  NOS  will  not  replicate  civilian  standards  but  will  be  as  near  to  them  as  can  be 
practically achieved for the type. To provide increased operational capability the ODM may also contain 
data to the Reduced Operating Standard (ROS) and/or to the Military Operating Standard (MOS).  This 
increased capability is achieved by the deliberate erosion of performance safety margins, making ROS 
and  MOS  operations  approximately  10  times  and  100  times  the  risk  of  NOS  respectively.    Typically 
MOS operations provide no allowance for engine failure.  Due to the increased risk inherent in the use 
of ROS or MOS data, explicit authorization is required, which is regulated via MAA RA1330. 
4. 
Dependent  of  aircraft  type  the  ODM  will  consist  of  one  or  more  volumes.    A  fast-jet  ODM  can 
normally be contained in one book.  For heavy fixed wing aeroplanes it is customary for the ODM to be 
divided into two books.  Book 1 contains the Scheduled Performance data and Book 2 Flight Planning 
data. A helicopter ODM is often augmented by Rapid Planning Data for in-flight use. 
5. 
Many  in  service  aircraft  have  a  means  of  providing  performance  planning  data  to  aircrew  that 
either compliments or replaces the traditional ODM.  Some of these alternates are: 
a. 
Civilian aircraft types will typically be operated using the civilian AFM, either hard copy or 
supplied electronically via interactive screens on the aircraft or on Electronic Flight Bags.  
b. 
American supplied types may be operated from the American supplied documents.  
c. 
Flight planning may be available via flight planning software and some types have type 
specific scheduled performance electronic performance planning aids.  
d. 
Quick-look performance data is often contained within the Flight Reference Cards (FRCs) or 
Flight Crew Checklists (FCCs).  
However performance planning data is provided, it remains a fundamental requirement that it is consistent 
with the certified source data, either contained within the ODM, AFM or other specified document. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 -2-16- Operating Data Manual (ODM) 
Presentation of Data 
6. 
Performance  planning  as  outlined  in  the  previous  chapters  is  a  lengthy  process  when  using  basic 
methods.  When the field lengths were 'balanced' (i.e. ASDA=TODA), the maximum take-off weight was 
produced in a reduced time, albeit with some penalty to take-off weight if clearway does in fact exist. 
7. 
In  the  D  and  X  and  the  more  recent  D  and  R  graphs,  comparison  is  made  between  the 
unbalanced  lengths  of  TODA/ASDA  and  TORA/ASDA.    By  adjustment  in  the  construction  of  the 
graphs,  the  above-mentioned  unbalanced  lengths  are  equated  into  equivalent  balanced  field 
lengths, the least of which is taken to be limiting.  Associated with each equivalent balanced field 
length is either an X or a V1/VR value, both serving the same function (the X being converted to a 
V1/VR  ratio  at  a  later  stage).    The  X  or  V1/VR  ratio  used  is  the  one  which  is  associated  with  the 
limiting  D  (or  R)  value.    This  need  not  necessarily  be  the  smallest  value  of  X  or  V1/VR.    A  single 
graph gives the maximum weight for a limiting value chosen (D or R).  In some cases a separate 
graph  may  be  supplied  for  both  D  factor  and  R  factor.    Conversion  of  V1/VR  ratio  or  X  to  V1
completes  the  take-off  weight  problem  as  far  as  runway  criteria  is  concerned  except  for  the 
checking  of  the  all  power  units  operating  limitation  and  maximum  permissible  V1/VR  ratio.    This 
solution may be presented as an individual graph, actual TODA being used and not the D factor.  
Volume  2,  Chapter  17  contains  more  detailed  information  on  D  and X graphs and the method of 
using them. 
8. 
In some ODMs, the 'all power units operating' case and the 'one power unit inoperative' case are 
both  presented  on  one  graph,  thus  giving  the  most  rapid  solution  when  using  ODMs.    It  must  be 
stressed  that,  since  this  gives  field  length  limiting  values,    no  account  is  taken  in  calculation  for 
maximum permissible take-off weight or limitations which can be imposed by possible net take-off flight 
path, en route terrain clearance and landing distance requirement restrictions. 
Regulated Take-off Graphs (RTOGs) 
9. 
A further step in the simplification of the take-off performance calculation is the Regulated Take-
off  Graph  (RTOG)  (Fig  1).    This  is  a  simple  graph,  for  an  aeroplane  type,  constructed  for  individual 
runways  at  a  chosen  aerodrome  taking  account  of  variable  atmospheric  conditions  (i.e. temperature, 
wind  and  pressure)  and  field  length  limitations  (i.e.  take-off  field  lengths,  elevation  and  slope).    Entry 
into  the  graph  against  temperature,  through  the  reported  wind  component,  produces  the  maximum 
take-off weight, V1 and VR.  The data may also be presented in table form. 
10.  A book of these graphs is produced to cover all commonly used aerodrome runways.  The graphs 
may  incorporate  modifications  demanded  by  noise  limitations,  tyre  speed limitations, and net take-off 
flight path with instructions, if necessary, for executing a planned, or emergency, turn.  It is possible to 
match strange aerodrome criteria, for which no graph has been prepared with those for which a graph 
is  produced,  or  with  specially  prepared  balanced  field  length  graphs.    This  obviates  the  need  to 
calculate the performance plan from first principles.  Where the runway criteria is such that the WAT 
limit  imposes  the  only  restriction,  then  the  runway  may  appear  as  an  entry  in  a  table  of  limiting 
conditions.  The table generally lists: 
a. 
The runway. 
b. 
Aerodrome dimensions. 
c. 
Limiting wind component. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 -2-16- Operating Data Manual (ODM) 
d. 
Either a correction to VR to obtain V1, or the V1/VR ratio. 
Conclusion 
11.  The  quickest  and  most  accurate  method  of  solving  performance  problems  is  to  use  a  computer 
with specially written software.  Such software has been in use by aeroplane manufacturers and large 
fleet  operators  for  some  time  and  is  now  more  generally  available.    Aircrew  should  note  that 
emergency  turn  data  produced  electronically  often  does  not  adhere  to  an  approved  standard 
instrument departure profile. 
12.  The  main  end-product  in  performance  planning  is  finding  the  value  of  the  maximum  permissible 
regulated take-off weight.  It should be clear, from this and the preceding chapters, that this weight may 
be  determined  by  the  take-off  distance,  the  net  take-off  flight  path,  the  en  route  terrain  clearance,  or 
the landing distance limitations, depending upon the particular circumstances. 
Revised Oct 13   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 -2-16- Operating Data Manual (ODM) 
2-16 Fig 1 Example of an RTOG 
LIVERPOOL
RUNWAY
27 ISSUE
JUL 91
TORA
7500
ASDA
7602 TODA
8100
LDA
7500
SLOPE
0.25DN ELEV
77
OBSTACLE
1
2
3
4
5
6
DISTANCE
8100
HEIGHT
-12
LIMITS
WIND
10T
OB1/S1
5T
OB1/S1
0
OB1/S1
10H
OB1/S1
20H
OB1/S1
30H
OB1/S1
340
VR
ANTI-ICING
ENG ONLY
3227 LBS
330
20H
3
Sub't From
0H
155
RTOW
VR For V1
MAX
154
320
0
1
153
0H
5
152
T
25
27
151
24
310
23
150
149
148
300
147
24
10T
26
290
145
144
143
280
142
23
141
22
25
140
23
270
139
138
137
24
280
-10
0
10
20
30
40
50
20H 10H
0
10T
o
TEMPERATURE  C
PRESSURE HEIGHT CORRECTIONS
LANDING WEIGHT
TEMPERATURE RANGE
10T WIND 223171 LBS
o
o
o
5  C
15  C
25  C
7T WIND 233000 LBS
+716 LB per - 100ft
+648 LB per - 100ft
+896 LB per - 100ft
-630 LB per + 100 ft
-727 LB per + 100 ft
-1178 LB per + 100 ft
LDA
7500 FT
Revised Oct 13   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 – 2-17 - D and X Graphs 
CHAPTER 17 - D AND X GRAPHS 
Introduction  
1. 
With the Civil Aviation Authority’s standard performance charts as used in the licensing examination 
being presented in a form which is typical of that used in modern flight manuals, many operators will be 
using an aeroplane Operating data manual (ODM) which still uses the D and X (or D and R) method of 
presenting the field length data to be used to determine a maximum weight for the specified conditions.  
In these charts, the two variables D and X are utilized in an intermediate stage of the calculations, but the 
graphs can be used without an exact knowledge of their physical meaning. 
General Description 
2. 
Although it is not necessary to understand the significance of D and X in order to use the graph 
successfully, the following points are added for interest: 
a. 
D represents the equivalent balanced field length, taking account of slope, wind etc. 
b. 
X  represents  a  correction  to  the  respective  deviation  from  the  balanced  field  power  failure 
speed ratio. 
c. 
The  values  of  X  are  ratios  of  V1  and  VR  for  a  balanced  field,  but  the  value  of  100  is 
appropriate to the balanced field length. 
d. 
Fig  1  shows  the  normal  plot  of  the  values  of  ASDR,  TORR  (all  engines  and  one  engine 
inoperative),  TODR  (all  engines  and  one  engine  inoperative)  and  the  following  points  should  be 
noted: 
(1)  X is 100 when TODA and ASDA are equal in still air with nil slope.  Thus with a TODA of 
6,000 ft and an ASDA of 6,000 ft in still air with nil slope, the D and X values obtained from 
this graph would be 6,000 and 100 respectively. 
(2)  In  the  TORA/ASDA  graph,  the  kink  in  the  D  values  represents  the  point  where  the  all 
engines TORR becomes limiting. 
(3)  TODR  (all  engines  operating)  gives  the  value  of  weight  which  satisfies  the  all  engines 
operating factorized TOD requirements. 
2-17 Fig 1 Significant Point on Final Take-off Analysis Plot 
TORR
TODR
ASDR
(All engines
operating)
TODR
R
/V
(One engine
1V
2
inoperative)
1
3
WEIGHT
3. 
Graphs are usually supplied for the following cases: 
a. 
D and X for TODA/ASDA. 
b. 
D and X for TORA/ASDA. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-17 - D and X Graphs 
c. 
D  for  TODA  (all  engines  operating).    (Note:  Some  aeroplanes  do  not  use  this  system,  but 
supply a graph to check that the TODR with all engines operating does not exceed the TODA). 
d. 
Take-off weight for a given value of D. 
e. 
Power failure speed ratio for a given value of X. 
f. 
Limitations of power failure speed ratio (brake energy considerations). 
Detailed Instructions 
4. 
Resolution of take-off weight is as follows: 
a. 
Enter the first graph with TODA and ASDA appropriate to the runway to be used, allowing for 
runway  slope  and  wind  as  necessary.    The  intersection  of  the  two  lines  so  determined  gives 
values of D and X which should be noted. 
b. 
Enter  the  next  graph  TORA  and  ASDA  and,  working  through  runway  slope  and  wind 
component, extract second values of D and X. 
c. 
Enter the third graph (where supplied) and obtain the value of D for the all engines operating case. 
d. 
Compare the three values of D; the lowest value represents the critical case and that value of 
D is then used to obtain the maximum take-off weight.  If this value of D is obtained from the two 
graphs showing ASDA/TORA or ASDA/TODA use the value of X associated with the appropriate 
D.  If the lowest value of D comes from the take-off distance all engines operating case, then the 
value  of  X  is  taken  from  the  graph  giving  the  next  lowest  value  of  D.    In  those  ODMs  where  a 
value  of  D  is  not  obtained  for  the  take-off  distance  (all  engines),  then  it  is  necessary,  once  the 
take-off  weight  has  been  obtained,  to  check  that  the  TODR  (all  engines)  does  not  exceed  the 
TODA. 
e.  The  next  graph  is  entered  with  aerodrome  altitude  and  temperature;  the  take-off  weight 
corresponding to the critical value of D is thus obtained (see Fig 2). 
f. 
The  value  of  the  power  failure  speed  ratio  corresponding  to  the  critical  value  of  X  is  then 
obtained.    It  is  now  necessary  to  check  that  the  power  failure  speed  ratio  does  not  exceed  the 
limiting value for the brake energy consideration. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-17 - D and X Graphs 
2-17 Fig 2 Example of Max TOW/D Chart 
Maximum Take-off Weight For A Given Value Of 'D'
55
60
65
70
75
80
15,000
Weight - Thousands KG
14,000
13,000
Flaps 15
o
12,000
T
F
11,000
10,000
ltitude
A
10,000
e
I
t
S
9,000
FT
e
erodrom
A
e
A
+
F
8,000
3
FT
0
'
I
C o
S
'D
7,000
A
8,000
FT
+20
6,000
o
FT
C
ISA 5,000
7,000
+1
IS
0 o
4,000 FT
A
C
3,000 FT
6,000
2,000 FT
Sea Level
1,000 FT
5,000
ISA-1
4,000
0 Co
3,000
10
20
30
40
120
130
140
150
160
170
180
o
Air Temperature  C
Weight - Thousands LB
5. 
If it is found that the take-off weight and power failure speed ratio do not meet these requirements, 
recalculation is then necessary.  
6. 
In the brake energy limitation case, this can be done in one of the following ways: 
a. 
By  having  a  graph  showing  the  correction  to  take-off  weight  for  brake  energy  limitations.  
With  this  graph  one  enters  with  the  case  that  is  limiting  (ie  either  TODA/ASDA  or  TORA/ASDA) 
and  the  calculated  power  failure  speed  ratio  (PFSR).    Against  the  maximum  permitted  value  of 
PFSR  a  percentage  correction  to  take-off  weight  is  obtained  to  satisfy  the  brake  energy 
requirement. 
b. 
Reducing the value of ASDA by an arbitrary amount (say 500 ft) and recalculating D and X. A 
new  take-off  weight  is  then  obtained  together  with  a  new  value  of  PFSR.    If  brake  energy  is 
limiting, a new maximum value of PFSR is obtained with the new take-off weight.  This process is 
repeated  for  other  values  of  ASDA  and  a  graph  is plotted for both sets of PFSR against weight.  
The intersection of the two lines so obtained then gives maximum take-off weight and associated 
PFSR as shown in Fig 3. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-17 - D and X Graphs 
2-17 Fig 3 Plot of PFSRs Against Take-off Weight 
175
Required
174
PFSR
T
H
IG
E
W 173
Brake Energy Limit
PFSR
172
.86
.88
.90
.92
V /V
1
R
7. 
The intersection of the two lines (in Fig 3) gives the take-off weight and the corresponding PFSR.  
From this the take-off distance (all engines) operating requirement must again be checked. 
Range of V1 Using D And X Graphs 
8. 
It is possible from the D and X graphs to obtain a range of V1 under certain conditions: 
a. 
Take-off Weight Equal to Maximum Take-off Weight
(1)  When TOD (All Engines) is Limiting (Fig 4a). 
(2)  When  TOR  (All  Engines)  is  Limiting  (Fig  4b).    In  this  case,  using  ASDA  the  X  value 
would  be  read  as  the  intersection  of  the TORA and ASDA lines (see Point A in Fig 5).  For 
the  same  take-off  weight  the  X  value  can  be  as  low  as  Point  B  (Fig  5).    Hence  a  useable 
range of X exists giving a range of V1 if desired. 
2-17 Fig 4 Take-off Distance (All Engines) Limiting 
TODR (All engines)
ASDR
RV/1V
TODR (One engine inoperative)
WEIGHT
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-17 - D and X Graphs 
2-17 Fig 5 Take-off Run (All Engines) Limiting 
TORR (All engines)
ASDR
RV/1V
Range
TORR (One engine inoperative)
WEIGHT
2-17 Fig 6 D and X Matrix 
'A'
'X'
ASDA
104
102
'B'
1
'D’
0
00
0
,0
9
0
0
,0
8
0
9
0
8
,0
7
0
0
,0
6
9
0
6
0
,0
5
TORA
b. 
Take-off  Weight Less Than Maximum Take-off Weight.  There will always be a range of 
V1 when the take-off weight is less than the maximum take-off weight.  The usable range will be 
governed by take-off run or take-off distance whichever is limiting in determining maximum take-
off weight (see Fig 6). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-17 - D and X Graphs 
2-17 Fig 7 Final Take-off Analysis - Less than Maximum Take-off Weight 
a  Take-off Distance Limiting
ASDR
R
ASDR
R
TO DR
TO DR
/ V
/ V
V 1 

