This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'AP3456 RAF Manual'.



AP3456 - 1-1 - The Atmosphere 
CHAPTER 1 - THE ATMOSPHERE 
Introduction 
1.
The  atmosphere  is  the  term  given  to  the  layer  of  air  which  surrounds  the  Earth  and  extends 
upwards from the surface to about 500 miles.  The flight of all objects using fixed or moving wings to 
sustain  them,  or  air-breathing  engines  to  propel  them,  is  confined  to  the  lower  layers  of  the 
atmosphere.  The properties of the atmosphere are therefore of great importance to all forms of flight. 
2. 
The  Earth’s  atmosphere  can  be  said  to  consist  of  four  concentric  gaseous  layers.    The  layer 
nearest the surface is known as the troposphere, above which are the stratosphere, the mesosphere 
and  the  thermosphere.    The  boundary  of  the  troposphere,  known  as  the  tropopause,  is  not  at  a 
constant height but varies from an average of about 25,000 ft at the poles to 54,000 ft at the equator.  
Above the tropopause the stratosphere extends to approximately 30 miles.  At greater heights various 
authorities have at some time divided the remaining atmosphere into further regions but for descriptive 
purposes the terms mesosphere and thermosphere are used here.  The ionosphere is a region of the 
atmosphere,  extending  from  roughly  40  miles  to  250  miles  altitude,  in  which  there  is  appreciable 
ionization.  The presence of charged particles in this region, which starts in the mesosphere and runs 
into  the  thermosphere,  profoundly  affects  the  propogation  of  electromagnetic  radiations  of  long 
wavelengths (radio and radar waves). 
3. 
Through  these  layers  the  atmosphere  undergoes  a  gradual  transition  from  its  characteristics  at 
sea  level  to  those  at  the  fringe  of  the  thermosphere,  which  merges  with  space.    The  weight  of  the 
atmosphere is about one millionth of that of the Earth, and an air column one square metre in section 
extending  vertically  through  the  atmosphere  weighs  9,800  kg.    Since  air  is  compressible,  the 
troposphere contains much the greater part (over three quarters in middle latitudes) of the whole mass 
of the atmosphere, while the remaining fraction is spread out with ever-increasing rarity over a height 
range of some hundred times that of the troposphere. 
4. 
Average representative values of atmospheric characteristics are shown in Fig 1.  It will be noted 
that the pressure falls steadily with height, but that temperature falls steadily to the tropopause, where 
it then remains constant through the stratosphere, but increasing for a while in the warm upper layers.  
Temperature falls again in the mesosphere and eventually increases rapidly in the thermosphere.  The 
mean free path (M) in Fig 1 is an indication of the distance of one molecule of gas from its neighbours, 
thus,  in  the  thermosphere,  although  the  individual  air  molecules  have  the  temperatures  shown,  their 
extremely rarefied nature results in a negligible heat transfer to any body present. 
Revised Mar 12   
Page 1 of 8 


AP3456 - 1-1 - The Atmosphere 
1-1  Fig  1  The Atmosphere 
Physical Properties of Air 
5. 
Air is a compressible fluid and as such it is able to flow or change its shape when subjected even to 
minute  pressures.    At  normal  temperatures,  metals  such  as  iron  and  copper  are  highly  resistant  to 
deformation by pressure, but in liquid form they flow readily.  In solids the molecules adhere so strongly 
that large forces are needed to change their position with respect to other molecules.  In fluids, however, 
the degree of cohesion of the molecules is so small that very small forces suffice to move them in relation 
to  each  other.    A  fluid  in  which  there  is  no  cohesion  between  the  molecules,  and  therefore  no  internal 
friction, and which is incompressible would be an 'ideal' fluid - if it were obtainable. 
6. 
Fluid Pressure.  At any point in a fluid the pressure is the same in all directions, and if a body is 
immersed in a stationary fluid, the pressure on any point of the body acts at right angles to the surface 
at that point irrespective of the shape or position of the body. 
7. 
Composition of Air.  Since air is a fluid having a very low internal friction it can be considered, within 
limits, to be an ideal fluid.  Air is a mixture of a number of separate gases, the proportions of which are: 
Revised Mar 12   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-1 - The Atmosphere 
1-1  Table  1  Composition of Air 
Element
By  Volume  %  By Weight %
Nitrogen
78.08
75.5
Oxygen
20.94
23.1
Argon
0.93
1.3
Carbon dioxide
0.03
0.05
Hydrogen
Neon
Helium
Krypton
Traces only
Xenon
Ozone
Radon
For  all  practical  purposes  the  atmosphere  can  be  regarded  as  consisting  of  21%  oxygen  and  78% 
nitrogen by volume.  Up to a height of some five to six miles water vapour is found in varying quantities, 
the amount of water vapour in a given mass of air depending on the temperature and whether the air is, 
or has recently been, over large areas of water.  The higher the temperature the greater the amount of 
water vapour that the air can hold. 
Measurement of Temperature 
8. 
Temperature can be measured against various scales: 
a. 
The Celsius scale (symbol º C) is normally used for recording atmospheric temperatures and 
the working temperatures of engines and other equipment.  On this scale, water freezes at 0º C 
and boils at 100º C, at sea level. 
b. 
On the Kelvin thermodynamic scale, temperatures are measured in kelvins (symbol K - note 
there is no degree sign) relative to absolute zero.  In the scientific measurement of temperature, 
'absolute  zero'  has  a  special  significance;  at  this  temperature  a  body  is  said  to  have  no  heat 
whatsoever.  Kelvin zero occurs at –273.15º C. 
c. 
On the Fahrenheit scale (symbol º F), water freezes at 32º F and boils at 212º F, at sea level.  
This scale is still used, particularly in the USA. 
9. 
Conversion Factors.  A kelvin unit equates to one degree C, therefore to convert º C to kelvins, 
add 273.15.  To convert º F to º C, subtract 32 and multiply by  5 ; to convert º C to º F, multiply by  9
9
5
and add 32. 
Standard Atmosphere 
10.  The  values  of  temperature,  pressure  and  density  are  never  constant  in  any  given  layer  of  the 
atmosphere, in fact, they are all constantly changing.  Experience has shown that there is a requirement for a 
standard  atmosphere  for  the  comparison  of  aircraft  performances,  calibration  of  altimeters  and  other 
practical  uses.    A  number  of  standards  are  in  existence  but  Britain  uses  the  International  Standard 
Atmosphere (ISA) defined by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). 
11.  The ISA assumes a mean sea level temperature of +15º C, a pressure of 1013.25 hPa* (14.7 psi) 
and  a  density  of  1.225  kg/m3.    The  temperature  lapse  rate  is  assumed  to  be  uniform  at  the  rate  of 
Revised Mar 12   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-1 - The Atmosphere 
1.98º C  per  1,000  ft  (6.5º  C  per  kilometre)  up  to  a  height  of  36,090  ft  (11  km),  above  which  height  it 
remains constant at – 56.5º C (see Table 2). 
1-1  Table  2  ICAO Standard Atmosphere 
Relative 
Altitude 
Temperature 
Pressure 
Pressure 
Density 
Density 
(ft) 
(º C) 
(hPa / mb) 
(psi) 
(kg/m3) 
(%)

+15.0 
1013.25 
14.7 
1.225 
100.0 
5,000 
+5.1 
843.1 
12.22 
1.056 
86.2 
10,000 
−4.8 
696.8 
10.11 
0.905 
73.8 
15,000 
−14.7 
571.8 
8.29 
0.771 
62.9 
20,000 
−24.6 
465.6 
6.75 
0.653 
53.3 
25,000 
−34.5 
376.0 
5.45 
0.549 
44.8 
30,000 
−44.4 
300.9 
4.36 
0.458 
37.4 
35,000 
−54.3 
238.4 
3.46 
0.386 
31.0 
40,000 
−56.5 
187.6 
2.72 
0.302 
24.6 
45,000 
−56.5 
147.5 
2.15 
0.237 
19.4 
50,000 
−56.5 
116.0 
1.68 
0.186 
15.2 
*Note:    The  most  commonly  used  unit  of  pressure  is  the  hectopascal  (hPa).    Some  references  may 
refer to the millibar (mb) which is equivalent to the hPa. 
Density 
12.  Density (symbol rho (ρ)) is the ratio of mass to volume, and is expressed in kilograms per cubic 
metre (kg/m3).  The relationship of density to temperature and pressure can be expressed thus: 
p
=
constant 

where p 
=
Pressure in hectopascals 
and T 
=
Absolute temperature (i.e. measured on the Kelvin scale) 
13.  Effects of Pressure on Density.  When air is compressed, a greater amount can occupy a given 
volume;  i.e.  the  mass,  and  therefore  the  density,  has  increased.    Conversely,  when  air  is  expanded 
less mass occupies the original volume and the density decreases.  From the formula in para 12 it can 
be seen that, provided the temperature remains constant, density is directly proportional to pressure, ie 
if the pressure is halved, so is the density, and vice versa. 
14.  Effect  of  Temperature  on  Density.    When  air  is  heated  it  expands  so  that  a  smaller  mass  will 
occupy a given volume, therefore the density will have decreased, assuming that the pressure remains 
constant.  The converse will also apply.  Thus the density of the air will vary inversely as the absolute 
temperature:  this  is  borne  out  by  the  formula  in  para  12.    In  the  atmosphere,  the  fairly  rapid  drop  in 
pressure as altitude is increased has the dominating effect on density, as against the effect of the fall in 
temperature which tends to increase the density. 
15. Effect of Humidity on Density.  The preceding paragraphs have assumed that the air is perfectly 
dry.    In  the  atmosphere  some  water  vapour  is  invariably  present;  this  may  be  almost  negligible  in 
certain conditions, but in others the humidity may become an important factor in the performance of an 
aircraft.    The  density  of  water  vapour  under  standard  sea  level  conditions  is  0.760  kg/m3.    Therefore 
water vapour can be seen to weigh 0.760/1.225 as much as air, roughly ⅝ as much as air at sea level.  
This  means  that  under  standard  sea  level  conditions  the  portion  of  a  mass  of  air  which  holds  water 
Revised Mar 12   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-1 - The Atmosphere 
vapour  weighs  (1  −  ⅝),  or  ⅜  less than  it  would  if  it  were  dry.    Therefore  air  is least  dense  when  it 
contains a maximum amount of water vapour and most dense when it is perfectly dry. 
Altitude 
16.  Pressure  Altitude.    Pressure  altitude  can  be  defined  as  the  vertical  distance  from  the  1013.25 
hPa  pressure  level.    When  the  term  'altitude'  appears  in  Operating  Data  Manuals  (ODMs)  and 
performance  charts,  it  refers  strictly  to  pressure  altitude.    Therefore,  when  the  sea  level  pressure  is 
other  than  1013.25  hPa,  aerodrome  and  obstacle  elevations  must  be  converted  to  pressure  altitude 
before use in performance calculations.  ODMs normally contain a conversion graph.  Pressure altitude 
can be obtained by setting the sub-scale of an ICAO calibrated altimeter to 1013.25 hPa and reading 
altitude directly from the instrument.  Alternatively, the approximate pressure altitude can be calculated.  
At  sea  level,  1  hPa  difference  in  pressure  is  equivalent  to  approximately  27  ft  of  height  change;  at 
20,000  ft,  1 hPa  equates  to  approximately  50  ft.    Thus,  for  calculations  close  to  sea  level,  it  can  be 
assumed that 1 hPa = 30 ft.  Pressure altitude at any point can therefore be determined by the formula: 
Pressure altitude ≏ Elevation + 30p 
where p is 1013 minus the sea level pressure at that point. 
Example:  To determine the pressure altitude of an airfield, elevation 1,700 ft, if sea level pressure is 
1003 hPa: 
p = 1013 – 1003 =  10 hPa 
∴ airfield pressure altitude ≏ 1,700 + (30 × 10) ft ≏ 2,000 ft 
17.  Density  Altitude.    For  aircraft  operations,  air  density  is  usually  expressed  as  a  density  altitude.  
Density altitude is the pressure altitude adjusted to take into consideration the actual temperature of the 
air.    For  ISA  conditions  of  temperature  and  pressure,  density  altitude  is  the  same  as  pressure  altitude.  
Knowledge of the density altitude can be of particular advantage in helicopter operations and is described 
further in Volume 2, Chapter 8.  Density altitude can be determined by the formula: 
density altitude = pressure altitude + 120t 
where t is the actual air temperature minus the standard (ISA) temperature for that pressure altitude.  
Continuing  the  calculation  from  para  16,  if  the  actual  air  temperature  at  the  airfield  elevation  was 
+13º C (ISA temp for 2,000 ft is +11º C), then the density altitude would be: 
2,000 ft + 120 (13º C – 11º C) = 2,000 ft + 120 (2) = 2,240 ft 
Dynamic Pressure 
18.  Because it possesses density, air in motion must possess energy and therefore exerts a pressure 
on  any  object  in  its  path.    This  dynamic  pressure  is  proportional to the density and the square of the 
speed.    The  energy  due  to  movement  (the  kinetic  energy  (KE))  of  one  cubic  metre  of  air  at  a  stated 
speed is given by the following formula: 
KE = ½ρV2 joules 
where ρ is the local air density in kg/m3
 
 
  and V is the speed in metres per second (m/s) 
If this volume of moving air is completely trapped and brought to rest by means of an open-ended tube 
the  total  energy  remains  constant.    In  being  brought  to  rest,  the  kinetic  energy  becomes  pressure 
Revised Mar 12   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-1 - The Atmosphere 
energy (small losses are incurred because air is not an ideal fluid) which, for all practical purposes, is 
equal to ½ρV2 newtons/m2, or if the area of the tube is S m2, then: 
total pressure (dynamic + static) = ½ρV2S newtons. 
19.  The term ½ρV2 is common to all aerodynamic forces and fundamentally determines the air loads 
imposed  on  an  object  moving  through  the  air.    It  is  often  modified  to  include  a  correction  factor  or 
coefficient.  The term stands for the dynamic pressure imposed by air of a certain density moving at a 
given speed, which is brought completely to rest.  The abbreviation for the term ½ρV2 is the symbol 'q'.  
Note  that  dynamic  pressure  cannot  be  measured  on  its  own,  as  the  ambient  pressure  of  the 
atmosphere (known as static) is always present.  The total pressure (dynamic + static) is also known 
as stagnation or pitot pressure (see Volume 1, Chapter 2).  It can be seen that: 
total pressure − static pressure = dynamic pressure 
MEASUREMENT OF SPEED 
Method of Measuring Air Speed 
20.  It  is  essential  that  an  aircraft  has  some  means  of  measuring  the  speed  at  which  it  is  passing 
through  the  air.    The  method  of  doing  this  is  by  comparing  the  total  pressure  (static  +  dynamic)  with 
static  pressure.    An  instrument  measures  the  difference  between  the  two  pressures  and  indicates 
dynamic pressure in terms of speed, the indicated speed varying approximately as the square root of 
the  dynamic  pressure.    This  instrument  is  known  as  an  air  speed  indicator  (ASI)  and  is  described  in 
detail in Volume 5, Chapter 5. 
Relationships Between Air Speeds 
21.  The general term 'air speed' is further qualified as: 
a. 
Indicated Air Speed (IAS)(VI).  Indicated air speed is the reading on the ASI, and the speed 
reference by which the pilot will normally fly. 
b. 
Calibrated  Air  Speed  (CAS)(Vc). When  the  IAS  has  been  corrected  by  the  application  of 
pressure error correction (PEC) and instrument error correction, the result is known as calibrated 
air speed (CAS).  PEC can be obtained from the Aircrew Manual or ODM for the type.  When the 
PEC  figures  for  individual  instruments  are  displayed  on  the  cockpit,  they  include  the  instrument 
error correction for that particular ASI (Note: In practice, any instrument error is usually very small 
and  can,  for  all  practical  purposes,  be  ignored.).    CAS  was  once  termed  RAS  (Rectified  Air 
Speed), a term still found in old texts and etched on some circular slide rules. 
c. 
Equivalent  Air  Speed  (EAS)(Ve).    Equivalent  air  speed  is  obtained  by  adding  the 
compressibility error correction (CEC) to CAS. 
d.
True Air Speed (TAS)(V) True air speed is the true speed of an aircraft measured relative 
to  the undisturbed air mass through which it is moving.  TAS is obtained by dividing the EAS by 
the square root of the relative air density. 
22.  The  ASI  can  be  calibrated  to  read  correctly  for  only  one  density/altitude.    All  British  ASIs  are 
calibrated  for  ICAO  atmosphere  conditions.    Under  these  conditions  and  at  the  standard  sea  level 
density (ρo) the EAS (Ve) is equal to the TAS (V).  At any other altitude where the density is ρ, then: 
Revised Mar 12   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-1 - The Atmosphere 
ρ
V = V
= V σ
e
ρo
where σ is the relative density. 
Thus, at 40,000 ft where the standard density is one quarter of the sea level value, the EAS wil  be ½ × TAS. 
23.  Although  all  the  speeds  mentioned  in  paragraph  21  have  their  own  importance,  the  two  most 
significant,  in  terms  of  aerodynamics,  are  EAS  and  TAS.    The  TAS  is  significant  because  it  gives  a 
measure of the speed of a body relative to the undisturbed air and the EAS is significant because the 
aerodynamic  forces  acting  on  an  aircraft  are  directly  proportional  to  the  dynamic  pressure  and  thus 
the EAS. 
24.  The TAS may be calculated in the following ways: 
a. 
By navigational computer (see Volume 9, Chapter 8). 
b. 
From  a  graph.    Some  ODMs  contain  IAS/TAS  conversion  graphs  and  these  enable  TAS  to 
be computed from a knowledge of height, indicated air speed and air temperature. 
c. 
By mental calculation (see Volume 9, Chapter 19). 
Mach Number 
25.  Small  disturbances  generated  by  a  body  passing  through  the  atmosphere  are  transmitted  as 
pressure waves, which are in effect sound waves, whether audible or not.  In considering the motion of 
the  body,  it  is  frequently  found  convenient  to  express  its  velocity  relative  to  the  velocity  of  these 
pressure waves.  This ratio is Mach number (M). 
V
M = a
where  V  =  TAS  and  a  =  local  speed  of  sound  in  air,which  varies  as  the  square  root  of  the  absolute 
temperature of the local air mass. 
Revised Mar 12   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-1 - The Atmosphere 
26.  Fig 2 shows the theoretical relationship between TAS, EAS and Mach number. 
1-1  Fig  2  Theoretical Relationship Between TAS, EAS and Mach Number 
Mach Number
0
1.0
2.0
3.0
4.0
100
100
80
80
60
60
40
40
20
20
0
0
- 50
0
400
800
1200
1600
2000
2400
oC
True Airspeed Knots
0
400
800
1200
1600
2000
2400
2800
True Airspeed Miles Per Hour
0
1000
2000
3000
4000
True Airspeed Feet Per Second
Revised Mar 12   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
CHAPTER 2 - AERODYNAMIC FORCE 
Introduction 
1. 
In aerodynamics, as in most subjects, a number of terms and conventional symbols are used.  The 
most commonly used terms and symbols are described in the first section of this chapter.  While many of 
these  definitions  are  self-explanatory,  some  are  less  obvious  and  need  to  be  accepted  until  they  are 
explained in later chapters.  The second part of this chapter discusses basic aerodynamic theory. 
DEFINITIONS AND SYMBOLS 
Aerofoil and Wing 
2. 
Aerofoil.    An  aerofoil  is  an  object  which,  as  a  result  of  its  shape,  produces  an  aerodynamic 
reaction perpendicular to its direction of motion.  All aerofoils are subject to resistance in their direction 
of motion.  This resistance is known as 'drag', while the perpendicular aerodynamic reaction is known 
as 'lift'.  The cross-sectional profile of an aerofoil is referred to as an 'aerofoil section' (see Fig 1). 
1-2  Fig 1 An Aerofoil Section 
Leading Edge
Trailing Edge
Mean Camber Line
Chord Line
3. 
Mean Camber Line or Mean Line.  As shown in Fig 1, the mean camber line is a line equidistant 
from  the  upper  and  lower  surfaces  of  an  aerofoil  section.    The  points  where  the  mean  camber  line 
meets the front and back of the section are known as the 'leading edge' (LE) and 'trailing edge' (TE) 
respectively. 
4. 
Chord Line.  The chord line is a straight line joining the leading and trailing edges of an aerofoil 
(see Fig 1). 
5. 
Chord.    The  chord  is  the  distance  between  the  leading  and  trailing  edge  measured  along  the 
chord line. 
6. 
Mean Chord.  The mean  chord of a  wing  is the  average chord,  ie the  wing area divided  by  the 
span. 
7. 
Maximum Camber.  Maximum camber is usually expressed as: 
Maximum distance between t e
h camber l
  ine an  
d the chord line
Chord
8. 
Positive Camber.  Where the mean camber line lies above the chord line, the aerofoil is said to have 
positive  camber  (as  in  Fig  1).    If  the  mean  camber  line  is  coincident  with  the  chord  line,  the  aerofoil  is 
symmetrical. 
9. 
Wing Span.  Wing span is the maximum lateral dimension of a wing (wingtip to wingtip). 
10.  Wing  Area.    The  wing  area  is  the  planform  area  of  the  wing  (as  opposed  to  surface  area), 
including those parts of the wing where it crosses the fuselage. 
Revised May 11   
Page 1 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
11.  Angle of Attack.  The angle of attack (α) is the angle between the chord line and the flight path 
or relative airflow (RAF) (see Fig 2). 
1-2  Fig 2 Angle of Attack 
Chord Line
Angle of Attack ( )
α
Relative Airflow (RAF)
12.  Angle  of  Incidence.   The  angle  of incidence  is that  angle at  which an  aerofoil  is attached to the 
fuselage  (sometimes  referred  to  as  the  'rigger’s  angle  of  incidence').    It  can  be  defined  as  the  angle 
between the chord line and the longitudinal fuselage datum.  The term is sometimes used erroneously 
instead of angle of attack. 
13.  Thickness/Chord Ratio.  The maximum thickness or depth of an aerofoil section, expressed as 
a percentage of chord length, is referred to as the thickness/chord (t/c) ratio. 
14. Aspect Ratio.  Aspect ratio is the ratio of span to mean chord, ie 
span
span 2
Aspect Ratio = 
or 
mea c
n  hord
wing area
15.  Wing Loading.  Wing loading is the weight of the aircraft divided by its wing area, ie the weight 
per unit area. 
16.  Load Factor.  Load Factor (n or g) is the ratio of total lift divided by weight, ie: 
total lift
n = weight
Note that engineers tend to use 'n' to denote load factor, whereas pilots usually refer to it as 'g'. 
Lift and Drag 
17.  Total Reaction.  The total reaction (TR) is the resultant of all the aerodynamic forces acting on 
the wing or aerofoil section (see Fig 3). 
18.  Centre of Pressure.  The centre of pressure (CP) is the point, usually on the chord line, through 
which the TR may be considered to act. 
19.  Lift.  Lift is the component of the TR which is perpendicular to the flight path or RAF. 
20.  Drag.  Drag is the component of the TR which is parallel to the flight path or RAF. 
Revised May 11   
Page 2 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
1-2  Fig 3 Total Reaction, Lift and Drag 
Total
Lift
Reaction
Centre of 
Pressure
Drag
RAF
Airflow 
21.  Free Stream Flow.  The free stream flow is the air in a region where pressure, temperature and 
relative  velocity  are  unaffected  by  the  passage  of  the  aircraft  through  it  (see  Fig  4).    It  is  also 
sometimes called relative airflow (RAF). 
22.  Streamline.    Streamline  is  the  term  given  to  the  path  traced  by  a  particle  in  a  steady  fluid  flow 
(see Fig 4). 
1-2  Fig 4 Free Stream Flow and Streamlines 
23.  Ideal Fluid.  An ideal fluid is one with no viscosity, ie no shearing resistance to motion. 
24.  Incompressible Fluid.  An incompressible fluid is one in which the density is constant. 
25.  Boundary Layer.  The boundary layer is the layer of a fluid close to a solid boundary along which it 
is flowing.  In the boundary layer, the velocity of flow is reduced from the free stream flow by the action of 
viscosity. 
26.  Laminar  or  Viscous  Flow.    Laminar  (or  viscous)  flow  is  a  type  of  fluid  flow  in  which  adjacent 
layers do not mix, except on a molecular scale. 
27.  Turbulent  Flow.    Turbulent  flow  is  a  type  of  fluid  flow  in  which  the  particle  motion  at  any  point 
varies  rapidly  in  both  magnitude  and  direction.    Turbulent  flow  gives  rise  to  high  drag,  particularly  in 
the boundary layer. 
28.  Transition  Point.    The  transition  point  is  that  point  within  the  boundary  layer  at  which  the  flow 
changes from being laminar to being turbulent. 
Revised May 11   
Page 3 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
Symbols 
29.  The following paragraphs explain many of the common symbols used in aerodynamic theory. 
30.  Density
a.  Density at any unspecified point = ρ (rho) 
b.  Density at ISA mean sea level = ρ0 = 1.2250 kg per m3
ρ
c.  Relative density = σ (sigma) =  ρ0
31.  Velocity
a. 
Equivalent air speed (EAS) = Ve
b. 
True air speed (TAS) = V, then  Ve = V σ
32.  Pressure
a. 
Static pressure at any unspecified point = p 
b. 
Free stream static pressure = p0
c. 
Dynamic pressure = q = ½ρV2 
or 
 q = ½ρ0Ve2
d. 
Total  pressure  (also  called  total  head  pressure,  stagnation  pressure,  or  pitot  pressure)  is 
usually denoted by pS. 
33.  Angle of Attack of Aerofoil or Wing
a. 
Angle of attack = α (alpha) 
b. 
Zero lift angle of attack = α0 (alpha nought) 
34.  Coefficient of Lift
a. 
Aerofoil.
lift/span
 
C1 = 
qc
b. 
Wing.
lift
 
CL =  qS
Where S = wing area, c = chord 
Revised May 11   
Page 4 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
35.  Coefficient of Drag
drag/span
a. 
Aerofoil.  Cd = 
qc
drag
b. 
Wing
 
CD =  qS
 
Where S = wing area, c = chord 
36.  Coefficient of Pressure.
pressure differen al
ti
p - p0
=
dynamic pressure
q
37.  Aircraft  Body  Axes  -  Notation.    Aircraft  body  axes  are  used  when  explaining  aircraft  stability.  
They are illustrated in Fig 5; the associated notation is listed in Table 1.   
1-2  Fig 5 Aircraft Body Axes 
Lateral 
Axis
Yawing
Rolling 
Longitudinal 
Axis
Pitching 
Normal 
Axis
1-2  Table 1 Aircraft Body Axes - Notation 
Longitudinal
Lateral
Normal
Symbol 



Axis 
Positive Direction 
Forward 
To Right 
Down 
Force 
Symbol 



Symbol 



Moment 
Designation 
Rolling 
Pitching 
Yawing 
Angle of Rotation 
Symbol 
φ (phi) 
θ (theta) 
ψ (psi) 
Velocity  during  a  Linear 



disturbance 
Angular 



Moment of Inertia 
Symbol 



Revised May 11   
Page 5 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
AERODYNAMIC PRINCIPLES 
General 
38.  Several  methods  or  theories  have  been  developed  to  predict  the  performance  of  a  given 
wing/aerofoil shape.  These can be used to explain the subtle changes in shape necessary to produce 
the  required  performance  appropriate  to  the  role  of  the  aircraft.    In  practice,  the  appropriate  wing 
shape is calculated from the required performance criteria. 
39.  The theory in this volume is confined to the Equation of Continuity and Bernoulli’s Theorem, thereby 
explaining  lift  by  pressure  distribution.    Volume  1,  Chapter  3  contains  other  theories,  namely  the 
Momentum Theory, Circulation Theory and Dimensional Analysis. 
Pressure Distribution 
40.  The  most  useful  non-mathematical  method  is  an  examination  of  the  flow  pattern  and  pressure 
distribution  on  the  surface  of  a  wing  in  flight.    This  approach  will  reveal  the  most  important  factors 
affecting  the  amount  of  lift  produced,  based  on  experimental  (wind-tunnel)  data.    As  a  qualitative 
method  however,  it  has  limitations  and  the  student  will  sometimes  be  presented  with  facts  capable 
only of experimental proof or mathematical proof. 
41.  The  pattern  of  the  airflow  round  an  aircraft  at  low  speeds  depends  mainly  on  the  shape  of  the 
aircraft  and  its  attitude  relative  to  the  free  stream flow.    Other  factors  are  the  size  of  the  aircraft,  the 
density  and  viscosity  of  the  air  and  the  speed  of  the  airflow.    These  factors  are  usually  combined  to 
form a parameter known as Reynolds Number (RN), and the airflow pattern is then dependent only on 
shape, attitude and Reynolds Number (see also para 73 et seq). 
42.  The  Reynolds  Number  (i.e.  size,  density  viscosity  and  speed)  and  condition  of  the  surface 
determine  the  characteristics  of  the  boundary  layer.    This,  in  turn,  modifies  the  pattern  of  the  airflow 
and distribution of pressure around the aircraft.  The effect of the boundary layer on the lift produced 
by  the  wings  may  be  considered  insignificant  throughout  the  normal  operating  range  of  angles  of 
attack.  In later chapters it will be shown that the behaviour of the boundary layer has a profound effect 
on the lift produced at high angles of attack. 
43.  When  considering  the  velocity  of  the  airflow  it  does  not  make  any  difference  to  the  pattern 
whether  the  aircraft  is  moving  through  the  air  or  the  air  is  flowing  past  the  aircraft;  it  is  the  relative 
velocity which is the important factor. 
Types of Flow 
44.  Steady  Streamline  Flow.    In  a  steady  streamline  flow the  flow  parameters  (eg  speed,  direction, 
pressure etc) may vary from point to point in the flow but, at any point, are constant with respect to time.  
This flow can be represented by streamlines and is the type of flow which it is hoped will be found over 
the various components of an aircraft.  Steady streamline flow may be divided into two types: 
a. 
Classical  Linear  Flow.    Fig  6  illustrates  the  flow  found  over  a  conventional  aerofoil  at  low 
angle of attack, in which the streamlines all more or less follow the contour of the body, and there 
is no separation of the flow from the surface. 
Revised May 11   
Page 6 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
1-2  Fig 6 Classical Linear Flow 
b. 
Controlled  Separated  Flow  or  Leading  Edge  Vortex  Flow.    This  is  a  halfway  stage 
between  steady  streamline  flow  and  unsteady  flow  described  later.    Due  to  boundary  layer 
effects, generally at a sharp leading edge, the flow separates from the surface, not breaking down 
into  a  turbulent  chaotic  condition  but,  instead,  forming  a  strong  vortex  which,  because  of  its 
stability  and  predictability,  can  be  controlled  and  made  to  give  a  useful  lift  force.    Such  flows, 
illustrated  in  Fig 7,  are  found  in  swept  and  delta  planforms,  particularly  at  the  higher  angles  of 
attack, and are dealt with in more detail in later chapters. 
1-2 Fig 7 Leading Edge Vortex Flow 
External
Flow
Vortex
45.  Unsteady Flow.  In an unsteady flow, the flow parameters vary with time and the flow cannot be 
represented by streamlines (see Fig 8). 
1-2 Fig 8 Unsteady Flow 
Streamlines
Unsteady
Flow
46.  Two-dimensional Flow.  If a wing is of infinite span, or, if it completely spans a wind tunnel from 
wall to wall, then each section of the wing will have exactly the same flow pattern round it, except near 
the  tunnel  walls.    This  type  of  flow  is  called  two-dimensional  flow  since  the  motion  in  any  one  plane 
parallel to the free stream direction is identical to that in any other, and there is no cross-flow between 
these planes. 
47.  Velocity Indication.  As the air flows round the aircraft, its speed changes.  In subsonic flow, a 
reduction in the velocity of the streamline flow is indicated by an increased spacing of the streamlines 
whilst  increased  velocity  is  indicated  by  decreased  spacing  of  the  streamlines.    Associated  with  the 
velocity changes there will be corresponding pressure changes. 
Revised May 11   
Page 7 of 17 


AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
48.  Pressure  Differential.    As  the  air  flows  towards  an  aerofoil,  it  will  be  turned  towards  the  low 
pressure (partial vacuum) region at the upper surface; this is termed 'upwash'.  After passing over the 
aerofoil the airflow returns to its original position and state; this is termed 'downwash' and is shown in 
Fig  9.    The  reason  for  the  pressure  and  velocity  changes  around  an  aerofoil  is  explained  in  later 
paragraphs.    The  differences  in  pressure  between  the  upper  and  lower  surfaces  of  an  aerofoil  are 
usually  expressed  as  relative  pressures  by  '–'  and  '+'.    However,  the  pressure  above  is  usually  a  lot 
lower  than  ambient  pressure  and  the  pressure  below  is  usually  slightly  lower  than  ambient  pressure 
(except at high angles of attack), i.e. both are negative. 
1-2 Fig 9 Two-dimensional Flow around an Aerofoil 
Angle of Attack
Upwash
Downwash
49.  Three-dimensional Flow.  The wing on an aircraft has a finite length and, therefore, whenever it is 
producing lift the pressure differential tries to equalize around the wing tip.  This induces a span-wise drift of 
the air flowing along the wing, inwards on the upper surface and outwards on the lower surface, producing 
a three-dimensional flow which crosses between the planes parallel to the free stream direction. 
50.  Vortices.    Because  the  spanwise  drift  is  progressively  less  pronounced  from  tip  to  root,  the 
amount of transverse flow is strong at the tips and reduces towards the fuselage.  As the upper and 
lower airflows meet at the trailing edge they form vortices, small at the wing root and larger towards the 
tip (see Fig 10).  A short distance behind the wing, these form one large vortex in the vicinity of the 
wing tip, rotating clockwise on the port wing and anti-clockwise on the starboard wing; viewed from 
the rear.  Tip spillage means that an aircraft wing can never produce the same amount of lift as an 
infinite span wing, for the same angle of attack. 
1-2 Fig 10 Three-dimensional Flow 
Note: 
The  end  'a'  of  the  aerofoil 
section 
abuts  the 
wind 
tunnel  wall  and  may  be 
regarded  as  a  wing  root.  
The wool streamer indicates 
virtually no vortex. 
End 'b' is a free wing tip and 
a  marked  vortex  can  be 
51.  Vortex Influence.  The overall size of the vortex behind the trailing edge will depend on the amount 
of the transverse flow.  It can be shown that the greater the coefficient of lift, the larger the vortex will be.  
The familiar pictures of wing-tip vortices, showing them as thin white streaks, only show the low pressure 
Revised May 11   
Page 8 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
central core (where atmospheric moisture is condensing) and it should be appreciated that the influence on 
the airflow behind the trailing edge is considerable.  The number of accidents following loss of control by 
flying into wake vortex turbulence testifies to this.  The vortices upset the balance between the upwash and 
downwash of two-dimensional flow, reinforcing the downwash and reducing the effective angle of attack, 
and  inclining  the  total  reaction  slightly  backwards  as  the  effective  relative  airflow  is  now  inclined 
downwards.  The component of the total reaction parallel to the line of flight is increased; this increase is 
termed  the  induced  drag.    The  resolved  vector  perpendicular  to  the  flight  direction  (i.e.  lift)  is  slightly 
reduced, (see Volume 1, Chapter 5). 
BASIC AERODYNAMIC THEORY 
General 
52.  The  shape  of  the  aircraft  (and  boundary  layer)  will  determine  the  velocity  changes  and 
consequently the airflow pattern and pressure distribution.  For a simplified explanation of why these 
changes occur it is necessary to consider: 
a. 
The Equation of Continuity. 
b. 
Bernoulli’s Theorem. 
A more detailed explanation of other aerodynamic theories is given in Volume 1, Chapter 3. 
The Equation of Continuity 
53.  The  Equation  of  Continuity  states  basically  that  mass  can  neither  be  created  nor  destroyed  or, 
simply stated, air mass flow rate is a constant.
54.  Consider the streamline flow of air through venturi (essentially, a tube of varying cross-sectional 
area).    The  air  mass flow  rate,  or  mass  per  unit  time,  will  be  the  product  of  the  cross-sectional  area 
(A),  the  flow  velocity  (V)  and  the  density  (ρ).    This  product  will  remain  a  constant  value  at  all  points 
along the tube, i.e. 
AVρ = constant. 
This  is  the  general  equation  of  continuity  which  applies  to  both  compressible  and  incompressible 
fluids. 
55.  When considering compressible flow it is convenient to assume that changes in fluid density will 
be insignificant at Mach numbers below about 0.4 M.  This is because the pressure changes are small 
and have little effect on the density.  The equation of continuity may now be simplified to: 
constant
A × V = constant,   or   V = 
A
from which it may be seen that a reduction in the tube’s cross-sectional area will result in an increase 
in velocity and vice versa.  This, combined with Bernoulli’s theorem (see para 56), is the principle of a 
venturi.  The equation of continuity enables the velocity changes round a given shape to be predicted 
mathematically. 
Revised May 11   
Page 9 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
Bernoulli’s Theorem 
56.  Consider a gas in steady motion.  It possesses the following types of energy: 
a. 
Potential energy due to height. 
b. 
Heat energy (ie kinetic energy of molecular motion). 
c. 
Pressure energy. 
d. 
Kinetic energy due to bulk fluid motion. 
In  addition,  work  may  be  done  by  or  on  the  system  and  heat  may  pass  into  or  out  of  the  system.  
However, neither occurs in the case of flow around an aerofoil. 
57.  Daniel  Bernoulli’s  work  demonstrated  that  in  the  steady  streamline  flow outside  the  boundary 
layer,  the  sum  of  the  energies  present  remained  constant.    It  is  emphasised  that  the  words  in  bold 
represent  the  limitations  of  Bernoulli’s  experiments.    In  low  subsonic  flow  (<  0.4  M),  it  is  convenient  to 
regard air as being incompressible, in which case the heat energy change is insignificant.  Above 0.4 M, 
however, this simplification would cause large errors in predicted values and is no longer permissible. 
58.  Bernoulli’s Theorem may be simplified still further by assuming changes in potential energy to be 
insignificant.  For practical purposes therefore, in the streamline flow of air round a wing at low speed: 
pressure energy + kinetic energy = constant 
It can be shown that this simplified law can be expressed in terms of pressure, thus: 
p + ½ρV 2 = constant, 
where 
p = static pressure, 
ρ = density, 
V = flow velocity. 
The significance of this law will be recognized if it is translated into words: static pressure + dynamic 
pressure  is  a  constant.    The  constant  is  referred  to  as  total  pressure,  stagnation  pressure  or  pitot 
pressure.  The dynamic pressure, ½ρV2, is sometimes designated by the letter q. 
59.  It  has  already  been  stated  that  the  flow  velocity  is  governed  by  the  shape  of  the  aircraft.    From 
Bernoulli’s  Theorem  (simplified)  it  is  evident  that  an  increase  in  velocity  causes  a  decrease  in  static 
pressure and vice versa. 
The Flat Plate Effect 
60.  At  the  stall,  there  is  a  partial  collapse  of  the  low  pressure  on  the  top  surface  of  the  wing, 
considerably reducing the total lift.  The contribution of the lower surface is relatively unchanged.  The 
circulation theory of lift becomes invalid at any angle of attack beyond the stall; the aerofoil may then 
be regarded as a flat inclined plate (as in Fig 11) producing lift from the combined effect of stagnation 
pressure and flow deflection from the underside (change of momentum). 
Revised May 11   
Page 10 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
1-2 Fig 11 Inclined Flat Plate - Lift Acting at Centre of Area 
Relative Airflow
Lift
Total
Reaction
Drag
Flat Plate
Pressure Distribution around an Aerofoil 
61.  Although  the  whole  aircraft  contributes  towards  both  lift  and  drag,  it  may  be  assumed  that  the 
wing is specifically designed to produce the necessary lift for the whole of the aircraft.  Examination of 
the distribution of pressure round the wing is the most convenient practical way to see how the lift is 
produced.  Fig 12 shows the pressure distribution round a modern general-purpose aerofoil section in 
two-dimensional flow and how it varies with changes in angle of attack. 
62.  The pressure distribution around an aerofoil is usually measured with a multi-tube manometer: this 
consists  of  a  series  of  glass  tubes  filled  with  a  liquid  and  connected  to  small  holes  in  the  aerofoil 
surface.  As air flows over the aerofoil the variations in pressure are indicated by the differing levels of 
liquid in the tubes. 
1-2 Fig 12 Pressure Distribution around an Aerofoil 
α = 0
α = 6o
α = 15o
63.  The  pressure  force  at  a  point  on  the  aerofoil  surface  may  be  represented  by  a  vector  arrow, 
perpendicular to the surface, whose length is proportional to the difference between absolute pressure at 
Revised May 11   
Page 11 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
that point and free stream static pressure p0, i.e. proportional to (p – p0).  It is usual to convert this to a 
non-dimensional  quantity  called  the  pressure  coefficient  (Cp)  by  comparing  it  to  free  stream  dynamic 
pressure (q), thus: 
(p − p )
C
o
=
p
q
64.  The convention for plotting these pressure coefficients is as follows: 
a. 
Measured  pressure  higher  than  ambient  pressure:  at  these  points,  (p  –  p0)  will  be  positive, 
giving a positive Cp and the pressure force vector is drawn pointing towards the surface. 
b. 
Measured pressure lower than ambient pressure: here, (p – p0) will be negative, resulting in 
a negative Cp giving a force directed outwards from the surface. 
65.  It  is  useful  to  consider  the  value  of  Cp  at  the  leading-edge  stagnation  point  where  the  air  is 
brought to rest.  The pressure at this point is designated ps.  This pressure will be total pressure = free 
stream static pressure + free stream dynamic pressure.  The pressure coefficient will therefore be: 
(p + q −
0
) p0 andtherefore C = +1
p
q
Cp can never be greater than 1, since this  would imply slowing the air down to  a speed of less than 
zero, which is impossible. 
66.  Each  of  the  pressure  coefficient  force  vectors  will  have  a  component  perpendicular  to  the  free 
stream  flow  which  is,  by  definition,  a  lift  component.    Therefore,  it  is  possible  to  obtain  the  total  lift 
coefficient from the pressure distribution, by subtracting all the lift components pointing down (relative 
to the free stream) from all those pointing up. 
67.  Inspection  of  the  pressure  force  distribution  diagrams  gives  an  indication  of  the  direction  and 
magnitude  of  the  total  reaction  (TR)  and  the  position  of  the  centre  of  pressure  (CP).    In  the  normal, 
unstalled operating range, two facts are immediately apparent: 
a. 
The lift coefficient increases with an increase in angle of attack. 
b. 
The CP moves forward with an increase in angle of attack. 
These two facts will be of considerable use in later chapters. 
68.  A  common  way  to  illustrate  the  pressure  distribution  round  an  aerofoil  section  is  to  plot  it  in  the 
form of a graph (see Fig 13).  Notice that, whereas in the previous diagrams the Cp force vectors are 
plotted  perpendicular  to  the  aerofoil  surface,  in  the  graph  they  are  converted  so  that  they  can  be 
plotted perpendicular to the chord line.  Note also in Fig 13, the convention of plotting negative values 
upwards to relate the graph to lift in the natural sense. 
Revised May 11   
Page 12 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
1-2 Fig 13 Graphical Representation of Aerofoil Pressure Distribution 
(Angle of Attack approx 10º) 
1.0
Upper Surface
Lower Surface
pC
20
40
60
80
100
% Chord
+1.0
Stagnation Point
Summary 
69.  The airflow pattern depends on: 
a. 
Angle of attack. 
b. 
Shape (thickness/chord ratio, camber). 
70.  Lift depends on the airflow pattern.  It also depends on: 
a. 
Density of the air. 
b. 
Size of the wing. 
c. 
Speed. 
71.  The equation of continuity states that: 
a. 
Air mass flow rate is a constant. 
b. 
Cross-sectional area ×  velocity  × density  = constant,  i.e. AVρ  = k.  It also  assumes that, at 
speeds below M = 0.4, pressure changes, being small, have little effect on ρ and therefore: 
 
 
A × V = k (a different constant) 

k
 V =  A
and  therefore,  a  reduced  A  gives  greater  velocity.    This  (together  with  the  Bernoulli  principle)  is 
the venturi principle. 
72.  Bernoulli’s  Theorem  states  that,  assuming  steady  incompressible  flow  (ie  M<0.4),  pressure 
energy plus kinetic energy is constant, therefore: 
1
p +
ρV 2 = a constant
2
This constant is known as the total pressure, stagnation pressure or pitot pressure. 
Revised May 11   
Page 13 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
REYNOLDS NUMBER 
Introduction 
73. In  the  early  days  of  flying,  when  aircraft  speeds  were  of  the  order  of  30  mph  to  40  mph,  testing  of 
aerofoils was a comparatively crude operation.  But as speeds increased and the design of aircraft became 
more  sophisticated,  wind  tunnels  were  developed  for  the  purpose  of  testing  scale  models.    This  led  to 
problems in dynamic similarity; these were easier to understand than to solve. 
Scale 
74.  If a 1/10th scale model is used, all the linear dimensions are 1/10th of those of the real aircraft, 
but  the  areas  are  1/100th;  and,  if  the  model  is  constructed  of  the  same  materials,  the  mass  is 
1/1,000th  of  the  real  aircraft  mass.    So  the  model  is  to  scale  in  some  respects,  but  not  in  others.  
This  is  one  of  the  difficulties  in  trying  to  learn  from  flying  models  of  aircraft  and,  unless  the 
adjustment of weights is very carefully handled, the results of tests in manoeuvres and spinning may 
be completely false. 
Fluid Flow 
75.  During the 19th Century, a physicist named Reynolds was involved in experiments with the flow of 
fluids  in  pipes.    He  made  the  important  discovery  that  the  flow  changed  from  streamlined  to  turbulent 
when  the  velocity  reached  a  value  which  was  inversely  proportional  to  the  diameter  of  the  pipe.    The 
larger the pipe, the lower the velocity at which the flow became turbulent, e.g. if the critical velocity in a 
pipe of 2.5 cm diameter was 6 m/s, then 3 m/s would be the critical velocity in a pipe of 5 cm diameter.  
He also discovered that the rule applied to the flow in the boundary layer around any body placed within 
the stream.  For example, if two spheres of different sizes were placed within a flow, then almost the entire 
boundary layer would become turbulent when the free stream velocity reached a value which was inversely 
proportional to the diameter of each sphere. 
Scale Correction 
76.  Reynolds’  theorem  states  that  the  value  of  velocity × size  must  be  the  same  for  both  the 
experimental  model  and  for  the  full  size  aircraft  it  represents.    This  is  because  the  nature  of  the 
boundary  layer flow must be the same in both cases, if dynamic similarity  is to be ensured.  If it is 
necessary  to  carry  out  a  test  on  a  1/10th  scale  model  to  determine  what  would  happen  on  the  full 
size  aircraft  at  200  kt,  the  wind-tunnel  speed  would  have  to  be  2,000  kt.    However,  this  is  a 
supersonic  speed,  and  clearly  well  above  M  =  0.4,  and  so  compressibility  would  also  need  to  be 
taken fully into account.  In fact, not only is it a requirement that the Reynolds’ principle should hold, 
but  also  that  the  Mach  number  must  be  equal  for  both  aircraft  and  model.    This  is  clearly  not  the 
case here. 
77.  The  reason  for  Reynolds’  speed-size  relationship  is  related  to  the  internal  friction  (ie  viscosity) 
and density of the fluid.  To account for all of these factors, he established that similarity of flow pattern 
would be achieved if the value of 
density × velocity × size was constant. 
viscosity
This value is called the Reynolds Number. 
Revised May 11   
Page 14 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
78.  To account for the reduction in size, the density could be increased.  Clearly, it is not very practical to 
fill a wind tunnel with oil or water and accelerate it to 150 kt or 200 kt to obtain the flight Reynolds Number.  
In any case, no model could be built strong enough to endure the forces that would arise without breaking 
or being unacceptably distorted.  However, it is quite possible to increase the density of the air by using a 
high-pressure  tunnel.    Increasing  the  pressure  has  little  or  no  effect  upon  the  viscosity,  so  that  with 
increased density it is possible to reduce the velocity and/or size and still maintain aerodynamic similarity.  
For  example,  if  the  air  is  compressed  to  25  atmospheres,  then  the  density  factor  is  25,  with  no 
corresponding increase in viscosity (μ).  It is then possible to test the model referred to in para 76 at 
,
2 000 kt   i.e. at 80 kt. 
25
Viscosity 
79.  Although a change in density does not affect the viscosity of the air, the temperature does, and 
so  it  is  necessary  to  keep  the  compressed  air  cool  to  prevent  the  viscosity  from  rising.    Unlike 
liquids,  which  become  less  viscous  with  rise  in  temperature,  air  becomes  more  viscous,  and  any 
increase in viscosity would offset the benefits of increased density. 
Definition of Reynolds Number 
80.  For  every  wind-tunnel  test  there  is  one  Reynolds  Number  (RN),  and  it  is  always  published  with 
the results of the test. 
ρVL
RN =
μ
Where 
 ρ is density, 
V is the velocity of the test, 
L is a dimension of the body (usually chord), 
µ is the viscosity of the fluid. 
Considering the units involved it is not surprising to see test results quoted at RN = 4 × 106, or even 
12 × 106. 
Aerodynamic Forces 
81.  Since one of the major problems in using models is the effect of the large aerodynamic force felt 
on a small model, it is useful to look at the effect of using high-pressure tunnels.  For example, taking 
again a 1/10th model, a speed of 80 kt and 25 atmospheres, to test for a full-scale flight at 200 kt, the 
forces will be factored by: 
1
802
th (scale) ×
(speed) × 25 (density  factor)
100
200 2
1
6,400
25
1
=
×
×
=
100
40,000
1
25
Thus  dynamic  similarity  is  achieved,  with  forces  that  are  1/25th  of  the  full-scale  forces;  even  that  is 
quite  high,  considering  that  the  weight  of  the  model  is  only  1/1000th  of  the  weight  of  the  full-scale 
aircraft (if made of the same materials). 
Revised May 11   
Page 15 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
Inertial and Viscous Forces 
82. On  geometrically  similar  bodies,  the  nature  of  the  boundary  layer,  and  hence  the  flow  pattern,  is 
completely determined as long as the density (ρ) and viscosity (μ) of the fluid, and the speed (V) and 
length (L) of the body, remain constant (ie the Reynolds Number is the same). 
83.  Furthermore, RN  is a measure of the ratio between the  viscous forces and the  inertial forces of 
the  fluid,  and  this  can  be  verified  as  follows.    The  inertial  force  acting  on  a  typical  fluid  particle  is 
measured by the product of its mass and its acceleration.  Now the mass per unit volume of the fluid 
is, by definition, the density (ρ), while the volume is proportional to the cube of the characteristic length 
(L3), hence the mass is proportional to ρL3.  The acceleration is the rate of change of velocity; that is, 
the change in velocity divided by the time during which the change occurs.  The change in the velocity, 
as the fluid accelerates and decelerates over the body, is proportional to (V).  The time is proportional 
to  the  time  taken  by  a  fluid  particle  to  travel  the  length  of  the  body  at  the  speed  (V);  so  the  time  is 
L
proportional to  V .  The acceleration is therefore proportional to 
L
V2
V ÷
ie
V
L
The inertial force, which is mass × acceleration, can now be expressed: 
ρL3
V 2
inertial force ∝
×
∝ ρ L2 V2 
1
L
84.  The  viscous  forces  are  determined  by  the  product  of  the  viscous  sheer  stress  and  the  surface 
area over which it acts.  The area is proportional to the square of the characteristic length, that is, to 
L2.    The  viscous  sheer  stress  is  proportional  to  viscosity  (µ)  and  to  the  rate  of  change  of  speed  with 
height from the bottom of the boundary layer.  The latter is proportional to  V .  Hence, the shear stress 
L
is proportional to   V 
μ  .  Therefore the viscous force is proportional to: 
 L 
V
L2 ×μ ×
= Lμ V
L
85.  Comparing inertial forces with viscous forces: 
inertial forces
ρ L2 V2
ρVL

=
viscous forces
Lμ V
μ
μ
which is the formula for Reynolds Number.  
 is called the kinematic viscosity of the fluid and when 
ρ
this is constant the only variables are V and L. 
Revised May 11   
Page 16 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-2 - Aerodynamic Force 
Relevance of Reynolds Number to Pilots 
86.  The graph at Fig 14 shows the typical variations in the lift curve slope of an aerofoil over a range of 
Reynolds Numbers.  There is a substantial difference between CLmax at flight RNs and wind tunnel test 
RNs,  and  an  aircraft  designer  must  take  account  of  this.    However,  over  the  range  of  RN  values 
experienced in flight, the effect on the lift curve and CLmax is negligible.  Although aircrew should have an 
awareness  of  Reynolds  Number,  since  it  affects  the  design  of  the  aircraft  in  which  they  fly,  it  is  of  no 
operational significance. 
1-2 Fig 14 Scale Effect on CL and CLmax Curves 
High RN (flight)
Low RN (wind tunnel)
CL
α
Revised May 11   
Page 17 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-3 - Aerodynamic Theories 
CHAPTER 3 - AERODYNAMIC THEORIES 
Introduction 
1. 
Momentum  Theory,  Dimensional  Analysis  and  Vortex  Theory  are  three  of  the  more  common 
theories used to predict the performance of the aerofoil shape.  Momentum Theory is another way of 
looking at Bernoulli’s Theorem, and Dimensional Analysis is a mathematical derivation of aerodynamic 
force and takes into account the effect of Reynolds Number and Mach Number. 
Momentum Theory 
2. 
If a vane or blade deflects a jet of fluid as in Fig 1 then, assuming frictionless flow past the vane, 
there will be no loss of velocity in the jet. 
1-3 Fig 1 Flow Past a Vane 
F
V
V
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-3 - Aerodynamic Theories 
3. 
From Newton’s second law: 

=
ma = rate of change of momentum 

dV 
=
m


dt 
If A is the cross-section area of the jet and ∆V is 
the net change in velocity, 
velocity change

=
m
time
 m 
=

 × velocity change
 time 
=
mass flow × ΔV 
∴  F  = (ρAV) × ΔV 
and from the vector diagram in Fig 2 
ΔV 
=
2 × V ≈ 1.4V
∴   F = 1.4ρV2A 
and substituting, 

=
½ ρV2

=
2.8qA 
1-3 Fig 2 Vector Diagram 
V
V
∆V
4. 
Thus, by merely deflecting the stream a force of up to 2.8qA may be produced.  This principle can 
be  applied  on  an  aerofoil  which  can  be  said  to  produce  an  aerodynamic  advantage  by  changing  the 
momentum of a stream of air.  It can also be seen that the force produced depends on the attitude in 
the stream (α) and on the curvature of the aerofoil. 
Dimensional Analysis 
5. 
It  can  be  demonstrated  experimentally  that  the  force  acting  on  geometrically  similar  objects 
moving through the air is dependent on at least the following variables: 
a. 
Free stream velocity. 
b. 
Air density. 
c. 
The size of the object. 
d. 
The speed of sound, i.e. speed of propagation of small pressure waves. 
e. 
The viscosity of the air. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-3 - Aerodynamic Theories 
f. 
Shape, attitude and smoothness of the object. 
6. 
It  is  possible  to  derive  explicit  equations  for  lift  and  drag  by  the  use  of  dimensional  analysis. 
This  principle  relies  on  the  fact  that  in  any  physical  equation  the  dimensions  of  the  left-hand  side 
(LHS) must be the same as the dimensions of the right-hand side (RHS).  The dimensions used are 
those of mass, length and time (MLT) which are independent of specific units.  The factors listed in 
para 5 are repeated below together with their appropriate symbols and dimensions. 
Dependent 
Symbol 
Dimensions 
Variable 
velocity 

LT–1
density 
ρ
ML–3
area (wing) 

L2
sonic speed 

LT–1
viscosity 
µ
ML–1 T–1
There is no convenient method of measuring shape, attitude or smoothness, so these variables are 
included in a constant (k). 
7. 
The dependence of aerodynamic force on V, ρ, S, a and µ may be expressed as: 
F = k( ρ
.
V .S.a.μ)
which theory allows to be written: 
F = k( a
b
c
d
e
V × ρ × S × a × μ )
(1) 
where k, a, b, c, d and e are unknown. 
8. 
Equation (1) may now be rewritten in terms of the MLT system, remembering that 
force = mass × acceleration = MLT–2 





k(LT )a
1
(ML )b
3
(L )c
2
(LT )d
1
( 1 1
ML T )e
=
(2) 
9. 
The condition for dimensional equivalence between the two sides of equation (2) is that the sum of the 
indices of a given quantity on the RHS must equal the index of that quantity on the LHS.  Applying this rule 
we get: 
for time  
– a – d – e  = – 2 
for mass  
b + e  = + 1 
for length 
a – 3b + 2c + d – e  = + 1 
10.  Taking the equations for time and mass from para 9 and transposing them to make a and b the 
subject of the equations respectively gives: 
a  =
 2 – d – e 
b  =
 1 – e 
Similarly, transposing the equation for length to make c the subject gives: 
2c = 1 – a + 3b – d + e 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-3 - Aerodynamic Theories 
substituting for a and b in the above formula gives: 
2c = 1 – (2 – d – e) + 3(1 – e) – d + e 
which simplifies to: 
 e 
c
=
1 −  
 2 
11.  Substituting these values of a, b and c in equation (1) we get: 

e
F = k(V) 2−d−e × (ρ) −
1 e × (S)


1
× d
a
× e
2
μ 


and collecting terms of like indices we get: 
e


d
μ
2
  

kρV S
 
(3) 
1 
 
2 
 ρVS 
1
1
 2 2
12.  Dimensionally,  S2  =   L


  = L 
and so the last term of equation (3) is   μ 


 ρVL 
1
1
which is        
=

Reynolds Number
RN
 a 
1
1
also  
  
 =
=
 V 
Mach Number
M
13.  Equation (3) therefore becomes: 
F = kρV2SM-dRN-e 
and, noting that dynamic pressure = ½ρV2 we can introduce another constant, C, such that C = 2k and 
obtain: 
F = C½ρV2S(M-dRN-e) 
(4) 
14.  It  is  significant  that  this  solution  includes  unknown  exponential  functions  of  Mach  number  and 
Reynolds  Number,  a  fact  which  is  often  ignored  when  the  lift  and  drag  equations  are  quoted.  In 
practice,  at  the  sacrifice  of  an  exact  equation,  the  parameters  M  and  RN  are  included  in  the 
constant C.    C,  therefore,  becomes  a  coefficient  dependent  on  Mach  number,  Reynolds  Number, 
shape, attitude and smoothness. 
Thus  C = 2kM-dRN-e
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-3 - Aerodynamic Theories 
15.  Equation (4) is a general equation for aerodynamic force and represents either the lift component, 
the drag component or their vector sum (TR), i.e. 
lift
=
CL½ρV2S 
and   drag
=
CD½ρV2S 
Similarly,     moment
=
CM½ρV2S 
 where CM is a function of M, RN, etc. 
Vortex or Circulation Theory 
16.  If  a  cambered  aerofoil  at  positive  angle  of  attack  (as  in  Fig  3)  is  compared  with  the  aerofoil  in 
Fig 4, it will be seen that the mean camber line in the latter has been straightened and set at zero angle 
of attack, and that the thickness distribution of the original aerofoil has been plotted about the straight 
mean camber line. This shape is known as the symmetrical fairing of an aerofoil section. 
1-3 Fig 3 Aerofoil at Positive Angle of Attack 
Lift
Positive 
Angle of Attack
Camber
Line
X
X
RAF
1-3 Fig 4 Symmetrical Fairing of an Aerofoil 
(No Lift)
X
X
17.  The effect of angle of attack and camber on the flow pattern round the aerofoil in Fig 3 relative to 
the flow round the symmetrical fairing, is to accelerate the air over the top surface and decelerate the 
air along the bottom surface.  Thus the flow over an aerofoil can be regarded as the combination of two 
different  types  of  flow:  one  of  these  is  the  normal  flow  round  the  symmetrical  fairing  at  zero  angle of 
attack  (Fig  5a)  and  the  other  is  a  flow  in  which  air  circulates  around  the  aerofoil,  towards  the  trailing 
edge over the upper surface and towards the leading edge over the lower surface (Fig 5b). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-3 - Aerodynamic Theories 
1-3 Fig 5 The Flow Round a Lifting Aerofoil Section Separated into Two Elemental Flows 
(No lift)
a
b
The  lift  of  the  aerofoil  due  to  camber  and  angle  of  attack  must  therefore  be  associated  with  the 
circulatory flow.  A special type of flow which is the same as that of Fig 5b is that due to a vortex, that is 
a mass of fluid rotating in concentric circles. 
18.  The two important properties of vortex flow are: 
a. 
Velocity.    In  the  flow  round  a  vortex  the  velocity  is  inversely  proportional  to  the  radius,  i.e. 
radius × velocity = constant. 
b. 
Pressure.    Because  the  flow  is  steady,  Bernoulli’s  Theorem  applies  and  the  pressure 
decreases as the velocity increases towards the centre of the vortex. 
19.  A strong vortex will have high rotational speeds associated with it and vice versa.  The constant of 
para 18a  determines  the  size  of  the  rotational  speeds  and  it  is  therefore  used  to  measure  vortex 
strength.  For theoretical reasons the formula radius × velocity = constant is changed to: 
2πrV = another constant = K.  The constant K is cal ed the circulation. 
20.  The circulation and velocity at a point outside the vortex core are connected by the formula:  K = 
2πrV with dimensions L2T–1 (ft2 per sec) where r = radius, and V = velocity. 
21.  If a vortex is in a stream of air and some restraint is applied to the vortex to prevent it being blown 
downstream, the streamlines of the flow will be as shown in Fig 6. 
1-3 Fig 6 Flow Round a Vortex Rotating in a Uniform Stream 
S
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-3 - Aerodynamic Theories 
The point S is of some interest; it is a stagnation point in the stream, and the direction of flow passing 
through S is shown by the arrows.  The air which passes through S splits into two, some going over the 
top  of  the  vortex  and  some  below  it.    That  part  of  the  streamline  through  S  which  passes  over  the 
vortex  forms  a  closed  loop  and  the  air  within  this  loop  does  not  pass  downstream  but  circulates 
continually round the vortex.  The velocity at any point is the vector sum of the velocity of the uniform 
stream and the velocity due to the vortex in isolation.  Thus it can be seen that the air above the vortex 
is speeded up and that below the vortex is slowed down. 
22.  As a result of these velocity differences between the flow above and below the vortex, there are 
pressure differences.  These pressure differences cause a force on the vortex of magnitude ρVK per 
unit length which acts perpendicular to the direction of the free stream, ie it is a lift force by definition.  
This relationship is known as the Kutta-Zhukovsky relationship. 
23.  The flow round an aerofoil section can be idealized into three parts: 
a. 
A uniform stream. 
b. 
A distortion of the stream due to aerofoil thickness. 
c. 
A flow similar to a vortex. 
This is another way in which lift may be explained because in para 22 it was stated that a vortex in a 
uniform stream experiences a lift force. 
24.  Assuming,  for  simplicity,  that  the  lift  is  uniform  along  the  span,  and  ignoring  the  effects  of 
thickness and viscosity, a wing can be replaced by a vortex of suitable strength along the locus of the 
centres of pressure.  This vortex is known as line or bound vortex, or just a lifting line, and is illustrated 
in Fig 7. 
25.  The arrangement in Fig 7 is physically impossible because a vortex cannot exist with open ends due to 
the  low  pressure  in  its  core.    A  vortex  must  therefore  either  be  re-entrant,  or  abut  at  each  end  on  a solid 
boundary.    The  simple  line  vortex  is  therefore  modified  to  represent  the  uniformly  loaded  wing  by  a 
horseshoe vortex as illustrated in Fig 8.  To make the vortex re-entrant it is necessary to complete the 
fourth side of the rectangle by a suitable vortex.  When a wing is accelerated from rest, the circulation 
around  it,  and  therefore  lift,  is  not  produced  instantaneously.    As  the  circulation  develops,  a  starting 
vortex  is  formed  at  the  trailing  edge  and  is  left  behind the wing.  This vortex is equal in strength and 
opposite in sense to the circulation around the wing. 
1-3 Fig 7 A Wing with Uniform Lift replaced by a Line Vortex 
L
V
L
V
K
Revised Mar 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-3 - Aerodynamic Theories 
1-3 Fig 8 The Horseshoe Vortex 
Bound Vortex
Representing
the Wing
Vortex Decay
Through the
Action of Viscosity
Trailing Vortices
Starting Vortex
(Far Downstream)
26.  The  starting  vortex,  or  initial  eddy,  can  be  demonstrated  by  simple  experiment.    A  flat  piece  of 
board to represent a wing is placed into water, cutting the surface at moderate angle of attack.  If the 
board is suddenly moved forward, an eddy will be seen to leave the rear of the board. 
27.  The  transformation  of  a  wing  into  a  vortex  of  suitable  strength  is  a  complex  mathematical 
operation.  It can be seen, however, that when the value of K is obtained, the lift can be obtained from 
the Kutta-Zhukovsky relationship.  This theoretical model of an aircraft wing is most useful in explaining 
three-dimensional effects such as induced drag, aspect ratio etc (Volume 1, Chapter 5). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
CHAPTER 4 – LIFT 
Introduction 
1.
Having covered the basic aerodynamic principles in Volume 1, Chapter 2, this chapter will deal in 
a  little  more  detail  with  pressure  distribution  and  Centre  of  Pressure  (CP)  movement,  define  and 
discuss aerodynamic centre and then move on to the factors affecting lift and the lift/drag ratio.  Finally 
the various types of aerofoils will be discussed.   
Distribution of Pressure About the Wing 
2. 
Fig 1 illustrates an actual pressure plot around an aerofoil at 6° angle of attack.  The straight lines 
indicate the positions from which the tappings were taken and the positive and negative pressures are 
those above and below free stream static pressure.  Conditions at the trailing edge (TE) are difficult to 
plot because of the small values of pressure there and the difficulty of providing adequate tappings. 
1-4 Fig 1 Pressure Plotting 
LE
TE
Direction
of Flow
Angle of Attack = 6°
3. 
Although most low speed aerofoils are similar in shape, each section is intended to give certain 
specific  aerodynamic  characteristics.    Therefore,  there  can  be  no  such  thing  as  a  typical  aerofoil 
section  or  a  typical  aerofoil  pressure  distribution  and  it  is  only  possible  to  discuss  pressure 
distributions around aerofoils in the broadest of general terms.  So, in general, at conventional angles 
of  attack,  compared  with  the  free  stream  static  pressure  there  is  a  pressure  decrease over much of 
the upper surface, a lesser decrease over much of the lower surface so that the greatest contribution 
to overall lift comes from the upper surface. 
4. 
The aerofoil profile presented to the airflow determines the distribution of velocity and hence the 
distribution  of  pressure  over  the  surface.    This  profile  is  determined  by  the  aerofoil  geometry,  ie 
thickness distribution and camber, and by the angle of attack.  The greatest positive pressures occur 
at  stagnation  points  where  the  flow  is  brought  to  rest,  at  the  trailing  edge,  and  somewhere  near  the 
leading edge (LE), depending on the angle of attack.  At the front stagnation point, the flow divides to 
pass over and under the section.  At this point there must be some initial acceleration of the flow at the 
surface  otherwise  there  could  be  no  real  velocity  anywhere  at  the  aerofoil  surface,  therefore  there 
must  be  some  initial  reduction  of  pressure  below  the  stagnation  value.    If  the  profile  is  such  as  to 
produce  a  continuous  acceleration  there  will  be  a  continuous  pressure  reduction  and  vice  versa.  
Some  parts  of  the  contour  will  produce  the  first  effect,  other  parts  the  latter,  bearing  in  mind  always 
Revised May 11   
Page 1 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
that  a  smooth  contour  will  produce  a  smoothly  changing  pressure  distribution  which  must  finish  with 
the stagnation value at the trailing edge. 
5. 
Fig  2  shows  the  pressure  distribution  around  a  particular  aerofoil  section  at  varying  angles  of 
attack.  The flow over the section accelerates rapidly around the nose and over the leading portion of 
the surface, the rate of acceleration increasing with increase in angle of attack.  The pressure reduces 
continuously  from  the  stagnation  value  through  the  free  stream  value  to  a  position  when  a  peak 
negative  value  is  reached.    From  there  onwards  the  flow  is  continuously  retarded,  increasing  the 
pressure  through  the  free  stream  value  to  a  small  positive  value  towards  the  trailing  edge.    The  flow 
under  the  section  is  accelerated  much  less  rapidly  than  that  over  the  section,  reducing  the  pressure 
much  more  slowly  through  the  free  stream  value  to  some  small  negative  value,  with  subsequent 
deceleration  and  increase  in  pressure  through  free  stream  value  to  a  small positive value toward the 
trailing edge.  If the slight concavity on the lower surface towards the trailing edge was carried a little 
further forward, it might be possible to sustain a positive pressure over the whole of the lower surface 
at  the  higher  angles  of  attack.    However,  although  this  would  increase  the  lifting  properties  of  the 
section, it might also produce undesirable changes in the drag and pitching characteristics.  Therefore, 
it  can  be  seen  that  any  pressure  distribution  around  an  aerofoil  must  clearly  take  account  of  the 
particular aerofoil contour. 
1-4 Fig 2 Pressure Distribution About an Aerofoil 

+
+
− °
4

a


+
+

b

+4°
+

+
c

+8°
+
+
d

+14°
+
+
e
Revised May 11   
Page 2 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
6. 
From  examinations  of  Fig  2  it  can  be  seen  that  at  small  angles  of  attack  the  lift  arises  from  the 
difference  between  the  pressure  reductions  on  the  upper  and  lower  surfaces,  whilst  at  the  higher 
angles  of  attack  the  lift  is  due  partly  to  the  decreased  pressure  above  the  section  and  partly  to  the 
increased  pressure  on  the  lower  surface.    At  a  small  negative  angle  of  attack  (about  −4°  for  this 
aerofoil) the decrease in pressure above and below the section would be equal and the section would 
give no lift.  At the stalling angle the low pressure area on the top of the section suddenly reduces and 
such lift as remains is due principally to the pressure increase on the lower surface. 
Centre of Pressure (CP) 
7. 
The  overall  effect  of  these  pressure  changes  on  the  surface  of  the  aerofoil  can  be  represented  in 
various simplified ways, one of which is to represent the effects by a single aerodynamic force acting at a 
particular point on the chord line, called the centre of pressure (CP).  The location of the CP is a function of 
camber and section lift coefficient, both the resultant force and its position varying with angle of attack (see 
Fig 3).  As the angle of attack is increased the magnitude of the force increases and the CP moves forward; 
when the stall is reached the force decreases abruptly and the CP generally moves back along the chord.  
With a cambered aerofoil the CP movement over the normal working range of angles of attack is between 
20%  and  30%  of  the  chord  aft  of  the  leading  edge.    With  a  symmetrical  aerofoil  there  is  virtually  no  CP 
movement over the working range of angles of attack at subsonic speeds. 
1-4 Fig 3 Movement of the Centre of Pressure 
tre
n
e
C
g
ic
in
m
s
a
a
n
y
re
d
c
ro
In
e
α
A
r
o L
Centre of Pressure
C
LE
10% 20% 30% 40%
TE
Aerodynamic Centre 
8. 
An  aircraft  pitches  about  the  lateral  axis  which  passes  through  the  centre  of  gravity.    The  wing 
pitching  moment  is  the  product  of  lift  and  the  distance  between  the  CG  and  the  CP  of  the  wing.  
Unfortunately, the CP moves when the angle of attack is altered so calculation of the pitching moment 
becomes complicated. 
9. 
The  pitching  moment  of  a  wing  can  be  measured  experimentally  by  direct  measurement  on  a 
balance or by pressure plotting.  The pitching moment coefficient (Cm) is calculated as follows: 
Pitching moment
C
=
m
qSc
 where c is the mean aerodynamic chord, q is dynamic pressure, and S is the wing area.  The value of 
pitching  moment  and  therefore  Cm  will  depend  upon  the  point about which the moment is calculated 
and will vary because the lift force and the position of the CP change with angle of attack. 
Revised May 11   
Page 3 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
10.  If pitching moments are measured at various points along the chord for several values of CL one 
particular  point  is  found  where  the  Cm  is  constant.    This  point  occurs  where  the  change  in  CL  with 
angle  of  attack  is  offset  by  the  change  in  distance  between  CP  and  CG.    This  is  the  aerodynamic 
centre  (AC).    For  a  flat  or  curved  plate  in  inviscid,  incompressible  flow  the  aerodynamic  centre  is  at 
approximately 25% of the chord from the leading edge.  Thickness of the section and viscosity tend to 
move  it  forward  and  compressibility  moves  it  rearwards.    Some  modern  low  drag  aerofoils  have  the 
AC a little further forward at approximately 23% chord. 
11.  There are two ways of considering the effects of changing angle of attack on the pitching moment 
of an aerofoil.  One way is to consider change in lift acting through a CP which is moving with angle of 
attack; the other simpler way is to consider changes in lift always acting through the AC which is fixed. 
12.  The  rate  of  change  of  Cm  with  respect  to  CL  or  angle  of  attack  is  constant  through  most  of  the 
C
angle  of  attack  range  and  the  value  of 
m   depends  on  the  point  on  the  aerofoil  at  which  Cm  is 
C L
measured.  Curves of Cm versus CL are shown in Fig 4. It can be seen that a residual pitching moment 
is present at zero lift. 
1-4 Fig 4 Cm Against CL 
m
C
Nose Up
Cm About B
CLmax
0
CL
CmAbout Aerodynamic Centre
m
C O
m
C About A
Nose Down
L
L
L
A
B
AC
This is because an aerofoil with positive camber has a distribution of pressure as illustrated in Fig 5.  It 
should  be  noted  that  the  pressure  on  the  upper  surface  towards  the  leading  edge  is  higher  than 
ambient and towards the trailing edge the pressure is lower than ambient.  This results in a nose down  
(negative) pitching moment even though there is no net lift at this angle of attack.  The Cm at zero lift 
angle  of  attack  is  called  Cmo  and,  since  the  pitching  moment  about  the  AC  is  constant  with  CL  by 
definition, its value is equal to Cmo.  The value of Cmo is determined by camber and is usually negative 
but is zero for a symmetrical aerofoil and can be positive when there is reflex curvature at the trailing 
edge.  When Cm is measured at point A (Fig 4), an increase in CL will cause an increase in lift and a 
larger  negative  (nose  down)  moment.    When  measured  at  point  B,  an  increase  in  CL  will  cause  the 
moment to become less negative and eventually positive (nose up). 
Revised May 11   
Page 4 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
1-4 Fig 5 Pressure Pattern at Zero Lift Angle of Attack 
Resultant force
on rear of section
Pressure lower
Pressure higher
than ambient
than ambient
Pressure lower
Resultant force
than ambient
on front of section
13.  Approaching CLmax , the Cm /CL graph departs from the straight line, Fig 6.  The CL decreases and 
the CP moves aft.  If at this stage, the Cm becomes negative; it tends to unstall the wing and is stable.  
If the Cm becomes positive the pitch up aggravates the stall and is unstable.  This is known as pitch-up 
and is associated with highly swept wings. 
1-4 Fig 6 Cm In The Region of CLmax
+ Cm
C Lmax

Unstable
C mo
Stable
Lift 
14.  By definition, lift is that component of the total aerodynamic reaction which is perpendicular to the 
flight path of the aircraft. 
15.  It  can  be  demonstrated  experimentally  that  the  total  aerodynamic reaction, and therefore the lift 
acting on a wing moving through air, is dependent upon at least the following variables: 
a. 
Free stream velocity (V2). 
b. 
Air density (ρ). 
c. 
Wing area (S). 
d. 
Wing shape in section and in planform. 
Revised May 11   
Page 5 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
e. 
Angle of attack (α). 
f. 
Condition of the surface. 
g. 
Viscosity of the air (µ). 
h. 
The speed of sound. ie the speed of propagation of small pressure waves (a). 
16.  In Volume 1, Chapter 2, and earlier in this chapter, it was seen that lift increased when the angle 
of  attack  of  a  given  aerofoil  section  was  increased;  and  that  the  increase  in  lift  was  achieved 
mechanically  by  greater  acceleration  of  the  airflow  over  the  section,  with  an  appropriate  decrease  in 
pressure. The general and simplified equation for aerodynamic force is ½ρV2S × a coefficient, and the 
coefficient indicates the change in the force which occurs when the angle of attack is altered. 
17.   The equation for lift is CL½ρV2S, and CL for a given aerofoil section and planform allows for angle 
of attack and all the unknown quantities which are not represented in the force formula.  Three proofs 
for the lift equation are given in Volume 1, Chapter 3. 
Coefficient of Lift (CL) 
18.  The coefficient of lift is obtained experimentally at a quoted Reynolds Number from the equation: 
Lift
=
CL½ρV2S
Lift
lift
CL 
=
1
=
S
2
ρV
qS
2
and the values are plotted against angle of attack.  It is then possible to consider the factors affecting 
lift in terms of CL and to show the effects on the CL curve. 
Factors Affecting CL
19.  The coefficient of lift is dependent upon the following factors: 
a. 
Angle of attack. 
b. 
Shape of the wing section and planform. 
c. 
Condition of the wing surface. 
 ρVL 
d. 
Reynolds Number     

 μ 
e. 
Speed of sound (Mach number). 
20.  Angle of Attack.  A typical lift curve is shown in Fig 7, for a wing of 13% thickness/chord (t/c) 
ratio  and  2%  camber.  The  greater  part  of  the  curve  is  linear  and  the  airflow  follows  the  design 
contour  of  the  aerofoil  almost  to  the  trailing  edge  before  separation.    At  higher  angles  of  attack 
the curve begins to lean over slightly, indicating a loss of lifting effectiveness.  From the point of 
maximum  thickness  to  the  trailing  edge  of  the  aerofoil,  the  flow  outside  the  boundary  layer  is 
Revised May 11   
Page 6 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
decelerating,  accompanied  by  a  pressure  rise  (Bernoulli’s  theorem).    This  adverse  pressure 
gradient thickens the existing boundary layer.  In the boundary layer, the airflow’s kinetic energy 
has  been  reduced  by  friction,  the  energy  loss  appearing  as  heat.    The  weakened  flow, 
encountering  the  thickened  layer,  slows  still  further.    With  increasing  angle  of  attack,  the 
boundary layer separation point (Volume 1, Chapter 5, paragraph 19) moves rapidly forward, the 
detached  flow  causing  a  substantial  reduction  of  CL.    The  aerofoil  may  be  considered  to  have 
changed  from  a  streamlined  body  to  a  bluff  one,  with  the  separation  point  moving  rapidly 
forwards from the region of the trailing edge.  The desirable progressive stall of an actual wing is 
achieved  by  wash-out  at  the  tips  or  change  of  aerofoil  section  along  the  span,  or  a  combination 
of both. 
1-4 Fig 7 Typical Lift Curve for a Moderate Thickness Cambered Section 
CL
All Stated
+1.5
Mach Number
Reynolds No
Aerofoil Section
Aspect Ratio
+1.0
+0.5
Critical or
Stalling Angle
(About 16°)
−8
−4
+4
+8
+12
+16
+20
α (Degrees)
−0.5
21.  Effect  of  Shape.
Changes  in  the  shape  of  a  wing  may  be  considered  under  the  following 
headings: 
a.
Leading  Edge  Radius.    The  shape  of  the  leading  edge,  and  the  condition  of  its  surface, 
largely  determines the stalling characteristics of a wing.  In general, a blunt leading edge with a 
large radius will result in a well-rounded peak to the CL curve.  A small radius, on the other hand, 
invariably  produces  an  abrupt  stall  but  this  may  be  modified  considerably  by  surface roughness 
which is discussed later. 
b.
CamberThe  effect  of  camber  is  illustrated  in  Fig  8.  Line  (a)  represents  the  curve  for  a 
symmetrical section.  Lines (b) and (c) are for sections of increasing camber.  A symmetrical wing 
at zero angle of attack will have the same pressure distribution on its upper and lower surfaces, 
therefore it will not produce lift. 
1-4 Fig 8 Effect of Camber 
Revised May 11   
Page 7 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
CL
c
b a
α
As  the  angle  of  attack  is  increased,  the  stagnation  point  moves  from  the  chord  line  to  a  point 
below,  moving  slightly  further  backwards  with  increase  in  angle  of  attack.    This  effectively 
lengthens the path of the flow over the top surface and reduces it on the lower, thus changing the 
symmetrical section (Fig 9a) to an apparent cambered one as in Fig 9b.  A positively cambered 
wing will produce lift at zero angle of attack because the airflow attains a higher velocity over the 
upper  surface  creating  a  pressure  differential  and  lift.    This gives it a lead over the symmetrical 
section at all normal angles of attack but pays the penalty of an earlier stalling angle as shown by 
the CL versus α curve which shifts up and left in Fig 8 as the camber is increased.  The angle of 
attack at which the CL is zero is known as the zero-lift angle of attack (αLo) and a typical value is 
−3° for a cambered section. 
1-4 Fig 9 Symmetrical Aerofoil 
a  Zero Angle of Attack
A
Stagnation Point
B
Path A = Path B
b  Positive Angle of Attack
Stagnation
A
Point
B
Path A > Path B
c
Aspect  ratio.  Fig  10  shows  the  downward  component  of  airflow  at  the  rear  of  the  wing, 
caused  by  trailing  edge  vortices  and  known  as  induced  downwash  (ω).    The  induced  downwash 
causes  the  flow  over  the  wing  to  be  inclined  slightly  downwards  from  the  direction  of  the 
undisturbed  stream  (V)  by  the  angle  α1.    This  reduces  the  effective  angle  of  attack,  which 
determines  the  airflow  and  the  lift  and  drag  forces  acting  on  the  wing.    The  effect  on  the  CL  by 
change  of  aspect  ratio  (AR)  will  depend  on  how  the  effective  angle  of  attack  is  influenced  by 
change  in  AR.    It  has  been  shown  in  the  previous  chapter,  that  a  wing  of  infinite  span  has  no 
induced downwash.  It can be demonstrated that the nearer one gets to that ideal, ie high AR, the 
less effect the vortices will have on the relative airflow along the semispan and therefore the least 
deviation from the shape of the CL curve of the wing with infinite AR.  It can be seen from Fig 11 
that  at  any  angle  α,  apart  from  the  zero  lift  angle,  the  increase  in  CL  of  the  finite  wing  lags  the 
infinite wing, the lag increasing with reducing AR due to increasing α1.  Theoretically the CL peak 
values  should  not  be  affected,  but  experimental  results  show  a  slight  reduction  of  CLmax  as  the 
aspect ratio is lowered. 
Revised May 11   
Page 8 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
1-4 Fig 10 Effect of Aspect Ratio on the Induced Downwash 
a  High Aspect Ratio
Effective RAF
Induced
α
Downwash
V
α1
b  Low Aspect Ratio
Induced
V
α
Downwash
α1
1-4 Fig 11 Influence of Aspect Ratio A on the Lift Curve 
CL
(A=    
∞ )
(A  )
1
(A  < A  )
2
1
α
α
L0
d.
Sweepback.    If  an  aircraft’s  wings  are  swept  and  the  wing  area  remains  the  same,  then  by 
definition (span2/area) the aspect ratio must be less than the AR of the equivalent straight wing.  The 
shape of the CL versus angle of attack curve for a swept wing, compared to a straight wing, is similar to 
the  comparison  between  a  low  and  a  high  aspect  ratio  wing.    However,  this  does  not  explain  the 
marked reduction in CLmax at sweep angles in excess of 40° to 45°, which is mainly due to earlier flow 
separation  from  the  upper  surface.    An  alternative  explanation  is  to  resolve  the  airflow over a swept 
wing  into  two  components.    The  component  parallel  to  the  leading  edge  produces  no  lift.    Only  the 
component normal to the leading edge is considered to be producing lift.  As this component is always 
less than the free stream flow at all angles of sweep, a swept wing will always produce less lift than a 
straight wing (see Fig 12). 
1-4 Fig 12 Effect of Sweepback on CL 
Revised May 11   
Page 9 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
CL
Straight Wing
Swept Wing
α
22.  Effect  of  Surface  ConditionIt has long been known that surface roughness, especially near the 
leading  edge,  has  a  considerable  effect  on  the  characteristics  of  wing  sections.    The  maximum  lift 
coefficient,  in  particular,  is  sensitive  to  the  leading  edge  roughness.    Fig  13  illustrates  the  effect  of  a 
roughened leading edge compared to a smooth surface.  In general, the maximum lift coefficient decreases 
progressively with increasing roughness of the leading edge.  Roughness of the surface further downstream 
than about 20% chord from the leading edge has little effect on CLmax or the lift-curve slope.  The standard 
roughness illustrated is more severe than that caused by usual manufacturing irregularities or deterioration 
in  service,  but  is  considerably  less  severe  than  that  likely  to  be  encountered  in  service  as  a  result  of  the 
accumulation  of  ice,  mud  or  combat  damage.    Under  test, the leading edge of a model wing is artificially 
roughened by applying carborundum grains to the surface over a length of 8% from the leading edge of both 
surfaces. 
1-4 Fig 13 Effect of Leading Edge Roughness 
RN = 6   
× 106
1.6
Smooth
1.2
CL
Rough
0.8
0.4
+4
8
12
16
α
ρVL
23.  Effect  of  Reynolds  Number.    The  formula  for  Reynolds  Number  is 
,  that  is  density  ×
μ
velocity × a mean chord length, divided by viscosity.  A fuller explanation of Reynolds Number is given 
in  Volume  1,  Chapter  2.    If  we  consider  an  aircraft  operating  at  a  given  altitude,  L  is  constant,  ρ  is 
constant, and at a given temperature, the viscosity is constant: the only variable is V.  For all practical 
purposes  the  graph  in  Fig  14  shows  the  effect  on  CL  of  increasing  velocity  on  a  general-purpose 
aerofoil section.  It should be remembered than an increase in Reynolds Number, for any reason, will 
produce  the  same  effect.    Fig  14  shows  that  with  increasing  velocity  both  the  maximum  value  of  CL
and the stalling angle of attack is increased.  An increase in the velocity of the airflow over a wing will 
produce earlier transition and an increase in the kinetic energy of the turbulent boundary layer due to 
mixing; the result is delayed separation.  An increase in density, or a reduction in viscosity will have the 
same effect on the stall.  The effect shown in Fig 14 is generally least for thin sections (t/c < 12%) and 
greatest for thick, well-cambered sections. 
Revised May 11   
Page 10 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
1-4 Fig 14 Effect of Reynolds Number on CLmax
1.6
RN = 8.9 × 10 6
RN = 6.0 × 10 6
1.2
RN = 2.6 × 10 6
CL
0.8
0.4
0
8
16
24
α
24.  Effect of Mach Number.  The effect of Mach number is discussed in the chapter on Transonic 
and Supersonic Aerodynamics (Volume 1, Chapter 21). 
Aerofoils 
25.  The performance of an aerofoil is governed by its contour.  Generally, aerofoils can be divided 
into three classes: 
 