TORR
V
{ange
TORR
R
ange
R
Actual
Max
Actual
Max
WEIGHT
WEIGHT
b  Tak e-o ff Run Limit ing
TORR
R
ASDR
R
/ V
/ V
V 1 
V 1 
ASDR
TORR
TODR
{Range
{
TODR
ange
R
Actual
Max
Actual
Max
WEIGHT
WEIGHT
9. 
Method.
a. 
Enter the graph to find D appropriate to the actual take-off weight. 
b. 
Enter whichever graph was limiting on maximum take-off weight case (i.e. TORA or TODA). 
c. 
Enter with TORA or TODA and go through to meet the required value of D and read off the 
value of X (this is the minimum value of X). 
d. 
Re-enter with ASDA and go up through the graph to meet the required value of D and read 
off the value of X (this is the maximum value of X). 
e. 
With  these  two  values  of  X,  find  the  maximum  and  minimum  V1  and  ensure  that  the 
maximum permitted value is not exceeded. 
Note:    The  maximum  weight  given  by  field  length  consideration  may  not  always  be  the  maximum 
permissible  take-off  weight  for  the  flight.    D  and  X  graphs  do  not  take  account  of  other  performance 
regulations e.g. WAT limitations, net flight path, etc. 
10.  The  explanation  and  method  of  use,  stated  in  the  previous  paragraphs,  hold  good  for  the  more 
recent D and R graphs, where the main change is that instead of extracting X values, to be converted 
to a V1/VR ratio at a later stage, a V1/VR ratio is obtained directly. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 6 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
CHAPTER 18 - GRAPHS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  term  'graph'  is  usually  applied  to  a  pictorial  representation  of  how  one  variable  changes  in 
response  to  changes  in  another.   This chapter will deal with the form of simple graphs, together with 
the extraction of data from them, and from the 'families of graphs' and carpet graphs that are frequently 
encountered  in  aeronautical  publications.    Although  not  strictly  a  'graph',  the  Nomogram  will  also  be 
covered.    The  pictorial  representation  of  data  in  such  forms  as  histograms,  frequency  polygons,  and 
frequency curves will be treated in Volume 13. 
Coordinate Systems 
2. 
Graphs are often constructed from a table of, say, experimental data which gives the value of one 
variable, x, and the experimentally found value of the corresponding variable, y.  In order to construct a 
graph from this data it is necessary to establish a framework or coordinate system on which to plot the 
information.    Two  such  coordinate  systems  are  commonly  used:  Cartesian  coordinates  and  Polar 
coordinates.  Both systems will be described below, but the remainder of this chapter will be concerned 
only with the Cartesian system. 
3. 
Cartesian Coordinates.  Cartesian coordinates are the most frequently used system.  Two axes 
are  constructed  at  right  angles,  their  intersection  being  known  as  the  origin.    Conventionally  the 
horizontal  'x'  axis  represents  the  independent  variable;  the  vertical  'y'  axis  represents  the  dependent 
variable, i.e. the value that is determined for a given value of x.  Any point on the diagram can now be 
represented uniquely by a pair of coordinate values written as (x,y) provided that the axes are suitably 
scaled.  It is not necessary for the axes to have the same scale.  Thus, in Fig 1, the point P has the 
coordinates (3,4), i.e. it is located by moving 3 units along the x axis and then vertically by 4 'y' units.  It 
is  sometimes  inconvenient  to  show  the  origin  (0,0)  on  the  diagram  when  the  values  of  either  x  or  y 
cover a range which does not include 0. Fig 2 shows such an arrangement where the x-axis is scaled 
from  0  but  the  corresponding  values  of  y  do  not  include  0.    The  intersection  of  the  axes  is  the  point 
(0,200).  It should be noted from Fig 1 that negative values of x or y can be shown to the left and below 
the origin respectively. 
2-18 Fig 1 Cartesian Coordinates 
y
8
6
P(3,4)
4
2
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
4
5
–2
x
Revised Apr 15   
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
2-18 Fig 2 Cartesian Coordinates - Displaced Origin
y
400
300
200
1
2
3
4
5
6
x
4. 
Polar  Coordinates.    Polar  coordinates  specify  a  point  as  a  distance  and  direction  from  an  origin.  
Polar coordinates are commonly encountered in aircraft position reporting where the position is given as a 
range  and  bearing  from  a  ground  beacon;  they  are  also  used  in  certain  areas  of  mathematics  and 
physics.  As with Cartesian systems it is necessary to define an origin, but only one axis or reference line 
is required.  Any point is then uniquely described by its distance from the origin and by the angle that the 
line joining the origin to the point makes with the reference line.  The coordinates are written in the form 
(r,θ), with θ in either degree or radian measure.  Conventionally, angles are measured anti-clockwise from 
the  reference  line as positive and clockwise as negative.  Fig 3 illustrates the system.  Point Q has the 
π
1
− 1π
coordinates (3, 30º) or  (3, –330º) in degree measure; (3, 
) or (3, 
) in radian measure. 
6
6
2-18 Fig 3 Polar Coordinates 
Q(3,30º)
30º
0
1
2
3
4
The Straight Line Graph 
5. 
Table  1  shows  a  series  of  values  of  x  and  the  corresponding  values  of  y.    Fig  4  shows  these 
points plotted on a graph. 
Table 1 Values of x and y 