a. 
High lift 
 
b. 
General purpose 
 
c. 
High speed 
26.  High Lift AerofoilsA typical high lift section is shown in Fig 15a. 
a. 
High lift sections employ a high t/c ratio, a pronounced camber, and a well-rounded leading 
edge: their maximum thickness is at about 25% to 30% of the chord aft of the leading edge. 
b. 
The greater the camber, ie the amount of curvature of the mean camber line, the greater the 
shift of centre of pressure for a given change in the angle of attack.  The range of movement of 
the  CP  is  therefore  large  on  a  high  lift  section.    This  movement  can  be  greatly  decreased  by 
reflexing upwards the trailing edge of the wing, but some lift is lost as a result. 
Revised May 11   
Page 11 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
1-4 Fig 15 Aerofoil Sections 
a  H igh Lift
c  High  Speed
b  General Purp ose
Mean Camber Line
c. 
Sections of this type are used mainly on sailplanes and other aircraft where a high CL is all-
important and speed a secondary consideration. 
27.  General Purpose AerofoilsA typical general purpose section is shown in Fig 15b. 
a. 
General purpose sections employ a lower t/c ratio, less camber and a sharper leading edge 
than  those  of  the  high  lift  type,  but  their  maximum  thickness  is  still  at  about  25%  to 30% of the 
chord aft of the leading edge.  The lower t/c ratio results in less drag and a lower CL than those of 
a high lift aerofoil. 
b. 
Sections  of  this  type  are  used  on  aircraft  whose  duties  require  speeds  which,  although 
higher than those mentioned in para 26, are not high enough to subject the aerofoil to the effects 
of compressibility. 
28.  High Speed AerofoilsTypical high speed sections are shown in Fig 15c. 
a. 
Most high speed sections employ a very low t/c ratio, no camber and a sharp leading edge.  
Their maximum thickness is at about the 50% chord point. 
b. 
Most  of  these  sections  lie  in  the  5%  to  10%  t/c  ratio  band,  but  even  thinner  sections  have 
been  used  on  research  aircraft.    The  reason  for  this  is  the  overriding  requirement  for  low  drag; 
naturally the thinner sections have low maximum lift coefficients. 
c. 
High  speed  aerofoils  are  usually  symmetrical  about  the  chord  line;  some  sections  are 
wedge-shaped whilst others consist of arcs of a circle placed symmetrically about the chord line.  
Revised May 11   
Page 12 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
The behaviour and aerodynamics of these sections at supersonic speeds are dealt with in detail 
in Volume 1, Chapter 21. 
Performance 
29.  The performance of all aerofoils is sensitive to small changes in contour. Increasing or decreasing 
the thickness by as little as 1% of the chord, or moving the point of maximum camber an inch or so in 
either direction, will alter the characteristics.  In particular, changes in the shape of the leading edge have 
a marked effect on the maximum lift and drag obtained and the behaviour at the stall - a sharp leading 
edge stalling more readily than one that is well rounded.  Also it is important that the finish of the wing 
surfaces be carefully preserved if the aircraft is expected to attain its maximum performance.  Any dents 
or scratches in the surface bring about a deterioration in the general performance.  These points are of 
particular importance on high performance aircraft when a poor finish can result in a drastic reduction not 
only in performance, but also in control at high Mach numbers. 
Summary 
30.  The pressure distribution around an aerofoil varies considerably with shape and angle of attack, 
however, at conventional angles of attack, the greatest contribution to overall lift comes from the upper 
surface. 
31.  There are two points through which the lift force may be considered to act.  The first is a moving 
point called the centre of pressure, and the second is a fixed point called the aerodynamic centre.  The 
aerodynamic centre is used in most work on stability. 
32.  Lift is dependent upon the following variables: 
a. 
Free stream velocity. 
b. 
Air density. 
c. 
Wing area. 
d. 
Wing shape in section and planform. 
e. 
Angle of attack. 
f. 
Condition of the surface. 
g. 
Viscosity of the air. 
h. 
The speed of sound. 
33.  The coefficient of lift is dependent upon the following factors: 
a. 
Angle of attack. 
b. 
Shape of the wing section and planform. 
c. 
Condition of the wing surface. 
d. 
Speed of sound. 
Revised May 11   
Page 13 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-4 - Lift 
ρVL
e. 
Reynolds Number  μ
34.  Aerofoils are generally divided into three classes: 
a. 
High lift. 
b. 
General purpose. 
c. 
High speed. 
Revised May 11   
Page 14 of 14 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
CHAPTER 5- DRAG 
Introduction 
1.    Each  part  of  an  aircraft  in  flight  produces  an  aerodynamic  force.    Total  drag  is  the  sum  of  all  the 
component  of  the  aerodynamic  forces  which  act  parallel  and opposite to the direction of flight.  Each 
part of total drag represents a value of resistance of the aircraft’s movement, that is, lost energy.   
Components of Total Drag 
2. 
Some  textbooks  still  break  down  Total  Drag  into  the  old  terms  Profile  Drag  and  Induced  Drag.  
These latter terms are now more widely known as Zero Lift Drag and Lift Dependent Drag respectively 
and are described later.  There are three points to be borne in mind when considering total drag: 
a. 
The  causes  of  subsonic  drag  have  changed  very  little  over  the  years  but  the  balance  of 
values  has  changed  e.g.  parasite  drag  is  such  a  small  part  of  the  whole  that  it  is  no  longer 
considered  separately,  except  when  describing  helicopter  power  requirements  (Volume  12, 
Chapter 6). 
b. 
An aircraft in flight will have drag even when it is not producing lift. 
c. 
In producing lift the whole aircraft produce additional drag and some of this will be increments 
in those components which make up zero lift drag. 
3. 
Zero  Lift  Drag.    When  an  aircraft  is  flying  at  zero  lift  angle  of  attack  the  resultant  of  all  the 
aerodynamic forces acts parallel and opposite to the direction of flight.  This is known as Zero Lift Drag 
(but Profile Drag or Boundary Layer Drag in some textbooks) and is composed of: 
a. 
Surface friction drag. 
b. 
Form drag (boundary layer normal pressure drag). 
c. 
Interference drag. 
4. 
Lift Dependent Drag.  In producing lift the whole aircraft will produce additional drag composed 
of: 
a. 
Induced drag (vortex drag). 
b. 
Increments of: 
(1)  Form drag. 
(2)  Surface friction drag. 
(3)  Interference drag. 
ZERO LIFT DRAG 
The Boundary Layer 
5. 
Although  it  is  convenient  to  ignore  the  effects  of  viscosity  whenever  possible,  certain  aspects  of 
aerodynamics cannot be explained if viscosity is disregarded. 
Revised May 11   
Page 1 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
6. 
Because  air  is  viscous,  any  object  moving  through  it  collects  a  group  of  air  particles  which  it  pulls 
along.    A  particle  directly  adjacent  to  the  object’s  surface  will,  because  of  viscous  adhesion,  be  pulled 
along at approximately the speed of the object.  A particle slightly further away from the surface will also 
be pulled along; however its velocity will be slightly less than the object’s velocity.  As we move further and 
further away from the surface the particles of air are affected less and less, until a point is reached where 
the movement of the body does not cause any parallel motion of air particles whatsoever. 
7. 
The layer of air extending from the surface to the point where no dragging effect is discernable is 
known as the boundary layer.  In flight, the nature of the boundary layer determines the maximum lift 
coefficient, the stalling characteristics of a wing, the value of form drag, and to some extent the high-
speed characteristics of an aircraft. 
8. 
The  viscous  drag  force  within  the  boundary  layer  is  not  sensitive  to  pressure  and  density 
variations  and  is  therefore  unaffected  by  the  variations  in  pressures  at  right  angles  (normal)  to  the 
surface of the body.  The coefficient of viscosity of air changes in a similar manner to temperature and 
therefore decreases with altitude. 
Surface Friction Drag 
9. 
The surface friction drag is determined by: 
a. 
The total surface area of the aircraft. 
b. 
The coefficient of viscosity of the air. 
c. 
The rate of change of velocity across the flow. 
10.  Surface  Area.    The  whole  surface  area  of  the  aircraft  has  a  boundary  layer  and  therefore  has 
surface friction drag. 
11.  Coefficient  of  Viscosity.    The  absolute  coefficient  of  viscosity  (μ)  is  a  direct  measure  of  the 
viscosity of a fluid, ie it is the means by which a value can be allotted to this property of a fluid.  The 
greater the viscosity of the air, the greater the dragging effect on the aircraft’s surface.  
12.  Rate of Change of Velocity.  Consider the flow of air moving across a thin flat plate, as in Fig 1.  
The boundary layer is normally defined as that region of flow in which the speed is less than 99% of the 
free stream flow, and usually exists in two forms, laminar and turbulent.  In general, the flow at the front 
of a body is laminar and becomes turbulent at a point some distance along the surface, known as the 
transition point From Fig 1 it can be seen that the rate of change of velocity is greater at the surface in 
the turbulent flow than in the laminar.  This higher rate of change of velocity results in greater surface 
friction  drag.    The  velocity  profile  for  the  turbulent  layer  shows  the  effect  of  mixing  with  the  faster 
moving air above the boundary layer.  This is an important characteristic of the turbulent flow since it 
indicates a higher level of kinetic energy.  Even when the boundary layer is turbulent however, a very 
thin  layer  exists  immediately  adjacent  to  the  surface  in  which  random  velocities  are  smoothed  out.  
This  very  thin  layer  (perhaps  1%  of  the  total  thickness  of  the  turbulent  layer)  remains  in  the  laminar 
state and is called the laminar sub-layer.  Though extremely thin, the presence of this layer is important 
when considering the surface friction drag of a body and the reduction that can be obtained in the drag 
of a body as a result of smoothing the surface. 
Revised May 11   
Page 2 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
1-5 Fig 1 Boundary Layer 
Distance from
Surface (20 mm)
Distance from
Surface (2 mm)
Velocity Profile
Laminar
Turbulent
Laminar Sub-Layer
Transition
Point
Transition to Turbulence 
13.  It follows from para 12 that forward movement of the transition point increases the surface friction 
drag.  The position of the transition point depends upon: 
a. 
Surface condition. 
b. 
Speed of the flow. 
c. 
Size of the object. 
d. 
Adverse pressure gradient. 
14. Surface  Condition.    Both  the  laminar  and  turbulent  boundary  layers  thicken  downstream,  the 
average thickness varying from approximately 2 mm at a point 1 m downstream of the leading edge, to 
20  mm  at  a  point  1  m  downstream  of  the  transition  point.    Generally,  the  turbulent  layer  is  about ten 
times  thicker  than  the  laminar  layer  but  exact  values  vary  from  surface  to  surface.    The  thin  laminar 
layer is extremely sensitive to surface irregularities.  Any roughness which can be felt by the hand, on 
the  skin  of  the  aircraft,  will  cause  transition  to  turbulence  at  that  point,  and  the  thickening  boundary 
layer will spread out fanwise down-stream causing a marked increase in surface friction drag. 
15.  Speed  and  Size.    The  nineteenth  century  physicist,  Reynolds,  discovered  that  in  a  fluid  flow  of 
given density and viscosity the flow changed from streamline to turbulent when the velocity reached a 
value  that  was  inversely  proportional  to  the  thickness  of  a  body  in  the  flow.    That  is,  the  thicker  the 
body,  the  lower  the  speed  at  which  transition  occurred.    Applied  to  an  aerofoil  of  given  thickness  it 
follows  that  an  increase  of  flow  velocity  will  cause  the  transition  point  to  move  forward  towards  the 
leading edge.  (A fuller explanation of Reynolds Number (RN) is given in Volume 1, Chapter 2.) Earlier 
transition  means  that  a  greater  part  of  the  surface  is  covered  by  a  turbulent  boundary  layer,  creating 
greater  surface  friction  drag.    However,  it  should  be  remembered  that the turbulent layer has greater 
kinetic  energy  than  the  laminar,  the  effect  of  which  is  to  delay  separation,  thereby  increasing  the 
maximum value of CL (see Volume 1, Chapter 4). 
16.  Adverse  Pressure  Gradient.    It  has  been  found  that  a  laminar  boundary  layer  cannot  be 
maintained, without mechanical assistance, when the pressure is rising in the direction of flow, ie in an 
adverse  pressure  gradient.    Thus  on  the  curved  surfaces  of  an  aircraft  the  transition  point  is  usually 
beneath,  or  near  to,  the  point  of  minimum  pressure  and  this  is  normally  found  to  be  at  the  point  of 
maximum thickness.  Fig 2 illustrates the comparison between a flat plate and a curved surface. 
Revised May 11   
Page 3 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
1-5 Fig 2 Effect of Adverse Pressure Gradient 
Transition
Point
Uniform
Pressure
Turbulent
Laminar
Transition
Same
Point
RN
Velocity Decre
Pre
a
ss
s
ur
i
e
n
In
g
creasing
Turbule
Laminar
nt
(Adverse
Pressure
Gradient)
Form Drag (Boundary Layer Normal Pressure Drag) 
17.  The  difference  between  surface friction and form drag can be easily appreciated if a flat plate is 
considered in two attitudes, first at zero angle of attack when all the drag is friction drag, and second at 
90º angle of attack when all the drag is form drag due to the separation. 
18.  Separation Point.  The effect of surface friction is to reduce the velocity, and therefore the kinetic 
energy,  of  the  air  within  the  boundary  layer.    On  a  curved  surface  the  effect  of  the  adverse  pressure 
gradient is to reduce further the kinetic energy of the boundary layer.  Eventually, at a point close to the 
trailing  edge  of  the  surface,  a  finite  amount  of  the  boundary  layer  stops  moving,  resulting  in  eddies 
within the turbulent wake.  Fig 3 shows the separation point and the flow reversal which occurs behind that 
point.    Aft  of  the  transition  point, the faster moving air above mixes with the turbulent boundary layer and 
therefore has greater kinetic energy than the laminar layer.  The turbulent layer will now separate as readily 
under the influence of the adverse pressure as would the laminar layer. 
1-5 Fig 3 Boundary Layer Separation 
Velocity Decreasing
Pressure Increasing
Separation Point
Streamlining 
19.  When  a  boundary  layer  separates  some  distance  forward  of  the  trailing  edge,  the  pressure 
existing at the separation point will be something less than at the forward stagnation point.  Each part 
of  the  aircraft  will  therefore  be  subject  to  a  drag  force  due  to  the  differences  in  pressure  between  its 
fore and aft surface areas.  This pressure drag (boundary layer normal pressure drag) can be a large 
part  of  the  total  drag  and  it  is  therefore  necessary  to  delay  separation  for  as  long  as  possible.    The 
Revised May 11   
Page 4 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
streamlining  of  any  object  is  a  means  of  increasing  the  fineness  ratio  to  reduce  the  curvature  of  the 
surfaces and thus the adverse pressure gradient (fineness ratio of an aerofoil is 
chord ). 
thickness
Interference Drag 
20.  On a complete aircraft the total drag is greater than the sum of the values of drag for the separate 
parts of the aircraft.  The additional drag is the result of flow interference at wing/fuselage, wing/nacelle 
and other such junctions leading to modification of the boundary layers.  Further turbulence in the wake 
causes  a  greater  pressure  difference  between  fore  and  aft  surface  areas  and  therefore  additional 
resistance  to  movement.    For  subsonic  flight  this  component  of  total  drag  can  be  reduced  by  the 
addition of fairings at the junctions, e.g. at the trailing edge wing roots. 
Summary 
21.  The drag created when an aircraft is not producing lift, e.g. in a truly vertical flight path, is called 
zero lift drag; it comprises: 
a. 
Surface friction drag. 
b. 
Form drag (boundary layer normal pressure drag). 
c. 
Interference drag. 
22.  Surface friction drag is dependent upon: 
a. 
Total wetted area. 
b. 
Viscosity of the air. 
c. 
Rate of change of velocity across the flow: 
(1)  Transition point. 
(2)  Surface condition. 
(3)  Speed and size. 
(4)  Adverse pressure gradient. 
23.  Form drag is dependent upon: 
a. 
Separation point: 
(1)  Transition point. 
(2)  Adverse pressure gradient. 
b. 
Streamlining. 
24.  Interference drag is caused by the mixing of airflows at airframe junctions. 
25.  Zero lift drag varies as the square of the equivalent air speed (EAS). 
Revised May 11   
Page 5 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
LIFT DEPENDENT DRAG 
General 
26.  All  of  the  drag  which  arises  because  the  aircraft  is  producing  lift  is called lift dependent drag. It 
comprises in the main induced drag, but also contains increments of the types of drag which make up 
zero lift drag.  The latter are more apparent at high angles of attack. 
Induced Drag (Vortex Drag) 
27.  If  a  finite  rectangular  wing  at  a  positive  angle  of  attack  is  considered,  the  spanwise  pressure 
distribution will be as shown in Fig 4.  On the underside of the wing, the pressure is higher than that of 
the surrounding atmosphere so the air spills around the wing tips, causing on outward airflow towards 
them.    On  the  upper  surface,  the  pressure  is  low,  and  the  air  flows  inwards.    This  pattern  of  airflow 
results in a twisting motion in the air as it leaves the trailing edge.  Viewed from just downstream of the 
wing, the air rotates and forms a series of vortices along the trailing edge, and near the wing tips the air 
forms into a concentrated vortex. 
1-5 Fig 4 Spanwise Flow 
Low Pressure
High Pressure
Further  downstream  all  of  the  vorticity  collects  into  trailing  vortices  as  seen  in  Fig  5.    The  wing  tip 
vortices intensify under high lift conditions, e.g. during manoeuvre, and the drop in pressure at the core 
may be sufficient to cause vapour trails to form. 
Revised May 11   
Page 6 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
1-5 Fig 5 Trailing Vortices 
28.  Induced Downwash.  The trailing vortices modify the whole flow pattern.  In particular, they alter the 
flow direction and speed in the vicinity of the wing and tail surfaces.  The trailing vortices therefore have a 
strong influence on the lift, drag and handling qualities of an aircraft.  Fig 6 shows how the airflow behind 
the wing is being drawn downwards.  This effect is known as downwash which also influences the flow 
over the wing itself, with important consequences.  Firstly the angle of attack relative to the modified total 
airstream direction is reduced.  This in effect is a reduction in angle of attack, and means that less lift will 
be generated unless the angle of attack is increased.  The second and more important consequence is 
that what was previously the lift force vector is now tilted backward relative to the free stream flow.  There 
is therefore a rearward component of the force which is induced drag or vortex drag.  A further serious 
consequence  of  downwash  is  that  the  airflow  approaching  the  tailplane  is  deflected  downwards  so  that 
the effective angle of attack of the tailplane is reduced. 
1-5 Fig 6 Downwash 
Diagrammatic Explanation 
29.  Consider a section of a wing of infinite span which is producing lift but has no trailing edge vortices.  
Fig  7a  shows  a  total  aerodynamic  reaction  (TR)  which  is  divided  into  lift  (L)  and  drag  (D).    The  lift 
component, being equal and opposite to weight, is at right angles to the direction of flight, and the drag 
component is parallel and opposite to the direction of flight.  The angle at which the total reaction lies to 
the relative airflow is determined only by the angle of attack of the aerofoil. 
Revised May 11   
Page 7 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
1-5 Fig 7 Effect of Downwash on Lift and Drag 
D
L
TR
L
Lift Reduced
Downwash
a
b
Induced Drag
D
L
TR
c
30.  Fig  7b  shows  the  same  section,  but  of  a  wing  of  finite  span  and  therefore  having  trailing  edge 
vortices.    The  effect  of  the  induced  downwash  (due  to  the  vortices)  is  to  tilt  downwards  the  effective 
relative airflow, thereby reducing the effective angle of attack.  To regain the consequent loss of lift the 
aerofoil must be raised until the original lift value is restored (see Fig 7c).  The total reaction now lies at 
the original angle, but relative to the effective airflow, the component parallel to the direction of flight is 
longer.    This  additional  value  of  the  drag  -  resulting  from  the  presence  of  wing  vortices  is  known  as 
induced drag or vortex drag. 
Factors Affecting Induced Drag 
31.  The main factors affecting vortex formation and therefore induced drag are: 
a. 
Planform. 
b. 
Aspect ratio. 
c. 
Lift and weight. 
d. 
Speed. 
For an elliptical planform, which gives the minimum induced drag at any aspect ratio: 
2
C
= CL where C = coefficient of induced drag 
Di
π
Di
A
A =  aspect ratio 
A correction factor k is required for other planforms. 
Revised May 11   
Page 8 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
32.  Planform.  Induced drag is greatest where the vortices are greatest, that is, at the wing tips; and 
so, to reduce the induced drag the aim must be to achieve an even spanwise pressure distribution.  An 
elliptical planform has unique properties due to elliptic spanwise lift distribution, viz: 
a. 
The downwash is constant along the span. 
b. 
For a given lift, span and velocity, this planform creates the minimum induced drag. 
An  elliptical  wing  poses  manufacturing  difficulties,  fortunately  a  careful  combination  of  taper  and 
washout, or section change, at the tips, can approximate to the elliptic ideal. 
33.  Aspect Ratio (AR).  It has been previously stated that, if the AR is infinite, then the induced drag 
is  zero.    The  nearer  we  can  get  to  this  impossible  configuration,  then  the  less  induced  drag  is 
produced.  The wing tip vortices are aggravated by the increased tip spillage, caused by the transverse 
flow  over  the  longer  chord  of  a  low  AR  wing  and  the  enhanced  induced  downwash  affects  a  greater 
proportion  of  the  shorter  span.    Induced  drag  is  inversely  proportional  to  the  AR,  e.g.  if  the  AR  is 
doubled, then the induced drag is halved. 
34.  Effect of Lift and Weight.  The induced downwash angle (α1) (Volume 1, Chapter 4, Fig 10), and 
therefore  the  induced  drag,  depends  upon  the  difference  in  pressure  between  the  upper  and  lower 
surfaces of the wing, and this pressure difference is the lift produced by the wing.  It follows then that 
an increase in CL (e.g. during manoeuvres or with increased weight) will increase the induced drag at 
that speed.  In fact, the induced drag varies as C 2
L  and, therefore, as weight2, at a given speed. 
35.  Effect of Speed.  If, while maintaining level flight, the speed is reduced to, say, half the original, then 
the dynamic pressure producing the lift ( ½ ρV2 ) is reduced four times.  To restore the lift to its original 
value,  the  value  of  CL must be increased four-fold.  The increased angle of attack necessary to do this 
inclines the lift vector to the rear, increasing the contribution to the induced drag.  In addition, the vortices 
are affected, since the top and bottom aerofoil pressures are altered with the angle of attack. 
36.  High  Angles  of  Attack.    Induced  drag  at  high  angles  of  attack,  such  as  occur  at  take-off,  can 
account for nearly three-quarters of the total drag, falling to an almost insignificant figure at high speed. 
Increments of Zero Lift Drag Resulting from Lift Production 
37.  Effect of Lift.  Remembering that two of the factors affecting zero lift drag are transition point and 
adverse pressure gradient, consider the effect of increasing lift from zero to the maximum for manoeuvre.  
Forward movement of the peak of the low-pressure envelope will cause earlier transition of the boundary 
layer to turbulent flow, and the increasing adverse pressure gradient will cause earlier separation.  Earlier 
transition increases the surface friction drag and earlier separation increases the form drag. 
38.  Frontal Area.  As an aircraft changes its angle of attack, either because of a speed change or to 
manoeuvre, the frontal area presented to the airflow is changed and consequently the amount of form 
drag is changed. 
39.  Interference Drag.  Interference drag arises from the mixing of the boundary layers at junctions 
on  the  airframe.    When  the  aircraft  is  producing  lift,  the  boundary  layers  are  thicker  and  more 
turbulent  and  therefore  create  greater  energy  losses  where  they  mix.    The  increments  of  surface 
friction,  form  and  interference  drag  arise  because  the  aircraft  is  producing  lift,  and  these  values  of 
additional drag may be included in lift dependent drag.  It follows that the greater the lift, the greater the 
drag increments, and, in fact, this additional drag is only really noticeable at high angles of attack. 
Revised May 11   
Page 9 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
Variation of Drag with Angle of Attack 
40.  Fig  8  shows  that  total  drag  varies  steadily  with  change  of  angle  of  attack,  being  least  at  small 
negative  angles  and  increasing  on  either  side.    The  rate  of  increase  becomes  marked  at  angles  of 
attack above about 8º and after the stall it increases at a greater rate.  The sudden rise at the stall is 
caused by the turbulence resulting from the breakdown of steady flow. 
1-5 Fig 8 Typical Drag Curve for a Cambered Section 
o
o
0
16
0.32
    Usual   
Angles of Flight
le
0.28
g
n
A
g
) D 0.24
llin
(C
ta
t
S
n
ie
0.20
ffic
e
o
0.16
C
g
ra
D
0.12
0.08
0.04
0
o
o
o
-5
0
5
10o
15o
20o
Angle of Attack
Variation of Lift/Drag Ratio with Angle of Attack 
41.  It is apparent that for a given amount of lift it is desirable to have the least possible drag from the 
aerofoil.    Typically,  the  greatest  lifting  effort  is  obtained  at  an  angle  of  attack  of  about  16º  and  least 
drag occurs at an angle of attack of about –2º.  Neither of these angles is satisfactory, as the ratio of lift 
to drag at these extreme figures is low.  What is required is the maximum lifting effort compared with 
the drag at the same angle, ie the highest lift/drag ratio (L/D ratio). 
42.  The L/D ratio for an aerofoil at any selected angle of attack can be calculated by dividing the CL at 
that  angle  of  attack  by  the  corresponding  CD.    In  practice  the  same  result  is  obtained  irrespective  of 
whether the lift and drag or their coefficients are used for the calculation: 
2
1
L
C
ρV S
L
C
2
L
=
=
2
1
D
C
V
ρ
S
C
D
2
D
Revised May 11   
Page 10 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
1-5 Fig 9 Variation of L/D Ratio with Angle of Attack 
o
o
0
5
16o
Usual
Angles of Flight
25
20
)
/D 15
(L
le
g
tio
n
a
A
R 10
t
g
n
ie
ra
ffic
ift/D
E
L 5
t
s
o
M
0
g
le
llin
g
ta
n
S
A
-5
o
-5
o
5
20o
15o
10o
0o
25o
Angle of Attack
43.  Fig 9 shows that the lift/drag ratio increases rapidly up to an angle of attack of about 4º at which 
point the lift may be between 12 to 25 times the drag, the exact figure depending on the aerofoil used.  
At  larger  angles  the  L/D ratio decreases steadily, because even though the lift itself is still increasing 
the proportion of drag is rising at a faster rate.  One important feature of this graph is the indication of 
the  angle  of  attack  for  the  highest L/D  ratio; this angle is one at which the aerofoil gives its best all-
round performance.  At a higher angle the required lift is obtained at a lower, and hence, uneconomical 
speed; at a lower angle it is obtained at a higher, and also uneconomical, speed.
Summary 
44.  Lift dependent drag comprises: 
a. 
Induced drag (vortex drag). 
b. 
Increments of: 
(1)  Surface friction drag. 
(2)  Form drag. 
(3)  Interference drag. 
Revised May 11   
Page 11 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-5 - Drag 
45.  Induced drag varies as: 
a. 
CL
1
b. 
2
V
c. 
(Weight)2 
1
d. 
aspect ratio
TOTAL DRAG 
General 
46.  A typical total drag curve is shown in Fig 10.  This curve is valid for one particular aircraft for one 
weight only
 in level flight.  Speeds of particular interest are indicated on the graph: 
a. 
The  shaded  area  is  the  minimum  product  of  drag  and  velocity  and  therefore  gives  the 
minimum power speed (VMP). 
b. 
VIMD is the speed at which total drag is lowest.  It coincides with the best lift/drag ratio speed. 
c. 
Maximum EAS/drag ratio speed is the main aerodynamic consideration for best range.  It has 
the value of 1.32 × VIMD. 
1-5 Fig 10 Total Drag Curve 
Total Drag
g
ra
D
Zero Lift Drag
Lift Dependent Drag
V
V
V
EAS
EAS (V )
MP
IMD
MAX D
I
Revised May 11   
Page 12 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
CHAPTER 6 - STALLING 
Introduction 
1. 
In Volume 1, Chapter 5, it was stated that the nature of the boundary layer determined the stalling 
characteristics  of  a  wing.    In  particular  the  phenomenon  of  boundary  layer  separation  is  extremely 
important.    This  chapter  will  first  discuss  what  happens  when  a  wing  stalls,  it  will  then  look  at  the 
aerodynamic symptoms and the variations in the basic stalling speed and finally consider autorotation. 
Boundary Layer Separation 
2. 
Boundary  layer  separation  is  produced  as  a  result  of  the  adverse  pressure  gradient  developed 
round the body.  The low energy air close to the surface is unable to move in the opposite direction to 
the pressure gradient and the flow close to the surface flows in the reverse direction to the free stream.  
The  development  of  separation  is  shown  in  Fig  1.    A  normal  typical  velocity  profile  is  shown 
corresponding  to  point  A,  while  a  little  further  down  the  surface,  at  point  B,  the  adverse  pressure 
gradient  will  have  modified  the  velocity  profile  as  shown.    At  point  C,  the  velocity  profile  has  been 
modified to such an extent that, at the surface, flow has ceased.  Further down the surface, at point D, 
the flow close to the surface has reversed and the flow is said to have separated.  Point C is defined as 
the separation point.  In the reversed flow region aft of this point the flow is eddying and turbulent, with 
a mean velocity of motion in the opposite direction to the free stream. 
1-6 Fig 1 Velocity Profile 
Direction
of Flow
Reversed
Flow Region
A
B
C
D
3. 
Trailing Edge Separation.  On a normal subsonic section virtually no flow separation occurs before 
the trailing edge at low angles of attack, the flow being attached over the rear part of the surface in the 
form of a turbulent boundary layer.  As the angles of attack increases, so the adverse pressure gradient is 
increased  as  explained  in  Volume  1,  Chapter  5,  and  the boundary layer will begin to separate from the 
surface  near  the  trailing  edge  of  the  wing  (see Fig  2).    As  the  angle  of  attack  is  further  increased  the 
separation  point  will  move  forwards  along  the  surface  of  the  wing  towards  the  leading  edge.    As  the 
separation  point  moves  forward  the  slope  of  the  lift/angle  of  attack  curve  decreases  and  eventually  an 
angle of attack is reached at which the wing is said to stall.  The flow over the upper surface of the wing is 
then completely broken down and the lift produced by the wing decreases. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
1-6 Fig 2 Trailing Edge Separation 
Separation Point
moves forward as
Incidence increases
Reverse
Turbulent
Flow
Wake
4. 
Leading  Edge  Separation.    Turbulent  trailing  edge  separation  is  usually  found  on  conventional 
low  speed  wing  sections;  another  type  of  separation  sometimes  occurs  on  thin  wings  with  sharp 
leading  edges.    This  is  laminar  flow  separation;  the  flow  separating  at  the  thin  nose  of  the  aerofoil 
before  becoming  turbulent.    Transition may then occur in the separated boundary layer and the layer 
may  then  re-attach  further  down  the  body  in  the  form  of  a  turbulent  boundary  layer.    Underneath  the 
separated  layer  a  stationary  vortex  is  formed  and  this  is  often  termed  a  bubble  (Fig  3).    The  size  of 
these bubbles depends on the aerofoil shape and has been found to vary from a very small fraction of 
the  chord  (short  bubbles)  to  a  length  comparable  to  that  of  the  chord  itself  (long  bubbles).  The long 
bubbles  affect  the  pressure  distribution  even  at  small  angles  of  attack,  reducing  the  lift-curve  slope.  
The eventual stall on this type of wing is more gradual.  However, the short bubbles have little effect on 
the pressure  distribution,  and  hence  on  the  lift  curve  slope,  but  when  the  bubble  eventually  bursts  the 
corresponding stall is an abrupt one. 
1-6 Fig 3 Leading Edge Separation 
Separation Bubble
5.
Critical  Angle.    The  marked  reduction  in  the  lift  coefficient  which  accompanies  the  breakdown  of 
airflow  over  the  wing  occurs  at  the  critical  angle  of  attack  for  a  particular  wing.    In  subsonic  flight  an 
aircraft will always stall at the same critical angle of attack except at high Reynolds Numbers (Volume 1, 
Chapter 2).  A typical lift curve showing the critical angle is seen in Fig 4; it should be noted that not all lift 
is lost at the critical angle, in fact the aerofoil will give a certain amount of lift up to 90º. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
1-6 Fig 4 Lift Curve 
1.2
)
1.0
L
(C
ift
0.8
L
f
le
o
g
t
n
n
0.6
lA
ie
a
ffic
e
0.4
ritic
o
C
C
0.2
-5
5
10
15
20
25
Aerodynamic Symptoms 
6. 
The  most  consistent  symptom,  or  stall  warning,  arises  from  the  separated  flow  behind  the  wing 
passing over the tail surfaces.  The turbulent wake causes buffeting of the control surfaces which can 
usually be felt at the control column and rudder pedals.  As the separation point starts to move forward, 
to within a few degrees of the critical angle of attack, the buffeting will usually give adequate warning of 
the  stall.    On  some  aircraft  separation  may  also  occur  over  the  cockpit  canopy  to  give  additional 
audible  warning.    The  amount  of  pre-stall  buffet  depends  on  the  position  of  the  tail  surfaces  with 
respect to the turbulent wake.  When the trailing edge flap is lowered the increased downwash angle 
behind the (inboard) flaps may reduce the amount of buffet warning of the stall. 
Pitching Moments 
7. 
As  angle  of  attack  is  increased  through  the  critical  angle  of  attack  the  wing  pitching  moment 
changes.    Changes  in  the  downwash  angle  behind  the  wing  also  cause  the  tail  pitching  moment  to 
change.    The  overall  effect  varies  with  aircraft  type  and  may  be  masked  by  the  rate  at  which  the 
elevator is deflected to increase the angle of attack.  Most aircraft, however, are designed to produce a 
nose-down pitching moment at the critical angle of attack. 
Tip Stalling 
8. 
The wing of an aircraft is designed to stall progressively from the root to the tip.  The reasons for 
this are threefold: 
a. 
To induce early buffet symptoms over the tail surface. 
b. 
To retain aileron effectiveness up to the critical angle of attack. 
c. 
To  avoid  a  large  rolling  moment  which  would  arise  if  the  tip  of  one  wing  stalled  before  the 
other (wing drop). 
9. 
A  rectangular  straight  wing  will  usually  stall  from  the  root  because  of  the  reduction  in  effective 
angle  of  attack  at  the tips caused by the wing tip vortex.  If washout is incorporated to reduce vortex 
drag,  it  also assists in delaying tip stall.  A tapered wing on the other hand will aggravate the tip stall 
due to the lower Reynolds Number (smaller chord) at the wing tip. 
10.  The most common features designed to prevent wing tip stalling are: 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
a.
WashoutA reduction in incidence at the tips will result in the wing root reaching its critical 
angle of attack before the wing tip. 
b.
Root  Spoilers.    By  making  the  leading  edge  of  the  root  sharper,  the  airflow  has  more 
difficulty in following the contour of the leading edge and an early stall is induced. 
c.
Change  of  Section.    An  aerofoil  section  with  more  gradual  stalling  characteristics  may  be 
employed towards the wing tips (increased camber). 
d
Slats and Slots.  The use of slats and/or slots on the outer portion of the wing increases the 
stalling  angle  of  that  part  of  the  wing.    Slats  and  slots  are  dealt  with  more  fully  in  Volume  1, 
Chapter 10. 
STALLING SPEED 
General 
11.  In  level  flight  the  weight  of  the  aircraft  is  balanced  by  the  lift,  and  from  the  lift  formula 
(Lift = CL½ρV2S) it can be seen that lift is reduced whenever any of the other factors in the formula are 
reduced.  For al  practical purposes density (ρ) and wing area (S) can be considered constant (for a 
particular  altitude  and  configuration).    If  the  engine  is  throttled  back  the  drag  will  reduce  the  speed, 
and, from the formula, lift will be reduced.  To keep the lift constant and so maintain level flight, the only 
factor that is readily variable is the lift coefficient (CL). 
12.  As has been shown, the CL can be made larger by increasing the angle of attack, and by so doing 
the lift can be restored to its original value so that level flight is maintained at the reduced speed.  Any 
further reduction in speed necessitates a further increase in the angle of attack, each succeeding lower 
IAS  corresponding  to  each  succeeding  higher  angle  of  attack.    Eventually,  at  a  certain  IAS,  the  wing 
reaches its stalling angle, beyond which point any further increase in angle of attack, in an attempt to 
maintain the lift, will precipitate a stall. 
13.  The speed corresponding to a given angle of attack is obtained by transposing the lift formula, thus: 
1
2
 

=
C
ρ V S
L 2
0
I
L

2
VI
=
C 1 ρ S
L
0
2
L

VI
=
C 1 ρ S
L
0
2
If  it  is  required  to  know  the  speed  corresponding  to  the critical angle of attack, the value of CL in the 
above formula is CLmax and: 
L
VIstall
=
C
1 ρ S
L max
0
2
Inspection of this formula shows that the only two variables (clean aircraft) are V, and L, ie: 
V
∝ lift
Istall
14.  This relationship is readily demonstrated by the following examples: 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
a.
Steep  Dive.    When  pulling  out  of  a  dive,  if  the  angle  of  attack  is  increased  to  the  critical 
angle, separation will occur and buffet will be felt at a high air speed. 
b.
Vertical  Climb.    In  true  vertical  flight  lift  is  zero  and  no  buffet  symptoms  will  be  produced 
even at zero IAS. 
Basic Stalling Speed 
15.  The  most  useful  stalling  speed  to  remember  is  the  stalling  speed  corresponding  to  the  critical 
angle of attack in straight and level flight.  It may be defined as the speed below which a clean aircraft 
of stated weight, with the engines throttled back, can no longer maintain straight and level flight.  This 
speed is listed in the Aircrew Manual for a number of different weights. 
16.  Applying these qualifications to the formulae in para 13, it can be seen that level flight requires a 
particular value of lift, ie L=W, and: 
W
VB
=
C
1 ρ S
L max
0
2
where VB 
=
basic stalling speed 
17.  If the conditions in para 15 are not met, the stalling speed will differ from the basic stalling speed.  
The factors which change VB are therefore: 
a. 
Change in weight. 
b. 
Manoeuvre (load factor). 
c. 
Configuration (changes in CLmax). 
d. 
Power and slipstream. 
Weight Change 
18.  The relationship between the basic stalling speeds at two different weights can be obtained from 
the formula in para 16: 

 


W1
 
W2

ie the ratio of V
=
B1:VB2 

:
C
1 ρ   C
1 ρ 

max
0
2
 
max
0
2

and, as the two denominators on the right-hand side are identical: 
VB2:VB1  =
2
W :
1
W
B
V 2
2
W
or 
=
V
W
1
B
1
2
W
from which 
VB2
=
V 1
B
1
W
where VB1 and VB2 are the basic stalling speeds at weights W1 and W2 respectively. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
19.  This relationship is true for any given angle of attack provided that the appropriate value of CL is 
not  affected  by  speed.    The  reason  is  that,  to  maintain  a  given  angle  of  attack  in  level  flight,  it  is 
necessary to reduce the dynamic pressure (IAS) if the weight is reduced. 
Manoeuvre 
20.  The relationship between the basic stalling speed and the stalling speed in any other manoeuvre 
(VM)  can  be  obtained  in  a  similar  way  by  comparing  the  general  formula  in  para  13  to  the  level  flight 
formula in para 16.  Thus: 

 