–3 
–2 
–1 





–6 
–4 
–2 




It will be seen that all the points lie on a straight line which passes through the origin.  It is clear from 
the  table  of  values  that  if  the  value  of  x  is,  say,  doubled  then  the  corresponding  value  of  y  is  also 
doubled.  Such a relationship is known as direct proportion and the graphical representation of direct 
proportion is always a straight line passing through the origin.  In general the value of y corresponding 
to a value of x may be derived by multiplying x by some constant factor, m, ie: y = mx.  In the example, 
m has the value 2, i.e. y = 2x.  Because such a relationship produces a straight-line graph, it is known 
Revised Apr 15   
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
as  a  linear  relationship  and  y  =  mx  is  known  as  a  linear  equation.    Such  relationships  are  not 
uncommon.    For  example  the  relationship  between distance travelled, (d), speed, (s), and time, (t) is 
given by d = st.  This would be a straight-line graph with d plotted on the y-axis and t on the x-axis. 
2-18 Fig 4 Graph of y = 2x
6
5
4
y
3
2
1
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
–1
x
–2
–3
–4
–5
–6
6. 
It is of course possible for a straight line through the origin to slope down to the right rather than 
up to the right as in the previous example.  In this case positive values of y are generated by negative 
values of x and the equation becomes: y = – mx 
7. 
Consider now the values of x and y in Table 2, and the associated graph, Fig 5. 
Table 2 Values of x and y 

–3 
–2 
–1 





–4 
–2 





2-18 Fig 5 Graph of y = 2x + 2 
8
6
y
4
2
–4
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
4
–2
x
–4
–6
–8
Clearly  the  graph  is  closely  related  to  the  previous  example  of  y  =  2x.   In essence the line has been 
raised up the y-axis parallel to the y = 2x line.  Investigation of the table of values will reveal that the 
Revised Apr 15   
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
relationship  between x and y is governed by the equation: y = 2x + 2, and in general, a graph of this 
type has the equation: y = mx + c, where c is a constant.  It will be apparent that the equation y = mx is 
identical to the equation y = mx + c if a value of 0 is attributed to the constant c.  Thus, y = mx + c is 
the  general  equation  for  a  straight  line,  m  and  c  being  constants  which  can  be  positive,  negative  or 
zero.  A zero value of m generates a line parallel to the x-axis.  The value of c is given by the point at 
which the line crosses the y-axis and is known as the intercept. 
8. 
Gradient.    Consider  Fig  6  which  shows  two  straight-line  graphs:  y  =  2x  and  y  =  4x.    Both  lines 
pass through the origin and the essential difference between them is their relative steepness.  The line 
y = 4x shows y changing faster for any given change in x than is the case for y = 2x.  The line y = 4x is 
said to have a steeper gradient than the line y = 2x.  The gradient is defined as the change in y divided 
by the corresponding change in x, ie  y  .  Rearranging the general equation for a straight line (y = mx), 
x
y
to make m the subject gives m = 
, i.e. the constant m is the gradient of the straight line.  As the line 
x
y = mx + c has been shown to be parallel to y = mx, this clearly has the same gradient, given by the  
value of m.  In the equation: 
distance = speed × time 
'speed'  is  equivalent  to  'm'  in  the  general  equation,  and  it  is  apparent  that  the  gradient,  speed, 
represents a rate of change - in this case the rate of change of distance with time.  This concept of the 
gradient representing a rate of change will become important when dealing with calculus in Volume 13, 
Chapter 14. 
2-18 Fig 6 Graphs of y = 2x and y = 4x 
y = 4x
8
y = 2x
6
y
4
2
–4
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
4
x
–2
–4
Non-Linear Graphs 
9. 
Not  all  relationships  result  in  straight-line  graphs,  indeed,  they  are  a  minority.    A  body  falling  to earth 
under the influence of gravity alone falls a distance y feet in time t seconds governed by the equation: 
y = 16t2
Table 3 shows a range of values of t with the corresponding values of y, and Fig 7 the associated graph. 
Revised Apr 15   
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
Table 3 Values of t and y 









16 
64 
144 
256 
400 
Although not relevant in this example, notice that negative values of t produce identical positive values 
of y to their positive counterparts.  The graph is therefore symmetrical about the y-axis and the shape 
is known as a parabola.  The constant in front of the t2 term determines the steepness of the graph. 
2-18 Fig 7 Graph of y = 16t2
400
300
y
200
100
–5
–4
–3
–2
–1
1
2
3
3
5
t (sec)
10.  Consider now the problem "How long will it take to travel 120 km at various speeds?"  This can be 
expressed as the equation: 
120
t = s
where  t  =  time  in  hours  and  s  =  speed  in  km/hr.    This  is  an  example  of  inverse  proportion,  ie an 
increase in s results in a proportional decrease in t.  If values are calculated for s and t, and a graph is 
plotted, it will have the form illustrated in Fig 8 known as a hyperbola. 
2-18 Fig 8 Graph of t =  120  - Inverse Proportion 
s
10
r)
(h 5
t
0
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100
s (km/hr)
11.  Graphs of y = sin x and y = cos x will be encountered frequently.  The shapes of the graphs are 
shown below (Fig 9). 
Revised Apr 15   
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
2-18 Fig 9 Graphs of sin and cos 
2-18 Fig 9a  y = sin x 
2-18 Fig 9b  y = cos x  
1
1
0
90
180
270
360
0
π
π


2
2
–1
–1
The sine graph is shown with the x-axis scaled in degrees while the cosine graph has the x-axis scaled 
in radians.  Either is correct; the radian form is frequently encountered in scientific texts.  Sketches of 
these  graphs  are  useful  when  trying  to  determine  the  value  and  sign  of  trigonometric  functions  of 
angles outside of the normal 0º to 90º range.  Notice that both graphs repeat themselves after 360º (2π
radians). 
12.  Finally, it is worth considering the graph that describes the relationship: 
y = eax
where  a  is  a  positive  or  negative  constant.    This  form  of  equation  is  very  common  in  science  and 
mathematics  and  variants  of  it  can  be  found  in  the  description  of  radioactive  decay,  in  compound 
interest problems, and in the behaviour of capacitors.  The irrational number 'e' equates to 2.718 to 4 
significant  figures.    The  graph  of  y  =  ex  is  shown  in  Fig  10a  and  that  of  y  =  e–x  in  Fig  10b.    The 
significant  point  about  these  graphs,  which  are  known  as  exponential  graphs,  is  that  the  rate  of 
increase (or decrease) of y increases (or decreases) depending upon the value of y. A large value of y 
exhibits a high rate of change.  It is also worth noting that there can be found a fixed interval of x over 
which  the  value  of  y  doubles  (or  halves)  its  original  value  no  matter  what  initial  value  of  y  is  chosen.  
This is the basis of the concept of radioactive decay half-life.  The interval is equivalent to  0.693  where 
a
a is the constant in the equation y = eax.
2-18 Fig 10 Exponential Graphs
8-7 Fig 10a  y = ex
8-7 Fig 10b  y = e–x
60
1.0
50
0.8
40
0.6
y
30
y
0.4
20
0.2
10
0
0
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
x
x
Revised Apr 15   
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
13.  Logarithmic  Scales.    Clearly  plotting  and  interpreting  from  exponential  graphs  can  be  difficult.  
The  problem  can  be  eased  by  plotting  on  a graph where the x-axis is scaled linearly while the y-axis 
has a logarithmic scale.  This log-linear graph paper reduces the exponential curve to a straight line.  A 
comparison between the linear and log-linear plots of y = ex is shown in Fig 11. 
2-18 Fig 11 Comparison Between Linear and Log-linear Plots 
2-18 Fig 11a  y = ex (Linear  Scales) 
2-18 Fig 11b  y = ex (Log-linear Scales) 
60
100
50
50
40
y
y
30
10
20
5
10
0
1
1
2
3
4
0
1
2
3
4
x
x
The Presentation and Extraction of Data 
14.  So far this chapter has been concerned with the mathematical background to simple graphs.  More 
commonly  graphs  will  be  encountered  and  used  as  a  source  of  data,  especially  in  the  field  of  flight 
planning  and  aircraft  performance.    Whilst  occasionally  these  graphs  will  be  either  the  simple  forms 
already described or variations on these forms, more often rather complex graphs are used as being the 
only  practical  way  of  displaying  complex  relations.    Two  such  types  of  complex  graph  will  be described 
here in order to establish the method of data extraction.  Finally, the nomogram will be discussed. 
Revised Apr 15   
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
15.  Carpet Graphs.  An example of a carpet graph is shown in Fig 12. 
2-18 Fig 12 Carpet Graph 
Altimeter Lag Correction
(for altitudes up to 5000 feet)
0
0
-50
5
200
-100
250
10
Example 
-150
300
(see text)
Dive Angle (degrees)
15
-200
350
IAS (knots)
-250
400
20
-300
450
25
-350
500
30
The  aim  of  the  graph  is  to  indicate  the  lag  in  the  altimeter  experienced  in  a  dive.    Unlike  the  graphs 
already  discussed  where  one  input,  'x',  produced  one  output,  'y',  the  carpet  graph  has  two  inputs  for 
one output.  The output is on the conventional 'y' axis but there is no conventional 'x' axis, rather there 
are two input axes.  On the right hand edge of the 'carpet' diagram are figures for dive angle whilst on 
the bottom edge are figures for indicated air speed.  To use the graph it is necessary to enter with one 
parameter, say dive angle, and follow the relevant dive angle line into the diagram until it intersects the 
appropriate  IAS  line.    Intermediate  dive  angle  and  IAS  values  need  to  be  interpolated,  thus  in  the 
example values of 17º and 375 kt have been entered.  From the point of intersection a horizontal line is 
constructed which will give the required lag correction figure where it intersects the 'y' axis, −118 feet in 
the example. 
16.  Families  of  Graphs.    It  is  often  necessary  to  consider  a  number  of  independent  factors  before 
coming  to  an  end  result.    In  this  situation  a  family  of  graphs  is  frequently  used  to  present  the  required 
information.  Fig 13 shows such a family designed for the calculation of the aircraft's take-off ground run.  
Apart from the aircraft configuration which is indicated in the graph title, there are five input parameters.  
There will very often be a series of related graphs with variations in the title, for example in this case there 
will be another family of graphs for an aircraft with wing stores.  It is clearly important that the correct set is 
selected.  The method of using the graph will be described with reference to the example. 
Revised Apr 15   
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
2-18 Fig 13 Family of Graphs 
Take-off Ground Run. Clean or Gunpod Only
Mid-flap
RL
RL
RL
4000
3500
Temperature 
Example  
3000
Relative to
(see text)
ISA(  C)
ISA +15
2500
)teef(
ISA
n
u
2000
R
ISA -20
d
n
u
or
4000
G
1500
2000
0
Altitude 
1000
(feet)
  -20
0
20
40
Tailwind
500
4.4
4.6
4.8
5.0
5.2
Headwind
OAT( C)
Aircraft Mass 
Downhill
Uphill
-2
0
2
-20
0
20
40
(tonnes)
Runway Slope (%)
Reported Wind Component (knots)
RL = Reference Line
17.  At  the  left  end  is  a  small  carpet  graph.    Starting  with  the  value  of  outside  air  temperature  (21º) 
proceed  vertically  to  intersect  the  altitude  line  (2,000  feet).    Alternatively  enter  the  'carpet'  at  the 
intersection of the altitude and temperature relative to ISA.  From this intersection proceed horizontally 
into  the  next  graph  to  intersect  the  vertical  reference  line,  marked  RL.    From  this  point  parallel  the 
curves until reaching the point representing the value of runway slope as indicated on the bottom scale 
(1%  uphill).    From  here  construct  a  horizontal  line  to  the  next  graph  reference  line.    Repeat  the 
procedure of paralleling the curves for aircraft mass (4.8 tonnes) and then proceed horizontally into the 
last graph for head/tail wind (20 kt head) which is used in the same manner.  Finally the horizontal line 
is produced to the right hand scale where the figure for ground run can be read (1,900 feet). 
18.  The Nomogram.  The nomogram is not strictly a graph but a diagrammatic way of solving rather 
complex equations.  There are usually two input parameters for which one or two resultant outputs may 
be  derived.    Fig  14  shows  a  nomogram  for  the  determination  of  aircraft  turning  performance.    The 
equations involved are: 
Rate of turn TAS = 
TAS
Radius of Turn
                    = Acceleration × tan Bank Angle  
This nomogram consists of four parallel scaled lines.  Two known values are joined by a straight line, and 
the intersection of this line with the other scales gives the unknown values.  In the example illustrated, an 
input TAS of 180 kts with a Rate 1 turn gives a resultant of 1.1 g, and a radius of turn of 1nm. 
Revised Apr 15   
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-18 - Graphs 
2-18 Fig 14 A Nomogram 
40
30
20
10
5
4
3
2
1
0.5
Radius of Turn 'T' 
in Nautical Miles
5
10
20
30 40
50
100
200
300 400
700
Rate of Turn 'W' 
in Degrees Per Minute
Rate 1
Rate 2
Rate 3
2
3 4 5
10
1520
30
40
50 60
70
80
Angle of Bank 'θ' in Degrees 
1.11.2
1.5
2
3
4 5
Resultant Acceleration 'g'
180
200
250
300
350
400
450 500
550 600
True Air Speed 'V' 
in Knots
V
The variables are related by the equation V    =         = g tan θ
w

To use the Nomogram join two known values by a straight line 
and the intersection of this line on its projection with the other  
scales give the unknown values
Example : TAS (V)
= 180 Kt
Rate of Turn (W)
= 1
Angle of Bank ( )
θ
= 25
Using the Nomogram (see dotted line)
Resultant Acceleration  (g)
= 1.1
Radius of Turn (T)
= 1 nm
Revised Apr 15   
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 – 2-19 - Reduced Thrust Take Off 
CHAPTER 19 - REDUCED THRUST TAKE-OFF 
Introduction 
1. 
In recent years, a reduced thrust take-off procedure has been developed in order to improve engine 
reliability and to conserve engine life.  Clearly, it can be used only when full take-off thrust is not required 
to  meet  the  various  performance  requirements  on  the  take-off  and  initial  climb  out.    Those  aeroplanes 
approved  for  this  procedure  have  Operating  Data  Manual  (ODM)  appendices  containing  all  the 
information  necessary.    This  procedure  is  known  by  differing  names  e.g.  Graduated  Power  Take-off 
(British Airways), Factored Take-off Thrust (Royal Air Force), Variable Take-off Thrust and many others. 
2. 
A  take-off  can  be  limited  by  many  considerations.    The  three  which  are  significant  in  terms  of 
reduced thrust are: 
a. 
Take-off field lengths. 
b. 
Take-off WAT limitation (engine-out climb gradients). 
c. 
Net take-off flight path (engine-out obstacle clearance). 
3. 
Where the proposed take-off weight (TOW) is such that none of these considerations is limiting, 
then the take-off thrust may be reduced, within reason, until one of the conditions becomes limiting. 
4. 
The following general principles apply: 
a. 
Whilst  the  procedure  is  optional  and  is  generally  used  at  the  Captain’s  discretion,  it  is  not 
unreasonable for an operator to require it to be used when there is no resultant loss of safety. 
b. 
Under Federal Aviation Regulations (USA national regulations) the thrust reduction must not 
exceed  10%,  whilst  the  CAA  require  that  a  minimum  thrust,  easily  identified  by  the  pilot,  will  be 
limiting. 
c. 
The reduced thrust procedure should not be used in either of the following conditions: 
(1)  Contaminated runway surface. 
(2)  When specified in the relevant ODM or Aircrew Manual. 
d. 
The  overall  procedure  includes  a  method  for  periodically  checking  that  the  engines  are 
capable of producing full take-off thrust. 
Method 
5. 
There  are  several  possible  methods  that  can  be  used,  but  the  most  usual  is  the  'assumed 
temperature' method.  A temperature higher than the actual ambient temperature is determined, at which 
the  actual  TOW  would  be  the  Regulated  Take-off  Weight  (RTOW),  all  other  parameters  having  their 
actual  values.    The  take-off  thrust  appropriate  to  this  higher  temperature  is  then  used  for  the  take-off.  
This method ensures that all the take-off performance requirements are met at the reduced thrust, with a 
small additional margin because the density effect of the actual ambient temperature is lower than that of 
the assumed temperature.  While this means that, in the event of a continued take-off following an engine 
failure, the whole take-off would be good in terms of performance, it is nevertheless recommended that 
full take-off power be restored in the event of an engine failure above V1. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-19 - Reduced Thrust Take Off 
6. 
There  are  some  particular  variations  applying  to  aeroplanes  with  contingency  power  ratings; 
details are given in ODMs.  All ODM appendices on reduced thrust contain a worked example.  Finally, 
remember  that  the  performance  consideration  which  is  limiting at full thrust (field length, WAT curve, 
net flight path) is not necessarily the limiting one at reduced thrust. 
Safety Considerations 
7. 
Although  by  using  reduced  thrust  take-offs  the  aeroplane  is  now  being  operated  at  or  near  a 
performance limited condition, more often, there is no increase in risk because: 
a. 
The 'assumed temperature' method of reducing thrust to suit the take-off weight does so at a 
constant  thrust/weight  ratio;  the  actual  take-off  distance,  take-off  run  and  accelerate  stop 
distances  at  reduced  thrust  are  less  than  at  full  thrust  and  full  weight  by  approximately  1%  for 
every 3 °C that the actual ambient temperature is below the assumed temperature. 
b. 
The  accelerate  stop  distance  is  further  improved  by  the  increased  effectiveness  of  full 
reverse thrust at the lower temperature. 
c. 
The continued take-off after engine failure is protected by the ability to restore full power on 
the operative engines. 
d. 
A significant percentage of take-offs are at weights close enough to the RTOW not to warrant 
the use of reduced thrust. 
e. 
The excess margins on lighter weight take-offs are largely preserved by the maximum thrust 
reduction rule (or minimum thrust requirement). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-20- Engine-Out Ferrying 
CHAPTER 20 – ENGINE-OUT FERRYING 
Introduction 
1.  Engine-out ferrying is the process of flying a multi-engine aeroplane from one place to another 
with one of its engines inoperative.  It is a convenience to an operator, in that it avoids the necessity 
of  holding  a  costly  spare  engine  at  all  stations  on  the  operator’s  route  network.    It  is  sometimes 
called  '3-engine  ferry',  which  is  not  inaccurate  for  a  4-engine  aeroplane.    Three-engine  aeroplanes 
can  also  be  ferried  with  one  engine  out  so  long  as  they  meet  the  rules;  some  have  demonstrated 
this.    The  safety  level  on  an  engine-out  ferry  is,  of  course,  lower  than  on  all-engines  operation, 
hence passengers may not be carried.  Depending on the performance and handling qualities of the 
type, and its certification standard, the actual risk can vary from very little more than that associated 
with a normal take-off to considerably more than that with a normal take-off. 
2.  Under British Civil Airworthiness Requirements (BCARs), the ferrying take-off procedure gives full 
protection  against  failure  of  a  further  engine  from  a  controllability  point  of  view  and  limits  the  risk  of 
inadequate  performance  to  a  period  covering  the  maximum  stop  speed  to  the  speed  at  the  'gear 
locked up' point.  A failure in this period would result in an overrun during an abandoned take-off and a 
very  low  screen  height  during  a  continued  take-off.    Those  aeroplanes  approved  for  this  procedure 
have Operating Data Manual (ODM) appendices containing all the information necessary. 
Performance Operating Limitations 
3.
Ferrying is a specialized operation of an aeroplane certificated in Group A Transport Category in 
which  an  acceptable  level  of  safety  is  achieved  by  setting  against  power-unit  unserviceability, 
operational restrictions as to use, weight and flight technique. 
4.  Weather Conditions.  The visibility and cloud ceiling prevailing at the aerodrome of departure and 
forecast  for  the  destination  and  alternate  aerodromes  shall  be  not  less  than  1nm  and  1,000  ft 
respectively (BCARs). 
5.  Route Limitation.  No place along the intended track shall be more than 2 hours flying time in still 
air  at  the  ferrying  cruising  speed  from  an  aerodrome  at  which  the  aeroplane  can  comply  with  Ferry 
Landing Distance Required relating to an alternate aerodrome. 
6.  Weight  Restrictions.    It  is  always  necessary  for  the  take-off  weight  to be restricted, for obvious 
reasons.  The restriction is not great on a high performance aeroplane but is very much more on a low 
performance 4-engine aeroplane, and can be crippling on a 3-engine aeroplane.  If there is any doubt, 
the solution is to take-off light and fly shorter legs, within reason. 
7.  Ferrying TORR.  The Ferrying TORR shall be the gross distance to accelerate from 'brakes off', 
to  the  Ferrying  Rotation  Speed,  and  thereafter  to  effect  the  transition  to  climbing  flight  and  attain  a 
screen height of 35 ft at a speed not less than Ferrying Take-off Safety Speed. 
8.  Ferrying  TODR.    The  Ferrying  TODR  shall  be  the  gross  distance  at  para  7,  multiplied  by  1.18.  
The Ferrying TODR shall not exceed the accelerate stop distance available at the aerodrome at which 
the take-off is to be made. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-20- Engine-Out Ferrying 
9.  Ferrying Take-off Net Flight Path.  The Ferrying Take-off Net Flight Path, which extends from a 
height  of  35  ft  to  a  height  of  1,500  ft,  shall  be  the  gross  flight  path  with  one  serviceable  power  unit 
inoperative reduced by a gradient of 0.5% and plotted from a point 35 ft above the end of the Ferrying 
TODR to a point at which a height of 1,500 ft above the aerodrome is reached.  It shall clear vertically 
by  35  ft  all  obstacles  lying  within  200  ft/60  m  plus  half  the  aeroplane  wing-span  either  side  of  the 
intended  track.    In  assessing  the ability of the aeroplane to satisfy this condition, it shall be assumed 
that changes of direction shall not exceed 15º. 
10.  En Route Terrain Clearance.  The ability of the aeroplane to comply with the requirements shall 
be assessed on the one serviceable power unit inoperative net data. 
11.  Ferrying Landing Distances Required.  The Ferrying Landing Distance Required is calculated in 
the following manner: 
a. 
Destination  Aerodromes.    The  Ferrying  Landing  Distance  Required  shall  be  the  normal 
landing distance required, multiplied by 1.05. 
b. 
Alternate  Aerodromes.    The  Ferrying  Landing  Distance  Required  appropriate  to  alternate 
aerodromes  shall  be  the  Ferrying  Landing  Distance  appropriate  to  destination  aerodromes 
(determined in accordance with para 11a), multiplied by 0.95. 
12.  Take-off Technique.  The take-off technique is established and published in the ODM.  This will 
include details of crosswind limitations, runway surface conditions and the establishment of a Vl speed 
(Vl  as  used  in  this  context  is  a  convenient  shorthand  expression  for  a  decision  speed  in  relation  to 
engine  ferry  -  it  does  not  imply  performance  protection  in  its  usual  context  in  relation  to  normal  all-
engines operation). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 – 2-21 - Load Bearing Strength of Airfield Pavements 
CHAPTER 21- LOAD BEARING STRENGTH OF AIRFIELD PAVEMENTS 
Introduction 
1. 
An aerodrome pavement should be strong enough for an aeroplane to be operated without risk of 
damage to either the pavement or the aeroplane and, in normal circumstances, the pavement should 
last long periods without requiring major maintenance. 
2. 
It  is  necessary  to  classify  both  pavements  and  aeroplanes  in  such  a  way  that  the  load  bearing 
capacity of the pavement can readily be compared with the load exerted by the aeroplane.   
Pavements 
3. 
Pavement Types.  There are two main types of aerodrome pavement: 
a. 
Rigid  Pavement.    Rigid  pavement  is  the  term  used  when  the  bearing  strength  is  derived 
from concrete slabs. 
b. 
Flexible  Pavement.    Flexible  pavement  consists  of  a  series  of  layers  of  compacted 
substance; the surface top layer is usually of bituminous material. 
4. 
Stress Effects.  The stress effect on a pavement, caused by an aircraft, will vary with the all-up 
weight (AUW), tyre pressure (and thus contact area), number and spacing of wheels, and the type and 
thickness  of  the  pavement.    Aircraft  with  a  multi-wheel  arrangement  are  able  to  spread  their  weight 
better than those with a single wheel arrangement. 
5. 
Runway  Surfaces.    The  surface  of  a  runway  should  not  have  irregularities  that  might  affect 
aircraft  steering  or  otherwise  adversely  affect  the  take-off  or  landing  of  an  aircraft.    The  surface 
should  provide  good  braking  action,  and  the  coefficient  of  friction  in  both  wet  and  dry  conditions 
must reach a satisfactory standard. 
6. 
Aircraft  Compatibility.    During  flight  planning,  the  officer  authorizing  the  flight,  and  the  aircraft 
captain,  should  consider  compatibility  of  aircraft  type  with  pavement  strengths  for  aerodromes  of 
intended  operation.    Aerodrome  pavement  strengths  are  published  in  the  Aeronautical  Information 
Publication  (AIP),  Military  AIP,  and  En-Route  Supplements  (ERS).    The  main  methods  of  comparing 
aircraft  loading  against  pavement  strength  are  explained  within  this  chapter,  listed  in  mainly 
chronological order, to assist explanation of their development. 
The Load Classification Number (LCN) System 
7. 
The  Load  Classification  Number  (LCN)  system  is  an  early  system,  based  on  aircraft  having 
wheels in single units with a minimum tyre contact area of 200 in2.  The derivation of the LCN number 
is  from  the  ratio  between  two  values.    The  first  value  (the  'standard  value')  is  the  load  required  to 
produce a failure of a given surface when acting over an area of 530 in2.  The second value is the load 
required to produce a failure on the same surface, but applied over a lesser specified area.  The ratio 
between these two values is expressed as a percentage and is known as the LCN.  By comparing the 
wheel  loading  of  an  aeroplane  with  the  LCN  of  an  aerodrome  pavement,  it  is  possible  to  determine 
whether  the  pavement  is  sufficiently  strong  for  that  particular  aeroplane.    The  load  exerted  by  the 
aeroplane depends on: 
Revised Jun 14  Page 1 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-21 - Load Bearing Strength of Airfield Pavements 
a. 
Aeroplane AUW. 
b. 
Tyre pressure (and thus contact area). 
8. 
Application  of  the  LCN  System.    The  aircraft  LCN  must  not exceed the aerodrome LCN if the 
number of aircraft movements is to be unrestricted. 
9. 
Aircraft  with  Multiple  Wheel  Units.    The  introduction  of  increasingly  heavier  aeroplanes  with 
their associated multiple wheel units and higher tyre pressures, i.e. smaller contact areas, complicated 
the original calculations.  In order to obtain a simple figure on which comparisons could be made, the 
concept of Equivalent Single Wheel Loading was introduced. 
Equivalent Single Wheel Loading (ESWL) 
10.  In order for aircraft with multi-wheel undercarriages and higher tyre pressures to be classed within 
the  LCN  system,    the  concept  of  Equivalent  Single  Wheel  Loading  (ESWL)  was  introduced.    The 
ESWL of a particular group of two or more closely spaced wheels is calculated, at the tyre pressure of 
the  assembly,  enabling  it  to  be  compared  with  a  single  wheel  unit.    Thus,  a  direct,  though  complex 
relationship  exists  between  ESWL  and  LCN,  and  conversion  can  be  achieved  by  means  of  an 
appropriate table or graph. 
The Load Classification Group (LCG) System 
11.  The  Load  Classification  Group  (LCG)  system  is  a  development  from,  and  improvement  on,  the 
earlier  LCN  system.    It  is  intended  to  take  account  of  local  LCN  variations  by  placing  pavement  load 
bearing  capacity  into  groups,  each  of  which  embrace  a  range  of LCN values as shown in Fig 1.  For 
example, it can be seen that a pavement with an LCN of 70 would belong within LCG III. 
2-21 Fig 1 Correlation of LCN and LCG 
LCN
LCG 
101 upwards 
I    (Heavy ac) 
76 - 100 
II 
51 - 75 
III 
31 - 50 
IV 
16 - 30 