L
 
W

the ratio VM : VB = 
:
C
1 ρ   C
1 ρ 

max
0
2
 
max
0
2

Again, the denominators on the right-hand side are identical and so: 
VM:VB

L :
W
VM
L
or 
V

B
W
L
from which, 
VM

VB W
 L 
21.  The relationship  
 is the load factor, n, and is indicated on the accelerometer (if fitted).  Thus 
 W 
VM = VB n  and, in a 4g manoeuvre, the stalling speed is twice the basic stalling speed. 
22.  In the absence of an accelerometer the artificial horizon may be used as a guide to the increased 
stalling speed in a level turn. 
From Fig 5, cos φ =  W1
W
 = 
L
L
L
1
and therefore, 
=
W
cos ϕ
substituting in the formula in para 20: 
V
=
1
V
M
B
cos ϕ
and, in a 60º bank turn the stalling speed is  2 or 1.4 times the basic stalling speed. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
1-6 Fig 5 Forces on an Aircraft in a Level Turn 
W1
L
ϕ
ϕ
CPF
W
ϕ
= Angle of Bank
W 1
= Vertical Component of Lift = W
CPF = Horizontal Component of Lift = Centripetal Force
Configuration 
23.  From the formula in para 16 it can be seen that the stalling speed is inversely proportional to CLmax
i.e. in level flight 
V ∝
1
B
CL max
24.  Any change in CLmax due to the operation of high lift devices or due to compressibility effects will 
affect  the  stalling  speed.    In  particular,  lowering  flaps  or  extending  slats  will  result  in  a  new  basic 
stalling speed.  These changes are usually listed in the Aircrew Manual. 
Power 
25.  At the basic stalling speed, the engines are throttled back and it is assumed that the weight of the 
aircraft  is  entirely  supported  by  the  wings.    If  power  is  applied  at  the  stall  the  high  nose  attitude 
produces  a  vertical  component  of  thrust  which  assists  in  supporting  the  weight  and  less  force  is 
required  from  the  wings.    This  reduction  in  lift  is  achieved  at  the  same  angle  of  attack  (CLmax)  by 
reducing the dynamic pressure (IAS) and results in a lower stalling speed. 
26.  From  Fig  6  it  can  be  seen  that  L  =  W  –  T  sin αS which is less than the power-off case; and, as 
V
∝ L
M
, VM with power on < VB. 
1-6 Fig 6 Comparison of Power Off and Power On Stalling 
Fig 6a Power Off 
Fig 6b Power On 
T sin 
 + L
S
L = C
V   
2
1
S
L max 2
B
T
T sin  S
S
Flight Path
Flight Path
W
W
  = Stalling Angle of Attack 
S
T sin 
 = Vertical Component of Thrust
S
27.  It  should  be  noted  that,  for  simplicity,  the load on the tailplane has been ignored and the engine 
thrust line assumed parallel to the wing chord line. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 7 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
28.  Slipstream Effect.  For a propeller-powered aircraft an additional effect is caused by the velocity 
of the slipstream behind the propellers. 
29.  Vector Change to RAF.  In Fig 7 the vector addition of the free stream and slipstream velocities 
results in a change in the RAF over that part of the wing affected by the propellers. 
a
Increase in Velocity.  The local increase in dynamic pressure will result in more lift behind 
the  propellers  relative  to  the  power-off  case.    Thus,  at  a  stalling  angle  of  attack,  a  lower  IAS  is 
required to support the weight, ie the stalling speed is reduced. 
b.
Decrease in Angle of Attack The reduction in angle of attack partially offsets the increase 
in  dynamic  pressure  but  does  not  materially  alter  the  stalling  speed  unless  CL  max  is  increased.  
The  only  effect  will  be  to  increase  the  attitude  at  which  the  stall  occurs.    Unless  the  propeller 
slipstream  covers  the  entire  wing,  the  probability of a wing drop will increase because the wings 
will stall progressively from the tips which are at a higher angle of attack than the wings behind the 
propellers. 
1-6 Fig 7 Slipstream Effect 
Direction of
Slipstream
Flight
Path
Slipstream
Free Stream Velocity
Velocity
Resultant RAF
Reduction in
Angle of Attack
Autorotation 
30.  The autorotational properties of a wing are due to the negative slope of the CL / α curve when α is 
greater than the stalling angle of attack. 
31.  With reference to the stalled aircraft illustrated at Fig 8, if the aircraft starts to roll there will be a 
component  of  flow  induced  tending  to  increase  the  angle  of  attack  of  the  down-going  wing  and 
decrease  the  angle  of  attack  of  the  up-going  wing.    The  cause  of  the  roll  may  be  either  accidental 
(wing-drop), deliberate (further effects of applied rudder) or use of aileron at the stall. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 8 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
1-6 Fig 8 Vector Addition of Roll and Forward Velocities 
RAF
Roll
Component
Roll
Component
RAF
RAF
Roll
TAS
Stall
Decreased
Rising Wing
TAS
Roll
Stall
RAF
Increased
Down-Going Wing
32.  The  effect  of  this  change  in  angle  of  attack  on  the  CL  and  CD  curves  (see Fig  9)  is  that  the 
'damping in roll' effect normally produced at low α is now reversed.  The increase in angle of attack 
of the down-going wing decreases the CL and increases the CD.  Conversely, the decrease in angle 
of attack of the up-going wing slightly decreases the CL and decreases the CD.  The difference in lift 
produces  a  rolling  moment  towards  the  down-going  wing  tending  to  increase  the  angular  velocity.  
This  angular  acceleration  is  further  increased  by  the  roll  induced  by  the  yawing  motion  due  to  the 
large difference in drag. 
1-6 Fig 9 Autorotation 
Rising Wing
Down-going Wing
)
le
a
c
Roll to 
s
Down-going
e
L
Wing
m
C
a
s
CL
Yaw to 
d
n
Down-going
a
to
t
Wing
D
o
C
(n
CD
α
Stall
Revised Mar 10   
Page 9 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-6 - Stalling 
33.  The cycle is automatic in the sense that the increasing rolling velocity sustains or even increases the 
difference in angle of attack.  It should be noted, however, that at higher angles, the slope of the  CL  curve 
may recover again to zero.  This may impose a limit on the α at which autorotation is possible. 
34.  It is emphasized that autorotation, like the stall, is an aerodynamic event which is dependent on 
angle of attack.  It is therefore possible to autorotate the aircraft in any attitude and at speeds higher 
than  the  basic  stalling  speed.    This  principle  is  the  basis  of  many  of  the  more  advanced  aerobatic 
manoeuvres. 
Summary 
35.  Boundary  layer  separation  is  produced  as  a  result  of  the  adverse  pressure  gradient  developed 
round the body. 
36.  In subsonic flight an aircraft will always stall at the same critical angle of attack. 
37.  The wing of an aircraft is designed to stall progressively from the root to the tip.  The reasons for 
this are: 
a. 
To induce early buffet symptoms over the tail surface. 
b. 
To retain aileron effectiveness up to the critical angle of attack. 
c. 
To avoid a large rolling moment which would arise if the tip of one wing stalled before the other. 
38.  The most common design features for preventing tip stalling are: 
a. 
Washout. 
b. 
Root spoilers. 
c. 
Change of section. 
d. 
Slats and slots. 
39.  Basic  stalling  speed  is  the  speed  below  which  a  clean  aircraft  of  stated  weight,  with  engines 
throttled back, can no longer maintain straight and level flight. 
40.  The formula for the basic stalling speed is: 
W
VB
=
C
1 ρ S
L max
0
2
Factors which affect VB are: 
2
W
a. 
Change in weight:   
 
B
V 2  =  V 1
B
1
W
V
=
1
b. 
Manoeuvre (load factor): 
V
V n or 
V
M
B
M
B
cos ϕ
1
c. 
Configuration (changes in): CLmax   

B
CL max
d. 
Power and Slip-stream:  
 
 
VM power on < VB
Revised Mar 10   
Page 10 of 10 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
CHAPTER 7 - SPINNING 
Introduction 
1. 
Spinning is a complicated subject to analyse in detail.  It is also a subject about which it is difficult to 
make generalizations which are true for all aircraft.  One type of aircraft may behave in a certain manner in a 
spin  whereas  another  type  will  behave  completely  differently  under  the  same  conditions.    This  chapter  is 
based on a deliberately-induced, erect spin to the right although inverted and oscillatory spins are discussed 
in later paragraphs. 
2. 
The accepted sign conventions applicable to this chapter are given in Table 1, together with Fig 1. 
1-7 Table 1 Sign Conventions Used in this Chapter 
AXIS (Symbol)
LONGITUDINAL (x)
LATERAL (y)
NORMAL (z)
Positive Direction
Forwards 
To right 
Downwards 
MOMENTS OF INERTIA



ANGULAR VELOCITY
Designation
Roll 
Pitch 
Yaw 
Symbol



Positive Direction
to right 
nose-up 
to right 
MOMENTS
Designation
rolling moment 
pitching moment 
yawing moment 
Symbol



Positive Direction
to right 
nose-up 
to right 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 1 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
1-7 Fig 1 The Motion of an Aircraft in an Erect Spin to the Right 
Helix Angle
Drag
Total Reaction
(Wing Normal
Force)
a  Forces
Lift = Centripetal Force
W 2
W Ω 2R
v
=
=
g R
g
Spin to Right
(     Radians Per Sec)
Weight
b  Angular Velocities
r = Rate of Yaw
q = Rate of Pitch
z
p = Rate of Roll
x
Wing
Tilt
Angle
(positive)
c  Sideslip
v = Vertical Velocity
Sideslip
Phases of the Spin 
3. 
The spin manoeuvre can be divided into three phases: 
a. 
The incipient spin. 
b. 
The fully-developed spin. 
c. 
The recovery. 
4. 
The Incipient Spin A necessary ingredient of a spin is the aerodynamic phenomenon known as 
autorotation.  This leads to an unsteady manoeuvre which is a combination of: 
a. 
The ballistic path of the aircraft, which is itself dependent on the entry attitude. 
b. 
Increasing  angular  velocity  generated  by  the  autorotative  rolling  moment  and  drag-induced 
yawing moment. 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 2 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
5. 
The Steady Spin.  The incipient stage may continue for some 2 to 6 turns, after which the aircraft 
will settle into a steady, stable, spin.  There will be some sideslip and the aircraft will be rotating about 
all  three  axes.    For  simplicity,  but  without  suggesting  that  it  is  possible  for  all  aircraft  to  achieve  this 
stable condition, the steady spin is qualified by a steady rate of rotation and a steady rate of descent. 
6. 
The  Recovery.    The  recovery  is  initiated  by  the  pilot  by  actions  aimed  at  first  opposing  the 
autorotation and then reducing the angle of attack (α) so as to unstall the wings.  The aircraft may then 
be recovered from the ensuing steep dive. 
The Steady Erect Spin 
7. 
While  rotating,  the  aircraft  will  describe  some  sort  of  ballistic  trajectory  dependent  on  the  entry 
manoeuvre.    To  the  pilot  this  will  appear  as  an  unsteady,  oscillatory  phase  until  the  aircraft  settles 
down into a stable spin with steady rate of descent and rotation about the spin axis.  This will occur if 
the  aerodynamic  and  inertia  forces  and  moments  can  achieve  a  state  of  equilibrium.   The attitude of 
the  aircraft  at  this  stage  will  depend  on  the  aerodynamic  shape  of  the  aircraft,  the  position  of  the 
controls and the distribution of mass throughout the aircraft. 
Motion of the Aircraft 
8. 
The motion of the centre of gravity in a spin has two components: 
a. 
A vertical linear velocity (rate of descent = V fps). 
b. 
An  angular  velocity  (Ω  radians  per  sec)  about  a  vertical  axis,  called  the  spin  axis.    The 
distance  between  the  CG  and  the  spin  axis  is  the  radius  of  the  spin  (R)  and  is  normally  small 
(about a wing semi-span). 
The combination of these motions results in a vertical spiral or helix.  The helix angle is small, usually 
less than 10°.  Fig 1 shows the motion of the aircraft in spin. 
9. 
As  the  aircraft  always  presents  the  same  face  to  the  spin  axis,  it  follows  that  it  must  be  rotating 
about a vertical axis passing through the centre of gravity at the same rate as the CG about the spin 
axis.  This angular velocity may be resolved into components of roll, pitch and yaw with respect to the 
aircraft body axes.  In the spin illustrated in Fig 1b, the aircraft is rolling right, pitching up and yawing 
right.  For convenience the direction of the spin is defined by the direction of yaw. 
10.  In  order  to understand the relationship between these angular velocities and aircraft attitude it is 
useful to consider three limiting cases: 
a. 
Longitudinal Axis Vertical.  When the longitudinal axis is vertical the angular motion will be all 
roll. 
b. 
Lateral  Axis  Vertical.    For  the  aircraft  to  present  the  same  face  (pilot’s  head)  to  the  spin 
axis, the aircraft must rotate about the lateral axis.  The angular motion is all pitch. 
c. 
Normal Axis Vertical.  For the aircraft to present the same face (inner wing tip) to the axis of 
rotation,  the  aircraft  must  rotate  about  the  normal  axis  at  the  same  rate  as  the  aircraft  rotates 
about the axis of rotation.  Thus the angular motion is all yaw. 
11.  Although these are hypothetical examples which may not be possible in practice, they illustrate the 
relationship  between  aircraft  attitude  and  angular  velocities.    Between  the  extremes  quoted  in  the 
previous paragraph, the motion will be a combination of roll, pitch and yaw, and depends on: 
a. 
The rate of rotation of the aircraft about the spin axis. 
b. 
The attitude of the aircraft, which is usually defined in terms of the pitch angle and the wing 
tilt angle.  Wing tilt angle, often confused with bank angle, involves displacement about the normal 
and the longitudinal axes. 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 3 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
12.  The aircraft’s attitude in the spin also has an important effect on the sideslip present (see Fig 1c).  If 
the wings are level, there will be outward sideslip; that is, the relative airflow will be from the direction of 
the outside wing (to port in the diagram).  If the attitude of the aircraft is changed such that the outer wing 
is  raised  relative  to  the  horizontal,  the  sideslip  is  reduced.    This  attitude  change  can  only  be  due  to  a 
rotation of the aircraft about the normal axis.  The angle through which the aircraft is rotated, in the plane 
containing the lateral and longitudinal axes, is known as the wing tilt angle and is positive with the outer 
wing  up.    If  the  wing  tilt  can  be  increased  sufficiently  to  reduce  the  sideslip  significantly,  the  pro-spin 
aerodynamic rolling moment will be reduced. 
Balance of Forces in the Spin 
13.  Only  two  forces  are  acting  on  the  centre  of  gravity  while  it  is  moving  along  its  helical  path  (see 
Fig 1a). 
a. 
Weight (W). 
b. 
The aerodynamic force (N) coming mainly from the wings. 
The resultant of these two forces is the centripetal force necessary to produce the angular motion. 
14.  Since the weight and the centripetal force act in a vertical plane containing the spin axis and the 
CG,  the  aerodynamic  force  must  also  act  in  this  plane,  ie  it  passes  through  the  spin  axis.    It  can  be 
shown that, when the wing is stalled, the resultant aerodynamic force acts approximately perpendicular 
to the wing.  For this reason it is sometimes called the wing normal force. 
15.  If the wings are level (lateral axis horizontal), from the balance of forces in Fig 1a: 
a. 
Weight   =   Drag  
   =    C 1
D /2ρV2S 
W
Therefore, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
=
1
C
ρS
2
b. 
Lift    
= Centripetal force 
Ω
W 2R
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  C 1
L /2ρV2S = 
g
1
2
gC
ρV S
Therefore, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
R = 
L 2
2
Ω
W
Where:   R = spin radius 
 
 
 S = area, 
   
 
 V = rate of descent 
   
 
W = weight 
If the wings are not level, it has been seen that the departure from the level condition can be regarded 
as  a  rotation  of  the  aircraft  about  the  longitudinal  and  normal  axes.    Usually  this  angle,  the  wing  tilt 
angle, is small and does not affect the following reasoning. 
Effect of Attitude on Spin Radius 
16.  If for some reason the angle of attack is increased by a nose-up change in the aircraft’s attitude, 
the vertical rate of descent (V) will decrease because of the higher CD (para 15a).  The increased alpha 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 4 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
on  the  other  hand,  will  decrease  CL  which,  together  with  the  lower  rate  of  descent,  results  in  a 
decrease in spin radius, (para 15b).  It can also be shown that an increase in pitch increases the rate of 
spin, which will decrease R still further. 
17.  The two extremes of aircraft attitude possible in the spin are shown in Fig 2.  The actual attitude 
adopted by an aircraft will depend on the balance of moments. 
1-7 Fig 2 Simplified Diagram of Pitch Attitude 
R
R
α
α
RAF
= Angle of 
Flat Spin
RAF
Steep Spin
Pitch
18.  The effects of pitch attitude are summarized below: an increase in pitch (eg flat spin) will: 
a. 
Decrease the rate of descent. 
b. 
Decrease the spin radius. 
c. 
Increase the spin rate. 
It can also be shown that an increase in pitch will decrease the helix angle. 
Angular Momentum 
19.  In a steady spin, equilibrium is achieved by a balance of aerodynamic and inertia moments.  The inertia 
moments  result  from  a  change  in  angular momentum due to the inertia cross-coupling between the three 
axes. 
20.  The angular momentum about an axis depends on the distribution of mass and the rate of rotation.  
It is important to get a clear understanding of the significance of the spinning characteristics of different 
aircraft and the effect of controls in recovering from the spin. 
Moment of Inertia (I) 
21.  A concept necessary to predict the behaviour of a rotating system is that of moment of inertia.  This 
quantity  not  only  expresses  the  amount  of  mass  but also its distribution about the axis of rotation.  It is 
used in the same way that mass is used in linear motion.  For example, the product of mass and linear 
velocity  measures  the  momentum  or  resistance  to  movement  of  a  body  moving  in  a  straight  line.  
Similarly, the product of moment of inertia (mass distribution) and angular velocity measures the angular 
momentum of a rotating body.  Fig 3 illustrates how the distribution of mass affects angular momentum. 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 5 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
1-7 Fig 3 Two Rotors of the Same Weight and Angular Velocity 
Large ' I'
Ω Radians
Small ' I'
Per Sec
Angular
Momentum Small
Angular
Momentum Large
22.  The  concept  of  moment  of  inertia  may  be  applied  to  an  aircraft  by  measuring  the  distribution  of 
mass about each of the body axes in the following way: 
a. 
Longitudinal Axis.  The distribution of mass about the longitudinal axis determines the 
moment of inertia in the rolling plane which is denoted by A.  An aircraft with fuel stored in the wings 
and in external tanks will have a large value of A, particularly if the tanks are close to the wing tips.  
The tendency in modern high speed aircraft towards thinner wings has necessitated the stowage of 
fuel elsewhere and this, combined with lower aspect ratios, has resulted in a reduction in the value of 
A for those modern high performance fighter and training aircraft. 
b. 
Lateral  Axis.    The  distribution  of  mass  about  the  lateral  axis  determines  the  moment  of 
inertia in the pitching plane which is denoted by B.  The increasing complexity of modern aircraft 
has resulted in an increase in the density of the fuselage with the mass being distributed along the 
whole length of the fuselage and a consequent increase in the value of B. 
c. 
Normal Axis.  The distribution of mass about the normal axis determines the moment of inertia in 
the  yawing  plane  which  is  denoted  by  C.    This  quantity  will  be  approximately  equal  to  the  sum  of  the 
moments of inertia in the rolling and pitching planes.  C, therefore, will always be larger than A or B. 
23.  These moments of inertia measure the mass distribution about the body axes and are decided by 
the design of the aircraft.  It will be seen that the values of A, B and C for a particular aircraft may be 
changed by altering the disposition of equipment, freight and fuel. 
Inertia Moments in a Spin 
24.  The  inertia  moments  generated  in  a  spin  are  described  below  by  assessing  the  effect  of  the 
concentrated masses involved.  Another explanation, using a gyroscopic analogy, is given in Volume 1, 
Chapter 8. 
a. 
Roll.    It  is  difficult  to  represent  the  rolling moments using concentrated masses, as is done 
for  the  other  axes.  For  an  aircraft  in  the  spinning  attitude  under  consideration  (inner  wing  down 
pitching nose up), the inertia moment is anti-spin, ie tending to roll the aircraft out of the spin.  The 
equation for the inertia rolling moment is: 
L = − (C − B)rq 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 6 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
b. 
Pitch.  The imaginary concentrated masses of the fuselage, as shown in Fig 4, tend to flatten 
the spin.  The equation for the moment is: 
M = (C − A)rp 
1-7 Fig 4 Inertia Pitching Moment 
Inertia Moment
c. 
Yaw.    The  inertia  couple  is  complicated  by  the  fact  that  it  comprises  two  opposing  couples 
caused  by  the  wings  and  the  fuselage,  see  Fig  5.    Depending  on  the  dominant  component,  the 
couple  can  be  of  either  sign  and  of  varying  magnitude.    The  inertia  yawing  moment  can  be 
expressed as: 
N = (A − B)pq 
25.  This is negative and thus anti-spin when B > A; positive and pro-spin when A > B. 
1-7 Fig 5 Inertia Yawing Moments 
Wing (A)
Inertia
Fuselage (B)
Moment
Inertia Moment
26.  The B/A ratio has a profound effect on the spinning characteristics of an aircraft. 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 7 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
Aerodynamic Moments 
27.  It is now necessary to examine the contributions made by the aerodynamic factors in the balance 
of moments in roll, pitch and yaw.  These are discussed separately below. 
28.  Aerodynamic  Rolling  Moments.    The  aerodynamic  contributions  to  the  balance  of  moments 
about the longitudinal axis to produce a steady rate of roll are as follows: 
 
a. 
Rolling  Moment  due  to  Sideslip.
The  design  features  of  the  aircraft  which  contribute 
towards positive lateral stability produce an aerodynamic rolling moment as a result of sideslip.  It 
can be shown that when an aircraft is in a spin, dihedral, sweepback, and high mounted wings all 
reverse  the  effect  of  positive  lateral  stability,  and  induce  a  rolling moment in the same sense as 
the sideslip.  In a spin, the relative airflow is from the direction of the outer wing and, therefore, the 
aircraft will slideslip in the opposite direction to the spin.  As a result, a rolling moment is produced 
in the opposite direction to the spin; this contribution is therefore anti-spin. 
b. 
Autorotative  Rolling  Moment.    In  Volume  1,  Chapter  11,  it  is  shown  that  the  normal 
damping in roll effect is reversed at angles of attack above the stall.  This contribution is therefore 
pro-spin. 
c. 
Rolling Moment due to Yaw.  The yawing velocity in the spin induces a rolling moment for 
two reasons: 
(1)  Difference in Speed of the Wings.  Lift of the outside wing is increased and that of the 
inner wing decreased inducing a pro-spin rolling moment. 
(2)  Difference in Angle of Attack of the Wings.  In a spin, the direction of the free stream 
is  practically  vertical  whereas  the  direction  of  the  wing  motion  due  to  yaw  is  parallel  to  the 
longitudinal axis.  The yawing velocity not only changes the speed but also the angle of attack 
of the wings.  Fig 6 illustrates the vector addition of the yawing velocity to the vertical velocity 
of the outer wing.  The effect is to reduce the angle of attack of the outer wing and increase 
that of the inner wing.  Because the wings are stalled  (slope of CL curve is negative), the CL
of the outer wing is increased and the CL of the inner wing decreased thus producing another 
pro-spin rolling moment. 
1-7 Fig 6 Change in Angle of Attack due to Yaw (Outer Wing) 
(Outer Wing Illustrated)
z Axis
Yaw
v
Wing
Motion
Due to
Reduction in
Yaw
Rate of
Angle of
Descent
Attack
v
Resultant RAF
Revised Jun 11   
Page 8 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
d. 
Aileron Response.  Experience has shown that the ailerons produce a rolling moment in the 
conventional sense even though the wing is stalled. 
29. Aerodynamic Pitching Moments.  The aerodynamic contributions to the balance of moments about 
the lateral axis to produce a steady rate of pitch are as follows: 
a. 
Positive Longitudinal Static Stability.  In a spin the aircraft is at a high angle of attack and 
therefore  disturbed  in  a  nose-up  sense  from  the  trimmed  condition.    The  positive  longitudinal 
stability responds to this disturbance to produce a nose-down aerodynamic moment.  This effect 
may be considerably reduced if the tailplane lies in the wing wake. 
b. 
Damping in Pitch Effect.  When the aircraft is pitching nose-up the tailplane is moving down 
and its angle of attack is increased (the principle is the same as the damping in roll effect).  The 
pitching velocity therefore produces a pitching moment in a nose-down sense.  The rate of pitch in 
a spin is usually very low and consequently the damping in pitch contribution is small. 
c. 
Elevator Response.  The elevators act in the conventional sense.  Down-elevator increases 
the  nose-down  aerodynamic  moment  whereas  up-elevator  produces  a  nose-up  aerodynamic 
moment.  It should be noted, however, that down-elevator usually increases the shielded area of 
the fin and rudder. 
30.  Aerodynamic  Yawing  Moments.    The  overall  aerodynamic  yawing  moment  is  made  up  of  a 
large number of separate parts, some arising out of the yawing motion of the aircraft and some arising 
out  of  the  sideslipping  motion.    The  main  contributions  to  the  balance  of  moments  about  the  normal 
axis to produce a steady rate of yaw are as follows: 
a. 
Positive Directional Static Stability.  When sideslip is present keel surfaces aft of the CG 
produce  an  aerodynamic  yawing  moment  tending  to  turn  the  aircraft  into  line  with  the  sideslip 
vector (ie directional static stability or 'weathercock effect').  This is an anti-spin effect, the greatest 
contribution to which is from the vertical fin.  Vertical surfaces forward of the CG will tend to yaw 
the  aircraft  further  into  the  spin,  ie  they  have  a  pro-spin  effect.    In  a  spin  outward  sideslip  is 
present  which,  usually  produces  a  net  yawing  moment towards the outer wing; ie in an anti-spin 
sense.  Because of possible shielding effects from the tailplane and elevator and also because the 
fin may be stalled, the directional stability is considerably reduced and this anti-spin contribution is 
usually small. 
b. 
Damping  in  Yaw  Effect.    Applying  the  principle  of  the  damping  in  roll  effect  to  the  yawing 
velocity, it has been seen that the keel surfaces produce an aerodynamic yawing moment to oppose 
the yaw.  The greatest contribution to this damping moment is from the rear fuselage and fin.  In this 
respect  the  cross-sectional  shape  of  the  fuselage  is  critical  and  has  a  profound  effect  on  the 
damping moment.  The following figures give some indication of the importance of cross-section: 
Cross-Section 
Damping Effect 
(anti-spin) 
Circular 

Rectangular 
2.5 
Elliptical 
3.5 
Round top/flat bottom 
1.8 
Round bottom/flat top 
4.2 
Round bottom/flat top with strakes 
5.8 
Damping from body o
  f given c
  ross - section
Damping effect = 
Damping from circular cy
  clinder
Revised Jun 11   
Page 9 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
Fuselage  strakes  are  useful  devices  for  improving  the  spinning  characteristics  of  prototype 
aircraft.    The  anti-spin  damping  moment  is  very  dependent  on  the  design  of  the  tailplane/fin 
combination.  Shielding of the fin by the tailplane can considerably reduce the effectiveness of the 
fin.  In extreme cases a low-set tailplane may even change the anti-spin effect into pro-spin. 
c. 
Rudder  Response.    The  rudder  acts  in  the  conventional  sense,  ie  the  in-spin  rudder 
produces  pro-spin  yawing  moment  and  out-spin  rudder  produces  anti-spin  yawing  moment.  
Because of the shielding effect of the elevator (para 29c), it is usual during recovery to pause after 
applying  out-spin  rudder  so  that  the  anti-spin  yawing  moment  may  take  effect  before  down-
elevator is applied. 
Balance of Moments 
31.  In para 16 it was seen that the balance of forces in the spin has a strong influence on the rate of 
descent.    It  does  not,  however,  determine  the  rate of rotation, wing tilt or incidence at which the spin 
occurs:  the  balance  of  moments  is  much  more  critical  in  this  respect.    The  actual  attitude,  rate  of 
descent, sideslip, rate of rotation and radius of a spinning aircraft can only be determined by applying 
specific  numerical  values  of  the  aircraft’s  aerodynamic  and  inertia  data  to  the  general  relationships 
discussed below. 
32.  Rolling Moments.  The balance of rolling moments in an erect spin is: 
a. 
Pro-spin:  The following aerodynamic rolling moments in an erect spin is: 
(1)  Autorotative rolling moment. 
(2)  Rolling moment due to sideslip. 
(3)  Rolling moment due to yaw. 
b. 
Anti-spin.    The  inertia  rolling  moment,  − (C − )
B rq is  anti-spin.  These  factors  show  that 
autorotation  is  usually  necessary  to  achieve  a  stable  spin.    A  small  autorotative  rolling  moment 
would necessitate larger sideslip to increase the effect of rolling moment due to sideslip.  This, in 
turn, would reduce the amount of wing tilt and make the balance of moments in yaw more difficult 
to achieve, however the balance of moments in this axis is not as important as in the other two. 
33.  Pitching  Moments.    In  para  25  it  was  seen  that  the  inertia  pitching  moment,  (C  –  A)  rp,  of  the 
aircraft  is always nose-up in an erect spin.  This is balanced by the nose-down aerodynamic pitching 
moment.  The balance between these two moments is the main factor relating angle of attack to rate of 
rotation in any given case and equilibrium can usually be achieved over a wide range.  It can be shown 
that  an  increase  in  pitch  will  cause  an  increase  in  the  rate  of  rotation  (spin  rate).    This,  in  turn,  will 
decrease the spin radius (para 16). 
34.  Yawing Moments.  The balance of yawing moments in an erect spin is: 
a. 
Pro-spin
(1) 
Yawing moment due to applied rudder. 
(2) 
A small contribution from the wing, due to yaw, is possible at large angles of attack. 
(3) 
Yawing moment due to sideslip (vertical surfaces forward of CG). 
(4) 
Inertia yawing moment,  (A – B)pq, if A > B. 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 10 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
b. 
Anti-spin.
(1) 
Inertia yawing moment, (A – B)pq, if B > A. 
(2) 
Yawing moment due to sideslip (vertical surfaces aft of the CG). 
(3) 
Damping in yaw effect. 
It can be seen that in-spin rudder is usually necessary to achieve balance of the yawing moments and 
hold the aircraft in a spin. 
35.  Normal  Axis.    For  conventional  aircraft  (A  and  B  nearly  equal),  it  is  relatively  easy  to  achieve 
balance  about the normal axis and the spin tends to be limited to a single set of conditions (angle of 
attack, spin rate, attitude).  For aircraft in which B is much larger than A, the inertia yawing moment can 
be  large  and,  thus  difficult  to  balance.    This  is  probably  the  cause  of  the  oscillatory  spin exhibited by 
these types of aircraft. 
36.  Yaw  and  Roll  Axis.    The  requirements  of  balance  about  the  yaw  and  roll  axes  greatly  limit  the 
range  of  incidences  in  which  spinning  can  occur  and  determine  the  amount  of  sideslip  and  wing  tilt 
involved.  The final balance of the yawing moments is achieved by the aircraft taking up the appropriate 
angle  of  attack  at  which  the  inertia  moments  just  balance  the  aerodynamic  moments.    This  particular 
angle of attack also has to be associated with the appropriate rate of spin required to balance the pitching 
moments and the appropriate angle of sideslip required to balance the rolling moments. 
SPIN RECOVERY 
Effect of Controls in Recovery from a Spin 
37.  The relative effectiveness of the three controls in recovering from a spin will now be considered.  
Recovery is aimed at stopping the rotation by reducing the pro-spin rolling moment and/or increasing 
the  anti-spin  yawing  moment.    The  yawing  moment  is  the  more important but, because of the strong 
cross-coupling  between  motions  about  the  three  axes  through  the  inertia  moments,  the  rudder  is  not 
the only means by which yawing may be induced by the pilot.  Once the rotation has stopped the angle 
of attack is reduced and the aircraft recovered. 
38.  The  control  movements  which  experience  has  shown  are  generally  most  favourable  to  the 
recovery from the spin have been known and in use for a long time, ie apply full opposite rudder and 
then  move  the  stick  forward  until  the  spin  stops,  maintaining  the  ailerons  neutral.    The  rudder  is 
normally  the  primary  control  but,  because  the  inertia  moments  are generally large in modern aircraft, 
aileron deflection is also important.  Where the response of the aircraft to rudder is reduced in the spin 
the aileron may even be the primary control although in the final analysis it is its effect on the yawing 
moment which makes it work. 
39.  The initial effect of applying a control deflection will be to change the aerodynamic moment about 
one  or  more  axes.    This  will  cause  a  change  in  aircraft attitude and a change in the rates of rotation 
about all the axes.  These changes will, in turn, change the inertia moments. 
Effect of Ailerons 
40.  Even  at  the  high  angle  of  attack  in  the  spin  the ailerons act in the normal sense.  Application of 
aileron  in  the  same  direction  as  the  aircraft  is  rolling  will  therefore  increase  the  aerodynamic  rolling 
moment.  This will increase the roll rate (p) and affect the inertia yawing moment, (A – B)pq.  The effect 
of an increase in p on the inertia yawing moment depends on the mass distribution or B/A ratio: 
a. 
B/A > 1.  In an aircraft where B/A > 1, the inertia yawing moment is anti-spin (negative) and 
an increase in p will decrease it still further, ie make it more anti-spin.  The increase in anti-spin 
inertia yawing moment will tend to raise the outer wing (increase wing tilt) which will decrease the 
outward  sideslip.    This  will  restore  the  balance  of  rolling  moments  by  decreasing  the  pro-spin 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 11 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
aerodynamic moment due to lateral stability.  The increase in wing tilt will also cause the rate of 
pitch, q, to increase, which, in turn: 
(1)  Causes a small increase in the anti-spin inertia rolling moment, – (C – B)rq, (C > B) and 
thus helps to restore balance about the roll axis (para 32). 
(2)  Further increases the anti-spin inertia yawing moment. 
b. 
B/A  <  1.    A  low  B/A  ratio  will  reverse  the  effects  described  above.    The  inertia  yawing 
moment will be pro-spin (positive) and will increase with an increase in p. 
41.  Due to secondary effects associated with directional stability, the reversal point actually occurs at 
a B/A ratio of 1.3.  Thus: 
a. 
B/A > 1.3 Aileron with roll (in-spin) has an anti-spin effect. 
b. 
B/A < 1.3.  Aileron with roll (in-spin) has a pro-spin effect. 
42.  Some aircraft change their B/A ratio in flight as stores and fuel are consumed.  The pilot has no 
accurate  indication  of  the  value  of  B/A  ratio  and,  where  this  value  may  vary  either  side  of  1.3,  it  is 
desirable  to  maintain  ailerons  neutral  to  avoid  an  unfavourable  response  which  may  delay  or  even 
prohibit recovery. 
43.  An additional effect of aileron applied with roll is to increase the anti-spin yawing moments due to aileron 
drag. 
Effect of Elevators 
44.  In para 29 it was seen that down-elevator produces a nose-down aerodynamic pitching moment.  
This  will  initially  reduce  the  nose-up  pitching  velocity  (q).    Although  this will tend to reduce alpha, the 
effect on the inertia yawing and rolling moments is as follows: 
a. 
Inertia  Yawing  Moment  (A  –  B)pq.    If  B  >  A,  the  inertia  yawing  moment  is  anti-spin.    A 
reduction in q will make the inertia yawing moment less anti-spin, ie a pro-spin change.  When A 
> B, however, down-elevator will cause a change in inertia yawing moment in the anti-spin sense. 
b. 
Inertia Rolling Moment – (C – B)rq The inertia rolling moment is always anti-spin because 
C > B.  A reduction in q will therefore make it less anti-spin which is again a change in the pro-spin 
sense. 
The result of these pro-spin changes in the inertia yawing and rolling moments is to decrease the wing 
tilt  thus  increasing  the  sideslip  angle  (Fig  1)  and  rate  of  roll.    It  can  also  be  shown  that  the  rate  of 
rotation about the spin axis will increase. 
45.  Although  the  change  in  the  inertia  yawing  moment  is  unfavourable,  the  increased  sideslip  may 
produce  an  anti-spin  aerodynamic  yawing  moment  if  the  directional  stability  is  positive.    This 
contribution will be reduced if the down elevator seriously increases the shielding of the fin and rudder. 
46.  The overall effect of down-elevator on the yawing moments therefore depends on: 
a. 
The pro-spin inertia moment when B > A. 
b. 
The anti-spin moment due to directional stability. 
c. 
The loss of rudder effectiveness due to shielding. 
In  general,  the  net  result  of  moving  the  elevators  down  is  beneficial  when  A  >  B  and  rather  less  so 
when B > A, assuming that the elevator movement does not significantly increase the shielding of the 
fin and rudder. 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 12 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
Effect of Rudder 
47.  The  rudder  is  nearly  always  effective  in  producing  an  anti-spin  aerodynamic  yawing  moment 
though  the  effectiveness  may  be  greatly  reduced  when  the  rudder  lies  in  the  wake  of  the  wing  or 
tailplane.  The resulting increase in the wing tilt angle will increase the anti-spin inertia yawing moment 
(when B > A) through an increase in pitching velocity.  The overall effect of applying anti-spin rudder is 
always beneficial and is enhanced when the B/A ratio is increased. 
48.  The effect of the three controls on the yawing moment is illustrated in Figs 7, 8 and 9. 
1-7 Fig 7 Yawing Moment (N) per degree of Aileron 
N
Anti-Spin
Mass in
Mass in
Wings
Fuselage
1.3
B/A Ratio
Pro-Spin
1-7 Fig 8 Yawing Moment (N) per Degree of Down Elevator 
N
Anti-Spin
Mass in
Mass in
Wings
Fuselage
B/A Ratio
Pro-Spin
Revised Jun 11   
Page 13 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
1-7 Fig 9 Yawing Moment (N) per Degree of Anti-spin Rudder 
N
Anti-Spin
B/A Ratio
Mass in
Mass in
Wings
Fuselage
Pro-Spin
Revised Jun 11   
Page 14 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
Inverted Spin 
49.  Fig 10 shows an aircraft in an inverted spin but following the same flight path as in Fig 1.  Relative 
to  the  pilot  the  motion  is  now  compounded  of  a  pitching  velocity  in  the  nose-down  sense,  a  rolling 
velocity to the right and a yawing velocity to the left.  Thus roll and yaw are in opposite directions, a fact 
which affects the recovery actions, particularly if the aircraft has a high B/A ratio. 
1-7 Fig 10 The Inverted Spin 
q
p
r
50.  The inverted spin is fundamentally similar to the erect spin and the principles of moment balance 
discussed  in  previous  paragraphs  are  equally  valid  for  the  inverted  spin.    The  values  of  the 
aerodynamic  moments,  however,  are  unlikely  to  be  the  same  since,  in  the  inverted  attitude,  the 
shielding effect of the wing and tail may change markedly. 
51.  The  main  difference  will  be  caused  by  the  change  in  relative  positions of the fin and rudder and 
the tailplane.  An aircraft with a low-mounted tailplane will tend to have a flatter erect spin and recovery 
will be made more difficult due to shielding of the rudder.  The same aircraft inverted will respond much 
better  to  recovery  rudder  since  it  is  unshielded  and  the  effectiveness  of  the  rudder  increased  by  the 
position of the tailplane.  The converse is true for an aircraft with a high tailplane. 
52.  The  control  deflections  required  for  recovery  are  dictated  by  the  direction  of  roll,  pitch  and  yaw, 
and the aircraft’s B/A ratio.  These are: 
a. 
Rudder to oppose yaw as indicated by the turn needle. 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 15 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-7 - Spinning 
b. 
Aileron in the same direction as the observed roll, if the B/A ratio is high. 
c. 
Elevator  up  is  generally  the  case  for  conventional  aircraft  but,  if  the  aircraft  has  a  high  B/A 
ratio  and  suffers  from  the  shielding  problems  previously  discussed,  this  control  may  be  less 
favourable and may even become pro-spin. 
Oscillatory Spin 
53.  A  combination  of  high  wing  loading  and  high  B/A  ratio  makes  it  difficult  for  a  spinning  aircraft  to 
achieve  equilibrium  about  the  yaw  axis.    This  is  thought  to  be  the  most  probable  reason  for  the 
oscillatory spin.  In this type of spin the rates of roll and pitch are changing during each oscillation.  In a 
mild  form  it  appears  to  the  pilot  as  a  continuously  changing  angle  of  wing  tilt,  from  outer  wing  well 
above the horizon back to the horizontal once each turn; the aircraft seems to wallow in the spin. 
54.  In  a  fully-developed  oscillatory  spin  the  oscillations  in  the  rates  of  roll  and  pitch  can  be  quite 
violent.  The rate of roll during each turn can vary from zero to about 200 degrees per second.  At the 
maximum rate of roll the rising wing is unstalled which probably accounts for the violence of this type of 
spin.    Large  changes  in  attitude  usually  take  place  from  fully  nose-down  at  the  peak  rate  of  roll,  to 
nose-up at the minimum rate of roll. 
55.  The  use  of  the  controls  to  effect  a  change  in  attitude  can  change  the  characteristics  of  an 
oscillatory spin quite markedly.  In particular: 
a. 
Anything which increases the wing tilt will increase the violence of the oscillations, eg in-spin 
aileron or anti-spin rudder. 
b. 
A  decrease  in  the  wing  tilt  angle  will  reduce  the  violence  of  the  oscillations,  eg  out-spin 
aileron or down-elevator. 
The recovery from this type of spin has been found to be relatively easy, although the shortest recovery 
times are obtained if recovery is initiated when the nose of the aircraft is falling relative to the horizon. 
Conclusions 
56.  The foregoing paragraphs make it quite clear that the characteristics of the spin and the effect of 
controls  in  recovery  are  specific  to  type.    In  general  the  aerodynamic  factors  are  determined  by  the 
geometry of the aircraft and the inertial factors by the distribution of the mass. 
57.  The aspects of airmanship applicable to the spin manoeuvre are discussed in detail in Volume 8, 
Chapter  15,  but  in  the  final  analysis  the  only  correct  recovery  procedure  is  laid  down  in  the  Aircrew 
Manual for the specific aircraft. 
Revised Jun 11   
Page 16 of 16 

AP3456 1-8  Gyroscopic Cross-coupling Between Axes
CHAPTER 8- GYROSCOPIC CROSS-COUPLING BETWEEN AXES 
Introduction 
1. 
In the preceding chapter, the effects of the inertia moments have been explained by considering 
the masses of fuselage and wings acting either side of a centreline.  The effect of these concentrated 
masses  when  rotating  can  be  visualized  as  acting  rather  in  the  manner  of  the  bob-weights  of  a 
governor. 
2. 
Another,  and  more  versatile,  explanation  of  the  cross-coupling  effects  can  be  made  using  a 
gyroscopic analogy, regarding the aircraft as a rotor. 
Inertia Moments in a Spin 
3. 
The  inertia  moments  generated  in  a  spin  are  essentially  the  same  as  the  torque  exerted  by  a 
precessing  gyroscope.    Figs  1,  2  and  3  illustrate  the  inertia  or  gyroscopic  moments  about  the  body 
axes.  These effects are described as follows: 
a. 
Inertia Rolling Moments (Fig 1).  The angular momentum in the yawing plane is Cr, and by 
imposing on it a pitching velocity of q, an inertia rolling moment is generated equal to −Crq, ie 
in the opposite sense to the direction of roll in an erect spin.  The inertia rolling moment due 
to  imposing  the  yawing  velocity  on  the  angular  momentum  in  the  pitching plane is in a pro-
spin sense equal to +Brq.  The total inertia rolling moment is therefore equal to (B − C)rq, 
or since C > B: − (C − B) rq.  
1-8 Fig 1 Total Inertia Rolling Moment 
b. 
Inertia  Pitching  Moments  (Fig  2).    The  angular  momentum  in  the  rolling  plane  is  Ap  and 
imposing a yawing velocity of r on the rolling plane rotor causes it to precess in pitch in a nose-down 
sense due to inertia pitching moment (−Apr).  Similarly, the angular momentum in the yawing plane 
is  Cr,  and  imposing  a  roll  velocity  of  p  on  the  yawing  plane  rotor  generates  an  inertia  pitching 
moment (+Crp) in the nose-up sense.  The total inertia moment is therefore (C − A)rp.  In an erect 
spin,  roll  and  yaw  are  always  in  the  same  direction  and  C  is  always  greater  than  A.    The  inertia 
pitching moment is therefore positive (Nose-up) in an erect spin. 
Revised Mar 15   
Page 1 of 2 