11 - 15 
VI 
01 - 10 
VII  (Light ac) 
12.  The Pavement Load Classification Group.  In this system, the bearing strength of a pavement, 
derived from characteristics and type of construction, is indicated by placing it in a Load Classification 
Group (LCG). 
13.  Aircraft  Groupings.    Aircraft  are  also  given  an  LCG  value,  which  is  promulgated  in  ODMs  or 
Aircrew  Manuals.    If  the  aircraft  weight  is  published  as  an  LCN,  then  appropriate  pavement  LCG 
requirement can be read from Fig 1.  
14.  Application of the LCG System.  Provided that the LCG of the aircraft corresponds to that of the 
pavement, unlimited use of the pavement area is permitted, i.e. an aeroplane whose LCG places it in 
Group IV may be operated continuously on pavements of LCGs I, II, III or IV. 
Revised Jun 14  Page 2 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-21 - Load Bearing Strength of Airfield Pavements 
Example:  A fully-loaded Tucano T Mk 1 aircraft falls within LCG VII.  The ERS entry for Cranwell 
Rwy  09/27  (Fig  2)  shows  that  the  pavement  for  runway  09/27  is  LCG  IV.    The  Tucano  T  Mk  1 
aircraft can therefore operate without restriction from that runway.   
2-21 Fig 2 ERS Extract – Cranwell 
CRANWELL England RAF  N53 01.82 W000 28.99  Elev 218ft                              EGYD / ---
TC, UK(L)1/2/5, UK(H)2/6, EU(H)SP1/2/1-OAT Barnsley ASRgn                          London FIR
TEL
PST  
(01400) 261201 Ext 7377 DFT  
95751
TIME
PPR H24.  0815-1730(A) Mon-Thu, 0815-1700(A) Fri, or as required by 3FTS.
0845-1700(A) Sat-Sun, or as required by EMUAS or 7 AEF only.  ATZ opr hr H24.
RWY
09/2  
(082.69ºT/-0.65%) 6,831ft/2,082m, Asphalt/Concrete, LCG IV; L4, 6, 7, 12, 13, 15(a)
15.  Aerodrome LCG Overload.  Because of the safety factor incorporated, the published LCG for the 
pavement always represents a safe loading less than the maximum that the pavement can carry.  It is 
therefore possible to allow occasional/infrequent use of a pavement by an aeroplane with an LCG one 
category heavier than the published pavement LCG, e.g. an aeroplane whose LCG places it in Group 
IV may be operated occasionally on pavements of LCG V.  It can be seen from Fig 3 that at all weights, 
apart  from  the  overload  case,  the  C130  can  operate  unrestricted  from  RW  09/27  at  Cranwell.    At 
overload  weight,  with  an  LCG  of  III,  the  C130  can  operate  from  the  runway  occasionally  but  such 
operations  are  at  the  discretion  of  the  aerodrome  operator.    An  aircraft  with  an  LCG  category  two  or 
more  heavier  than  the  published  aerodrome  LCG  will  probably  only  be  allowed  to  operate  at  the 
aerodrome in an emergency. 
2-21 Fig 3 LCN/LCG – Hercules C130 Mk 3 & C130 Mk 4 
ESWL 
LCN 
LCG 
Operating Weight Empty  
lbf 
kgf 
23,237 
10,540 
23 