AP3456 1-8  Gyroscopic Cross-coupling Between Axes
1-8 Fig 2 Total Inertia Pitching Moment 
(Positive)
Angular Momentum = Cr
r
y
C
P
x
(Positive)
Inertia Pitching
Moment = + Crp
z
c. 
Inertia Yawing Moments (Fig 3).  Replacing the aircraft by a rotor having the same moment 
of  inertia  in  the  rolling  plane,  its  angular  momentum  is  the  product  of  the  moment  of  inertia  and 
angular velocity (Ap).  Imposing a pitching velocity (q) on the rotor will generate a torque tending to 
precess  the  rotor  about  the  normal  axis in the same direction as the spin.  It can be shown that 
this inertia yawing moment is equal in value to +Apq where the positive sign indicates a pro-sign 
torque.  Similarly, the angular momentum in the pitching plane is equal to Bq and imposing a roll 
velocity  of  p  on  the  pitching  plane  rotor  will  generate  an  inertia  yawing  moment  in  an  anti-spin 
sense equal to −Bpq.  The total inertia yawing moment is therefore equal to (A − B)pq, or, if B > A, 
then − (B − A)pq. 
1-8 Fig 3 Total Inertia Yawing Moment 
Revised Mar 15   
Page 2 of 2 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
CHAPTER 9 - WING PLANFORMS 
Introduction 
1. 
The  preceding  chapters  discussed  the  basic  considerations  of  lift,  drag,  stalling  and  spinning  and 
explained the causes of these phenomena.  However, it is now necessary to examine another important 
aspect of the design of wings, ie the planform.  The planform is the geometrical shape of the wing when 
viewed from above; it largely determines the amount of lift and drag obtainable from a stated wing area 
and has a pronounced effect on the value of the stalling angle of attack. 
2. 
This chapter is concerned mainly with the low-speed effects of variations in wing planforms.  The 
high-speed effects are dealt with in the chapters on high-speed flight. 
Aspect Ratio 
3. 
The aspect ratio (A) of a wing is found by dividing the square of the wingspan by the area of the wing: 
Span 2
A = Area
Thus, if a wing has an area of 250 square feet and a span of 30 feet, the aspect ratio is 3.6.  Another 
wing with the same span but with an area of 150 square feet would have an aspect ratio of 6.  Another 
method  of  determining  the  aspect  ratio  is  by  dividing  the  span  by  the  mean  chord  of  the  wing.    For 
example, a span of 50 ft with a mean chord of 5 ft gives an aspect ratio of 10. 
4. 
From the preceding examples it can be seen that the smaller the area or mean chord in relation to 
the  span,  the  higher  is  the  aspect  ratio.   A rough idea of the performance of a wing can be obtained 
from knowledge of the aspect ratio. 
Aspect Ratio and Induced (Vortex) Drag 
5. 
The origin and formation of trailing edge and wing tip vortices was explained in Volume 1, Chapter 
5  where  it  was  shown  that  the  induced  downwash  was  the  cause  of  induced  drag.    The  downwash 
imparted to the air is a measure of the lift provided by a wing. 
6. 
Induced  drag  is  inversely  proportional  to  aspect  ratio.    A  graph  showing  the  curves  of  three 
different aspect ratio wings plotted against CD and angle of attack can be seen in Fig 1. 
1-9 Fig 1 Effect of Aspect Ratio on CD
0.28
A = 6
0.24
) D
(C 0.20
g
ra
D 0.16
d
e
c 0.12
A = 18
u
d
In 0.08
A = ∞
0.04
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
Aspect Ratio and Stalling Angle 
7. 
A stall occurs when the effective angle of attack reaches the critical angle.  As has been shown in 
Volume  1,  Chapter  5  induced  downwash  reduces  the  effective  angle  of  attack  of  a  wing.    Since 
induced  drag  is  inversely  proportional  to  aspect  ratio  it  follows  that  a  low  aspect  ratio  wing  will  have 
high  induced  drag,  high  induced  downwash and a reduced effective angle of attack.  The low aspect 
ratio wing therefore has a higher stalling angle of attack than a wing of high aspect ratio. 
8. 
The  reduced  effective  angle  of  attack  of  very  low  aspect  ratio  wings  can  delay  the  stall 
considerably.  Some delta wings have no measurable stalling angle up to 40º or more inclination to the 
flight path.  At this sort of angle, the drag is so high that the flight path is usually inclined downwards at 
a steep angle to the horizontal.  Apart from a rapid rate of descent, and possible loss of stability and 
control,  such  aircraft  may  have  a  shallow  attitude  to  the  horizon  and  this  can  be  deceptive.    The 
condition is called the 'super stall' or deep stall, although the wing may be far from a true stall and still 
be generating appreciable lift. 
Use of High Aspect Ratio 
9. 
Aircraft types such as sailplanes, transport, patrol and anti-submarine demand a high aspect ratio to 
minimize the induced drag (high performance sailplanes often have aspect ratios between 25 and 30). 
10.  While the high aspect ratio wing will minimize induced drag, long thin wings increase weight and 
have  relatively  poor  stiffness  characteristics.    Also,  the  effects  of  vertical  gusts  on  the  airframe  are 
aggravated by increasing the aspect ratio.  Broadly it can be said that the lower the cruising speed of 
the  aircraft,  the  higher  the  aspect  ratios  that  can  be  usefully  employed.    Aircraft configurations which 
are  developed  for  very  high-speed  flight  (especially  supersonic  flight)  operate  at  relatively  low  lift 
coefficients and demand great aerodynamic cleanness.  This usually results in the development of low 
aspect ratio planforms. 
The Effects of Taper 
11.  The  aspect  ratio  of  a  wing  is  the  primary  factor  in  determining  the  three-dimensional 
characteristics  of  the  ordinary  wing  and  its  drag  due  to  lift.    However,  certain  local  effects  take place 
throughout  the  span  of  the  wing  and  these  effects  are  due  to  the  distribution  of  area  throughout  the 
span.  The typical lift distribution is arranged in some elliptical fashion. 
12.  The  natural  distribution  of  lift  along  the  span  of  the  wing  provides  a  basis  for  appreciating  the 
effect  of  area  distribution  and  taper  along  the  span.    If  the  elliptical  lift  distribution  is  matched  with  a 
planform whose chord is distributed in an elliptical fashion (the elliptical wing), each square foot of area 
along  the  span  produces  exactly  the  same  lift  pressure.    The  elliptical  wing  planform  then  has  each 
section  of  the  wing  working  at  exactly  the  same  local  lift  coefficient  and  the  induced  downflow  at  the 
wing is uniform throughout the span.  In the aerodynamic sense, the elliptical wing is the most efficient 
planform  because  the  uniformity  of  lift  coefficient  and  downwash  incurs  the  least  induced  drag  for  a 
given aspect ratio.  The merit of any wing planform is then measured by the closeness with which the 
distribution of lift coefficient and downwash approach that of the elliptical planform. 
13.  The effect of the elliptical planform is illustrated in Fig 2 by the plot of local lift coefficient (C1) to 
C
wing  lift  coefficient  (C
1
L), 
  against  semi-span  distance.    The elliptical  wing  produces  a  constant 
CL
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
C
value of 
1  = 1.0 throughout the span from root to tip.  Thus, the local section angle of attack (α0), 
CL
and  local  induced  angle  of  attack  (α1),  are  constant  throughout  the  span.    If  the  planform  area 
distribution is anything other than elliptical it may be expected that the local section and induced angles 
of attack will not be constant along the span. 
14.  A planform previously considered is the simple rectangular wing which has a taper ratio of 1.0.  A 
characteristic of the rectangular wing is a strong vortex at the tip with local downwash behind the wing 
which  is  high  at  the  tip  and  low  at  the  root.    This  large  non-uniformity  in  downwash  causes  similar 
variation in the local induced angles of attack along the span.  At the tip, where high downwash exists, 
the  local  induced  angle  of  attack  is  greater  than  the  average  for  the  wing.    Since  the  wing  angle  of 
attack is composed of the sum of α1 and α0, a large, local α1 reduces the local α0 creating low local lift 
coefficients at the tip.  The reverse is true at the root of the rectangular wing where low local downwash 
exists.  This situation creates an induced angle of attack at the root which is less than the average for 
the wing and a local section angle of attack higher than the average for the wing.  The result is shown 
by the graph in Fig 2 which depicts a local coefficient at the root almost 20% greater than the wing lift 
coefficient. 
1-9 Fig 2 Lift Distribution and Stall Patterns 
Stal
Progression
E
A El iptical
B Rectangular,λ =  1.0
1.5
B
D
C
F
1
1.0
1.0
A
CL
C
0.5
C Moderate Tape λ
r, =  0.5 D High Taper, λ =  0.25
Spanwise Lift Distribution
Root
Tip
Tip Chord
Taper Ratio, (   
λ) =  Root Chord
E
Pointed Tip, λ =  0
F Sweepback
15.  The  effect  of  the  rectangular  planform  may  be  appreciated  by  matching  a  near  elliptical  lift 
distribution  with  a  planform  with  a  constant  chord.    The  chords near the tip develop less lift pressure 
than the root and consequently have lower section lift coefficients.  The great non-uniformity of local lift 
coefficient  along  the  span  implies  that  some  sections  carry  more  than  their  share  of  the  load  while 
others carry less.  Hence, for a given aspect ratio, the rectangular planform will be less efficient than 
the elliptical wing.  For example, a rectangular wing of A = 6 would have 16% higher induced angle of 
attack for the wing and 5% higher induced drag than an elliptical wing of the same aspect ratio. 
16.  At the other extreme of taper is the pointed wing, which has a taper ratio of zero.  The extremely 
small area at the pointed tip is not capable of holding the main tip vortex at the tip and a drastic change 
in  downwash  distribution  results.    The  pointed  wing  has  greatest  downwash  at  the  root  and  this 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
downwash  decreases  toward  the  tip.    In  the  immediate  vicinity  of  the  pointed  tip  an  upwash  is 
encountered  which  indicates  that  negative  induced  angles  of  attack  exist  in  this  area.    The  resulting 
variation of local lift coefficient shows low C1 at the root and very high C1 at the tip.  The effect may be 
appreciated  by  realizing  that  the  wide  chords  at  the  root  produce  low  lift  pressures  while  the  very 
C
narrow chords towards the tip are subject to very high lift pressures.  The variation of 
1  throughout 
CL
the span of the wing of taper ratio = 0 is shown on the graph of Fig 2.  As with the rectangular wing, the 
non-uniformity of downwash and lift distribution result in inefficiency of this planform.  For example, a 
pointed  wing  of  A  =  6  would  have  17%  higher  induced  angle  of  attack  for  the  wing  and  13%  higher 
induced drag than an elliptical wing of the same aspect ratio. 
17.  Between  the  two  extremes  of  taper  will  exist  planforms  of  more  tolerable  efficiency.    The 
C
variations of 
1  for a wing of taper ratio 0.5 are similar to the lift distribution of the elliptical wing and 
CL
the drag due to lift characteristics is nearly identical.  A wing of A = 6 and taper ratio = 0.5 has only 3% 
higher α1 and 1% greater CD1 than an elliptical wing of the same aspect ratio. 
18.  The elliptical wing is the ideal of the subsonic aerodynamic planform since it provides a minimum 
of induced drag for a given aspect ratio.  However, the major objection to the elliptical planform is the 
extreme  difficulty  of  mechanical layout and construction.  A highly tapered planform is desirable from 
the  standpoint  of  structural  weight  and  stiffness  and  the  usual  wing  planform  may  have  a  taper  ratio 
from 0.45 to 0.20.  Since structural considerations are important in the development of an aeroplane, 
the tapered planform is a necessity for an efficient configuration.  In order to preserve the aerodynamic 
efficiency,  the  resulting  planform  is  tailored  by  wing  twist  and  section  variation  to  obtain  as  near  as 
possible the elliptic lift distribution. 
Stall Patterns 
19.  An additional effect of the planform area distribution is on the stall pattern of the wing.  The desirable 
stall pattern of any wing is a stall which begins at the root sections first.  The advantages of the root stall 
first  are  that  ailerons  remain  effective  at  high angles of attack, favourable stall warning results from the 
buffet on the tailplane and aft portion of the fuselage, and the loss of downwash behind the root usually 
provides a stable nose-down moment to the aircraft.  Such a stall pattern is favoured but may be difficult 
to obtain with certain wing configurations.  The types of stall patterns inherent with various planforms are 
illustrated in Fig 2.  The various planform effects are separated as follows: 
a. 
The elliptical planform has constant lift coefficients throughout the span from root to tip.  Such 
a lift distribution means that all sections will reach stall at essentially the same wing angle of attack 
and the stall will begin and progress uniformly throughout the span.  While the elliptical wing would 
reach  high  lift  coefficients  before  an  incipient  stall,  there  would  be  little  advance  warning  of  a 
complete  stall.    Also,  the  ailerons  may  lack  effectiveness  when  the  wing  operates  near  the  stall 
and lateral control may be difficult. 
b. 
The lift distribution of the rectangular wing exhibits low local lift coefficients at the tip, and high 
local lift coefficients at the root.  Since the wing will initiate the stall in the area of highest local lift 
coefficients, the rectangular wing is characterized by a strong root stall tendency.  Of course, this 
stall  pattern  is  favourable  since  there  is  adequate  stall  warning  buffet,  adequate  aileron 
effectiveness,  and  usually  strong  stable  moment  changes  on  the  aircraft.    Because  of  the  great 
aerodynamic  and  structural  inefficiency  of  this  planform,  the  rectangular  wing  finds  limited 
application only to low cost, low speed, light planes. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
c. 
The wing of moderate taper (taper ratio = 0.5) has a lift distribution which is similar to that of 
the elliptical wing.  Hence the stall pattern is much the same as the elliptical wing. 
d. 
The highly tapered wing of taper ratio = 0.25 shows the stalling tendency inherent with high 
taper.  The lift distribution of such a wing has distinct peaks just inboard from the tip.  Since the 
wing stall is started in the vicinity of the highest local lift coefficient, this planform has a strong 
'tip stall' tendency.  The initial stall is not started at the exact tip but at the station inboard from 
the tip where the highest local lift coefficients prevail. 
e. 
The pointed tip wing of taper ratio equal to zero develops extremely high local lift coefficients 
at  the  tip.    For  all  practical  purposes  the  pointed  tip  will  be  stalled  at  any  condition  of  lift  unless 
extensive  tailoring  is  applied  to  the  wing.    Such  a  planform  has  no  practical  application  to  a 
subsonic aircraft. 
f. 
The effect of sweepback on the lift distribution of a wing is similar to the effect of reducing the 
taper ratio.  The full significance of sweepback is discussed in the following paragraphs. 
SWEEPBACK 
Swept-back Leading Edges 
20.  This type of planform is used on high-speed aircraft and may take the form of a sweptback wing, 
or a delta, with or without a tailplane.  The reason for the use of these planforms is their low drag at the 
higher speeds.  Volume 1, Chapter 22 deals fully with this aspect.  However, the high speed/low drag 
advantages are gained at the cost of a poorer performance at the lower end of the speed range. 
Effect of Sweepback on Lift 
21.  If  a  straight  wing  is  changed  to  a  swept  planform,  with  similar  parameters  of  area,  aspect  ratio, 
taper,  section  and  washout,  the  CLmax  is  reduced.    This  is  due  to  premature  flow separation from the 
upper surface at the wing tips.  For a sweep angle of 45º, the approximate reduction in CLmax is around 
30%.  Fig 3 shows typical CL curves for a straight wing, a simple swept-back wing, and a tailless delta 
wing of the same low aspect ratio. 
1-9 Fig 3 Effect of Planform on CL max
Swept Back Wing
1.6
No Sweep
A=2
A= 2
1.4
) L 1.2
(C
ift 1.0
L
Tailless Delta Wing
f
o 0.8
A=2
t
n
ie 0.6
ffic 0.4
e
o 0.2
C
4
8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
Angle of Attack ( )
α
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
22.  A  swept  wing  presents  less  camber  and  a  greater  fineness  ratio  to  the  airflow.    However,  the 
reasons  for  the  lowering  of  the  CL  slope  are  more  readily  apparent  from  an  examination  of  Figs  4 
and 5.  From Fig 4 it can be seen that the velocity V can be divided into two components, V1 parallel to 
the leading edge which has no effect on the lift, and V2 normal to the leading edge which does affect 
the  lift  and  is  equal  to  V  cos  Λ.    Therefore,  all  other  factors  being  equal,  the  CL  of  a  swept  wing  is 
reduced in the ratio of the cosine of the sweep angle. 
1-9 Fig 4 Flow Velocities on a Swept Wing 
Λ
V
V
Λ
V1
2
1-9 Fig 5 Effect of Change in Angle of Attack 
Angle of Attack
Λ
Change ∆α
in this Plane
Angle of Attack
Change ∆α cos Λ
in this Plane
23.  Fig  5 shows that an increase in fuselage angle of attack ∆α will only produce an increase in the 
angle  of  attack  ∆α  cos  Λ  in  the  plane  perpendicular  to  the  wing  quarter  chord  line.    Since  we  have 
already said that it is airflow in the latter plane which effects CL, the full increment of lift expected from 
the ∆α change is reduced to that of a ∆α cos Λ change. 
24.  Considering Fig 3, the stall occurs on all three wings at angles of attack considerably greater than 
those of wings of medium and high aspect ratios.  On all aircraft it is desirable that the landing speed 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
should  be  close  to  the  lowest  possible  speed  at  which  the  aircraft  can  fly;  to  achieve  this  desirable 
minimum the wing must be at the angle of attack corresponding to the CL max. 
25.  On  all  wings  of  very  low  aspect  ratio,  and  particularly  on  those  with  a  swept-back  planform,  the 
angles  of  attack  giving  the  highest  lift  coefficients  cannot  be  used  for  landing.    This  is  because,  as 
explained  later,  swept-back  planforms  have  some  undesirable  characteristics  near  the  stall  and 
because the exaggerated nose-up attitude of the aircraft necessitates, among other things, excessively 
long  and  heavy  undercarriages.    The  maximum  angle  at  which  an  aircraft  can  touch  down  without 
recourse to such measures is about 15º, and the angle of attack at touchdown will therefore have to be 
something of this order.  Fig 3 shows that the CL corresponding to this angle of attack is lower than the 
CLmax for each wing. 
26.  Compared  with  the  maximum  usable  lift  coefficient  available  for  landing  aircraft  with  unswept 
wings, those of the swept and delta wings are much lower, necessitating higher landing speeds for a 
given  wing  loading.    It is now apparent that, to obtain a common minimum landing speed at a stated 
weight, an unswept wing needs a smaller area than either of the swept planforms.  The simple swept 
wing needs a greater area, and so a lower wing loading, in order that the reduced CL can support the 
weight  at  the  required  speed.    The  tailless  delta wing needs still more area, and so a still lower wing 
loading, to land at the required speed.  Fig 6 shows typical planforms for the three types of wing under 
consideration,  with  the  areas  adjusted  to  give  the  same  stalling  speed.    The  much larger area of the 
delta wing is evident. 
1-9 Fig 6 Planform Areas Giving a Common Stalling Speed 
Effect of Sweepback on Drag 
27.  The  main  reason  for  employing  sweepback  as  a  wing  planform  is  to  improve  the  high-speed 
characteristics of the wing.  Unfortunately, this has adverse effects on the amount of drag produced at 
the higher range of angles of attack.  The induced drag increases approximately in proportion to
1
.  
cos Λ
This is because, as already explained, by sweeping the wing, CL is reduced, and therefore to maintain 
the same lift the angle of attack has to be increased.  This increases the induced downwash and hence 
the induced drag. 
28.  The practical significance of this high increase in drag is the handling problems it imposes during 
an approach to landing.  Because of the greater induced drag, the minimum drag speed is higher than 
for a comparable straight wing, and the approach speed is usually less than the minimum drag speed.  
Therefore, if a pilot makes a small adjustment to the aircraft’s attitude by, for example, raising the nose 
slightly, the lift will be increased slightly, but there will be a large increase in drag which will result in a 
rapid fall off in speed, and a large increase in power to restore equilibrium.  In fact, the stage may be 
reached where the use of full power is insufficient to prevent the aircraft from descending rapidly. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 7 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
29.  On some aircraft this problem is overcome by employing high drag devices such as airbrakes or 
drag-chutes  to  increase  the  zero  lift  drag.    This  results  in  a  flatter  drag curve with the minimum drag 
speed closer to the approach speed (see Fig 7).  A further advantage is that more power is required on 
the approach which, on turbojet aircraft, means better engine response. 
1-9 Fig 7 Improvement in Approach Speed Stability 
Swept Wing
Increased Profile Drag
g
ra
D
Straight Wing
VApp IAS
Effect of Sweepback on Stalling 
30.  When  a  wing  is  swept  back,  the  boundary  layer  tends  to  change  direction  and  flow  towards  the 
tips.    This  outward  drift  is  caused  by  the  boundary  layer  encountering  an  adverse  pressure  gradient 
and flowing obliquely to it over the rear of the wing. 
31.  The pressure distribution on a swept wing is shown by isobars in Fig 8.  The velocity of the flow 
has been shown by two components, one at right angles and one parallel to the isobars.  Initially, when 
the  boundary  layer  flows  rearwards  from  the  leading  edge  it  moves  towards  a  favourable  pressure 
gradient,  ie  towards  an  area  of  lower  pressure.    Once  past  the  lowest  pressure  however,  the 
component  at  right  angles  to  the  isobars  encounters  an  adverse  pressure  gradient  and  is  reduced.  
The component parallel to the isobars is unaffected, thus the result is that the actual velocity is reduced 
(as it is over an unswept wing) and also directed outwards towards the tips. 
1-9 Fig 8 Outflow of Boundary Layer 
Pressure Gradient
Across Wing
Isobars
++
+

– –

+
++
Pooling of Boundary
Layer at Tip
Revised Mar 10   
Page 8 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
32.  The  direction  of  the  flow  continues  to  be  changed  until  the  component  at  right  angles  to  the 
isobars is reduced to zero, whilst the parallel component, because of friction, is also slightly reduced.  
This results in a 'pool' of slow moving air collecting at the tips. 
33.  The  spanwise  drift  sets  up  a  tendency  towards  tip  stalling,  since  it  thickens  the  boundary  layer 
over the outer parts of the wing and makes it more susceptible to separation, bringing with it a sudden 
reduction in CL max over the wing tips. 
34.  At  the  same  time  as  the  boundary  layer  is  flowing  towards the tips, at high angles of attack, the 
airflow  is  separating  along  the  leading  edge.    Over  the  inboard  section  it  re-attaches  behind  a  short 
'separation bubble', but on the outboard section it re-attaches only at the trailing edge or fails to attach 
at all.  The separated flow at the tips combines with the normal wing tip vortices to form a large vortex 
(the ram’s horn vortex).  The factors which combine to form this vortex are: 
a. 
Leading edge separation. 
b. 
The flow around the wing tips. 
c. 
The spanwise flow of the boundary layer. 
These factors are illustrated in Fig 9, and the sequence of the vortex development and its effect on the 
airflow over the wing is shown in Fig 10.  From Fig 10 it can be seen that the ram’s horn vortex has its 
origin on the leading edge, possibly as far inboard as the wing root.  The effect of the vortex on the air 
above  it  (the  external  flow)  is  to  draw  the  latter  down  and  behind  the  wing,  deflecting  it  towards  the 
fuselage (Fig 11). 
1-9 Fig 9 Vortex Development 
Leading Edge
Separation
Flow
Around
Wing
Spanwise 
Tips
Flow of
Boundary Layer
Revised Mar 10   
Page 9 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
1-9 Fig 10 Formation of Ram’s Horn Vortex 
Boundary Layer
Flow
1-9 Fig 11 Influence on External Flow 
External Flow
35.  The span wise flow of the boundary layer increases as angle of attack is increased.  This causes 
the  vortex  to  become  detached  from  the  leading  edge  closer  inboard  (see Fig  12).    As  a  result, 
outboard ailerons suffer a marked decrease in response with increasing angle of attack.  This, in turn, 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 10 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
means  that  comparatively  large  aileron  movements  are  necessary  to  manoeuvre  the  aircraft  at  low 
speeds;  the  aircraft  response  may  be  correspondingly  sluggish.    This  effect  may  be  countered  by 
limiting the inboard encroachment of the vortex as described below, or by moving the ailerons inboard.  
Another possible solution is the use of an all-moving wing tip. 
1-9 Fig 12 Shift of Ram’s Horn Vortex 
α= 3°
α= 8°
Alleviating the Tip Stall 
36.  Most  of  the  methods  used  to  alleviate  the  tip  stall  aim  either  at  maintaining  a  thin  and  therefore 
strong boundary layer, or re-energizing the weakened boundary layer: 
a
Boundary Layer Fences.  Used originally to restrict the boundary layer out-flow, fences also 
check the spanwise growth of the separation bubble along the leading edge (see para 34). 
b
Leading  Edge  SlotsThese  have  the  effect  of  re-energizing  the  boundary  layer  (see  also 
Volume 1, Chapter 10). 
c
Boundary  Layer  SuctionSuitably  placed  suction  points  draw  off  the  weakened  layer;  a 
new high-energy layer is then drawn down to take its place (see also Volume 1, Chapter 10). 
d.
Boundary Layer Blowing.  High velocity air is injected into the boundary layer to increase its 
energy (see also Volume 1, Chapter 10). 
e.
Vortex Generators.  These re-energize the boundary layer by making it more turbulent.  The 
increased  turbulence  results  in  high-energy  air  in  layers  immediately  above  the  retarded  layer 
being mixed in and so re-energizing the layer as a whole.  Vortex generators are most commonly 
fitted  ahead  of  control  surfaces  to  increase  their  effect  by  speeding  up  and  strengthening  the 
boundary  layer.    Vortex  generators  also  markedly  reduce  shock-induced  boundary  layer 
separation and reduce the effects of the upper surface shockwave. 
f.
Leading  Edge Extension.  Also known as a 'sawtooth' leading edge, the extended leading 
edge  is  a  common  method  used  to  avoid  the  worst  effects  of  tip  stalling.    An  illustration  of  a 
leading-edge extension can be seen at Volume 1, Chapter 22, Fig 29.  The effect of the extension 
is to cut down the growth of the main vortex.  A further smaller vortex, starting from the tip of the 
extension, affects a much smaller proportion of the tip area and in lying across the wing, behind 
the tip of the extension, it has the effect of restricting the outward flow of the boundary layer.  In 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 11 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
this way the severity of the tip stall is reduced and with it the pitch-up tendency.  Further effects of 
the leading-edge extension are: 
(1)  The  t/c  ratio  of  the  tip  area  is  reduced,  with  consequent  benefits  to  the  critical  Mach 
number. 
(2)  The  Centre  of  Pressure  (CP)  of  the  extended  portion  of  the  wing  lies  ahead  of  what 
would  be  the  CP  position  if  no  extension  were  fitted.    The  mean  CP  position  for  the  whole 
wing is therefore further forward and, when the tip eventually stalls, the forward shift in CP is 
less marked, thus reducing the magnitude of the nose-up movement. 
g.
Leading Edge Notch.  The notched leading edge has the same effect as the extended leading 
edge insofar as it causes a similar vortex formation thereby reducing the magnitude of the vortex over 
the tip area and with it the tip stall.  Pitch-up tendencies are therefore reduced.  The leading-edge notch 
can be used in conjunction with extended leading edge, the effect being to intensify the inboard vortex 
behind  the  devices  to  create  a  stronger  restraining  effect  on  boundary  layer  out-flow.    The  choice 
whether  to  use  either  or  both  of  these  devices  lies  with  the  designer  and  depends  on  the  flight 
characteristics of the aircraft.  An illustration can be seen at Volume 1, Chapter 22, Fig 30. 
Pitch-up 
37.  Longitudinal Instability Longitudinal instability results when the angle of attack of a swept wing 
increases to the point of tip stall.  The instability takes the form of a nose-up pitching moment, called 
pitch-up,  and  is  a  self-stalling  tendency  in  that  the  angle  of  attack  continues  to  increase  once  the 
instability has set in.  The aerodynamic causes of pitch-up are detailed in the following paragraphs. 
38.  Centre  of  Pressure  (CP)  Movement.    When  the  swept-back  wing  is  unstalled,  the  CP  lies  in a 
certain  position  relative  to  the  CG,  the  exact  position  being  the  mean  of  the  centres  of  pressure  for 
every  portion  of  the  wing  from  the  root  to  the  tip.    When  the  tip  stalls,  lift  is  lost  over  the  outboard 
sections and the mean CP moves rapidly forward; the wing moment (Fig 13) is reduced and a nose-up 
pitching moment results which aggravates the tendency. 
1-9 Fig 13 Nose-up Pitching Moment Resulting from Tip Stalling 
L
Wing
Moment
Tail Lift
Tail
Moment
W
39.  Change  of  Downwash  over  the  Tail  plane.    Fig  14  shows  that  the  maximum  downwash  from  the 
swept-back wing in unstalled flight comes from the tip portions; this is to be expected since the CL is highest 
over these parts of the wing.  When the wing tips stall, effective lift production is concentrated inboard and 
the maximum downwash now operates over the tailplane and increases the tendency to pitch up.  This effect 
can be reduced by placing the tailplane as low as possible in line with, or below, the wing chord line, so that it 
lies in a region in which downwash changes with angle of attack are less marked. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 12 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
1-9 Fig 14 Variation of Downwash 
Unstalled
Tip Stalled
CG
CG CP
CP
Stalled
Stalled
Max
Tail
Downwash
Plane
Max Downwash
L
Resultant
L
Downwash
Nose-up
Pitching
Moment
Increased
W
Tail Moment
Tail Moment
Wing Moment
 Increased
Decreased
40.  Washout  Due  to  Flexure.    When  a  swept  wing  flexes  under  load,  all  chordwise  points  at  right 
angles to the main spar are raised to the same degree, unless the wing is specially designed so that 
this is not so.  Thus, in Fig 15, the points A and B rise through the same distance and the points C and 
D rise through the same distance but through a greater distance than A and B.  Thus, C rises further 
than  A  and  there  is  a  consequent  loss  in  incidence at this section.  This aeroelastic effect is termed, 
'washout due to flexure', and is obviously greatest at the wing tips.  It is most noticeable during high g 
manoeuvres  when  the  loss  of  lift  at  the  tips,  and  the  consequent  forward  movement  of  the  centre  of 
pressure,  causes  the  aircraft  to  tighten  up  in  the  manoeuvre.    A  certain  amount  of  washout  due  to 
flexure  is  acceptable  provided  the  control  in  pitch  is  adequate  to  compensate  for  it,  but  it  can  be 
avoided by appropriate wing design. 
1-9 Fig 15 Washout Due to Flexure 
Leading Edge
A
Main Sp
D
ar
B
C
Trailing Edge
Revised Mar 10   
Page 13 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
41.  Pitch-up  on  Aircraft  with  Straight  Wings.    On  aircraft  with  low aspect ratio, short-span wings, 
pitch-up can be caused by the effect of the wing tip vortices.  As the angle of attack is increased the 
vortices  grow  larger  until  at  or  near  the  stall  they  may  be  large  enough  to  affect  the  airflow  over  the 
tailplane.  As each vortex rotates inwards towards the fuselage over its upper half, the tailplane angle 
of attack is decreased giving rise to a pitch-up tendency. 
42.  Rate of Pitch-up.  From the pilot’s point of view pitch-up is recognized when the pull force on the 
control column which is being applied to the aircraft near the stall has to be changed to a push force to 
prevent  the  nose  from  rising  further;  the  more  the  speed  decreases,  the  further  forward  must  the 
control  column  be  moved  to  restrain  the  nose-up  pitch.    Pitch-up  in  level  flight  or  in  any  1g  stall  is 
usually  gentle,  since  the  rate  at  which  the  stall  is  spreading  is  comparatively  slow  and  is  usually 
accompanied  by  the  normal  pre-stall  buffeting.    When  the  stall  occurs  in  a  manoeuvre,  under  g,  the 
onset  of  pitch-up  can  be  violent  and  sudden,  corresponding  to  the  rate  of  spread  of  the  stall.    This 
aspect is dealt with in more detail in Volume 1, Chapter 15. 
The Crescent Wing 
43.  The  crescent  wing  planform  combines  variable  sweep with a changing thickness/chord ratio.  At 
the root section where the wing is thickest, the angle of sweep is greatest.  As the t/c ratio is reduced 
spanwise, so is the angle of sweep, so that the outboard sections are practically unswept.  Hence there 
is little or no outflow of the boundary layer at the tips.  The advantages of the crescent wing are: 
a. 
The critical drag rise Mach number is raised. 
b. 
The peak drag rise is reduced. 
c. 
Because of the lack of outflow of the boundary layer at the tips, tip stalling is prevented. 
FORWARD SWEEP 
General 
44.  The  benefits  of  wing  sweep  can  be  achieved  by  sweeping  the  wing  backwards  or  forwards,  yet 
only  in  recent  years  has  the  forward swept wing (FSW), become a serious alternative to sweepback.  
The reason for this lies in the behaviour of wing structures under load, see Para 40. 
45.  The main advantages lie in the sub/transonic regime.  Taking the 70% chordline as the average 
position for a shockwave to form as the critical Mach number is approached, the sweep angle of this 
chordline influences wave drag. 
46.  The  FSW  can  maintain  the  same  chord-line  sweep  as  the swept-back wing (SBW) but due to a 
geometric advantage, achieves this with less leading-edge sweep and enjoys the advantages accruing 
from this subsonically (Para 20, et seq). 
47.  The  decision  to  employ  FSW  or  SBW  will  depend  inter  alia, on  the  speed  regime  envisaged  for 
the  design.   Due to better lift/drag ratio in the sub-sonic and near transonic speed range (typical of a 
combat  air  patrol)  fuel  consumption  is  improved  over  the  SBW.    For  a  high  speed  supersonic 
interception, the higher supersonic drag is a disadvantage. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 14 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
Wing Flexure 
48.  Under flexural load the airflow sees a steady increase in effective angle of attack from root to tip, 
the opposite effect to aft-sweep.  Under g loading, lift will be increase at the tips, leading to pitch-up as 
the  centre  of  pressure  moves  forwards.    Additionally,  the  increased  angle  of  attack  at  the  tips  now 
leads  to  increased  wing  flexure,  which  leads  to  increased  effective  angle  of  attack  at  the  tips.    The 
result of this aero-elastic divergence is likely to be structural failure of the wing, so it is not surprising 
that sweepback was considered to be a better option until comparatively recently.  What changed the 
situation  was  the  development  of  carbon  fibre  technology,  which  can  produce  controlled  wing  twist 
under load, such that the effect described is eliminated. 
Vortex Generation 
49.  Fig  16  shows  the  difference  in  ram’s  horn  vortex  behaviour.    In  the  swept  forward  design,  the 
ram’s horn vortex develops inwards towards the root, not outwards towards the tips. 
1-9 Fig 16 Comparison of Ram’s Horn Vortex Behaviour 
50.  There  will,  of  course,  still  be  vortices  from  the  wing  tips,  but  these  no  longer  reinforce  and 
aggravate the ram’s horn vortex, which now lies along the fuselage, or slightly more outboard if a small 
section of the wing root is swept back. 
Stalling 
51.  A swept forward wing will tend to stall at the root first.  This stall can be controlled in a number of 
ways.    Since  a  conventional  tail  plane  would  tend  to  lie  in  a  vortex,  a  popular  option  is  to  combine 
sweep forward with a canard foreplane.  Downwash from a carefully placed canard can delay root stall, 
(see Para 68), and even the vortices from the canard can be used to energize the airflow over inboard 
sections of the wing, maintaining lift to higher angles of attack. 
52.  The root-stall characteristics give better lateral control at the stall as aileron control is retained, but 
may incur a penalty in directional control as the fin and rudder are acting in the chaotic turbulence from 
the root separation. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 15 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
DELTA WINGS 
Tailless Delta 
53.  On  aircraft  using  this  type  of  wing  the  angle  of  attack  is  controlled  by  movement  of  the  trailing 
edge  of  the  wing;  an  upward  movement  produces  a  downward  force  on  the  trailing  edge  and  so 
increases the angle of attack.  When compared with an identical wing which uses a separate tailplane 
to control the angle of attack, the tailless delta reveals two main differences: 
a. 
The CL max is reduced. 
b. 
The stalling angle is increased. 
Reduction of CL max
54.  The chord line of the wing is defined as being a straight line joining the leading edge to the trailing 
edge.  If a given wing/aerofoil combination has a hinged trailing edge for use as an elevator, then it can 
be said that when the trailing edge is in any given angular position the effective aerofoil section of the 
wing has been changed. 
a. 
When such a wing reaches its stalling angle in level flight, the trailing edge elevator must be 
raised to impose a downward force on the trailing edge to maintain the wing at the required angle 
of attack.  The raised trailing edge has two effects; it deflects upwards the airflow passing over it 
and so reduces the downwash, the amount of which is proportional to the lift, and it reduces the 
extent  of  both  the  low-pressure  area  over  the  upper  surface  of  the  wing  and  the  high-pressure 
area below, thereby lowering the CL. 
b. 
The curves of Fig 17 show that a section with a raised trailing edge will suffer a decreased CL 
max compared to the basic section. 
1-9 Fig 17 Effect of Hinged Trailing Edge on CL max and Stalling Angle 
Basic Section
ift
L
Angle of Attack
Increase in Stalling Angle 
55.  The planform of the delta wing gives it an inherently low aspect ratio and therefore a high stalling 
angle and a marked nose-up attitude at the stall in level flight.  If a certain delta wing is used without a 
tail  plane,  ie  the  trailing  edge  is  used  as  an  elevator,  then  the  stalling  angle  is  higher  than  when  the 
same wing is used in conjunction with a tail plane. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 16 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
56.  All  else  being  equal  (planform,  aspect  ratio,  area,  etc) changes  in  the  amount  of  camber  (by 
altering  the  angular  setting  of  the  trailing  edge  elevator)  do  not  affect  the  stalling  angle  appreciably.  
That  is,  the  angle  between  the  chord  line  (drawn  through  the  leading  and  trailing  edges)  and  the 
direction of the airflow remains constant when at maximum CL irrespective of the setting of the hinged 
trailing  edge.    Fig  18  illustrates  this  point  and  it  can  be  seen  that  for  both  the  'tailed'  and  'tailless', 
aircraft the stalling angle is the same when measured on the foregoing principles. 
1-9 Fig 18 Comparison of Stalling Angle 
30o
30o
38o
57.  However, it is normal practice and convention to measure the stalling angle with reference to the 
chord line obtained when the moveable trailing edge is in the neutral position, and not to assume a new 
chord  line  with  each  change  in  trailing  edge  movement.    When  the  stalling  angle  is  measured  with 
reference to the conventional fixed chord line, it can be seen from Fig 18 that the angle is greater.  Fig 
18 also shows that, because the wing proper is set at a greater angle at the stall when a trailing edge 
elevator is used, the fuselage attitude is more nose-up, giving a more exaggerated attitude at the stall 
in level flight. 
58.  Since it is easier to refer to angle of attack against a fixed chord line, the basic chord line is always 
used as the reference datum.  This convention is the reason for the apparently greater stalling angles 
of  tailless  delta  wings;  it  is  perhaps  a  more  realistic  method,  as  the  pilot  is  invariably  aware  of  the 
increased  attitude  of  his  aircraft  relative  to  the  horizontal  but  is  not  always  aware  of  increases  in  the 
angle of attack. 
The CL Curve 
59.  Reference to Fig 3 shows that the peak of the curve for the lift coefficient is very flat and shows 
little  variation  of  CL  over  a  comparatively  wide  range  of  angles.    This  very  mild  stalling  behaviour 
enables  the  delta  wing  to  be  flown  at  an  angle  of  attack  considerably  higher  than  that  of  the  CL  max, 
possibly  with  no  ill  effects  other  than  the  very  marked  increase  in  the  drag.    The  flat peak denotes a 
gradual stall, with a consequent gradual loss of lift as the stalling angle is exceeded. 
The Slender Delta 
60.  The slender delta provides low drag at supersonic speeds because of its low aspect ratio.  This, 
combined  with  a  sharp  leading  edge,  produces  leading  edge  separation  at  low  angles  of  attack.  
Paradoxically, this is encouraged.  Up to now the vortex so produced has been an embarrassment as it 
is unstable, varies greatly with angle of attack, causes buffet, increases drag and decreases CL max.  By 
careful design, the vortex can be controlled and used to advantage. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 17 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
61.  Vortex Lift.  The vortex on a slender delta is different in character from that on a wing of higher 
aspect  ratio  (greater than 3).  On the slender delta the vortex will cover the whole leading edge from 
root  to  tip,  rather  than  start  at  the  tip  and  travel  inwards  at  higher  angles  of  attack.    Its  behaviour  is 
therefore more predictable, and, as it is present during all aspects of flight, the following characteristics 
may be exploited: 
a. 
Leading edge flow separation causes CP to be situated nearer mid-chord.  Hence there will 
be less difference between CP subsonic and CP supersonic than before, and longitudinal stability 
is improved. 
b. 
The  vortex  core  is  a  region  of  low  pressure,  therefore  an  increase  in  CL  may  be  expected.  
On the conventional delta this cannot be utilized as the vortex seldom approaches anywhere near 
the wing root and most of its energy appears in the wake behind the wing, where it produces high 
induced drag.  On the slender delta the low pressure in the vortex is situated above the wing and 
can result in an increase in CL of as much as 30% under favourable conditions. 
VARIABLE GEOMETRY WINGS 
General 
62.  An  aircraft  which  is  designed  to  fly  at  supersonic  speeds  most  of  the  time  usually  has  poor  low 
speed  characteristics  which  have  to  be  accepted,  although  various  high  lift  devices  are  available  for 
reducing  take-off  and  landing  speeds  and  improving  the  low  speed  handling  qualities.    In  order  to 
achieve the desired high-speed performance, the aircraft has thin symmetric wing sections and highly 
swept  or  delta  wing  planforms;  these  wings  are  very  inefficient  at  low  speeds  where  unswept  wing 
planforms and cambered wing sections are required. 
63.  In  the  case  of  an  aircraft  which  is  required  to  be  operated  efficiently  at  both  high  and  low 
speeds, variable wing sweep is a desirable feature to be incorporated in the design.  The wings can 
then be swept back when the aircraft is being flown at high speeds and forward again when flying at 
low speeds. 
Stability and Control Problems 
64.  When the wing of an aircraft is moved backwards the aerodynamic centre moves rearwards.  The 
CG  of  the  aircraft  also  moves  back  at  the  same  time,  but,  since  most  of  the  weight  of  an  aircraft  is 
concentrated  in  the  fuselage,  the  movement  is  less  than  that  of  the  aerodynamic  centre.    The 
rearwards  movement  of  the  aerodynamic  centre  produces  a  nose-down  change  of  trim  and  an 
increase in the longitudinal static stability of the aircraft.  Additional up-elevator is required to trim the 
aircraft,  and  this results in additional drag called 'trim drag'.  This extra drag can be a relatively large 
part  of  the  total  drag  of  an  aircraft  at  supersonic  speeds  and  it  is  essential  that  it  should  be  kept  as 
small as possible.  Various design methods are available for reducing or eliminating the trim changes 
produced by sweeping the wings. 
65.  Wing Translation.  The aerodynamic centre can be moved forward again by translating the wing 
forwards as it is swept back.  This method involves extra weight and structural complications. 
66.  CG  Movement.    The  aircraft  can  be  designed so that the CG moves rearwards in step with the 
aerodynamic centre by mounting some weight in the form of engines, etc at the wing tips.  As engines 
would  have  to  swivel  to  remain  aligned  with  the  airflow,  additional  weight  and  other  complications 
result.  Another possible method of moving the CG is by transferring fuel to suitable trim tanks in the 
rear fuselage. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 18 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
67.  Leading  Edge  Fillet  and  Pivot  Position.    Another  solution  can  be  obtained  by  positioning  the 
pivot  point  outboard  of  the  fuselage  inside  a  fixed,  leading  edge  fillet,  called  a  'glove'.    The  optimum 
pivot position for minimum movement of the CP depends on the wing planform, but it is usually about 
20%  out  along  the  mid-span.    However,  the  fixed  glove-fairing  presents  a  highly  swept portion of the 
span  at  low-speed,  forward-sweep  settings.    This  incurs  the  undesirable  penalties  that  variable 
geometry is designed to overcome.  A compromise between sweeping the whole wing and a long glove 
giving the minimum CP shift is usually adopted (see Fig 19). 
1-9 Fig 19 Movement of CP 
Pivot
Pivot
CP Shift
CP Shift
Glove Fairing Pivot
Fuselage Pivot
Small CP Shift
Large CP Shift
CANARD WINGS 
Use and Disadvantages 
68.  A canard-type configuration is one which has a fore-plane located forward of the wing instead of in the 
more conventional aft position.  On an aircraft with a long slender fuselage with engines mounted in the tail 
and a CG position well aft, this layout has the obvious geometric advantage of a longer moment arm.  This 
enables  the  stability  and  trim  requirements  to  be  satisfied  by  a  fore-plane  of  smaller  area.    The  trim  drag 
problem will also be reduced because, at high speeds, an up-load will be required on the fore-plane to trim 
the aircraft.  There are, however, certain disadvantages with this layout: 
a
Stalling  ProblemsOn  a  'conventional'  rear-tailplane  configuration,  the  wing  stalls  before 
the tailplane, and longitudinal control and stability are maintained at the stall.  On a canard layout, 
if  the  wing  stalls  first,  stability  is  lost,  but  if  the  fore-plane  stalls  first  then  control  is  lost  and  the 
maximum  value  of  CL  is  reduced.    One  possible  solution  is  to  use  a  canard  surface  and  a  wing 
trailing edge flap in combination, with one surface acting as a trimming device and the other as a 
control.  Alternatively, an auxiliary horizontal tailplane at the rear may be used for trim and control 
at low speed. 
b
Interference Problems.  In the same way as the airflow from the wing interferes with the tail 
unit on the conventional rear-tail layout, so the airflow from the fore-plane interferes with the flow 
around the main wing and vertical fin in a canard layout.  This can cause a reduction in lift on the 
main  wing  and  can  also  result  in  stability  problems.    The  interference  with  the  vertical  fin  can 
cause a marked reduction in directional static stability at high angles of attack.  The stability may 
be improved by employing twin vertical fins in place of the single control vertical fin. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 19 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
SUMMARY 
Planform Considerations 
69.   Planform is the geometrical shape of the wing when viewed from above, and it largely determines 
the amount of lift and drag obtainable from a given area, it also has a pronounced effect on the stalling 
angle of attack. 
70.  Aspect ratio (A) is found by dividing the square of the wingspan by the area of the wing: 
Span2
Span
A =
or
Area
Mean Chord
71.  The following wing characteristics are affected by aspect ratio: 
a. 
Induced drag is inversely proportional to aspect ratio. 
b. 
The  reduced  effective  angle  of  attack  of  very  low  aspect  ratio  wings  can  delay  the  stall 
considerably.  (Some delta wings have no measurable stalling angle up to 40º.) 
72.  In the aerodynamic sense, the elliptical wing is the most efficient planform because the uniformity 
of lift coefficient and downwash incurs the least induced drag for a given aspect ratio. 
73.  Any swept-back planform suffers a marked drop in CL max, when compared with an unswept wing 
with  the  same  significant  parameters;  also,  the  boundary  layer  tends  to  change  direction  and  flow 
towards the tips. 
74.  The  spanwise  drift  of  the  boundary  layer  sets  up  a  tendency  towards  tip  stalling  on  swept  wing 
aircraft.  This may be alleviated by the use of one or more of the following: 
a. 
Boundary layer fences. 
b. 
Leading edge slots 
c. 
Boundary layer suction. 
d. 
Boundary layer blowing. 
e. 
Vortex generators. 
f. 
Leading edge extension. 
g. 
Leading edge notch. 
75.  The factors effecting pitch-up are: 
a. 
Longitudinal instability. 
b. 
Centre of pressure movement. 
c. 
Change of downwash over the tail-plane. 
d. 
Washout due to flexure. 
76.  The advantages of a crescent wing are: 
a. 
The critical drag rise Mach number is raised. 
b. 
The peak drag rise is reduced. 
c. 
Because of the lack of outflow of the boundary layer at the tips, tip stalling is prevented. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 20 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-9 - Wing Planforms 
77.  A FSW stalls at the root first, prolonging aileron control.  The configuration may offer an advantage in 
L/D ratio over sweepback in the appropriate speed range. 
78.  When compared with a delta which uses a separate tailplane to control angle of attack, the tailless 
delta reveals two main differences: 
a. 
The CL max is reduced. 
b. 
The stalling angle is increased. 
79.  Vortex lift has the following characteristics: 
a. 
Leading edge flow separation causes the CP to be situated nearer to midchord. 
b. 
The vortex core is a region of low pressure, therefore an increase in CL may be expected. 
80.  The canard configuration has the following advantages and disadvantages: 
a. 
Advantages: 
(1)  The control surface is ahead of any shocks which may form on the mainplane. 
(2)  On an aircraft with a long slender fuselage with engines mounted in the tail and the CG 
position well aft, the fore-plane has the advantage of a long moment arm. 
(3)  The stability and trim requirements can be satisfied with a smaller fore-plane area. 
(4)  Because up-loads will be required, the trim drag problem is reduced. 
b. 
Disadvantages: 
(1)  If the wing stalls first stability is lost. 
(2)  If the fore-plane stalls first control is lost. 
(3)  In  the  same  way  as  the  airflow  from  the  wing  interferes  with  the  tail  unit  on  the 
conventional rear-tail layout, so the airflow from the fore-plane interferes with the flow around 
the main wing and vertical fin of the canard configuration. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 21 of 21 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
CHAPTER 10 - LIFT AUGMENTATION 
Introduction 
1. 
As  aircraft  have  developed  over  the  years  so  their  wing  loading  has  increased  from  World  War  I 
figures of 12 lb to 15 lb per sq ft to figures in excess of 150 lb per sq ft.  These figures are derived from 
the weight of the aircraft divided by the wing area, which of course, also represents the lift required in level 
flight per unit area of wing.  Now, although aerofoil design has improved, the extra lift required has been 
produced by flying faster, with the result that where wing loading has gone up by a factor of 10, the stalling 
speed has also increased by a factor of √10.  In other words, stalling speeds have increased from about 
35  kt  to  120  kt.    This  in  turn  has  led  to  higher  touchdown  speeds  on  landing,  and  so  longer  runways 
and/or special retardation facilities such as tail chutes or arrester wires are needed.  The aircraft also has 
to  reach  high  speeds  for  unstick.    Lift  augmentation  devices  are  used  to  increase  the  maximum  lift 
coefficient, in order to reduce the air speed at unstick and touchdown. 
2. 
The chief devices used to augment the CLmax are: 
a. 
Slats - either automatic or controllable by the pilot.  Slots are also in this classification. 
b. 
Flaps - these include leading edge, trailing edge and jet flaps. 
c. 
Boundary  Layer  Control  (either  sucking  or  blowing  air  over  the  wing  to  re-energize  the 
boundary layer). 
SLATS 
Principle of Operation 
3. 
When  a  small  auxiliary  aerofoil  slat  of  highly  cambered  section  is  fixed  to  the  leading  edge  of  a 
wing along the complete span and adjusted so that a suitable slot is formed between the two, the CLmax
may be increased by as much as 70%.  At the same time, the stalling angle is increased by some 10°.  
The graph at Fig 1 shows the comparative figures for a slatted and unslatted wing of the same basic 
dimensions. 
1-10 Fig 1 Effect of Flaps and Slats on Lift 
2.0
lats
S
lus
P
t
g
n 1.5
p
in
ie
la
W
F
ffic
s
e
lu
o
P
C
g
in
ift
L
W
1.0
ing
W
lain
P
0.5
5
10
15
20
25
30
Angle of Attack
4. 
The  effect  of  the  slat  is  to  prolong  the  lift  curve  by  delaying  the  stall  until  a  higher  angle  of  attack.  
When  operating  at  high  angles  of  attack  the  slat  itself is generating a high lift coefficient because of its 
Revised Jul 18 
Page 1 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
marked camber.  The action of the slat is to flatten the marked peak of the low-pressure envelope at high 
angles of attack and to change it to one with a more gradual pressure gradient.  The flattening of the lift 
distribution  envelope  means  that  the  boundary  layer  does  not  undergo  the  sudden  thickening  that 
occurred through having to negotiate the very steep gradient that existed immediately behind the former 
suction peak, and so it retains much of its energy, thus enabling it to penetrate almost the full chord of the 
wing before separating.  Fig 2 shows the alleviating effect of the slat on the low-pressure peak and that, 
although flatter, the area of the low pressure region, which is proportional to its strength, is unchanged or 
even  increased.    The  passage  of  the  boundary  layer  over  the  wing  is  assisted  by  the  fact  that  the  air 
flowing  through  the  slot  is  accelerated  by  the  venturi  effect,  thus  adding  to  the  kinetic  energy  of  the 
boundary layer and so helping it to penetrate further against the adverse gradient. 
1-10 Fig 2 Effect of Slat on the Pressure Distribution 
No Slat
With Slat
5. 
As shown in Fig 1, the slat delays separation until an angle of about 25° to 28° is reached, during 
which time the lift coefficient has risen steadily, finally reaching a peak considerably greater than that of 
an unslatted wing.  Assuming that the CLmax of the wing is increased by, say 70%, it is evident that the 
stalling speed at a stated wing loading can be much reduced; for example, if an unslatted wing stalls at 
a speed of about 100 kt, its fully slatted counterpart would stall at about 80 kt.  The exact amount of the 
reduction achieved depends on the length of the leading edge covered by the slat and the chord of the 
slat.  In cases where the slats cover only the wing tips, the increase in CL is proportionately smaller. 
Automatic Slats 
6. 
Since the slat is of use only at high angles of attack, at the normal angles its presence serves only to 
increase drag.  This disadvantage can be overcome by making the slat moveable so that when not in use 
it lies flush against the leading edge of the wing as shown in Fig 3.  In this case the slat is hinged on its 
supporting arms so that it can move to either the operating position or the closed position at which it gives 
least drag.  This type of slat is fully automatic in that its action needs no separate control. 
1-10 Fig 3 Automatic Slat 
Slat Closed
Slat Open
Revised Jul 18 
Page 2 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
7. 
At  high  angles  of  attack  the  lift  of  the  slat  raises  it  clear  of  the  wing  leaving  the  required  slot 
between the two surfaces which accelerates and re-energizes the airflow over the upper surface. 
Uses of the Slat 
8. 
On  some  high  performance  aircraft  the  purpose  of  slats  is  not  entirely  that  of  augmenting  the 
CLmax  since  the  high  stalling  angle  of  the  wing  with  a  full-span  slat  necessitates  an  exaggerated  and 
unacceptable  landing  attitude  if  the  full  benefit  of  the  slat is to be obtained.  When slats are used on 
these  aircraft,  their  purpose  may  be  as  much  to  improve  control  at  low  speeds  by  curing  any 
tendencies towards wing tip stalling as it is to augment the lift coefficient. 
9. 
If the slats are small and the drag negligible they may be fixed, ie non-automatic.  Large slats are 
invariably  of  the  automatic  type.    Slats  are  often  seen  on  the  leading  edges  of  sharply  swept-back 
wings; on these aircraft the slats usually extend along most of the leading edge and, besides relieving 
the tip stalling characteristics, they do augment CL considerably, even though the angle of attack may 
be well below the stalling angle. 
10.  Automatic  slats  are  designed  so  that  they  open  fully  some  time  before  the  speed  reaches  that 
used for the approach and landing.  During this period they still accomplish their purpose of making the 
passage  of  the  boundary  layer  easier  by  flattening  the  pressure  gradient  over  the  front  of  the  wing.  
Thus whenever the slat is open, at even moderate angles of attack, the boundary layer can penetrate 
further aft along the chord thus reducing the thickening effect and delaying separation and resulting in 
a stronger pressure distribution than that obtained from a wing without slats.  As the angle of attack is 
increased so the effect becomes more pronounced. 
11. Built-in Slots Fig 4 shows a variation of the classic arrangement, in which suitably shaped slots 
are built into the wing tips just behind the leading edge.  At higher angles of attack, air from below the 
wing  is  guided  through  the  slots  and  discharged  over  the  upper  surfaces,  tangential  to  the  wing 
surface, thereby re-energizing the boundary layer to the consequent benefit of the lift coefficient. 
1-10 Fig 4 Built-in Slot 
Built-in Slots
12.  Stalling with Slats.  The effect of the slat at the highest angles of attack is to boost the extent of 
the low-pressure area over the wing.  At angles of attack of about 25°, the low-pressure envelope has 
been considerably enlarged and a proportionately larger amount of lift is being developed.  When the 
wing reaches a certain angle, the slat can no longer postpone events and the stall occurs.  When the 
powerful low pressure envelope collapses, the sudden loss of lift may result in equally sudden changes 
in the attitude of the aircraft.  This applies particularly if one wing stalls before the other; in this case a 
strong rolling moment or wing dropping motion would be set up. 
FLAPS 
Purpose 
13.  The operation of the flap is to vary the camber of the wing section.  High lift aerofoils possess a 
curved  mean  camber  line,  (the  line  equidistant  from  the  upper  and  lower  surfaces);  the  greater  the 
Revised Jul 18 
Page 3 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
mean  camber  the  greater  the  lift  capability  of  the  wing.    High  speed  aerofoils  however,  may  have  a 
mean  camber  line  which  is  straight,  and,  if  either  or  both  the  leading  edge  and  trailing  edge  can  be 
hinged downwards, the effect will be to produce a more highly cambered wing section, with a resultant 
increase in the lift coefficient. 
Action of the Flap 
14.  Increased camber can be obtained by bringing down the leading or trailing edge of the wing (or both).  
The use of leading edge flaps is becoming more prevalent on large swept-wing aircraft, and trailing edge 
flaps are used on practically all aircraft except for the tailless delta.  The effect of this increased camber 
increases the lift, but since the change in camber is abrupt the total increase is not as much as would be 
obtained  from  a  properly  curved  mean  camber  line.    (Fig 1  shows  the  effect  of  flaps  on  the  CLmax  and 
stalling angle.) 
Types of Flap 
15.  The  trailing  edge  flap  has  many  variations,  all  of  which  serve  to  increase  the  CLmax.    Some, 
however, are more efficient than others.  Fig 5 illustrates some representative types in use, the more 
efficient ones are usually more complicated mechanically.  
1-10 Fig 5 Types of Flaps 
Increase 
Angle of 
of 
High-lift devices
basic aerofoil 
Maximum 
Remarks 
at max lift 
lift 
Effects  of  all  high-lift  devices 
Basic aerofoil 

15°
depend  on  shape  of  basic 
aerofoil 
Increase  camber.    Much  drag 
50% 
12°
when  fully  lowered.    Nose-
Plain or camber flap 
down pitching moment. 
Increase  camber.    Even  more 
60% 
14°
drag  than  plain  flap.    Nose-
Split flap 
down pitching moment. 
Increase  camber  and  wing 
90% 
13°
area.  Much drag.  Nose-down 
pitching moment. 
Zap flap 
Control  of  boundary  layer.  
65% 
16°
Increase  camber.    Stalling 
Slotted flap 
delayed.  Not so much drag. 
Same  as  single-slotted  flap 
70% 
18°
only  more  so.    Treble  slots 
sometimes used. 
Double-slotted flap 
Increase  camber  and  wing 
90% 
15°
area.    Best  flaps  for  lift.  
Fowler flap 
Complicated 
mechanism.  
Nose-down pitching moment. 
Revised Jul 18 
Page 4 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
16.  The  increase  in  CLmax  obtained  by  the  use  of  flaps  varies  from  about  50%  for  the  single  flap,  to 
90%  for  the  Fowler  type  flap.    The  effectiveness  of  a  flap  may be considerably increased if the air is 
constrained  to  follow  the  deflected  surface  and  not  to  break  away  or  stall.    One  method  of achieving 
this is by the use of slotted flaps, in which, when the flap is lowered, a gap is made which operates as a 
slot to re-energize the air in a similar manner to leading edge slots.  Some aircraft have double-slotted, 
or even triple-slotted flaps which may give a CLmax increase of up to 120%. 
17.  The angle of attack at which the maximum lift coefficient is obtained with the trailing edge flap is 
slightly  less  than  with  the  basic  aerofoil.    Thus,  the  flap  gives  an  increased  lift  coefficient  without  the 
attendant exaggerated angles made necessary with slats. 
Effect of Flap on the Stalling Angle 
18.  When  the  trailing  edge  flap  is  lowered  the  angle  of  attack  for  level  flight  under  the  prevailing 
conditions  is  reduced.    For  each  increasing  flap  angle  there  is  a  fixed  and  lower  stalling  angle.    The 
lower stalling angle is caused by the change in the aerofoil section when the flap is lowered.  Volume 1, 
Chapter 9, Paras 55 to 58 describe how the use of a trailing edge elevator on a delta wing increases 
the  stalling  angle  and aircraft attitude at the stall; the same approach can be used to account for the 
effect of flap on the stalling angle. 
19.  The  trailing  edge  flap  is  directly  comparable  to  the trailing edge elevator insofar as the effect on 
stalling angle is concerned.  The raised trailing edge elevator at the stall increases the stalling angle of 
attack and the aircraft attitude in level flight but the lowered trailing edge flap reduces the stalling angle 
and the aircraft attitude at the level flight stall.  Fig 6 illustrates how the lowered flap affects the angle of 
attack and the aircraft attitude.  Pilots should take care not to confuse attitude with angle of attack, for, 
as  explained  in  Volume  1,  Chapter  15,  the  attitude  of  the  aircraft  has  no  fixed  relationship  with  the 
angle of attack while manoeuvring. 
1-10 Fig 6 Effect of Flap on Stalling Angle and Level Flight Stalling Attitude 
Stall (Flaps Down)
Stall (Flaps Up)
More
Nose-up
Attitude
Flatter
Attitude
α 
α 
α 
Lower
Higher
Stalling Angle
Stalling Angle
Full Flap (40°)
30°
20°
Flaps Up
) L
(C
ift
L
Angle of Attack
Revised Jul 18 
Page 5 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
Change in Pressure Distribution with Flap 
20.  All  types  of  flaps,  when  deployed,  change  the  pressure  distribution  across  the  wing.    Typical 
pressure distributions with flap deployed are shown in Fig 7 for plain and slotted flaps.  The slotted flap 
has a much greater intensity of loading on the flap itself. 
1-10 Fig 7 Change in Pressure Distribution with Flaps 
-5
With Slotted Flap
-4
-3
re
u
Flap
s
s
With
Hinge
re
Plain Flap
P -2
Plain
Wing
-1
LE
TE
1
Change in Pitching Moment with Flap 
21.  All  trailing  edge  flaps  produce  an  increased  nose-down  pitching  moment  due  to  the  change  in 
pressure  distribution  around  the  wing  flap.    Flaps,  when  lowered,  may  have  the  added  effect  of 
increasing the downwash at the tail.  The amount by which the pitching moment is changed resulting 
from  this  increase  in  downwash  depends  on  the  size  and  position  of  the  tail.    These  two  aspects  of 
change  in  pitching  moment  generally  oppose  each  other  and  on  whichever  aspect  is  dominant  will 
depend whether the trim change on lowering flap is nose-up or nose-down.  Leading edge flaps tend to 
reduce the nose-down pitching moment and reduce the wing stability near the stall. 
Lift/Drag Ratio 
22.   Although  lift  is  increased  by  lowering  flaps  there  is  also  an  increase  in  drag and proportionately 
the  drag  increase  is  much  greater  when  considered  at  angles  of  attack  about  those  giving  the  best 
lift/drag ratio.  This means that lowering flap almost invariably worsens the best lift/drag ratio. 
23.  For  a  typical  split  or  trailing  edge  flap,  as  soon  as  the  flap  starts  to  lower,  the  lift  and  drag  start 
increasing.  Assuming that the flap has an angular movement of 90°, for about the first 30° there is a 
steady rise in the CL; during the next 30° the CL continues to increase at a reduced rate and during the 
final part of the movement a further very small increase occurs. 
24.  In conjunction with the lift the drag also increases, but the rate of increase during the first 30° is 
small  compared  with  that  which  takes  place  during  the  remainder  of  the  movement,  the  final  30°
producing a very rapid increase in the rate at which the drag has been rising. 
25.  When flap is used for take-off or manoeuvring it should be set to the position recommended in the 
Aircrew Manual.  At this setting the lift/drag ratio is such that the maximum advantage is obtained for the 
minimum  drag  penalty.    For  landings,  however,  the  high  drag  of  the  fully  lowered  flap  is  useful  since  it 
permits  a  steeper  approach  without  the  speed  becoming  excessive  (ie  it  has  the  effect  of an airbrake).  
Revised Jul 18 
Page 6 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
The increased lift enables a lower approach speed to be used and the decreased stalling speed means 
that the touchdown is made at a lower speed.  The high drag has another advantage in that it causes a 
rapid deceleration during the period of float after rounding out and before touching down. 
Use of Flap for Take-Off 
26.  The  increased  lift  coefficient  when  the  flaps  are  lowered  shortens  the  take-off  run  provided  that 
the recommended amount of flap is used.  The flap angle for take-off is that for the best lift/drag ratio 
that  can  be  obtained  with  the  flaps  in  any  position  other  than  fully  up.    If  larger  amounts  of  flap  are 
used, although the lift is increased, the higher drag slows the rate of acceleration so that the take-off 
run, although perhaps shorter than with no flap, is not the shortest possible. 
27.  When the take-off is made at, or near, the maximum permissible weight, the flaps should invariably be 
set to the recommended take-off angle so that the maximum lifting effort can be obtained from the wing. 
28.  Raising the Flaps in Flight.  Shortly after the take-off, while the aircraft is accelerating and climbing 
slightly, the action of raising the flaps causes an immediate reduction in the lift coefficient and the aircraft 
loses height or sinks unless this is countered by an increase in the angle of attack.  If the angle of attack 
is  not  increased,  ie  if  the  pilot  makes  no  correcting  movement  with  the  control  column,  the  reduced  lift 
coefficient results in a loss of lift which causes the aircraft to lose height until it has accelerated to a higher 
air speed that counterbalances the effect of the reduced CL.  When the flaps are raised and the sinking 
effect is countered by an increased angle of attack, the attitude of the aircraft becomes noticeably more 
nose-up  as  the  angle  of  attack  is  increased.    The  more  efficient  the  flaps  the  greater  is  the  associated 
drop in lift coefficient and the larger the subsequent corrections that are needed to prevent loss of height.  
On  some  aircraft  it  is  recommended  that  the  flaps  should  be  raised  in  stages  so  as  to  reduce  the  CL
gradually and so avoid any marked and possibly exaggerated corrections.  This applies sometimes when 
aircraft are heavily loaded, particularly in the larger types of aircraft. 
Leading Edge Flap 
29.  The  effect  of  leading  edge  flaps  is,  as  with  other  flaps,  to  increase  the  CL  and  lower  the  stalling 
speed.  However, the fact that it is the leading edge and not the trailing edge that is drooped results in an 
increase in the stalling angle, and the level flight stalling attitude.  The difference is explained as before 
(Volume 1, Chapter 9, para 58, and para 19 of this chapter), by the fact that although the stalling angle 
measured with respect to the chord line joining the leading and trailing edges of the changed section may 
not  be  affected,  the  stalling  angle  is  increased  when  measured,  as  is  conventional,  with  respect  to  the 
chord  line  of  the  wing  with  the  flap  fully  raised.    Fig  8  illustrates  this  point.    Leading  edge  flaps  are 
invariably  used  in  conjunction  with  trailing  edge  flaps.    The  operation  of  the  leading  edge  flap  can  be 
controlled directly from the cockpit or it can be linked, for example, with the air speed measuring system 
so that the flaps droop when the speed falls below a certain minimum and vice versa. 
1-10 Fig 8 Effect of Leading Edge Flap on Stalling Angle 
Stall (Flap Down)
Stall (Flap Up)
Attitude in
Level Flight
more Nose-up
α+ α
α
Stalling Angle Higher
Revised Jul 18 
Page 7 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
30.   The  effect  of  leading  edge  flaps  is  similar  to  that  of  slats  except  that  the  stalling  angle  is  not 
increased as much.  The amount of increase in the CLmax is about the same in both cases.  The leading 
edge flap is sometimes referred to as a nose flap. 
Jet Flap 
31.  Jet flap is a natural extension of a slot blowing over trailing edge flaps for boundary layer control, 
using much higher quantities of air with a view to increasing the effective chord of the flap to produce 
so-called 'super circulations' about the wing. 
32.  The term jet flap implies that the gas efflux is directed to leave the wing trailing edge as a plane jet 
at an angle to the main stream so that an asymmetric flow pattern and circulation is generated about 
the aerofoil in a manner somewhat analogous to a large trailing edge flap.  By this means, the lift from 
the vertical component of the jet momentum is magnified several times by 'pressure lift' generated on 
the wing surface, while the sectional thrust lies between the corresponding horizontal component and 
the full jet momentum.  To facilitate variation of jet angle to the main stream direction, the air is usually 
ejected  from  a  slot  forward  of  the  trailing  edge,  over  a  small  flap  whose  angle  can  be  simply  varied 
(see Fig 9).  Such basic jet flap schemes essentially require the gas to be ducted through the wing and 
so  are  often  referred  to  as  'internal  flow'  systems.    Fig  10  illustrates  these,  and  the  basics  of  their 
'external flow' configurations. 
1-10 Fig 9 Jet Flap 
Centreline of Jet
tangential to
Nose of Flap
Hinge Line at 89%
Chord on Lower Surface
Some Jet Flap Systems 
Trailing Edge
Trailing Edge
Blowing
Flap Blowing
External Nozzle
External Nozzle
Under Wing
Above Wing
Revised Jul 18 
Page 8 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
Effect of Sweepback on Flap 
33.  The use of sweepback will reduce the effectiveness of trailing edge control surfaces and high lift 
devices.  A typical example of this effect is the application of a single slotted flap over the inboard 60% 
span  to  both  a  straight  wing  and  a  wing  with  35°  sweepback.    The  flap  applied  to  the  straight  wing 
produces an increase in the CLmax of approximately 50%.  The same type flap applied to the swept wing 
produces  an  increase  in  CLmax  of  approximately  20%.    The  reason  for  this  is  the  decrease  in  frontal 
area of flap with sweepback. 
Effect of Flap on Wing Tip Stalling 
34.  Lowering  flaps  may  either  increase  or  alleviate  any  tendency  towards  the  tip  stalling  of  swept 
wings.  When the flaps are lowered the increased downwash over the flaps and behind them induces a 
balancing upwash over the outer portions of the wing at high angles of attack and this upwash may be 
sufficient to increase the angle of attack at the tip to the stalling angle.  On the other hand, because of 
the lowered flaps, the higher suctions obtained over the inboard sections of the wing have the effect of 
restricting  the  outward  flow  of  the  boundary  layer  and  thus  a  beneficial  effect  is  obtained  on  wing  tip 
stalling tendencies.  The practical outcome of these opposing tendencies is dependent on the pressure 
configuration. 
BOUNDARY LAYER CONTROL 
General 
35.  Any  attempt  to  increase  the  lifting  effectiveness  of  a  given  wing  directly  and  fundamentally 
concerns the boundary layer.  If the boundary layer can be made to remain laminar and unseparated 
as  it  moves  over  the  wing,  then  not  only  is  the  lift  coefficient  increased  but  both  surface  friction  drag 
and form drag are reduced. 
36.  There  are  various  methods  of  controlling  the  boundary  layer  so  that  it  remains  attached  to  the 
aerofoil  surface  as  far  as  possible.    They  all  depend  on  the  principle  of  adding  kinetic  energy  to  the 
lower layers of the boundary layer. 
Boundary Layer Control by Suction 
37.  If enough suction could be applied through a series of slots or a porous area on the upper surface 
of  the  wing,  separation  of  the  boundary  layer  at  almost  all  angles  of  attack  could  be  prevented.  
However,  it has been found that the power required to draw off the entire boundary layer so that it is 
replaced by completely undisturbed air is so large that the entire output of a powerful engine would be 
required to accomplish this. 
38.  However,  even  moderate  amounts  of  suction  have  a  beneficial  effect  in  that  the  tendency  to 
separate  at  high  angles  of  attack  can  be  reduced.    The  effect  of  moderate  suction is to increase the 
strength and stability of the boundary layer. 
39.  The effect of the suction is to draw off the lower layer (the sub-layer) of the boundary layer, so that 
the upper part of the layer moves on to the surface of the wing.  The thickness of the boundary layer is 
thereby  reduced  and  also  its  speed  is  increased,  since  the  heavily  retarded  sub-layer  has  been 
replaced by faster moving air. 
Revised Jul 18 
Page 9 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
40.  The suction is effected either through a slot or series of slots in the wing surface or by having a 
porous  surface  over  the  area  in  which  suction  is  required.    These  devices  are  positioned  at  a  point 
where the thickening effect of the adverse gradient is becoming marked and not at the beginning of the 
adverse  gradient.    Generally,  suction  distributed  over  a  porous  area  has  a  better  effect  than  the 
concentrated effect through a slot. 
Boundary Layer Control by Blowing 
41.  When  air  is  ejected  at  high  speed  in  the  same  direction  as  the  boundary  layer  at  a  suitable  point 
close to the wing surface, the result is to speed up the retarded sub-layer and re-energize the complete 
boundary layer; again this enables it to penetrate further into the adverse gradient before separating. 
42.  Very high maximum lift coefficients can be obtained by combining boundary layer control with the 
use of flaps.  In this case the suction, or blowing, of air takes place near the hinge line of the flap.  An 
average CLmax, for a plain aerofoil is about 1.5, for the same aerofoil with a flap it may be increased to 
about  2.5;  when  boundary  layer  control  is  applied  in  the  form  of  blowing  or  suction  over  the  flap,  the 
CLmax  may  rise  to  as  high  as  5.    When  this  figure  is  put  into  the  lift  formula  under  a  given  set  of 
conditions it can be seen that the amount of lift obtained is greatly increased when compared with that 
from the plain aerofoil under the same conditions. 
1-10 Fig 10 Blown Flap 
43.  In  addition  to  the  use  of  boundary  layer  control  over  the  flaps  themselves,  it  can  be  used 
simultaneously  at  the  leading  edge.    In  this  way  even  higher  lift  coefficients  can  be  obtained;  the 
practical  limit  is  set,  in  the  conventional  fixed  or  rotating  wing  aircraft,  by  the  large  amount  of  power 
needed to obtain the suction or blowing which is necessary to achieve these high figures.  By the use 
of the maximum amount of boundary layer control, wind tunnel experiments on a full size swept-wing 
fighter have realized an increase in CLmax such that the normal 100 kt landing speed was reduced to 60 
kt.  This is evidence of the importance of the part that the boundary layer plays in aerodynamics. 
Vortex Generators 
44.  Vortex  generators  (VG)  can  either  take  the  form  of  metal  projections  from  the  wing  surface  or  of 
small jets of air issuing normal to the surface.  Both types work on the same principle of creating vortices 
which entrain the faster moving air near the top of the boundary layer down into the more stagnant layer 
near the surface thus transferring momentum which keeps the boundary layer attached further back on 
the wing.  An advantage of the air jet type is that they can be switched off for those stages of flight when 
they are not required and thus avoid the drag penalty.  There are many shapes for the metal projections, 
such as plain rectangular plates or aerofoil sections, the exact selection and positioning of which depends 
on  the  detailed  particular  requirement  of  the  designer.  When  properly  arranged,  VGs  can  improve  the 
performance and controllability of the aircraft, particularly at low speeds, in the climb and at high angles of 
attack.  In general, careful design selection can ensure that the increase in lift due to the generators can 
more than offset the extra drag they cause.  Examples of how designers use VGs and other devices to 
modify the flight characteristics of aircraft can be seen in the case of the Hawk T2. 
Revised Jul 18 
Page 10 of 12 


AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
a.  Hawk T2 VGs.   
The  'double  density'  vortex  generators  (VGs)  carried  on  the  Hawk  T2 
aircraft are attached at the 25% chord position and provide a means of mixing higher speed 
air into the boundary layer at transonic speeds.  The term 'double-density' refers to the span-
wise spacing which is half that seen on the T.Mk.1 aircraft.  The VG array serves to delay the 
onset  of  buffet  with  increasing  speed,  or  with  increasing  incidence  at  a  fixed  Mach  number, 
and helps to fix the position of the shock above the critical Mach number.  This ensures that in 
manoeuvring  flight  at  any  Mach  number,  the  tailplane  angle  per  'g'  characteristics  remain 
nominally  linear  up  to  a  manoeuvre  limiting  condition.    On  the  Hawk  T.Mk.1  aircraft  the 
tailplane angle per 'g' generally decreases at higher 'g' levels.  The VG array is sufficiently aft 
of the leading-edge so as to have no effect at low speed.
b.  Hawk T2 Side-mounted Unit Root Fin (SMURF).  
When the Hawk T1 was developed, it 
was found that with the flap down at low AOAs a situation could arise where the tailplane 
lacked the authority to raise the nose and the resultant downhill rush was referred to as 
"tobogganing" or "phantom dive".  To cure the problem on the T1, the flap vane was cut back 
to reduce the downwash at the tail.  When the next generation of Hawk was developed, the 
loss of lift caused by the cut back flap vane could no longer be tolerated and so an alternate 
means had to be found to prevent the tobogganing.  The problem of providing sufficient 
pitching moment control, flaps fully deflected and landing gear retracted, was solved by fitting 
fixed side-mounted strakes on the rear fuselage and parallel to aircraft datum.  In this position 
the tailplane leading edge is adjacent to the trailing edge of the strake when full back stick is 
applied.  When full, or almost full back stick is applied, the strakes create vortex flow over the 
tailplane lower surface, thus preserving the aerodynamic performance of the tailplane when a 
high down-load is required. 
1-10 Fig 11 – Hawk T2 Vortex Generators and SMURF Locations 
Revised Jul 18 
Page 11 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-10 - Lift Augmentation 
Deflected Slipstream 
45.  A  simple  and  practical  method  of  using  engines  to  assist  the  wing  in  the  creation  of  lift  is  to 
arrange  the  engine/wing  layout  so  that the wing is in the fan or propeller slipstream.  This, combined 
with  the  use  of  leading  edge  slats  and  slotted  extending  rear  flaps,  provides  a  reliable  high  lift 
coefficient solution for STOL aircraft.  A more extreme example involves the linking together of engines 
and synchronization of propellers.  The wings and flaps are in the slipstream of the engines and gain 
effectiveness by deflecting the slipstream downwards. 
SUMMARY 
Devices to Augment Lift 
46.  The chief devices used to augment CLmax are: 
a. 
Slats. 
b. 
Flaps. 
c. 
Boundary layer control. 
The effect of the slat is to prolong the lift curve by delaying the stall until a higher angle of attack; the 
effect of flap is to increase the lift by increasing the camber and the principle of boundary layer control 
is to add kinetic energy to the sub-layers of the boundary layer. 
47.  Since the slat is of use only at high angles of attack, at the normal angles its presence serves only 
to increase drag.  This disadvantage is overcome by making the slat movable so that when it is not in 
use it lies flush against the leading edge of the wing. 
48.  Flaps  may  be  on  the  leading  or  trailing  edge  and  many  aircraft  have  them  on  both.    Besides 
increasing the camber of the wing, many types of flap also increase the wing area.  Trailing edge flaps 
reduce the stalling angle; leading edge flaps increase the stalling angle. 
49.  The main methods of boundary layer control are: 
a. 
Blowing. 
b. 
Sucking. 
c. 
Vortex generators. 
Revised Jul 18 
Page 12 of 12 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
CHAPTER 11 - FLIGHT CONTROLS 
General Considerations 
1.
All aircraft have to be fitted with a control system that will enable the pilot to manoeuvre and trim 
the aircraft in flight about each of its three axes.   
2. 
The  aerodynamic  moments  required  to  rotate  the  aircraft  about  each  of  these  axes  are  usually 
produced  by  means  of  flap-type  control  surfaces  positioned  at  the  extremities  of  the  aircraft  so  that 
they have the longest possible moment arm about the CG. 
3. 
There are usually three separate control systems and three sets of control surfaces, namely: 
a. 
Rudder for control in yaw. 
b. 
Elevator for control in pitch. 
c. 
Ailerons for control in roll (the use of spoilers for control in roll is also discussed in this chapter). 
4. 
On some aircraft the effect of two of these controls is combined in a single set of control surfaces.  
Examples of such combinations include: 
a. 
Elevons.  Elevons combine the effects of ailerons and elevators. 
b. 
Ruddervator.    A  ruddervator  is  a  Vee  or  butterfly  tail,  combining  the  effects  of  rudder  and 
elevators. 
c. 
Tailerons.    Tailerons  are  slab  tail  surfaces  that  move  either  together,  as  pitch  control,  or 
independently for control in roll. 
5. 
It is desirable that each set of control surfaces should produce a moment only about the corresponding 
axis.    In practice, however, moments are often produced about the other axes as well, eg adverse yaw 
due to aileron deflection.  Some of the design methods used to compensate for these cross-effects are 
discussed in later paragraphs. 
Control Characteristics 
6. 
Control Power and Effectiveness The main function of a control is to allow the aircraft to fulfil 
its particular role.  This aspect is decided mainly by: 
a. 
Size and shape of the control. 
b. 
Deflection angle. 
c. 
Equivalent Air Speed 2 (EAS2). 
d. 
Moment arm (distance from CG). 
In practice, the size and shape of the control surface are fixed and, since the CG movement is small, 
the  moment  arm  is  virtually  constant.    The  only  variables  in  control  effectiveness  are  speed  and 
effective deflection angle. 
7. 
Control  Moment.    Consider  the  effect  of  deflecting  an  elevator  downwards,  the  angle  of  attack 
and  the  camber  of  the  tailplane  are  both  increased,  thereby  increasing  the  CL  value.    The  moment 
produced by the tail is the product of the change in lift (tail) × the moment arm to the CG (see Fig 1). 
Revised May 11   
Page 1 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
1-11 Fig 1 Effect of Elevator Deflection on the CL Curve 
dCL
C L
Deflection
Angle
CG
CP
RAF
C
Control
L
Down
dCL
Control Up
dCL
α
8. 
Effect  of  Speed.    The  aerodynamic  forces  produced  on  an  aerofoil  vary  as  the  square  of  the 
speed (see Volume 1, Chapter 2); it follows then, that for any given control deflection, the lift increment 
- and so the moment - will vary as the square of the speed, EAS2.  The deflection angle required to give 
an  attitude  change,  or  response,  is inversely  proportional  to  the  EAS2  .    To  the  pilot  this  means  that 
when  the  speed  is  reduced  by  half,  the  control  deflection  is  increased  fourfold  to  achieve  the  same 
result.  This is one of the symptoms of the level flight stall, erroneously referred to as 'sloppy controls'. 
9. 
Control  Forces.    When  a  control  surface  is  deflected,  eg  down  elevator,  the  aerodynamic  force 
produced by the control itself opposes the downwards motion.  A moment is thus produced about the 
control hinge line, and this must be overcome in order to maintain the position of the control.  The stick 
force  experienced  by  the  pilot  depends  upon  the  hinge  moment  and  the  mechanical  linkage  between 
the  stick  and  the  control  surface.    The  ratio  of  stick  movement  to  control  deflection  is  known  as  the 
stick-gearing, and is usually arranged so as to reduce the hinge moment. 
Aerodynamic Balance 
10.  If control surfaces are hinged at their leading edge, and allowed to trail from this position in flight, the 
forces required to change the angle on all except light and slow aircraft would be prohibitive.  To assist the 
pilot  to  move  the  controls  in  the  absence  of  powered  or  power-assisted  controls,  some  degree  of 
aerodynamic balance is required. 
11.  In  all  its  forms,  aerodynamic  balance  is  a  means  of  reducing  the  hinge  moment  and  thereby 
reducing  the  physical  effort  experienced  in  controlling  an  aircraft.    The  most  common  forms  of 
aerodynamic balance are: 
a. 
Horn balance. 
b. 
Inset hinge. 
c. 
Internal balance. 
d. 
Various types of tab balance. 
Revised May 11   
Page 2 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
12.  Horn Balance On most control surfaces, especially rudders and elevators, the area ahead of the 
hinge  is  concentrated  on  one  part  of  the  surface  in  the  form  of  a  horn  (see  Fig  2).    The  horn  thus 
produces a balancing moment ahead of the hinge-line.  In its effect the horn balance is similar to the 
inset hinge. 
1-11 Fig 2 Horn Balance 
Shielded Horn
Unshielded Horn
13.  Inset Hinge The most obvious way to reduce the hinge moment (see Fig 3a) is to set the hinge-
line inside the control surface thus reducing the moment arm.  The amount of inset is usually limited to 
20%  to  25%  of  the  chord  length,  this  ensures  that  the  CP  of  the  control  will  not  move  in  front  of  the 
hinge at large angles of control deflection (see Fig 3b). 
1-11 Fig 3 Hinge Moment and Inset Hinge 
F
F
Hinge
F
Hinge
Moment
Moment
Reduced
X
X
a  Hinge Moment = FX
b  Inset Hinge
14.  Over Balance.  Should the control CP move ahead of the hinge line, the hinge moment would assist 
the movement of the control and the control would then be over-balanced. 
15.  Internal  Balance.    Although  fairly  common  in  use,  this  form  of  aerodynamic  balance  is  not  very 
obvious because it is contained within the contour of the control.  When the control is moved there will be 
a  pressure  difference  between  upper  and  lower  surfaces.    This  difference  will  try  to  deflect  the  beak 
ahead  of  the  hinge-line  on  the  control  producing  a  partial  balancing  moment.    The  effectiveness  is 
controlled in some cases by venting air pressure above and below the beak (see Fig 4). 
1-11 Fig 4 Internal Balance 
Flexible Seal
Hinge Line
+VE
+VE
+
−VE
−VE
Beak
16.  Tab Balance.  This subject is fully covered in Volume 1,Chapter 12, Trimming and Balance Tabs. 
Revised May 11   
Page 3 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
Mass Balance - Flutter 
17.  Torsional Aileron Flutter.  This is caused by the wing twisting under loads imposed on it by the 
movement of the aileron.  Fig 5 shows the sequence for a half cycle, which is described as follows: 
a. 
The aileron is displaced slightly downwards, exerting an increased lifting force on the aileron 
hinge. 
b. 
The wing twists about the torsional axis (the trailing edge rising, taking the aileron up with it).  
The CG of the aileron is behind the hinge line; its inertia tends to make it lag behind, increasing 
aileron lift, and so increasing the twisting moment. 
1-11 Fig 5 Torsional Aileron Flutter 
Torsional or
a
Elastic Axis
CG
b
c
d
c. 
The  torsional  reaction  of  the  wing  has  arrested  the  twisting  motion  but  the  air  loads  on  the 
aileron,  the  stretch  of  its  control  circuit,  and  its  upward  momentum,  cause  it  to  overshoot  the 
neutral position, placing a down load on the trailing edge of the wing. 
d. 
The  energy  stored  in  the  twisted  wing  and  the  reversed  aerodynamic  load  of  the  aileron 
cause  the  wing  to  twist  in  the  opposite  direction.    The  cycle  is  then  repeated.    Torsional  aileron 
flutter  can  be  prevented  either  by  mass-balancing  the  ailerons  so  that  their  CG  is  on,  or  slightly 
ahead  of,  the  hinge  line,  or  by  making  the  controls  irreversible.    Both  methods  are  employed  in 
modern aircraft; those aircraft with fully powered controls and no manual reversion do not require 
mass-balancing; all other aircraft have their control surfaces mass-balanced. 
18.  Flexural Aileron Flutter.  Flexural aileron flutter is generally similar to torsional aileron flutter, but 
is  caused  by  the  movement  of  the  aileron  lagging  behind  the  rise  and  fall  of  the  outer  portion  of  the 
Revised May 11   
Page 4 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
wings  as  it  flexes,  thus  tending  to  increase  the  oscillation.    This  type  of  flutter  is prevented by mass-
balancing the aileron.  The positioning of the mass-balance weight is important; the nearer the wing tip, 
the smaller the weight required.  On many aircraft, the weight is distributed along the whole length of 
the  aileron  in  the  form  of  a  leading  edge  spar,  thus  increasing  the  stiffness  of  the  aileron  and 
preventing a concentrated weight starting torsional vibrations in the aileron itself. 
19.  Other  Control  Surfaces.    So  far  only  wing  flutter  has  been  discussed,  but  a  few  moments 
consideration  will  show  that  mass-balancing  must  be  applied  to  elevators  and  rudders  to  prevent  their 
inertia and the springiness of the fuselage starting similar troubles.  Mass-balancing is extremely critical; 
hence  to  avoid  upsetting  it,  the  painting  of  aircraft  markings  etc is  no  longer  allowed  on  any  control 
surface.  The danger of all forms of flutter is that the extent of each successive vibration is greater than its 
predecessor, so that in a second or two the structure may be bent beyond its elastic limit and fail. 
Control Requirements 
20.  The main considerations are outlined briefly below: 
a.
Control Forces If the stick forces are too light the pilot may overstress the aircraft, whereas 
if they are too heavy he will be unable to manoeuvre it.  The effort required must be related to the 
role of the aircraft and the flight envelope. 
b
Control  Movements.    If  the  control  movements  are  too  small  the  controls  will  be  too 
sensitive,  whereas  if  they  are  too  large  the  designer  will  have  difficulty  in  fitting  them  into  the 
restricted space of the cockpit. 
c.
Control  Harmony.    An  important  factor  in  the  pilot’s  assessment  of  the  overall  handling 
characteristics of an aircraft is the 'harmony' of the controls with respect to each other.  Since this 
factor  is  very  subjective  it  is  not  possible  to  lay  down  precise  quantitative  requirements.    One 
method often used is to arrange for the aileron, elevator and rudder forces to be in the ratio 1:2:4. 
Control Response 
21.  Ailerons.    Consider  the  effect  of  applying  aileron.    Deflection  of  the  controls  produces  a  rolling 
moment about the longitudinal axis and this moment is opposed by the aerodynamic damping in roll (the 
angle  of  attack  of  the  down-going  wing  is  increased  while  that  of  the  up-going  wing  is  decreased,  see
Volume  1,  Chapter  17).    The  greater  the  rate  of  roll,  the  greater  the  damping.    Eventually  the  rolling 
moment  produced  by  the  ailerons  will be exactly balanced by the damping moment and the aircraft will 
attain a steady rate of roll.  Usually the time taken to achieve the 'steady state' is very short, probably less 
than one second.  Thus, over most of the time that the ailerons are being used, they are giving a steady 
rate of roll response and this is known as steady state response.  The transient response is that which is 
experienced during the initiation period leading to a steady manoeuvre. 
22.  Rate versus Acceleration Control.  A conventionally-operated aileron is therefore described as a 
rate control, that is the aircraft responds at a steady rate of movement for almost all of the time.  The stick 
force required to initiate a manoeuvre may be less than, or greater than, the stick force required to sustain 
the  manoeuvre,  eg  rolling.    A  favourable  response  is usually assumed to be when the initiation force is 
slightly greater than the steady force required, the difference being up to 10%.  On some modern aircraft 
the  transient  response  time  to  aileron  deflection  is  increased.    By  the  time  the  steady  rate  of  roll  is 
obtained  the  aileron  is  being  taken off again.  In these circumstances the aileron control is producing a 
rate of roll response which is always increasing and it is then described as an acceleration control. 
Revised May 11   
Page 5 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
23.  Elevators.    When  the  elevators  are  used,  they  produce  a  pitching  moment  about  the  lateral  axis.  
The resulting pitching movement is opposed by the aerodynamic damping in pitch and by the longitudinal 
stability of the aircraft (see Volume 1, Chapter 17).  The response to the elevator is a steady state change 
in  angle  of  attack  with  no  transient  time,  that  is  a  steady  change  of  attitude.    Elevators  are  therefore 
described as a displacement control. 
24.  Rudders.  The yawing moment produced by rudder deflection is opposed by aerodynamic damping 
in yaw and by the direction of the aircraft.  The response to the rudder is a steady state of change of angle 
of  attack  on  the  keel  surfaces  of  the  aircraft,  with  no  transient  time.    The  rudder  control  has  a  similar 
response to the elevator and is therefore also described as a displacement control. 
Steady State Response 
25.  In Volume 1, Chapter 17, it is shown that stability opposes manoeuvre; more precisely, the steady 
state response to control deflection is greatly affected by the static stability.  This is easily seen when 
considering  the  response  to  rudder;  the  heavy  rudder  force  required  to  sustain  a  steady  yawing 
movement is a result of the strong directional static stability of most aircraft. 
26.  The  steady  state  response  to  controls  is  of  greater  importance  to  the  pilot  and  this  subject  is 
discussed in the following paragraphs. 
PRIMARY CONTROL SURFACES 
Elevators 
27.  The elevators are hinged to the rear spar of the tailplane and are connected to the control column 
so  that  forward  movement  of  the  column  moves  the  elevator  downwards  and  backward  movement 
moves  the  elevator  upwards.    When  the  control  column  is  moved  back  and  the  elevator  rises,  the 
effect  is  to  change  the  overall  tailplane/elevator  section  to  an  inverted  aerofoil  which  supplies  a 
downward  force  on  the  tail  of  the  aircraft  and,  as  seen  by  the  pilot,  raises  the  nose.    The  opposite 
occurs when a forward movement is made. 
28.  Elevators  are  normally  free  from  undesirable  characteristics,  but  large  stick  forces  may  be 
experienced on some aircraft if the aerodynamic balance of the elevators or the stability characteristics 
of  the  aircraft  are  at  fault.    The  tail  moment  arm  is  determined  by  the  position  of  CG,  and  to  retain 
satisfactory handling characteristics throughout the speed range, the CG position must be kept within a 
certain limited range.  If the CG moves too far forward, the aircraft becomes excessively stable and the 
pilot will run out of up-elevator before reaching the lowest speeds required. 
29.  Consider  an  aircraft  in  the  round-out  and  landing  where  longitudinal  static  stability  opposes  the 
nose-up  pitch.    The  downwash  angle  at  the  tail  is  much  reduced  by  the  ground  effect  thereby 
increasing the effective angle of attack at the tail.  This results in a reduced tail-down moment in pitch, 
therefore a greater elevator deflection angle is required to achieve the landing attitude than would be 
required  to  achieve  the  same  attitude  at  height.    A  forward  movement  of  the  CG  would  add  to  this 
problem by increasing the longitudinal stability. 
30.  Some  tailless  delta  aircraft  require  a  movement  aft  of  the  CG  (fuel  transfer)  to  ensure  that  the 
elevator movement is sufficient to achieve the landing attitude. 
Revised May 11   
Page 6 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
31.  Some light aircraft, notably civilian flying club types with a tricycle undercarriage have undersized 
elevators in order to make the aircraft 'unstallable'. 
Ailerons 
32.  It has been seen that the aileron is a rate control and the rate of roll builds up rapidly to a steady 
value  dictated  by  the  damping  in  roll  effect.  The value of the steady rate of roll produced by a given 
aileron  deflection  will  depend  upon  the  speed  and  altitude  at  which  the  aircraft  is  flying.    Additional 
effects due to aero-elasticity and compressibility may be present and will modify the roll response. 
33.  Effect of Altitude.  In a steady state of roll the rolling force and the damping in roll force are balanced.  
The rolling force is caused by the change in lift due to aileron deflection and is proportional to the amount of 
aileron deflection and to EAS.  The damping force is due to the change in lift caused by the increase in angle 
of attack of the downgoing wing and the decrease in angle of attack of the upgoing wing.  The value of the 
damping angle of attack can be found by the vector addition of the TAS and the rolling velocity, as illustrated 
in Fig 6.  It can be seen that for a constant damping angle of attack the rolling force, and therefore rate of roll, 
will increase in direct proportion to TAS.  When an aircraft is climbed at a constant EAS the rate of roll for a 
given aileron deflection therefore increases because TAS increases with altitude. 
1-11 Fig 6 Damping in Roll Effect - Downgoing Wing 
v
Rolling
Velocity
d α
α EAS2
RAF
34.  Effect of Forward Speed.  It has been shown that the rolling force is proportional to the amount 
of aileron deflection and to EAS.  It follows that rate of roll increases in proportion to EAS. 
35.  Aero-elastic  Distortion.    Ailerons  are  located  towards  the  wing  tips  by  the  necessity,  in  most 
aircraft, to utilize trailing edge flaps for landing and take-off.  This may cause the wing to twist when the 
ailerons  are  deflected  and  lead  to  an  effect  known  as  'aileron  reversal'.    It must  be  recognized  that 
aero-elastic distortion of the airframe may affect stability and control in pitch and yaw as well as in roll.  
Because the wings are usually the least rigid part of the airframe however, aileron reversal is important 
and reduces the ultimate rate of roll available at high forward speeds. 
36.  Wing  Twisting.    In  Fig  7,  it  can  be  seen  that  deflection  of  the  aileron  down  produces  a  twisting 
moment  about  the  torsional  axis  of  the  wing.    The  torsional  rigidity  of  the  wing  depends  on  the  wing 
structure  but  will  normally  be  strong  enough  to  prevent  any  distortion  at  low  speeds.    Aileron  power, 
however,  increases  as  the  square  of  the  forward  speed,  whereas  the  torsional  stiffness  in  the  wing 
structure is constant with speed.  At high speeds therefore, the twisting moment due to aileron deflection 
overcomes the torsional rigidity of the wing and produces a change in incidence which reduces the rate of 
roll.  On the rising wing, illustrated in Fig 7, the incidence is reduced whereas on the downgoing wing the 
effect is to increase the incidence.  A flight speed may be reached where the increment of CL produced 
by deflecting aileron is completely nullified by the wing twisting in the opposite sense.  At this speed, called 
reversal speed, the lift from each wing is the same in spite of aileron deflection, and the rate of roll will be 
zero.  At still higher speeds the direction of roll will be opposite to that applied by the pilot.  Reversal speed 
is  normally  outside  the  flight  envelope  of  the  aircraft  but  the  effects  of  aero-elastic  distortion  may  be 
apparent as a reduction in roll rate at the higher forward speeds. 
Revised May 11   
Page 7 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
1-11 Fig 7 Aero-elastic Distortion 
Reduction in CL
due to Wing Twist
Wing
Twist
Torsional Axis
37.  Aileron Response at Low Speeds.  Deflecting an aileron down produces an effective increase in 
camber and a small reduction in the critical angle of attack of that part of the wing to which the aileron 
is attached (usually the wing tip).  It is therefore important that the wings should stall progressively from 
root to tip in order to retain aileron effectiveness at the stall.  Rectangular straight wings are not much 
of a problem because washout is usually incorporated to reduce vortex drag.  Swept wings, however, 
are  particularly  prone  to  tip  stall  and  design  features  may  have  to  be  incorporated  to  retain  lateral 
control  at  low  speeds.    Some  of  these  aspects  were  discussed  in  Volume 1,  Chapter  9.    Loss  of 
effectiveness  of  the  down-going  aileron  due  to  tip  stall  will  not  necessarily  result  in  a  reversal  in  the 
direction  of  roll  (i.e.  wing-drop).    The  up-going  aileron  will  usually  retain  its  effectiveness  and 
produce  a  lesser  but  conventional  response.    The  factor  which  has  the  most  significant  effect  on 
aircraft  response  at  high  α  is  the  damping  in  roll  effect.    It  has  been  seen  that  when  the  aircraft  is 
rolling,  the  angle  of  attack  of  the  down-going  wing  is  increased  while  that  of  the  rising  wing  is 
decreased.    If  the  aircraft  is  close  to  the  stall  the  damping  effect  is  reversed  and  the  change  in  the 
rolling moments assists the rotation, see Fig 8.  This leads to the phenomenon known as 'autorotation'. 
1-11 Fig 8 Damping in Roll 
Roll
Roll
Autorotation
Damping
CL
α
38.  Adverse  Aileron  Yaw.    Unless  they  are  carefully  designed  aerodynamically,  the  ailerons  will 
materially  alter  the  drag  force  on  the  wing  in  addition  to  the  desired  change  in  lift  force.    When  an 
aileron  is  deflected  downwards  both  the  vortex  drag  and  the  boundary  layer  drag  are  increased.    On 
Revised May 11   
Page 8 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
the aileron-up wing, however, the vortex drag is decreased, though the boundary layer drag may be still 
increased.    The  changes  in  the  drag  forces  are  such  as  to  produce  a  yawing  moment  causing  the 
aircraft  to  yaw  in  the  opposite  sense  to  the  applied  roll.    Adverse  yaw  is  produced  whenever  the 
ailerons  are  deflected  but  the  effect  is  usually  reduced  by  incorporating  one  or  more  of  the  following 
design features: 
a.
Differential Ailerons.  For a given stick deflection the up-going aileron is deflected through a 
larger angle than the down-going aileron thus reducing the difference in drag and the adverse yaw. 
b.
Frise-type Ailerons.  The nose of the upgoing aileron protrudes into the airstream below the 
wing  to  increase  the  drag  on  the  down-going  wing.    This  arrangement  has  the  additional 
advantage that it assists the aerodynamic balancing of the ailerons. 
c.
Coupling  of  Controls.    A  method  used  in  some  modern  aircraft  to  overcome  the  adverse 
yaw is to gear the rudder to the ailerons so that when the ailerons are deflected the rudder moves 
to produce an appropriate yawing moment. 
d.
Spoilers.  On some aircraft, spoilers in the form of flat plates at right angles to the airflow are 
used to increase the drag of the down-going wing.  Spoilers are sometimes the only form of lateral 
control  used  at  high  speeds  (eg  the  ailerons  are  used  at  low  speeds,  where  spoilers  are  least 
effective,  but  spoilers  alone  at  high  speeds).    Other  uses  of  spoilers  are  as  airbrakes,  when  the 
spoilers of both wings operate together, or as lift dumpers, when the aircraft has landed.  They are 
usually hydraulically operated. 
39.  Cross-coupling Response.  When an aircraft is rolling the increased angle of attack of the down-
going  wing  increases  both  the  lift  and  the  drag,  whereas  on  the  up-going  wing  the  lift  and  drag  are 
reduced.  The lift and drag forces are by definition, however, perpendicular and parallel respectively to the 
local  relative  airflow  on  each  wing.    The  projections  of  the  lift  forces  onto  the  yawing  plane  produce  a 
yawing moment towards the rising wing (ie an adverse yaw), as shown in Fig 9a.  This is partially offset 
by the projections of the drag forces onto the yawing plane which usually produce a yaw in the same 
direction as roll (Fig 9b).  For a given rate of roll the change in angle of attack, δα, will be greatest at 
low forward speeds.  The adverse yaw due to roll is therefore greatest at low speed and may eventually 
become favourable at some high forward speed. 
1-11 Fig 9 Cross-coupling Response 
Fig 9a Adverse Yaw 
Fig 9b Favourable Yaw 
Adverse Yaw
Adverse Yaw
Due to Drag
Due to Lift
Down
Up
L
Down
Up
L
L
L
D
D
V
V
V
V
Down-going Wing
Up-going Wing
Down-going Wing
Up-going Wing
40.  Response  to  Sideslip.    The  lateral  response  of  the  aircraft  to  sideslip  is  usually  called  the 
'dihedral  effect'  and  produces  a  rolling  moment  opposite  to  the  direction  of  sideslip.    In  most 
conventional aircraft, this contribution is dominated by the yaw due to sideslip. 
Revised May 11   
Page 9 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
41.  Overbalance.    This  may  occur  at  any  airspeed  on  some  aircraft  not  fitted  with  power-operated 
controls, but usually only at the larger control angles.  It is shown by a progressive decrease, instead of an 
increase, of the aileron stick force as the control column is moved, ie a tendency for the ailerons to move 
to their full travel of their own accord.  In some cases this may happen fairly suddenly. 
42.  Snatch.  Snatching usually occurs at or near the stall, or at high Mach numbers.  It is caused by a 
continuous and rapid shifting of the centre of pressure of the aileron due to the disruption of the airflow 
over the surface, resulting in a snatching or jerking of the control, which may be violent. 
The Rudder 
43.  The rudder, which is hinged to the rear of the fin, is connected to the rudder bar.  Pushing the right 
pedal  will  cause  the  rudder  to  move  to  the  right,  and  in  so  doing  alter  the  aerofoil  section  of  the 
fin/rudder combination.  This provides an aerodynamic force on the rear of the aircraft which will move 
it to the left or, as the pilot sees it, the nose will yaw to starboard.  Rudder effectiveness increases with 
speed;  whereas  a  large  deflection  may  be  required  at  low  speed  to  yaw  a  given  amount,  a  much 
smaller  deflection  is  needed  at  the  highest  speeds.    The  steady  response  of  an  aircraft  to  rudder 
deflection is complicated by the fact that yaw results in roll, and rudder deflection may also cause the 
aircraft to roll. 
44.  Damping in Yaw Just as there is damping in pitch and roll, so also is the aircraft damped in yaw.  
The effect is similar in principle to damping in roll, in that the yawing velocity produces a change in the 
angle of attack of the keel surfaces.  Keel surface moments fore and aft of the CG oppose the yawing 
movement, and these moments exist only while the aircraft is yawing.  For simplicity, Fig 10 shows the 
damping effect on the fin and rudder.  The wings also produce a small damping in yaw effect because 
the outer wing moves faster than the inner wing and therefore produces more drag.  The damping in 
yaw effect decreases with altitude for the reasons stated in para 33. 
1-11 Fig 10 Damping in Yaw 
Aircraft
Yawing
Effecti
to Port
ve RAF
Yaw
Component
Damping in
Yaw Effect
45.  Roll  Due  to  Rudder  Deflection.    The  rudder  control  inevitably  produces  a  rolling  moment 
because the resultant control force acts above the longitudinal axis of the aircraft.  Usually this effect is 
small but on aircraft with a tall fin and rudder it can be important and is sometimes eliminated by linking 
up the rudder and aileron circuits. 
46.  Cross-coupling Response.  The response of the aircraft in roll to rudder deflection arises from 
the  resulting  yawing  motion  and/or  sideslip.    The  roll  due  to  sideslip,  ie  the  dihedral  effect,  has  a 
powerful cross-coupling effect, particularly on swept-wing aircraft.  Rudder control is often used to pick 
Revised May 11   
Page 10 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
up a dropped wing at low speeds in preference to using large aileron deflection.  If the starboard wing 
drops and port rudder is applied, the aircraft sideslips to starboard and the dihedral effect produces a 
rolling moment tending to raise the lower wing.  The roll due to yaw (ie rate of yaw) arises because the 
outer  wing  moves  faster  than  the  inner  wing  and  therefore  produces  more  lift.    The  roll  with  yaw  is 
greatest at high angles of attack/low speeds. 
47.  Rudder  Overbalance.    A  fault  which  may  be  encountered  is  overbalance.    This  is  indicated  by  a 
progressive lessening of the foot loads with increasing rudder displacement.  If, owing to a weakness in 
design, the aerodynamic balance is too great, it will become increasingly effective as the rudder is moved 
and may eventually cause it to lock hard over when the centre of pressure moves in front of the hinge-
line.  At large angles of yaw (sideslip), the fin may stall causing a sudden deterioration in rudder control 
and directional stability and, at the same time, rudder overbalance.  If this is encountered, the yaw must 
be  reduced  by  banking  in  the  direction  in  which  the  aircraft  is  yawing  and  not  by  stabilizing  the  yaw  by 
instinctively applying opposite bank.  The correct action reduces the sideslip by converting the motion into 
a  turn  from  which  recovery  is  possible  once  the  fin  has  become  unstalled.    Sometimes  slight  apparent 
rudder overbalance may be noticed under asymmetric power when large amounts of rudder trim are used 
to decrease the foot load on the rudder bar.  If this happens the amount of rudder trim should be reduced. 
48.  Rudder Tramping.  On some aircraft the onset of rudder overbalance may be shown by 'tramping', 
or a fluctuation in the rudder foot loads.  If the yaw is further increased overbalance may occur. 
49. Elevons  and  Tailerons.    Some  aircraft  with  swept-back  wings  combine  the  function  of  the 
elevators and ailerons in control surfaces at the wing tips called elevons, or if tail mounted, tailerons.  
These are designed so that a backward movement of the control column will raise both surfaces and 
so, acting as elevators, they will raise the nose.  If the control column is held back and also moved to 
one  side,  the  surfaces  will  remain  in  a  raised  position  and  so  continue  acting  as  elevators,  but  the 
angular position of each surface changes so that the lift at each wing tip is adjusted to cause a rolling 
moment in the direction that the control column has been moved.  If the control column is held central 
and then moved to one side the surfaces act as normal ailerons; a subsequent forward movement of 
the control column will lower both surfaces, maintaining the angular difference caused by the sideways 
movement of the control column, and the nose will drop while the aircraft is rolling. 
The All-moving (Slab) or Flying Tail 
50.  At  high  Mach  numbers,  the  elevator  loses  much  of  its  effectiveness  for  reasons  given  in  the 
chapters  on  high-speed  flight.    This  loss  of  effectiveness  is  the  cause  of  a  serious  decrease  in  the 
accuracy  with  which  the  flight  path  can  be  controlled  and  in  the  manoeuvrability.    To  overcome  this 
deficiency, the tailplane can be made to serve as the primary control surface for control in the looping 
plane.  When this is done some form of power assistance is usually employed to overcome the higher 
forces  needed  to  move  the  tailplane  during  flight.    With  the  flying  tail,  full  and  accurate  control  is 
retained  at  all  Mach  numbers  and  speeds.    Forward  movement  of  the  control  column  increases  the 
incidence of the tailplane to obtain the upward force necessary to lower the nose.  On some aircraft the 
elevator is retained and is linked to the tailplane in such a way that movement of the tailplane causes 
the elevator, by virtue of its linkage, to move in the usual direction to assist the action of the tailplane.  
When no elevator is used the whole is known as a slab tailplane. 
The Variable Incidence (VI) Tail 
51.  This is used on some aircraft as an alternative, and sometimes in addition, to trimming tabs.  By 
suitably  varying  the  incidence  of  the  tailplane  any  out-of-trim  forces  can  be  balanced  as  necessary.  
Revised May 11   
Page 11 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
The VI tailplane is generally more effective than tabs at high Mach numbers.  Its method of operation is 
usually electrical; the control being a switch which is spring-loaded to a central off position. 
The Vee Tail 
52.  The Vee, or butterfly, tail is an arrangement whereby two surfaces, forming a high dihedral angle, 
perform the functions of the conventional horizontal and vertical tail surfaces.  The effective horizontal 
tail area is the area of both surfaces projected on the horizontal plane.  The effective vertical tail area is 
the  area  of  both  surfaces  projected  on  the  vertical  plane.    As  the  lift  force  from  each  surface  acts 
normal  to  its  span  line,  the  vertical  component  acts  to  provide  a  pitching  moment, and the horizontal 
component acts to produce a yawing moment.  The two moveable portions, therefore, are capable of 
performing  the  functions  of  both  the  elevator  and  the  rudder.    They  are  sometimes  called  a 
ruddervator.  It can be seen that if both surfaces are moved up or down an equal amount, the net result 
is  a  change  in  the  vertical  force  component  only,  and  a  pitching  moment  only  results.    If  the  two 
surfaces are moved equal amounts in opposite directions, the result is a change in the net horizontal 
force  component  only,  and  a  yawing  moment  only  results.    Any  combination  of  the  two  movements 
results in combined pitching and yawing moments. 
53.  The elevator control in the cockpit is connected to give an equal deflection in the same direction.  
The  rudder  control  is  connected  to  give  equal  deflections  in  opposite  directions  to  the  two  surfaces.  
The  two  cockpit  controls  are  connected  to  the  two  surfaces  through  a  differential  linkage  or  gearing 
arrangement.  Thus the Vee tail performs the horizontal and vertical tail control functions with normal 
cockpit controls.  Some of the advantages claimed are: 
a. 
Weight saving - less total tail surface required. 
b. 
Performance  gain  -  less  total  tail  surface  and  lower  interference  drag,  as  only  two  surfaces 
intersect the fuselage. 
c. 
Removal of the tail from the wing wake and downwash. 
d. 
Better spin recovery, as the unblanketed portion of the tail acts both to pitch the aircraft down 
and to stop the rotation. 
AIRBRAKES 
General 
54.  Jet engine aircraft, having no propeller drag when the engine is throttled back, have comparatively 
low drag and lose speed only slowly.  Further, having eventually reached the desired lower speed, any 
slight downward flight path causes an immediate and appreciable increase in speed. 
55.  An  'air  brake'  is  an  integral  part  of  the  airframe  and can be extended to increase the drag of an 
aircraft  at  will,  enabling  the  speed  to  be  decreased  more  rapidly,  or  regulated  during  a  descent.    On 
some aircraft the undercarriage may be lowered partially, or completely, to obtain the same effect. 
56.  Although the area of the air brakes on a typical fighter is small, considerable drag is produced 
at high speeds.  For example, an air brake with an assumed CD of 1.2 and a total area of about 2.5 
sq ft produces a drag of about 5,700 lb when opened at 500 kt at sea level.  This figure is indicative 
of the large loads imposed on an aircraft when flying at high indicated speeds.  The effectiveness of 
an  air  brake  varies  as  the  square  of  the  speed  and  therefore  at  about  120  kt  the  same  air  brake 
gives  a  drag  of  about  330  lb  only.    The  decelerating  effect  of  air  brakes  can  be  seen  from  figures 
Revised May 11   
Page 12 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
obtained  from  an  aircraft  flying  at  400  kt  at  low altitude.  With the air brakes in, and power off, the 
aircraft takes 2 min 58 sec to slow to 150 kt; with air brakes out the time is reduced to 1 min 27 sec. 
57.  Ideally,  air  brakes  should  not  produce  any  effect  other  than  drag,  although  on  some  American 
aircraft the air brakes are designed to produce an automatic nose-up change of trim when opened.  In 
practice,  however,  the  opening  of  most  air  brakes  is  accompanied  by  some  degree  of  buffet,  with  or 
without  a  change  of  trim;  the  strength  of  these  adverse  effects  is  usually  greatest  at  high  speeds, 
becoming less as the speed decreases. 
Effect of Altitude on Effectiveness 
58.  Air  brakes  derive  their  usefulness  from  the  fact  that  they  are  subjected  to  dynamic  pressures  (the 
½ρV2 effect) and so provide drag in proportion to their area.  At high altitudes therefore, the effectiveness 
of  all  air  brakes  is  much  reduced  since the drag, which is low in proportion to the TAS, takes longer to 
achieve a required loss in speed, ie the rate of deceleration is reduced. 
59.  An air brake which develops, say, 2,000 lb drag at a stated IAS/TAS at sea level will develop the 
same drag at the same IAS at high altitude; but whereas the TAS at sea level was equal to the IAS, the 
TAS at altitude may be as much as 2 or more times the IAS.  Since the drag is required to decrease 
the kinetic energy, which is proportional to the TAS, it is apparent that the decelerating effect of the air 
brake (proportional to the IAS) is decreased, eg the time taken to decelerate over a given range of IAS 
will  be  doubled  at  40,000  ft compared to that at sea level since the IAS at 40,000 ft is about half the 
TAS. 
BRAKE PARACHUTES 
General 
60.  Brake parachutes are used to supplement the aircraft’s wheel brakes and so reduce the length of 
the landing run.  In general, they produce enough drag to cause a steady rate of deceleration varying 
from  about  0.25g  to 0.35g,  depending  upon  the  particular  installation.    Below  around 70 kt, the drag, 
varying  as  the  square  of  the  speed,  falls  to  a  much  lower  figure  and  the  wheel  brakes  become  the 
primary means of deceleration. 
Parachute Diameter 
61.  The diameter of the parachute depends on the weight and size of the aircraft.  For aircraft with a 
landing  weight  of  around  5,000  kg,  the  'flying'  diameter  of  the  parachute  is  from  2  m  to  3  m.    At  a 
touchdown speed of 130 kt, this gives a drag of about 1,250 kg and a deceleration rate of about 0.25g. 
62.  For  large  aircraft,  with  landing  weights  around  50,000  kg,  the  flying  diameter  of  the  brake 
parachute  is  about  11  m.    This  produces,  at  a  touchdown  speed  of  about  150  kt,  a  drag  of  some 
25,000 kg and an initial rate of deceleration of about 0.35g. 
Crosswind Landings 
63.  When used in a crosswind landing, the parachute aligns itself along the resultant between the vectors 
representing the forward speed of the aircraft and the 90° component of the crosswind vector (see Fig 11).  
This  causes  a  yawing  moment  which  increases  the  weather-cock  characteristics  of  the  aircraft.    For  90°
Revised May 11   
Page 13 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
crosswind components of up to 20 kt, the effect is small and can easily be countered by the pilot; at higher 
crosswind  speeds  it  becomes  progressively  more  difficult  to  keep  the  aircraft  straight.    As  the  aircraft 
decelerates,  the  flying  angle  between  the  parachute  and  the  centre  line  of  the  aircraft  increases,  but  the 
retarding force of the parachute will decrease with the reduction in V2 .  Thus the overall effect of decreasing 
speed is a reduction in the weathercocking tendency due to the brake parachute. 
1-11 Fig 11 Effect of Crosswind When Using a Brake Parachute 
Yawing Force
on Aircraft
Forward
Speed
90  
o Crosswind
Component
64.  Any  difficulty  in  directional  control  tends  to  occur  fairly  early  in  the  landing  run,  although  not 
necessarily at the highest speed; this is mainly due to the very small flying angle and the relatively high 
rudder  effectiveness.Tyre  sideslip  due  to  the  side  load  imposed  by  the  parachute  may  be  another 
significant factor. 
Jettisoning of Brake Parachute 
65.  At  any  time  after  the  parachute  has  been  streamed,  it  can  be  disconnected  or  jettisoned  by  the 
pilot in an emergency.  It is also usual to jettison the parachute at the end of the landing run. 
Inadvertent Streaming in Flight 
66.  If the parachute is opened inadvertently, at high speed, the opening load causes failure of a weak 
link  and  the  parachute  breaks  away  from  the  aircraft.    If  opened  too  early  on  the  approach  it  can  be 
disconnected by the pilot. 
Revised May 11   
Page 14 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
SUMMARY 
Flight Controls 
67.  The main control surfaces are: 
a. 
Rudder. 
b. 
Elevator. 
c. 
Aileron. 
On some aircraft, the effect of two of these controls is combined in a single set of control surfaces, e.g. 
elevons, ruddervator and tailerons (tail mounted 'elevons'). 
68.  Control power and effectiveness is decided by: 
a. 
Size and shape of the control. 
b. 
Deflection angle. 
c. 
EAS2. 
d. 
Moment arm. 
69.  Aerodynamic balance is a means of reducing the hinge moment and thereby reducing the physical 
effort experienced in controlling an aircraft.  The most common forms of aerodynamic balance are: 
a. 
Horn balance. 
b. 
Inset hinge. 
c. 
Internal balance. 
d. 
Various types of tab balance. 
70.  Flutter can be prevented by: 
a. 
Mass balancing. 
b. 
Increasing structural rigidity. 
c. 
Irreversible controls. 
71.  The main considerations for control requirements are: 
a. 
Control force. 
b. 
Control movement. 
c. 
Control harmony. 
72.  Different  control  responses  are  given  different  terms.    The  ailerons  are  normally  described  as  a 
rate control, and the rudder and elevator as displacement controls. 
73.  Methods of overcoming adverse aileron yaw are: 
a. 
Differential ailerons. 
b. 
Frise ailerons. 
c. 
Control coupling. 
d. 
Spoilers. 
Revised May 11   
Page 15 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-11 - Flight Controls 
74.  Some advantages claimed for the Vee tail are: 
a. 
Weight saving. 
b. 
Performance gain. 
c. 
Removal of the tail from the wing wake and downwash. 
d. 
Better spin recovery. 
Revised May 11   
Page 16 of 16 

AP3456 - 1-12 - Trimming and Balance Tabs 
CHAPTER 12- TRIMMING AND BALANCE TABS 
Introduction 
1.
The  previous  chapter  covered  flight  controls  and  the  methods  by  which  these  can  be  balanced.  
This  chapter  is  really  an  extension  of  the  last,  but  deals  mainly  with  tabs,  discussing  the  more 
important types and their method of operation. 
2. 
A tab is the small, hinged, surface forming part of the trailing edge of a primary control surface.  The 
principle of operation is described below and shown in Fig 1. 
1-12 Fig 1 Principle of the Tab 
a  Tab Neutral
CP
d
Pilot Holds Elevator in Required
Position for Level Flight with Force = CP   d
b  Tab Trimmed
CP
d
No Stick Force Since CP    d = cp   D
D
cp
3. 
Assume  that  the  aircraft  is  slightly  tail  heavy  and  therefore  requires  a  constant  push  force  to 
maintain  level  flight  (Fig  1a).    If  the  position  of  the  elevator  trimming tab is then adjusted so that it is 
moved upwards, the result is a download on the elevator trailing edge, which moves the elevator down 
(Fig  1b).    The  downward  movement  continues  until  the  downward  moment  of  the  tab  is  balanced  by 
the upward moment of the elevator. 
Fixed Tabs 
4. 
Fixed  tabs  can  only  be  adjusted  on  the  ground  and  their  setting  determined  by  one  or  more  test 
flights.  Thus, under conditions of no stick force, the trailing position of the control surfaces is governed 
by  the  position  of  the  tab  (see  Fig  2a).    This  type  of  tab is used on the ailerons of some aircraft and 
sometimes on the rudders of single engine jet aircraft. 
5. 
An early form of fixed tab, sometimes still used on light aircraft, consists of small strips of cord doped 
above or below the trailing edge of the control surface.  A strip of cord above the trailing edge deflects the 
surface downwards, the amount of deflection depending on the length and diameter of the cord used. 
Trim Tabs 
6. 
Trim  tabs  are  used  to  trim  out  any  holding  forces  encountered  in  flight,  such  as  those  occurring 
after  a  change  of  power  or  speed,  or  when  the  CG  position  changes  owing  to  fuel  consumption, 
dropping bombs or expending ammunition.  Whenever the speed, power or CG position is altered, one 
at a time or in combination, the changed trim of the aircraft necessitates resetting of the tabs. 
revised Mar 10 
 
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 - 1-12 - Trimming and Balance Tabs 
7. 
Operation  of  Trim  Tabs.    The  tabs  are  pilot  operated,  either  by  handwheels  in  the  cockpit  or 
electrically  (see  Fig  2b).    The  handwheels  always  operate  in  the  natural  sense,  ie  the  top  of  the 
elevator trim handwheel is moved forward to produce a nose-down trim change and vice versa.  Tabs 
may  also  be  electrically  operated  by  small  switches  spring-loaded  to  the  central  (off)  position;  to 
eliminate  a  holding  force  the  pilot  moves  the  appropriate  switch  in  the  same  direction  as  the  holding 
force until the stick load is zero, then releases the switch. 
8. 
Variation  of  Tab  Effectiveness  with  Speed.    The  sensitivity  and  power  of  a  trim  tab  varies  with 
speed in the same way as the control surfaces.  At low speeds large tab deflections may be required to 
trim an aircraft, but at high speeds small movements have a marked and immediate effect on the trim. 
1-12 Fig 2 Fixed and Trim Tabs 
a  Fixed Tab
Fixed Tab
Linkage to
Adjustable on
Control Column
the Ground
b  Trim Tab
To Trim
Wheel
Hinged Tab can be 
To Control Column
trimmed by Pilot
Other Methods of Trimming 
9. 
Spring-Bias Trimmers.  Trimming is also done on some light aircraft by adjusting the tension in 
springs which are connected directly to the pilot’s controls.  Thus an adjustment in the spring tension 
will bias the control column or rudder bar in any desired position. 
10.  Variable  Incidence  Tailplanes  and  All  Flying  (Slab)  Tailplanes.    These  are  used  to  counter 
large changes in trim in the pitching plane.  They are described in Volume 1, Chapter 11. 
11.  Variable  Incidence  Wings.    Strictly  speaking,  the  variable  incidence  wing  is  not  a  trimming 
device at all but a means of altering the attitude of the aircraft in flight.  On swept-wing aircraft which 
utilize  high  lift  devices  on  the  leading  edge,  the  net  effect  is  to  increase  the  stalling  angle  (see 
Volume 1,  Chapter 10).  A disadvantage of this is the nose high attitude of the aircraft in the take-off 
and  landing  configuration,  with  attendant  poor  cockpit  vision  and  the  requirement  for  long 
undercarriages.    The  variable  incidence  wing  overcomes  this  disadvantage  by  the  use  of  a  variable 
rigging  angle  of  incidence,  controllable  by  the  pilot,  which  allows  a  large  angle  of  attack  on  the  wing 
without a nose high attitude to the fuselage. 
revised Mar 10 
 
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 - 1-12 - Trimming and Balance Tabs 
BALANCE TABS 
General 
12.  Balance  tabs  are  used  to  balance  or  partially  balance  the  aerodynamic  load  on  the  control 
surfaces,  thus  reducing  stick  loads.    In  its  basic  form,  this  type  of  tab  is  not  under  the  control  of  the 
pilot,  but  the  tab  angle  is  changed  automatically  whenever  the  main  control  surface  is  moved.    The 
cross-sectional shape of the control surface may have an important effect on aerodynamic balance.  A 
convex  shape  can  tend  towards  overbalance  whilst  a  concave  shape  ('hollow-ground')  can  have  the 
opposite effect.  The latter shape is sometimes achieved by fitting narrow flat plates to the trailing edge 
of the tab to give the 'hollow-ground' effect. 
Geared Tabs 
13.  The geared tab is linked with the fixed surface ahead of the control surface and is geared to move 
at a set ratio, in the opposite direction to the movement of the control (Fig 3a).  Since the tab moves in 
the  opposite  sense  to  the  control,  it  produces  a  small  loss  of  lift,  but  the  reduction  in  control 
effectiveness is usually negligible. 
1-12 Fig 3 Geared Tabs 
a  Balance Tab
Fixed Link
To Control
     Column
b  Anti-balance Tab
14.  It  is  sometimes  necessary  to  incorporate  a  large  horn  balance to improve the stick-free stability, 
and it may then be necessary to fit an anti-balance tab to increase the stick force (Fig 3b). 
Servo Tabs 
15.  By  connecting  the  tabs  directly  to  the  cockpit  controls,  the  tab  can  be  made  to  apply  the  hinge 
moment  required  to  move  the  control  surface.    The  pilot’s  control  input  deflects  the  tab  and  the 
moment produced about the hinge line of the control surface causes this surface to 'float' to its position 
of equilibrium.  The floating control will then produce the required moment about the CG of the aircraft.  
The stick forces involved are only those arising from the hinge moments acting on the tab, which are 
much less than those on the main control surface.  A schematic diagram of a servo tab is shown in Fig 
4.  One of the chief disadvantages of the simple servo tab is that it lacks effectiveness at low speeds, 
since  any  tab  loses  most  of  its effect when deflected through an angle of more than about 20°.  The 
large control surface deflections required at low speeds need correspondingly large tab deflections and 
revised Mar 10 
 
Page 3 of 5 

AP3456 - 1-12 - Trimming and Balance Tabs 
therefore  this  system  is  not  always  satisfactory.    The  spring  tab,  described  in  para 16,  is  used  to 
overcome this fault. 
1-12 Fig 4 The Servo Tab System 
Control
Input
Free
to Pivot
Spring Tabs 
16.  The spring tab is a modification of the geared tab in which a spring is incorporated in the linkage 
permitting the tab gearing to be varied according to the applied stick forces.  The actual arrangement 
of the mechanism may vary with different designs according to the space limitations where it is to be 
applied.  A schematic arrangement of a spring tab is shown in Fig 5. 
1-12 Fig 5 The Spring Tab System 
Control
Input
Springs
Free
to Pivot
17.  Movement of the input rod deflects the tab against spring tension.  The input force is transmitted 
through the spring to the control surface which moves as a result of the combined effect of input force 
and aerodynamic assistance provided by the tab. 
18.  The amount of servo-action depends on the rate (strength) of the spring employed.  It can be seen 
that an infinitely strong spring produces no assistance from the tab whereas an infinitely weak spring 
causes the tab to behave as a servo-tab.  The effect of the spring tab can be regarded as producing a 
change in the basic speed squared law. 
19.  Spring  tabs  may  be  pre-loaded  to  prevent  them  from  coming  into  operation  until  the  stick  (or 
rudder) force exceeds a predetermined value.  This is done to keep the spring tab out of action at low 
speeds, thus avoiding excessive lightening and lack of feel.  A disadvantage of this arrangement is the 
sudden change in stick force gradient that occurs when the tab comes into operation. 
20.  The  spring  tab  has  been  widely  used  in  modern  aircraft  with  much  success.    On  very  large 
surfaces, however, the spring tab or servo-tab may produce a 'spongy' feel in the controls to which the 
pilot may object.  On the ground, when the control column is held in one position, the control surfaces 
can be moved by hand. 
Dual Purpose Tabs 
21.  In  some  aircraft,  the  features  of  two  or  more  of  the  foregoing  types  of  tabs  are  combined.    For 
example,  servo,  geared  or  spring  tabs  can  be  connected  to  the  pilot-operated  trim  wheel  so  that  the 
revised Mar 10 
 
Page 4 of 5 

AP3456 - 1-12 - Trimming and Balance Tabs 
basic position of the tab in relation to the control surface can be varied.  In this way the tab functions 
both as a trim tab and as a pure servo, geared or spring tab. 
Control Locks on Servo and Spring Tab Control Surfaces 
22.  On aircraft using servo or spring tabs, locking the control column or rudder bar will not prevent high 
winds from moving the control surfaces.  In these cases, external control surface clamps are essential. 
23.  On certain spring tab installations, partial or full movement of the control column or rudder bar is 
possible  when  the  external  clamps  are  still  in position.  For this reason, it is vital that the clamps are 
removed  before  flight  and  a  visual  check  of  the  correct  movement  of  the  control  surfaces  is  made 
when the control column is moved.  If the surface cannot be seen from the cockpit, movement should 
be  checked  with  the  assistance  of  the  ground  crew.    Any  restriction  in  the  movement  of  the  control 
column, other than the normal friction, must be investigated before flight. 
revised Mar 10 
 