ESWL 
LCN 
LCG 
Max Landing Weight 
lbf 
kgf 
39,278 
17,817 
42 
IV 
ESWL 
LCN 
LCG 
Max Take-off Weight 
lbf 
kgf 
47,374 
21,489 
50 
IV 
ESWL 
LCN 
LCG 
Overload 
lbf 
kgf 
51,511 
23,365 
55 
III 
16.  Recent LCG Values.  Instances may occur where the latest LCG value for a pavement does not 
agree with the last published LCN.  This is because the calculations of LCG are, in many cases, based 
on a new evaluation of pavement strength. 
The Aircraft Classification Number (ACN)/Pavement Classification Number (PCN) System 
17.  ICAO  Requirements  ICAO  Standard  Practices  now  recommend  that  Member  States  adopt 
uniform  and  standardized  systems  for  reporting  of  pavement  strengths.    For  pavements  intended  for 
use by aeroplanes having a maximum total weight authorized  (MTWA) in excess of 5,700 kg (12,500 
Revised Jun 14  Page 3 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-21 - Load Bearing Strength of Airfield Pavements 
lbs),  ICAO  recommends  the  use  of  the  Aircraft  Classification  Number  (ACN)/Pavement  Classification 
Number (PCN) system.  (For aircraft with MTWA of 5,700 kg or less, see para 22a.) 
18.  The ACN The ACN is a number expressing the relative effect of an aircraft mass on a pavement 
for a specified sub-grade strength.  It is calculated by taking into account the weight of the aircraft, the 
pavement type and the sub-grade category.  ACN values for aircraft (one for rigid pavements and one 
for  flexible  pavements)  are  promulgated  in  relevant  aircrew  manuals.    The  ACN  values  for  British 
military  aircraft  are  also  published  in  the  Flight  Information  Handbook.    The  ACN  values  for  the 
Hercules C130 are shown in Fig 4 as an example. 
2-21 Fig 4 ACN – Hercules C130 Mk 4 & C130 Mk 5 
Aircraft Classification Number (ACN) 
Rigid Pavement Subgrades 
Flexible Pavement Subgrades 
Tyre 
High 
Medium 
Low 
Ultra Low 
High 
Medium 
Low 
Ultra Low 
Load Condition 
PSI








155007 lbs  (1) 
105 
27 
28 
31 
33 
24 
27 
29 
33 
81320 lbs  (2) 
105 
11 
12 
13 
13 

11 
11 
14 
Overload 
114 
30 
31 
34 
37 
26 
30 
32 
37 
174165 lbs 
(1) Maximum Total Weight Authorised (MTWA) 
(2) Operating Weight Empty (OWE) 
If  the  aircraft  is  operating  at  an  intermediate  weight  at  take-off  or  landing,  the  ACN  value  can  be 
calculated by a linear variation between the tabled weights. 
19.  The PCN.  The PCN expresses the bearing strength of pavement, for unrestricted operations.  It 
is reported as a five part code, promulgated in a set order, e.g. PCN 23/F/B/X/U.  The five parts of the 
code are: 
a. 
The  Numerical  Value.    The  numerical  value  represents  the  bearing  strength  of  the 
pavement  for  an  unrestricted  number  of  movements.    The  numerical  value  is  against  a 
continuous scale, commencing at zero, with no upper limit. 
b. 
Pavement Type.  The reporting procedure for pavement type divides surfaces into rigid (R) 
or flexible (F). 
c. 
Sub-grade  Strength  Category.    The  strength  of  the  pavement  sub-grade  is  measured  and 
classified appropriate to the pavement type, as either high (A), medium (B), low (C) or ultra-low (D). 
d. 
Tyre Pressure Category.  Tyre pressures are divided into four groups - high  (W) (no upper 
limit), medium X) (max 217 psi), low (Y) (max 145 psi), very low (Z) (max 73 psi).  Thus, provision 
is  made  for  the  aerodrome  authority  to  place  a  limit  on  the  maximum  allowable  tyre  pressure,  if 
this is a particular constraint. 
e. 
Pavement Evaluation Method.  The pavement qualities may be determined by either a full 
technical evaluation (T) or, alternatively, by experience gathered from previous aircraft operations 
(U).  Where the latter is used, the pavement must be monitored for performance in case it does 
not meet expectations and begins to deteriorate. 
Using  the  decode  at  Fig  5,  it  can  be  seen  that  the  previous  example,  PCN  23/F/B/X/U,  describes  a 
pavement  of  PCN  23;  it  is  a  flexible  pavement,  of  medium  sub-grade  category,  the  maximum  tyre 
Revised Jun 14  Page 4 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-21 - Load Bearing Strength of Airfield Pavements 
pressure  is  Medium  (max  217  psi),  and  the  evaluation  was  carried  out  by  experience  of  aircraft 
operations. 
2-21 Fig 5 PCN Decode 
Part 
Code 
Details 
PCN 

PCN Number 

Rigid 
Pavement Type 

Flexible 

High 

Medium 
Sub-grade Category 

Low 

Ultra-low 

High         (no limit) 

Medium   (max 217 psi) 
Tyre Pressure 

Low         (max 145 psi) 

Very low (max 73 psi) 

Technical 
Evaluation Method 

By experience 
20.  Using the ACN/PCN System.  Provided that the pavement PCN is equal to, or greater than, the 
aircraft ACN, unlimited use of the pavement is permitted. 
Example:  A Hercules C130 aircraft is due to land at Newcastle, refuel to max AUW, and take-off 
for the next sortie.  Is there a performance limitation due to runway pavement strength?  The PCN 
for Runway 07/25 at Newcastle is promulgated as PCN 65/F/B/W/T (Fig 5).  This shows that the 
runway has a PCN of 65, the pavement is flexible, of medium sub-grade category, and there is no 
tyre pressure limit.  These values were ascertained by technical evaluation.   
2-21 Fig 6 ERS Extract - Newcastle Rwy 07/25 
NEWCASTLE England Civ  N55 02.25 W001 41.50  Elev 266ft                              EGNT / NCL
TC, UK(L)2/5, UK(H)2/6, EU(H)12/SP1/1-OAT  Tyne ASRgn                                   Scottish FIR
TEL
(0191) 286 0966 (Switchboard), x3244 (ATC Supervisor)
TIME
H24.  ATZ   
 f.
RWY
07/2  
(065ºT/-0.35%) 7,641ft/2,329m, Grooved Asphalt, PCN 65/F/B/W/T; L6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 15(a)
Fig  4  shows  that the C130’s ACN for flexible pavement of medium sub-grade is 28 at MTWA, 
12 at OWE and 31 at overload weight.  The C130’s tyre pressure (105/114 psi) is not relevant 
in this case, as there is no limit.  The PCN at Newcastle (65) is greater than the C130’s ACN at 
all operating weights and thus unlimited use of the runway pavement is permitted. 
21.  Aerodrome  PCN  Overload.    Aerodrome  authorities  decide  their  criteria  for  permitting  overload 
operations as long as pavements remain safe for use by aircraft.  When the ACN exceeds the PCN by 
50%, overload operations will probably only be allowed in an emergency. 
Other Load Classification Systems 
22.  In  addition  to  pavement  classification  systems  described  previously,  the  following  methods  of 
aerodrome surface classification may be encountered: 
Revised Jun 14  Page 5 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-21 - Load Bearing Strength of Airfield Pavements 
a. 
ICAO  Recommended  -  Aircraft  less  than  5,700  kg.    ICAO  recommends  that  the  bearing 
strength of a pavement intended for aircraft below 5,700 kg (12,500 lbs) MTWA, shall be reported 
by  a  simple  statement,  in  words,  of  the  maximum  allowable  aircraft  weight  and  the  maximum 
allowable tyre pressure.  For example, a pavement strength may be published as: 
"500 kg/0.75 MPa".  (Note: 1 megapascal (MPa) = 145 psi). 
b. 
Acceptable  Aeroplanes.    In  this  very  basic  system,  a  particular  aeroplane  e.g.  A300, 
may be quoted as the limiting size of aeroplane which can be accepted on a pavement.  This 
system  takes  no  account  of  aeroplane  wheel  configuration  or  tyre  pressures  and  therefore 
does not represent an accurate assessment of the actual pavement load bearing capability. 
c. 
Acceptable  All-up  Weight  (AUW).    This  system  imposes  an  AUW  limitation  for 
aeroplanes using the pavement; it may be further qualified by reference to the undercarriage 
configuration  e.g.  "200,000  lb  on  a  dual  tandem  undercarriage".    Compatibility  with  other 
weights  and  configurations  can  be  determined  by  comparing  the  aeroplane’s  LCN  with  the 
LCN  of  any  other  aeroplane  which  has  a  weight/undercarriage  configuration  similar  to  that 
quoted for the pavement. 
Taxiways/Parking Areas 
23.  The  airfield  information  published  in  No  1  AIDU  En-Route  Supplements  gives  strengths  of 
runways only.  The strengths of surfaces on taxiways and parking areas (which may differ from that of 
the runway) are promulgated in the Military AIP and the UK AIP.   
Example:  Figs 7 and 8 are extracted from the UK Mil AIP and show the apron/taxiway and runway 
data for RAFC Cranwell (EGYD). 
2-21 Fig 7 Apron and Taxiway Data for RAFC Cranwell (EGYD) 
1
Apron surfaces:
Apron
Surface
Strength
Hangars 265, 266, 534
Concrete
LCG IV
Hangars 29, 30
Concrete
LCG IV
East Apron to 
Asphalt
LCG IV
Hangar 30
Rubb Hangar
Concrete Block
LCG VII
2
Taxiway width, surface and strength:
Taxiway
Width
Surface
Strength
Perimeter
15m
Asphalt/Concrete
LCG IV
Link to 08-26
15m
Asphalt
LCG IV
Revised Jun 14  Page 6 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-21 - Load Bearing Strength of Airfield Pavements 
2-21 Fig 8 Runway Data for RAFC Cranwell (EGYD) 
Designations 
True and MAG 
Dimensions 
Strength (PCN) and 
Threshold 
Threshold elevation 
Runway 
bearing
of Runway 
surface of Runway 
co-ordinates
highest elevation of 
number
(m)
and stopway
TDZ of precision 
APP Rwy
1
2
3
4
5
6
08 
082·69° GEO 
2081 x 45 
LCG III 
N53 01 43·43 
217·5ft 
084·16° MAG 
Asphalt/Concrete 
W000 30 20·57 
TDZE 217·8ft 
26 
262·71° GEO 
2081 x 45 
LCG III 
N53 01 50·93 
180·3ft 
264·18° MAG 
Asphalt/Concrete 
W000 28 43·44 
TDZE 199·0ft 
01 
008·20° GEO 
1461 x 45 
LCG IV 
N53 01 15·79 
176·6ft 
009·67° MAG 
Asphalt/Concrete 
W000 29 07·53 
TDZE 186·8ft 
19
188·20° GEO 
1461 x 45
LCG IV 
N53 02 02·60 
182·4ft 
189·67° MAG
Asphalt/Concrete
W000 28 56·35
TDZE 187·2ft
Revised Jun 14  Page 7 of 7 

AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
CHAPTER 22 – FIXED WING AIRCRAFT – WEIGHT AND BALANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
The principles of weight and balance are applicable to all aircraft.  Aircraft carrying standard loads, 
e.g.  training  and  air  defence  aircraft,  are  normally  flown  under  a  pre-computed  weight  and  balance 
clearance,  but  transport  aircraft,  due  to  their  variable  load  capacity,  require  a  separate  clearance  for 
each sortie. 
2. 
The  basic  weight  and  centre  of  gravity  moment  for  each  individual  aircraft  are  recorded  in  the 
Form 700.  The essential weight and balance data for particular types or marks of aircraft is contained in: 
a. 
For transport aircraft - the Weight and Balance Data Book applicable to that aircraft type. 
b. 
For all other types of fixed wing aircraft - the Aircraft Maintenance Manual. 
For transport aircraft that may be used in the air transport support and air mobility roles, the weight and 
balance information required for preparing or loading the aircraft is repeated in the appropriate book in 
the AP 101B series which deals with air transport support and air mobility.  If the information contained 
in the documents detailed in sub-paras a and b contradicts that given in the AP 101B series, then the 
Weight and Balance Data Book or the Aircraft Maintenance Manual is to be taken as the final authority.  
Additional  information  concerning  aircraft  loads  may  be  found  in  AP  101A  -  1101-1,  Air  Transport 
Operations Manual - Fixed-Wing Aircraft - General and Technical Information. 
WEIGHT AND BALANCE 
Aircraft Weight Limitations 
3. 
A  limitation  is  imposed  on  the  all-up  weight  (AUW)  at  which  any  aircraft  is  permitted  to  operate.  
This limitation depends on the strength of the structural components of the aircraft and the operational 
requirements it is designed to meet.  If these limitations are exceeded, the safety of the aircraft may be 
jeopardized  and  its  operational  efficiency  impaired.    Subject  to  certain  flying  restrictions,  permission 
may be given to operate at an AUW in excess of the normal maximum.  However, as such operation 
reduces the safety factor, thereby increasing the risk of structural failure in manoeuvre or when flying in 
turbulent conditions, permission is granted only in rare circumstances. 
Effect of Increasing All-up Weight on Aircraft Performance 
4. 
The effect on an aircraft’s performance due to increasing AUW is to: 
a. 
Increase the stalling speed, thereby increasing the take-off and landing runs. 
b. 
Increase  the  aircraft’s  inertia,  thereby  reducing  acceleration  on take-off and deceleration on 
landing. 
c. 
Reduce the rate of climb. 
d. 
Lower the absolute ceiling and optimum range altitude. 
e. 
Reduce the range and endurance. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
f. 
Reduce manoeuvrability and asymmetric performance. 
g. 
Increase wear on tyres and brakes. 
Balance 
5. 
Whilst it is important to ensure that the normal maximum AUW of an aircraft is not exceeded, the 
distribution of that weight, i.e. the balance of the aircraft, is equally important. 
6. 
It  is  not  possible  to  design  an  aircraft  in  which  the  lift,  weight,  thrust  and  drag  forces  are 
always in equilibrium during straight and level flight; the centre of pressure (CP) and the drag line 
vary with changes of angle of attack and the position of the centre of gravity (CG) depends on the 
load distribution.  It is necessary, therefore, to provide a force to counteract the pitching moments 
that may be set up by these forces.  This is the function of the tailplane, which, together with the 
elevators  and  trimmers,  can  offset  any  moment  set  up  by  the  movement  of  the  CP  or  the  drag 
line.    It  is  also  able  to  counteract  any  of  the  unbalance  or  unstable  tendencies  caused  by 
movements of the CG, provided that these are confined within the normal limits. 
Effects of Unbalanced Loading 
7. 
Incorrect  loading  of  an  aircraft  can  move  the  CG  towards  the  normal  fore-and-aft  limits.    This 
can have the following effects on the aircraft’s performance: 
a. 
CG Too Far Forward. 
(1)  The  aircraft  will  become  difficult  to  manoeuvre  and  heavy  to  handle,  requiring  a  larger 
stick force than normal. 
(2)  Elevator authority may be insufficient for the round-out. 
(3)  There will be an increase in drag (and a consequent decrease in range and endurance) 
due to the increased nose-up trim required to maintain straight and level flight. 
b. 
CG Too Far Aft.
(1)  The aircraft becomes less stable (and may become unstable - leading to possible loss of 
control). 
(2)  The increased load on the tailplane may cause flutter in some aircraft. 
(3)  There will be an increase in drag (and a consequent decrease in range and endurance) 
due to the increased nose-down trim required to maintain straight and level flight. 
Changes in Weight and Balance During Flight 

The AUW of an aircraft is constantly changing during flight due to the consumption of fuel and oil, 
the  release  of  ammunition  and  pyrotechnics,  the  release  of  missiles  or  bombs  and  the  dropping  of 
supplies or parachutists.  All of these events will cause a reduction in the AUW.  Conversely, if in-flight 
refuelling takes place, then the AUW will be increased. 
9. 
Every alteration of the AUW will cause a movement of the aircraft’s CG unless the CG of the item 
causing the change in weight is coincident with the CG of the loaded aircraft.  The amount of the CG 
movement caused depends on the weight change of the item and its horizontal distance from the CG 
of  the  loaded  aircraft.    Any  movement  of  personnel  in  the  aircraft  during  flight  will  also  cause  a 
movement of the CG although this will not affect the AUW. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
CENTRE OF GRAVITY 
Centre of Gravity Limits 
10.  The optimum position for the CG of a loaded aircraft will change with the AUW.  Even if the CG of 
the  loaded  aircraft  is  at  its  optimum  position  at  take-off,  in-flight  changes  in  AUW  cause  the  CG  to 
move.  Such movement may cause a progressive loss of efficiency, leading to a state of serious, and 
even dangerous, unbalance as the distance from the optimum position increases.  Normally, only the 
fore-and-aft position of the CG is important on a conventional aircraft.  If the lateral or vertical position 
is likely to have any material effect, then limits will also be specified for these positions. 
11.  The  limits  of  permissible  movement  are  always related, either directly or indirectly, to the centre of 
gravity datum point.  In some cases, a second, or alternative, reference point is used.  This is known as 
the 'weighing reference point' and is marked at a convenient position on the aircraft structure at a known 
and stated distance from the CG datum point.  Measurements taken from this point can easily be related 
to the CG datum point. 
12.  The 'trim datum' is a point at a known distance from the CG datum.  It applies to aircraft on which 
a trim sheet, or other weight and balance calculating device, is used. 
Determination of Centre of Gravity 
13.  It  is  the  aircraft  captain’s  responsibility  to  ensure  that  the  aircraft  is  loaded  such  that  its  CG  lies 
within  the  authorized  limits  and  will  not  move  outside  these  limits  during  flight.    To  be  capable  of 
carrying  out  this  responsibility  the  aircraft  captain  must  be  conversant  with  the  method  used  for 
calculating the CG. 
14.  The Principle of Arms and Moments.  The turning effect (moment) of any weight about a point 
of balance (the fulcrum) is directly proportional to its distance from that point (the arm).  The moment of 
a  large  weight  near  the  point  of  balance  can,  therefore,  be  equalled  by  that  of  a  small  weight  at  a 
greater distance from the fulcrum.  From this, the following formula is derived: 
weight × arm = moment 
15.  In Fig 1, AB is a lever balanced about its fulcrum (C).  If a 40 lb weight (d) is suspended from 
a point A, 5 ft from C, and a 10 lb weight (e) from a point B, 20 ft on the other side of C, the lever 
will remain balanced.  This is because the positive moment 10 × 20 lb ft tending to turn the lever 
in  a  clockwise  direction  about  point  C  is equalled by the negative moment 40 × 5 lb ft tending to 
turn the lever in an anti-clockwise direction about point C. 
2-22 Fig 1 Principle of Arms and Moments 
16.  Practical Application of the Principle.  In practice, the formula weight × arm = moment is used 
to determine the position of the CG of any aircraft by using the weights and arms of the various loads 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
in the aircraft.  By multiplying these weights by their respective arms, their moments about the selected 
moment
points are found.  Since weight × arm = moment, it follows that arm = 
.  Therefore, the sum of 
weight
the moments divided by the sum of the weights gives a resultant arm which, when measured from the 
reference point about which the moments of the individual weights were calculated, locates the CG of 
the loaded aircraft.  As long as the position of the CG is within the authorized limits, the aircraft is safe 
to fly.  However, as all aircraft have an ideal CG position, i.e. one which allows the aircraft to give its 
best flight performance, every endeavour should be made to distribute the payload so that this position 
is obtained. 
17.  Fig 2 shows two weights, W1 and W2, of 10 lb and 16 lb respectively, located at points A and B, 
the  ends  of  a  thin  rod  whose  weight  is  assumed  to  be  negligible.    The centres of the weights are 13 
inches (in) apart.  Since gravity is acting downwards through the centre of each weight, the resultant of 
the  two  weights,  i.e.  the  combined  weight  of  26  lb,  will  act  downward  at some point between the two 
weights, this being the centre of gravity of the whole assembly. 
2-22 Fig 2 Simple CG Calculation - Datum Point at End of Rod 
a  Datum at A
+ = CG Position
= CG Datum Point
10lb
16lb
+
A
13 in
B
8 in
W2
b  Datum at B
+ = CG Position
= CG Datum Point
10lb
16lb
+
A
13 in
B
5 in
W
W
1
2
18.  The distance of this point from a stated reference point, ie a CG datum point, can be calculated by 
dividing  the algebraic sum of the moments of the weight about the reference point by the sum of the 
weights.    For  example,  Fig  2a  assumes  that  the  CG  datum  point  is  at  A  and,  following  the  accepted 
conventions  regarding  positive  and  negative  load  arms  and  moments,  the  algebraic  sum  of  the 
moments of the weights is: 
Item 
Weight (lb) 
Load Arm (in) 
Moment (lb in) 
Weight W1
10 


Weight W2
16 
+13 
+208 
Totals 
26 
+208 
+208
The CG is therefore  
 = +8 in from A. 
26
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
The positive sign indicates that it is to the right of A, so that the correct definition of the CG position is 
that it is 8 in to the right of A. 
19.  If the CG datum point is now assumed to be located at B (Fig 2b): 
Item 
Weight (lb) 
Load Arm (in) 
Moment (lb in) 
Weight W1
10 
−13 
−130 
Weight W2
16 


Totals 
26 
−130 
−130
Now the CG position is  
 = −5 in from B. 
26
The negative sign indicates that it is to the left of B so that the correct definition of the CG position is 5 
in to the left of B.  Note that this is exactly the same position as before but expressed in relation to a 
different CG datum point. 
20.  Consideration  will  now  be  given  to  the  use  of  a  datum  point  other  than  at  points  A  or  B.    Fig  3 
shows the same weights and rod as before but with a CG datum point located away from the rod, 3 in 
to the left of A.  Taking moments as before: 
Item 
Weight (lb) 
Load Arm (in) 
Moment (lb in) 
Weight W1
10 
+3 
+30 
Weight W2
16 
+16 
+256 
Totals 
26 
+286 
+286
Now the CG position is 
 = +11 in, i.e. 11 in to the right of the datum point.  This position is exactly 
26
the same as in the two previous examples. 
2-22 Fig 3 Simple CG Calculation - Datum Point Away from Rod 
+ = CG Position
= CG Datum Point
10lb
16lb
+
A
B
3 in 
13 in
11 in
W1
W2
21.  Finally, consideration will be given to the use of a datum point located on the rod and 2 in to the 
right of A (see Fig 4).  The weights and the rod are exactly the same as before, but there are now both 
positive  and  negative  load  arms  and  moments.    It  is  important  to  note  how  the  algebraic  sum  of  the 
moments is obtained: 
Item 
Weight (lb) 
Load Arm (in) 
Moment (lb in) 
Weight W1
10 
−2 
−20 
Weight W2
16 
+11 
+176 
Totals 
26 
+156 
+156
The CG position is now 
 = +6 in ie 6 in to the right of the CG datum point.  As the datum point 
26
itself is 2 in to the right of A, the CG position is 8 in to the right of A, ie the same position as before. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
2-22 Fig 4 Simple CG Calculation - Datum Point on Rod 
+ = CG Position
= CG Datum Point
10lb
16lb
+
A
B
13 in
2 in 
6 in
W
W
1
2
22.  Summarizing, in the examples in paras 17 – 20, the data given consisted of the two weights and 
their corresponding load arms.  From this, the algebraic sum of the longitudinal moments is calculated.  
The  sum  of  the  moments  (remembering  that  sign  is  important)  is  then  divided  by  the  sum  of  the 
weights to give the longitudinal distance and the fore-and-aft direction of the new CG position from the 
CG datum point. 
23.  Exactly  the  same  principles  are  applied  to  the  determination  of  the  basic  longitudinal  moment  and 
basic  CG  position  of  an  aircraft  when  the  aircraft  is  weighed  by  the  multi-point  weighing  method.    The 
aircraft, in a condition as near to its basic condition as possible, is supported so that its longitudinal datum 
and lateral datum are horizontal on three or more weighing units arranged so that their individual readings 
can  be  resolved  into  two  weights  corresponding  to  the  two  weights  in  the  previous  examples.    The 
horizontal distances from these two positions to the CG datum point are then determined either from data 
supplied  by  the  manufacturer  or  by  actual  measurement.    After  an  aircraft  has  been  weighed,  its  basic 
weight and CG moment at that weight are recorded within the aircraft’s Form 700. 
AIRCRAFT LOADING 
Trim Sheets 
24.  Trim  sheets  are  supplied  for  use  with  a  particular  type  of  aircraft.    Normally,  with  new  types  of 
aircraft,  they  are  supplied  initially  by the manufacturers and bear no RAF identification other than the 
designation of the aircraft.  After some experience has been gained in their use they may be modified, 
given an RAF Form number and made available through the usual channels.  Trim sheets are used in 
conjunction with the Weight and Balance Data Book for transport aircraft. 
25.  Some  arithmetical  work  is  still  required  for  the  compilation  of  a  trim  sheet,  but  this  has  been 
reduced to the minimum by the simplification of the necessary entries as follows: 
a. 
Load  index  figures  (index  values)  are  used;  these  are  the  moments  of  the  various  items  of 
load  divided  by  a  constant,  e.g.  1,000.    The  basic  moment  of  the  aircraft  is  also  divided  by  the 
same constant and is known as the basic index of the aircraft. 
b. 
The  weight,  load  arm  and  moment  of  each  item  of  standard  equipment  which  may  be 
installed  for  the  various  roles  have  been  calculated  and  recorded  as  index  value  changes  in  a 
Weight and Balance Data Book for the aircraft; some, or all, of this information may be given on 
the back of the trim sheet. 
c. 
The cargo/passenger accommodation of the aircraft is divided into load compartments.  The 
total weight in each compartment is recorded and dealt with as a separate entity. 
d. 
Load  adjustment  tables  are  provided  on  the  trim  sheet  to  enable  the  effect  of  adding  or 
removing specific items of load, or stated increments of weight from various load compartments, 
to  be  read  off  as  index  changes,  thus  avoiding  the  need  to  calculate  the  moments  involved.  
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
These tables are of particular value if it is necessary to change the weight or position of any item 
of load after the aircraft has been loaded and the trim sheet completed. 
26.  Layout.  All trim sheets conform to a general pattern of layout although the actual detail may vary 
between aircraft.  Trim sheets for a Hercules C Mk 1 aircraft (Forms 6746A & B) are shown at Figs 5 
and 6 and these can be taken as typical examples. 
Note:    On  the  Hercules  C  Mk  1,  all  weights  are  in  kilograms  (kg).    Some  aircraft  trim  sheets  require 
weights in pounds.  The operator must take appropriate care. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 7 of 9 













AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
2-22 Fig 5 Load Distribution and Trim Sheet 
2-22 Fig 6 Load Distribution and Trim Variation Sheet 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 8 of 9 

AP3456 – 2-22- Fixed Wing Aircraft 
27.  The top of the trim sheet (Fig 5) contains basic information such as the Flight Number, departure 
date, destination, etc.  The planning block is completed prior to a particular task and is used as a guide 
for Air Movements to allocate payload to that flight. 
28.  The Part 1 (serial 1-9) of the trim sheet consists of the weight of the aircraft, crew, role equipment 
and  other  items  which  remain  constant  throughout  the  flight.    This  weight  is  termed  the  Aircraft 
Prepared for Service (APS) weight (also known as Dry Operating Weight (DOW)). 
29.  Part  2a  (serial  10-18)  and  part  2b  (serial  40-53),  in  conjunction  with  their  relevant  index  tables 
(table X and Y), reflect the change in the position of the CG (expressed as an index value) as items of 
payload are loaded in various compartments of the aircraft. 
30.  Part  3  (serial  19-39)  combines  the  APS  weight  with  the  payload  weight  to  produce  a  Zero  Fuel 
Weight  (ZFW).    Added  to  this  ZFW  is  the  usable  fuel  for  the  particular  flight  (the  index  values  are 
shown  in  table  Z)  to  produce  an  AUW  for  take-off.    The  estimated  AUW  at  landing  is  determined  by 
deducting the amount of fuel used during the flight. 
31.  The positions of the CG at take-off and landing are then plotted on the graph opposite the Part 3.  
This  graph  shows  the  permitted  CG  envelope  of  the  Hercules C Mk 1.  Both positions must lie within 
the permitted envelope. 
32.  The reverse of the trim sheet and the cover of the pad contain information on completion and use 
of the trim sheet. 
33.  The  Form  6746A  (Fig  5)  is  used  for  initial  calculations.    If  there  are  late  changes  to  the  load  and  its 
distribution (e.g., extra passengers added at the final moments prior to take-off), then a Load Distribution and 
Trim Variation Sheet (Form 6746B) is used to calculate CG index changes (see Fig 6). 
Cargo Restraint 
34.  All cargo carried in an aircraft must be secured against forces that may tend to move it from its 
allotted position in the aircraft.  These forces may be caused by the acceleration and deceleration of 
the  aircraft  when  taking-off  or  landing,  by  air  turbulence,  by  control  surface  movements,  or  by  the 
inertia  of  the  cargo  item  should  the  aircraft  crash-land  or  ditch.    Under  certain  conditions  these 
forces are of greater magnitude in one direction than others; the extreme instances occurring if the 
aircraft is suddenly slowed by landing on soft ground or by a crash-landing. 
35.  If an item of cargo is not properly secured it may move, with one or more of the following results: 
a. 
Injury  to  personnel  in  the  aircraft  during  a  crash-landing,  particularly  those  forward  of  the 
cargo, e.g. the flight-deck crew. 
b. 
Movement of the aircraft CG position outside the permissible limits. 
c. 
Structural damage to the aircraft. 
d. 
Blockage of emergency exits. 
e. 
Damage to other cargo items. 
36.  Small  items  of  miscellaneous  cargo  may  be  safely  secured  by  a  net  draped  over  them  and 
secured  to  the  aircraft  structure,  but  bulky  and  heavy  items  such  as  large  crates,  vehicles  and  guns, 
etc must be more positively secured.  This is done by the use of special equipment known collectively 
as 'tie-down equipment'.  All transport aircraft are provided with tie-down points, which are part of the 
aircraft structure to which items of cargo can be secured. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 9 of 9 

Document Outline