Page 5 of 5 

AP3456 1-13  Level Flight 
CHAPTER 13 - LEVEL FLIGHT 
Introduction 
1. 
During flight four main forces act upon an aircraft: lift, weight, thrust and drag.  When an aircraft is 
in  steady  level  flight  a  condition  of  equilibrium  must  prevail.    The  unaccelerated  condition  of  flight  is 
achieved  with  the  aircraft  trimmed  for  lift  to  equal  weight  and  the  engine  set  for  thrust  to  equal  the 
aircraft drag. 
2. 
The four forces mentioned in para 1 each have their own point of action: lift through the centre of 
pressure (CP), weight through the centre of gravity (CG), and for the purposes of this chapter (although 
not  strictly  valid),  thrust  and  drag  act  in  opposite  directions  parallel  to  the  direction  of  flight  through 
points  varying  with  aircraft  design  and  attitude.    Although  the  opposing  forces  are  equal  there  is  a 
considerable difference between each pair of forces.  The lift/drag ratio for example may be as low as 
ten to one depending on the speed and power used. 
Pitching Moments 
3. 
The positions of the CP and CG are variable and under most conditions of level flight they are not 
coincident.  The CP changes its position with change in angle of attack and the CG with reduction in fuel 
or when stores are expended.  The outcome is that the opposing forces of lift and weight set up a couple 
causing either a nose-up or a nose-down pitching moment depending on whether the lift is in front of, or 
behind,  the  CG,  as  illustrated  in  Fig  1.    The  same  consideration  applies  to  the  position  of  the  lines  of 
action  of  the  thrust  and  drag.    Ideally,  the  pitching  moments  arising  from  these  two  couples  should 
neutralize each other in level flight so that there is no residual moment tending to rotate the aircraft. 
1-13 Fig 1 Pitching Moment 
Lift
Pitching
x
Moment
CG
CP
Weight
4. 
This ideal is not easy to attain by juggling with the lines of action of the forces alone but, as far as 
possible,  the  forces  are  arranged  as  shown  in  Fig  2.  With  this  arrangement  the  thrust/drag  couple 
produces  a  nose-up  moment  and  the  lift/weight  couple  a  nose-down  moment,  the  lines  of  action  of 
each  couple  being  positioned  so  that  the  strength  of  each  couple  is  equal.    If  the  engine  is  throttled 
back in level flight the thrust/drag couple is weakened and the lift/weight couple pitches the nose down 
so that the aircraft assumes a gliding attitude.  If power is then re-applied the growing strength of the 
thrust/drag couple raises the nose towards the level flight attitude. 
1-13 Revised Mar 10)   
 Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 1-13  Level Flight 
1-13 Fig 2 Disposition of the Four Forces 
Lift
Thrust
Drag
Weight
Tailplane and Elevator 
5. 
The function of a tailplane is to supply any force necessary to counter residual pitching moments 
arising  from  inequalities  in  the  two  main  couples,  ie it  has  a  stabilizing  function.    The  force  on  the 
tailplane  need  only  be  small  because  the  fact  that  the  tailplane  is  positioned  some  distance from the 
CG means that it can apply a large moment to the aircraft (Fig 3).  For this reason the area and lift of 
the tailplane is small compared with the mainplanes. 
1-13 Fig 3 Action of Tailplane 
F
Moment Arm
CG
6. 
In level flight, if any nose-up or nose-down tendency occurs, the elevator position can be altered to 
provide an upward or downward force respectively to trim the aircraft.  If the tailplane, or trailing edge, 
has to produce a down-load balancing force this will add to the apparent weight of the aircraft and to 
maintain level flight at the same speed the angle of attack must be increased to increase the lift.  The 
associated increase in drag is known as trim drag. 
Variation of Speed in Level Flight 
7. 
For level flight the lift must equal the weight.  From the lift formula (L = CL½ρV2S), it can be seen 
that,  for  a  given  aircraft  flying  at  a  stated  weight,  if  the  speed  factor  is  decreased,  then  the  lift 
coefficient (angle of attack) must be increased to keep the lift at the same value as the weight. 
8. 
Aircraft  Attitude  in  Level  Flight.    At  low  speed  the  angle  of  attack  must  be  high,  while  at  high 
speed only a small angle of attack is needed to obtain the necessary amount of lift.  Since level flight is 
being considered, these angles become evident to the pilot as an attitude which will be markedly nose-
1-13 Revised Mar 10)   
 Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 1-13  Level Flight 
up  at  very low speeds and less so as speed increases.  The difference between low and high speed 
attitudes is most marked on aircraft having swept-back wings or unswept wings of low aspect ratio, for 
the reasons given in Volume 1 Chapter 9. 
9. 
Aircraft Performance in Level Flight.  The variation of power required and thrust required with 
velocity  is  illustrated  in  Fig  4.    Each  specific  curve  of power or thrust required is valid for a particular 
aerodynamic  configuration  at  a  given  weight  and  altitude.    These  curves  define  the  power  or  thrust 
required to achieve equilibrium, ie lift equal to weight or constant altitude flight, at various air speeds.  
As shown by the curves of Fig 4, if it is desired to operate the aircraft at the air speed corresponding to 
point  A,  the  power  or  thrust  required  curves  define  a  particular  value  of  thrust or power that must be 
made  available  from  the  engine  to  achieve  equilibrium.    Some  different  air  speed,  such  as  that 
corresponding  to  point  B,  changes  the  value  of  thrust  or  power  required  to  achieve  equilibrium.    Of 
course, the change of air speed to point B would also require a change in angle of attack to maintain a 
constant  lift  equal  to  the  aircraft  weight.    Similarly,  to  establish  air  speed  and  achieve  equilibrium  at 
point C will require a particular angle of attack and engine thrust or power.  In this case, flight at point C 
would be in the vicinity of the minimum flying speed and a major portion of the thrust or power required 
would be due to induced drag.  The maximum level flight speed for the aircraft will be obtained when 
the  power  or  thrust  required  equals  the  maximum  power  or  thrust  available  from  the  engine.    The 
minimum flight air speed is not usually defined by thrust or power requirements since conditions of stall 
or stability and control problems generally predominate. 
1-13 Fig 4 Level Flight Performance 
a  Thrust and Velocity
b  Power and Velocity
Maximum
Available
Maximum
Power
Available
Thrust
d
d
A
ire
ire
u
A
u
q
q
e
e
R
R
t
r
s
B
Maximum
e
Maximum
ru
w
h
o
B
Level
T
C
Level
Flight
P
Flight
Speed
C
Speed
Velocity
Velocity
Effect of Weight on Level Flight 
10.  If an aircraft is flying level at a given angle of attack, for example that for best L/D ratio (about 4°), 
and at a known weight and EAS, then if the weight is reduced by dropping stores the lift must also be 
reduced to balance the new weight.  To maintain optimum conditions with the angle of attack at 4°, the 
speed must be decreased until the lift falls to the same value as the new weight. 
11.  The lower the weight, the lower is the EAS corresponding to a given angle of attack, the EAS at 
the required angle being proportional to the square root of the all-up weight. 
Effect of Altitude on Level Flight 
12.  Since  not  only  the  speed  but  also  the  lift  and  drag  vary  with  the  ½ρV2  factor,  the  relationship 
between  EAS  and  angle  of  attack  is  unchanged  at  altitude,  provided  of  course  that  the  weight  is 
1-13 Revised Mar 10)   
 Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 - 1-12 - Climbing and Gliding 
constant.    However,  compressibility  effects  tend  to  alter  the  relationship  by  reducing  the  CL
appropriate to a given angle of attack.  This aspect is dealt with in Volume 1, Chapter 21. 
Chapter 1-12 (Reformatted Mar 10)  
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 - 1-14 - Climbing and Gliding 
CHAPTER 14 - CLIMBING AND GLIDING 
Introduction 
1. 
This chapter deals primarily with the principles of flight involved in both climbing and gliding, but in 
considering the factors affecting the climb, some performance details are discussed. 
CLIMBING 
General 
2. 
During a climb an aircraft gains potential energy by virtue of elevation; this is achieved by one or, a 
combination of two means: 
a. 
The expenditure of propulsive energy above that required to maintain level flight. 
b. 
The expenditure of aircraft kinetic energy, ie loss of velocity by a zoom. 
Zooming for altitude is a transient process of exchanging kinetic energy for potential energy and is of 
considerable importance for aircraft which can operate at very high levels of kinetic energy.  However, 
the  major  portion  of  climb  performance  for  most  aircraft  is  a  near  steady  process  in  which  additional 
propulsive energy is converted into potential energy. 
Forces in the Climb 
3. 
To maintain a climb at a given EAS more power has to be provided than in level flight; this is first 
to  overcome  the  drag  as  in  level  flight  (PREQ  =  D  ×  V),  secondly  to  lift  the  weight  at  a  vertical  speed, 
which  is  known  as  the  rate  of  climb,  and  thirdly  to  accelerate  the  aircraft  slowly  as  the  TAS  steadily 
increases with increasing altitude. 
a
PREQ = DV + WVc + WV  g
where Vc is the rate of climb and a is the acceleration. 
The acceleration term can be ignored in low performance aircraft but has to be taken into account in jet 
aircraft with high rates of climb. 
4. 
In  Fig  1b  it  can  be  seen  that,  in  the  climb,  lift  is  less  than  weight.    If  this  is  so  then  the  lift 
dependent drag is less than at the same speed in level flight.  It can be seen from the figure that L = W 
cos θ.  However, it is stil  considered sufficiently correct to assume that lift equals weight up to about 
15º climb angle (since cos 15º is still 0.9659, the error due to this assumption is less than 2%). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-14 - Climbing and Gliding 
1-14 Fig 1 Forces in the Climb 
Fig 1a 
Fig 1b 
Lift
V
sin    =  C
Thrust
V
L = W cos
T = D + W sin
Drag
V
VC
W cos
Weight
W
W sin
5. 
Figs  1a  and  b  can  be  used  to  show  that  rate  of  climb  is  determined  by  the  amount  of  excess 
power and the angle of climb is determined by the amount of excess thrust left after opposing drag. 
In Fig 1a:  
sin 
= rate of climb
θ
V
In Fig 1b:  
sin θ  = thrust − drag
weight
 
 
 
 
 
    Since θ is the same in each case: 
rate of climb
= thrust − drag
V
weight
Therefore, rate of climb = V(thrust − drag)
weight
= P
− P
AV
REQ
weight
= excess power
weight
6. 
In  practice  aircraft  do  not,  for  varying  reasons  (e.g.  engine  cooling,  avoidance  of  an  exaggerated 
attitude), always use the exact speed for maximum rate of climb.  In jet aircraft this speed is quite high and at 
low altitude is not very critical due to the shape of the power available curve (see para 8).  In piston aircraft 
the speed is much lower and is normally found to be in the vicinity of the minimum drag speed. 
7. 
When  the  maximum  angle  of  climb  is  required  it  can  be  seen  from  Fig  1b,  where 
sin θ =  thrust − drag , that the aircraft should be flown at the speed which gives the maximum difference 
weight
between  thrust  and  drag.    For  piston  aircraft,  where  thrust  is  reducing  as  speed  is  increased beyond 
unstick, the best speed is usually as low as is safe above unstick speed.  For a jet aircraft, since thrust 
varies little with speed, the best speed is at minimum drag speed (Fig 2). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-14 - Climbing and Gliding 
1-14 Fig 2 Maximum Angle of Climb 
Fig 2a Piston Aircraft 
Fig 2b Jet Aircraft 
Thrust
Thrust
Drag
Drag
VMD
VMD
V
V
Power Available and Power Required 
8. 
The thrust horsepower available curve is calculated by multiplying the thrust (in pounds (lb)) by the 
corresponding speed (in feet per second (fps)) and dividing by 550.  The thrust power curve for a jet 
engine differs from that of a piston engine as shown in the upper curves of Fig 3.  The main reason for 
this difference is that the thrust of a jet engine remains virtually constant at a given altitude, irrespective 
of the speed; therefore when this constant thrust is multiplied by the appropriate air speed to calculate 
thrust horsepower, the result is a straight line.  The piston engine, on the other hand, under the same 
set of circumstances and for a given bhp, suffers a loss of thrust horsepower at both ends of its speed 
range  because  of  reduced  propeller  efficiency.    The  thrust  horsepower  available  curves  are 
representative  of  a  more  powerful  type  of  Second  World  War  piston  engine  fighter  and  a  typical  jet 
fighter having a high subsonic performance. 
1-14 Fig 3 Typical Power Available and Power Required Curves at Sea Level 
Sea Level
Y
Power
Best
Available
Climb
Speed Jet
Power
Jet
Power Required(Drag   
× TAS)
Y
Power
Available
Piston
Best Climb
Speed
Piston
X
X
Min
Drag
Speed
Min
Power
Speed
100
200
300
400
500
600
TAS (kt)
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-14 - Climbing and Gliding 
9. 
The horsepower required to propel an aircraft in level flight can be found by multiplying the drag 
(lb) by the corresponding TAS (fps) and dividing by 550.  The lower curve of Fig 3 is a typical example 
and  can  be  assumed  to  apply  to  both  a  piston  or  jet-propelled  airframe,  ie  the  airframe  drag  is  the 
same irrespective of the power unit used.  Note that the speed for minimum drag, although low, is not 
the  lowest  possible  nor  is  it  that  for  minimum  power.    The  increase  in  power  required  at  the  lowest 
speed is caused by the rapidly rising effects of induced drag. 
Climbing Performance 
10.  The vertical distance between the power available and the power required curves represents the 
power available for climbing at the particular speed.  The best climbing speed (highest rate of climb) is 
that at which the excess power is at a maximum; so that, after expending some power in overcoming 
the  drag,  the  maximum  amount  of  power  remains  available  for  climbing  the  aircraft.    For  the  piston 
engine aircraft the best speed is seen to be about 180 kt, and for the jet about 400 kt.  Notice that in 
the latter case a fairly wide band of speeds would still give the same amount of excess power for the 
climb  but  in  practice  the  highest  speed  is  used  since  better  engine  efficiency  is  obtained.    At  the 
intersection of the curves (points X and Y) all the available power is being used to overcome drag and 
none  is  available  for  climbing;  these  points  therefore  represent  the  minimum  and  maximum  speeds 
possible for the particular power setting. 
11.  If power is reduced the power available curve is lowered.  Consequently the maximum speed and 
maximum  rate  of  climb  are  reduced,  while  the  minimum  speed  is  increased.    When  the  power  is 
reduced  to  the  point  when  the  power  available  curve  is  tangential  to  the  power  required  curve,  the 
points X and Y coincide and the aircraft cannot climb. 
Effect of Altitude on Climbing 
12.  The thrust horsepower of both jet and piston engines decreases with altitude.  Even if it is possible 
to prolong sea-level power to some greater altitude by supercharging or some other method of power 
boosting,  the  power  will  inevitably  decline  when  the  boosting  method  employed  reaches  a  height  at 
which it can no longer maintain the set power. 
13.  At the highest altitudes the power available curves of both types of engine are lowered as shown 
in  Fig  4  and  the  power  required  curve  is  displaced  upwards  and  to  the  right.    Notice  that  the  power 
required to fly at the minimum drag speed is increased; this effect is caused by the fact that although 
the  minimum  drag  speed,  in  terms  of  EAS,  remains  the  same  at  all  heights,  the  speed  used  in  the 
calculation  of  thp  is  the  TAS,  which  increases  with  altitude  for  a  given  EAS.    Therefore  the  power 
required to fly at any desired EAS increases with altitude.  From Fig 4 it may be seen that the speed for 
the best rate of climb reduces with altitude and the range of speeds between maximum and minimum 
level flight speeds is also reduced. 
Note: The height of 40,000 ft used in Fig 4 was chosen because at that height EAS = ½ × TAS; a piston 
engine would not normally operate at that height. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-14 - Climbing and Gliding 
1-14 Fig 4 Effect of Altitude on Typical Power Available and Power Required Curves 
Fig 4a Piston Engine 
Fig 4b Jet Engine 
Power
Power Required
Power Required
Power
Power Available
(Sea Level)
(Sea Level)
(Sea Level)
Power Required
(40,000 Ft)
Power Available
Power Available
(Sea Level)
(40,000 Ft)
Power Required
(40,000 Ft)
Power Available
(40,000 Ft)
TAS at Sea Level
TAS at Sea Level
0
100 150 200
300
400
500
600
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
EAS at 40,000 Ft
EAS at 40,000 Ft
0
100110
200
300
0
100
145
200
300
14.  Ceilings.    The  altitude  at  which  the  maximum  power  available  curve  only  just  touches  the  power 
required curve and a sustained rate of climb is no longer possible is known as the absolute ceiling.  It is 
possible to exceed this altitude by the zoom climb technique which converts the aircraft’s kinetic energy 
(speed) to potential energy (altitude).  Another ceiling is the service ceiling which is defined as the altitude 
at which the maximum sustained rate of climb falls to 500 fpm (100 fpm for a piston aircraft). 
Operating Data Manuals 
15.  On  older,  simpler  types  of  aircraft  some  basic  take-off  and  climb  data  was  given  briefly  in  either 
narrative or tabular form in the Aircrew Manual.  Now, with modern complex aircraft, take-off and climb data 
is much more comprehensive and is given in the aircraft Operating Data Manual (ODM) either in graphical or 
detailed  tabular  form.    Further  information  on  ODM  is  given  in  Volume  2,  Chapter  16  and  in  Volume  8, 
Chapter 4. 
GLIDING 
Forces in the Glide 
16.  For  a  steady  glide,  with  the  engine  giving  no  thrust,  the  lift,  drag  and  weight  forces  must  be  in 
equilibrium (ignoring the deceleration term due to maintaining a constant IAS).  Fig 5 shows that the weight is 
balanced by the resultant of the lift and drag; the lift vector, acting as it does at right angles to the path of 
flight, will now be tilted forward while the drag vector still acts parallel to the path of flight.  To maintain air 
speed, energy must be expended to overcome this drag.  When the engine is no longer working the source 
of energy is the potential energy of the aircraft (i.e. the altitude). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 5 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-14 - Climbing and Gliding 
1-14 Fig 5 Forces in the Glide 
Fig 5a 
Fig 5b 
Total
Reaction
L = W cos
Lift
D = W sin 
Drag
t
V
h
W cos
ig
V sin 
e
H
Glide-Path
Weight
W sin
Distance
17.  The aircraft can either be made to have as low a rate of descent as possible, which will be obtained 
at  the  speed  which  requires  least  power,  or  it  can  be  made  to  have  as  shallow  an  angle  of  glide  as 
possible which will be the speed where least drag is produced (compare rate and angle of climb). 
Gliding for Endurance 
18.  It is rare that aircraft, other than sailplanes, require to glide for minimum rate of sink.  From Fig 5a it 
can be seen that for minimum rate of descent, V sin θ must be as smal  as possible.  But D × V (ie power 
required) = WV sin θ (ignoring the deceleration term due to maintaining a constant IAS).  Therefore, for a 
given weight, the rate of descent is least at the speed where the power required (DV) is least. 
Gliding for Range 
19.  Note that the triangle formed by lift, drag and total reaction is geometrically similar to that formed 
by distance, height and glidepath.  Now, if distance is to be maximum, gliding angle must be minimum.  
θ is minimum when cot θ is maximum and, from Fig 5b, it can be seen that: 
W c
  os θ
L
CL
cot θ
  =
=
=
W s
  in θ
 
D
CD
Therefore  the  best  angle  of  glide  depends  on  maintaining  an  angle  of  attack  which  gives  the  best 
lift/drag  ratio.    Therefore  for  maximum  distance  the  aircraft  should  be  flown  for  minimum  drag.    For 
angles of glide of less than 15º, cos θ approximates to 1 and so it is reasonable to use the level flight 
power  curves.    If  the  angle  of  descent  exceeds  about  15º  then  it  is  no  longer  sufficiently  correct  to 
assume that lift equals weight.  The actual lift needed is less and so the gliding speed is reduced by a 
factor  of  cos θ .    Since,  ignoring  compressibility,  drag  depends  on  EAS,  the  best  gliding  speed  at  a 
given weight is at a constant EAS regardless of altitude.  The rate of descent will, however, get less at 
lower altitudes as the TAS decreases. 
Effect of Wind 
20.  Since, in a glide for minimum rate of descent the position of the end of the glide is not important, 
wind  will  not  affect  gliding  for  endurance.    However,  when gliding for range the all-important target is 
the point of arrival; the aim is maximum distance over the ground.  In still air this is achieved by flying 
for  minimum  drag  as  explained  in  para  19.    The  effect  of a headwind will be to decrease the ground 
distance  travelled  by  approximately  the  ratio  of  the  wind  speed  compared  to  the  TAS.    A  calculated 
increase  of  airspeed  reducing  the  time  the  wind  effect  could  act  could  improve  the  ground  distance 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 6 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-14 - Climbing and Gliding 
travelled.    Similarly,  if  there  were  a  tailwind  the  ground  distance  travelled  would  be  increased.    A 
reduction  of  speed  towards  VMP ,  which  gives  the  minimum  rate  of  descent,  could  be  beneficial 
because it would allow more time for the wind to act on the aircraft.  The graphical method of finding 
the best speed to glide for maximum range in the presence of a head or tailwind is the same as that for 
finding  the  optimum  range  speed  for  a  piston  aircraft.    From  the  wind  value  along  the  TAS  axis  the 
tangent should be drawn to the power required curve (see Fig 6). 
1-14 Fig 6 The Graphical Method of Finding Maximum Range Gliding Speeds 
Power
Required
Optimum
Speed for
Headwind
30 Kts
Zero
30
Tailwind
0
Headwind
30
60
90
Knots
TAS = Groundspeed (Nil Wind)
Groundspeed (30 kt Tailwind)
0
30
60
90
100
Groundspeed (30 kt Headwind)
0
30
60
90
Effect of Weight 
21.  Variation in the weight does not affect the gliding angle provided that the speed is adjusted to fit the 
auw.  The best EAS varies as the square root of the auw.  A simple method of estimating changes in the 
EAS to compensate for changes in the auw up to about 20% is to decrease or increase the air speed by 
half the percentage change in the auw.  For example, a weight reduction of 10% necessitates a drop in air 
speed of 5%; an increase of weight of the same amount would entail a 5% increase. 
22.  Fig 7 shows that an increase in the weight vector can be balanced by lengthening the other vectors 
until the geometry and balance of the diagram is restored.  This is done without affecting the gliding angle.  
The  higher  speed  corresponding  to  the  increased  weight  is  provided  automatically  by  the  larger 
component  of  the  weight  acting  along  the  glide  path;  and  this  component  grows  or  diminishes  in 
proportion  to  the  weight.    Since  the  gliding  angle  is  unaffected,  the  range  is  also  unchanged  in  still  air.  
Where weight does affect the range is when there is a tailwind or headwind component.  The higher TAS 
for a heavier weight allows less time for the wind to affect the aircraft and so it is better to have a heavier 
aircraft  if  gliding  for  range  into  wind.  If minimum rate of descent is required then the aircraft should be 
light.    The  lower  drag  requires  a  less  rapid  expenditure  of  power  which  is  obtained  from  the  aircraft’s 
potential energy (height). 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 7 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-14 - Climbing and Gliding 
1-14 Fig 7 Effect of Weight on Glide 
Total
Reaction
Lift
Drag
Weight
23.  Although the range is not affected by changes in weight, the endurance decreases with increase 
of  weight  and  vice  versa.    If  two  aircraft  having  the  same  L/D  ratio  but  with  different  weights  start  a 
glide  from  the  same  height,  then  the  heavier  aircraft  gliding  at  a  higher  EAS  will  cover  the  distance 
between  the  starting  point  and  the  touchdown  in  a  shorter  time;  both  will,  however,  cover  the  same 
distance in still air.  Therefore the endurance of the heavier aircraft is less. 
24.  Usually the exact distance covered on the glide is not vitally important, therefore the gliding speed 
stated in the Aircrew Manual is a mean figure applying to the lower weights of a particular aircraft and 
giving the best all-round performance in the glide. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 8 of 8 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
CHAPTER 15 - MANOEUVRES 
Introduction 
1. 
Changes  in  the  attitude  of  an  aircraft  in  flight  can  take  place  in  any  one,  or  combination  of,  the 
three  major  axes  described  below.    During  manoeuvres  considerable  forces  are  at  work  on  the 
airframe  and  these  may  be  large  enough  to  cause  damage  or  even  structural  failure  if  the  aircraft  is 
manoeuvred without consideration of the limits for which the airframe has been designed. 
2. 
This  chapter  looks  at  the  nature  of  the  forces  which  affect  limitations,  the  build-up  of  the 
manoeuvre  envelope  and  the  theory  of  level  turns  as  a  specific  manoeuvre.    Volume  1,  Chapter  16 
gives greater detail on turning performance. 
Axes of Movement of an Aircraft 
3. 
Lateral  Axis.    The  lateral  axis  is  a  straight  line  through  the  CG  normal  to  the  plane  of  symmetry, 
rotation about which is termed pitching.  This axis may also be known as the pitching or looping axis.  If 
any  component  of  the  forward  flight  velocity  acts  parallel  to  this  axis,  the  subsequent  motion  is  called 
sideslip or skid. 
4. 
Longitudinal AxisThe longitudinal axis is a straight line through the CG fore and aft in the plane 
of symmetry, movement about which is known as rolling.  This axis is sometimes called the roll axis. 
5. 
Normal Axis. The normal axis is a straight line through the CG at right angles to the longitudinal 
axis, in the plane of symmetry, movement about which is called yawing.  This axis can be referred to 
as the yawing axis. 
6. 
Fixed  Relationship.    The  three  axes  are  fixed  relative  to  the  aircraft  irrespective  of  its  attitude.  
Fig 1 shows the major axes and the possible movements about them. 
1-15 Fig 1 The Three Major Axes 
Lateral 
Axis
Yawing
Rolling 
Longitudinal 
Axis
Pitching 
Normal 
Axis
Revised Mar 14   
Page 1 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
Acceleration 
7. 
Any aircraft or body in motion is subject to three laws of motion (Newton’s laws) which state that: 
a. 
All bodies tend to remain at rest or in a state of uniform motion in a straight line unless acted 
upon by an external force, ie they have the property of inertia. 
b. 
To change the state of rest, or motion in a straight line, a force is required.  To obtain a given 
rate  of  change  of  motion  and/or  direction  the  force  is  proportional  to  the  mass  of  the  body.    It 
follows that for a given mass, the greater the rate of change of speed and/or direction the greater 
is the force required. 
c. 
To every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. 
Most  manoeuvres  involve  changes  in  direction  and  speed,  the  degree  of  change  depending  on  the 
manoeuvre involved.  Any change of direction and/or speed necessarily involves an acceleration, which is 
often evident to the pilot as an apparent change in his weight.  During an acceleration the aircraft is not in 
equilibrium since an out-of-balance force is required to deflect it continuously from a straight line. 
8. 
While a body travels along a curved path it tries constantly to obey the first law and travel in a straight 
line.  To keep it turning a force is necessary to deflect it towards the centre of the turn.  This force is called 
centripetal force and its equal and opposite reaction is called centrifugal force.  Centripetal force can be 
provided  in  a  number  of  ways.    A  weight,  on  the  end  of  a  piece  of  string,  that  is  swung  in  a  circle  is 
subjected to centripetal force by the action of the string.  If the string is released the centripetal force is 
removed and the equal and opposite reaction (centrifugal force) disappears simultaneously.  The weight, 
conforming to the first law, then flies off in a straight line at a tangent to the circle. 
9. 
To clarify the difference between centripetal and centrifugal force, consider a body (Fig 2a) which 
moves along a series of straight lines AB, BC, CD and DE, each inclined to its neighbour at the same 
angle.    When  it  reaches  B  it  is  subjected  to  an  external  force  F1  acting  at  right  angles  to  AB,  which 
alters its path to BC.  At C a force F2, acting at right angles to BC, alters the path to CD and so on.  If 
the  path  from  A  to  E  consists  of  a  greater  number  of  shorter  lines  (Fig  2b)  the  moving  body  will  be 
deflected  at  shorter  intervals,  and  if  the  lines  are  infinitely  short  the intermittent forces blend into one 
continuous force F and the path becomes the arc of a circle (Fig 2c).  F will act at right angles to the 
direction of motion, i.e. towards the centre of the arc; the reaction to it, the centrifugal force, is equal in 
size and opposite in direction. 
1-15 Fig 2 Centripetal Force 
f4
E
E
E
f3
D
F
f
C
2
B
f1
A
A
A
a
b
c
Revised Mar 14   
Page 2 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
Gravity 
10. The  symbol  ‘g’  denotes  the  rate  of  acceleration  of  a  body  falling  freely  under the influence of its 
own  weight,  i.e.  the  force  of  gravity.    The  acceleration  is  about  9.8  m/sec/sec  at  the  Earth’s  surface 
when measured in a vacuum so that there is no drag acting upon the body.  The force of gravity varies 
with the distance from the Earth’s centre and therefore differs slightly at different points on the Earth’s 
surface, since the Earth is not a perfect sphere.  The weight of a body of a stated density and volume 
(mass)  is  proportional  to  the  force  of  gravity  and  so  varies  slightly.    For  practical  purposes  g  can  be 
considered  to  be  constant  at  sea  level,  irrespective  of  the  geographical  location.    As  altitude  is 
increased,  g  decreases  progressively,  but  in  unaccelerated  flight  this  effect  is  negligible  at  current 
operating heights. 
11.  If any object has, for example, a total force acting upon it equal to five times its own weight it will 
accelerate in the direction of the force at a rate five times greater than that due to gravity, namely 5 g.  
Although  g  is  a  unit  of  acceleration  it  is  often  used,  inaccurately,  to  indicate  the  force  required  to 
produce  a  given  acceleration.    Among  pilots  g  is  often  used  in  this  way  to  express  the  force 
accompanying a manoeuvre in terms of a multiple of the static weight.  For example, if a certain rate of 
turn (ie acceleration) necessitates a centripetal force of three times the aircraft weight then the turn is 
called  a  3  g  turn.    Since  the  force  is  felt  uniformly  throughout  the  entire  aircraft  and  its  contents,  the 
crew also experiences this force and acceleration and feel it as an apparent increase in weight which is 
proportional to the g.  During straight and level flight an aircraft accelerometer shows 1 g, for this is the 
normal  force  of  gravity  that  is  acting  at  all  times  on  all  objects.    During  inverted  level  flight  the 
instrument reads –1 g and the pilot’s weight, acting vertically downwards, is supported by his harness. 
Calculation of Centripetal Force 
12.  The  magnitude  of  the  centripetal  force  during  a  given  turn  is directly proportional to the mass of 
the body (its static weight) and the square of the speed, and is inversely proportional to the radius of 
WV2
turn.    It  is  calculated  from  the  formula 
  kg,  where  W  is  the  weight  (kg),  V  the  TAS (m/s), r the 
gr
radius of turn (m) and g is a constant 9. 8 m/s2. 
THE MANOEUVRE ENVELOPE 
General 
13.  The manoeuvre envelope (or Vn diagram) is a graphic representation of the operating limits of an 
aircraft.  The envelope is used: 
a. 
To lay down design requirements for a new aircraft. 
b. 
By manufacturers to illustrate the performance of their products.  
c. 
As a means of comparing the capabilities of different types. 
The axes of the envelope are: 
d. 
On the vertical axis, load factor (n), positive and negative. 
e.
On the horizontal axis, EAS. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 3 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
The Limits to the Basic Envelope (Theory) 
14.  One of the more obvious limits to the operation of an aircraft is the increase of the stalling speed 
as the load factor is increased.  From basic theory (see Volume 1, Chapter 2): 
lift
load factor (n) = weight
Lift at manoeuvre stalling speed (V )
∴n
M
=
Lift at basic stalling speed (V )
B
C
1 ρV 2 S
L max
M
2
=
C
1 ρV2 S
L max
B
2
V2
M
=
, so V
= V
n
M
B
V2
B
It should be noted from Fig 3 that flight below the basic stalling speed is perfectly feasible at load factors 
below one. 
1-15 Fig 3 Manoeuvre Stalling Speed 
V   =   80 at n = 1
B
+8
V   = 160 at n = 4
M
= 240 at n = 9
=    0  at n = 0
+6
+4
+2
Load +1
Factor
(n)
0
EAS
100
200
300
400
- 2
- 4
- 6
15.  g  Limits.    Any  aircraft  is  designed  to  certain  strength  requirements;  fighter  and  training  aircraft 
need  to  be  stronger  than  transport  aircraft.    Extra  strength  normally  means  an  increase  in  structural 
weight  which  in  turn  would  need  larger  engines;  therefore  most  aircraft  are  designed  to  a  bare 
minimum strength which depends on their role.  In this country the training and fighter aircraft are built 
to withstand about  +7 g in use, which is about the maximum that an average human pilot can stand 
and still remain conscious; transport aircraft are built to about +2 g.  Both classes usually have much 
lower  negative  g  limits  (e.g.  about  –3½    g  and  –½  g  respectively).    These  values  usually  have  a 
50% safety margin above which permanent deformation and failure may occur.  However this does not 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 4 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
mean that lesser damage will not occur; small excesses may cause rivets to 'pop' or panels to come 
off, and as the inroads into the safety margin increase so more severe damage may occur. 
lift
Since g =
, the g limits need to be reduced if the weight of the aircraft is increased in order to 
weight
retain the same safety margins. (Fig 4). 
1-15 Fig 4 g Boundary 
Break Up
+6 + 50%
+9
Distortion
+8
+6
+6
EAS above which aircraft
+4
can exceed 'g' limits
before stalling
+2
Load
Factor
EAS
(n)
0
100
200
300
400
−2
3
−4
-3 + 50%
−4.5
−6
16.  EAS  Limitation.    An  aircraft  has  a  speed  limit,  (or  maximum  permissible  diving  speed)  with  a 
“small”  (usually  5 or 10%) safety factor.  Exceeding this may lead to loss of access panels, failure of 
the weakest structure (often the tailplane or canopy) or even control reversal.  This limit completes the 
basic manoeuvre envelope, with operation outside the envelope either impossible or unsafe. (Fig 5). 
Variations in CL max 
1-15 Fig 5 EAS Limit 
+8
+6
+4
5 - 10% Safety
+2
Load
Factor
EAS
(n)
0
100
200
300
400
−2
−4
−6
Revised Mar 14   
Page 5 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
Variations in CL max
17.  The  boundaries  of  the  basic  envelope  constructed  up  to  this  point  have  been  drawn  on  the 
assumption that CL max remains constant.  However, when plotted against Mach number, CL max is seen 
to vary with changes of compressibility, Reynolds number and adverse pressure gradient. 
18.  Compressibility and its effects are dealt with fully in Volume 1, Chapter 21, but for the purpose of 
this chapter it may be said that increasing the angle of attack increases the local acceleration over the 
wing  so  that  the  critical  Mach  number  (MCRIT)  is  reached  at  a  progressively  lower  free  stream  Mach 
number (MFS).  The subsequent shockwaves are nearer the leading edge and as the flow behind the 
shock breaks away and is turbulent, a greater part of the wing is subject to separated flow and the loss 
of lift is greater.  Fig 6 shows typical variations at different angles of attack with Mach number.  With 
moderately thick wings this reduction could be at an extremely low MFS. 
1-15 Fig 6 Variation in CL with Mach Number 
LC
CLmax α = 9o
α = 6o
α = 3o
MFS
19.  The increase in Reynolds number due to speed only slightly affects the slope of CL curve, ie when 
plotted against speed (ignoring compressibility), CL is a straight line; its effect on CL max can, however, 
be quite marked because it delays separation to a higher angle of attack with the consequent increase 
in  CL  max.    When  plotting  CL  max against  speed,  theory  would  indicate  that  CL  max  would  increase  until 
compressibility effects become predominant, when it would decline. (Fig 7).  As speed increases, the 
adverse pressure gradient on the upper surface at high angles of attack becomes stronger; this causes 
the  boundary  layer  to  slow  down  and  thicken;  the  separation  point  is  moved  forward  and  the  CL  max
reduces. 
1-15 Fig 7 Effect of Increased Reynolds Number 
Effect of
L
Higher RN
C
α
Revised Mar 14   
Page 6 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
20.  For a variety of reasons the whole aircraft may be incapable of using the highest angle of attack,
so  that  the  usable  CL  max is  reduced.    The  reasons  for  this  vary  among  types,  but  may  include  the 
following: 
a. 
Reduction in effectiveness of the elevator, due to its operation behind a shockwave on either 
the wing or tailplane. 
b. 
Buffet  on  the  tailplane  from  the  thick  fluctuating  wake  of  the  wing,  making  it  impossible 
accurately to hold angles of attack near the stall.  As a result a lower angle has to be chosen. 
c. 
Wing tip stalling or the increase in downwash over the tailplane caused by the large vortices 
of a swept-wing aircraft may lead to pitch-up, again limiting the usable angles of attack. 
21.  What happens in practice depends very much on the wing in question but it is generally true that 
the  theoretical  CLmax  cannot  be  used  because  control  problems  due  to  separated  flow  prevent  the 
required angle of attack being selected.  Generally, the obtainable maximum value of CL for subsonic 
and  most  transonic  aircraft  decreases  from  a  very  low  Mach  number  along  the  dashed  line  in  Fig  6.  
For supersonic aircraft the CLmax may decline with increasing Mach number in the subsonic range, but 
usually recovers as the speed exceeds M1.0. 
The Modified Envelope due to Reduction in CLmax 
22.  The  reduction  in  CL  max  means  that  the  wing  gives  less  lift  than  was  expected  at  any  particular 
speed.    Consequently  the  available  load  factor  is  reduced  and  a  new  lift  boundary  curve  must  be 
produced. (Fig 8). 
1-15 Fig 8 Lift Boundary 
Pitch-up
+9
+8
Lift Boundary
+7
Buffet
+6
+5
+4
Load
+3
Factor
(n)
+2
+1
EAS
0

100
200
300
400
1
−2
−3
−4
23.  As  each  EAS corresponds to a higher Mach number at altitude, so the CL max will decline further 
and  new  curves  must  be  drawn  for  each  altitude,  although  the  Mach  number  at  which  the  maximum 
load factor occurs will remain the same (see Fig 9).  It should be noted that a lift boundary also exists 
for negative load factors and that a different lift boundary exists at different weights. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 7 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
1-15 Fig 9 Variation of Lift Boundary with Altitude 
+6
+5
Theoretical
10,000 ft
Curve
+4
30,000 ft
50,000 ft
+3
+2
Load
M
a
Factor
c
(n)
h
+1
L
im
i
Mach No
t
0
(a)
− 1
(a) = Mach Number at which
Maximum Load Factor Occurs
−2
−3
Structural Limitations 
24.  Mach Limit.  Aircraft designed for subsonic or transonic flight usually have a compressibility Mach 
number.    If  this  is  exceeded  the  position  and  size  of  the  shockwaves  make  control  difficult  or 
impossible and could even lead to structural failure.  At high angles, of attack the airflow is accelerated 
more and the wave development will occur at a lower Mach number.  As a result, this limit appears as 
a  curved  line  (see  Fig  9).    In  the  complete  envelope  diagram,  because  the  EAS/Mach  number 
relationship changes with height, Mach number limits must be drawn for each altitude; these are shown 
in Fig 10. 
1-15 Fig 10 The Complete Flight Envelope 
+8
+6
10,000ft
+4
30,000ft
+2
Load
Factor
(n)
EAS
0
100
200
300
400
−2
− 4
− 6
Revised Mar 14   
Page 8 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
25.  Rolling g Limit A rolling g limit is an additional limit imposed on the operation of an aircraft when 
the roll control is deflected.  It is a lower figure than the ordinary g limit because the wing structure has 
to  provide  strength  to  withstand  the  twisting  forces  caused  by  the  roll  control  deflection  besides 
providing strength to withstand the normal g.  It may also be imposed to avoid structural failure due to 
divergence caused by inertia cross-coupling, see Fig 11. 
1-15 Fig 11 Rolling g Limit 
+8
Buffet
+6
Corner
Rolling 'g' Limit
+4
+2
Load
Factor
(n)
EAS
0
100
200
300
400
− 2
− 4
− 6
26.  Buffet  Corners.    If  high  air  loads  are  combined  with  high  loadings,  the  weakest  part  of  the 
structure is more likely to fail.  In the case of the tailplane this will be further aggravated if it is buffeted 
by the turbulent wake of the wings, possibly leading to fatigue failure. 
27.  Other  LimitsOther  limits  which  could  be  imposed  include  considerations for different weights, 
fuel states, stores, CG positions, etc. 
Information Available from a Manoeuvre Envelope 
28.  When all the limits are drawn together they show the available range of manoeuvre for the aircraft 
at any height.  The envelope shows: 
a. 
Basic stalling speed. 
b. 
Available load factor at any height and speed. 
c. 
Maximum EAS at any height. 
d. 
Stalling speed at any height and load factor. 
These  points  are,  of  course,  in  addition  to  the  Aircrew  Manual  limitations  which  can  be  read  directly 
from the envelope: 
e. 
Maximum permitted load factor. 
f. 
Maximum EAS. 
g.
Compressibility Mach number. 
h. 
Rolling g limits. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 9 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
Limitations due to Power Unit 
29.  The  thrust  boundary  shows  the  maximum  altitude  and/or  speed  range  available  at  any  given  load 
factor.  Just as the manoeuvre envelope shows the available range of manoeuvre for the aircraft at any 
height  so  the  thrust  boundary  shows  the  limitations  due  to  the  amount  of  thrust  available.    A  thrust 
boundary shows at what speeds, altitudes and load factors the thrust available from the engine is equal to 
the drag produced by the whole aircraft when in straight and level flight or in a level turn.  Since the thrust 
varies with altitude and the drag varies with speed a typical boundary is as shown in Fig 12. 
1-15 Fig 12 Thrust Boundary 
20,000
1.75
1.5
n = 1
n = 2.0
15,000
2.25
(ft)
e
d 10,000
ltitu
A
2.5
5,000
n = 2.75
SL
80
100
120
140
160
180
200
220
240
260
280
EAS
TURNING 
General 
30.  For  an  aircraft  to  turn,  centripetal  force  is  required  to  deflect  it  towards  the  centre  of  the  turn.    By 
banking the aircraft and using the horizontal component of the now inclined lift force, the necessary force 
is obtained to move the aircraft along a curved path. 
31.  If the aircraft is banked, keeping the angle of attack constant, then the vertical component of the 
lift force will be too small to balance the weight and the aircraft will start to descend.  Therefore, as the 
angle  of  bank  increases,  the  angle  of  attack  must  be  increased  progressively  by  a  backward 
movement of the control column to bring about a greater total lift.  The vertical component is then large 
enough to maintain level flight, while the horizontal component is large enough to produce the required 
centripetal force. 
Effect of Weight 
32.  In  a  steady  level  turn,  if  thrust  is  ignored,  then  lift  is  providing  a  force  to  balance  weight  and  a 
centripetal force to turn the aircraft.  If the same TAS and angle of bank can be obtained, the radius of 
turn  is  basically  independent  of  weight  or  aircraft  type.    However  not  all  aircraft  can  reach  the  same 
angle of bank at the same TAS. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 10 of 17 


AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
The Minimum Radius Turn 
33.  To achieve a minimum radius turn it can be shown (see Volume 1, Chapter 16) that the following 
must be satisfied: 
a.
Wing loading must be as low as possible. 
b. 
The  air  must  be  as  dense  as  possible,  ie  at  Mean  Sea  Level  (MSL)  (achievable  only 
theoretically). 
c. 
The maximum value of the product of CL and angle of bank must be obtained.  Note that this does 
not say maximum angle of bank, for the fol owing reason.  The angle of bank is increased to provide the 
increased lift force which is needed to give the centripetal force towards the centre of the turn.  To do this, 
when already at the critical angle of attack, the speed must be increased.  An increase in speed may cause 
a fal  in the maximum value of CL (see Fig 6).  Thus bank and CL may not both be at maximum value at the 
same time. 
1-15 Fig 13 Forces in a Turn 
1
W
L
ϕ
ϕ
CPF
W
ϕ
= Angle of Bank
1
W
= Vertical Component of Lift = W
CPF = Horizontal Component of Lift = Centripetal Force
34.  If the aircraft is kept on the verge of the stall to obtain CLmax and the speed is steadily increased from the 
basic  stalling  speed,  the  radius  will  decrease  as  bank  is  increased  until,  in  theory,  the  minimum  radius  is 
obtained  at  infinite  speed  (see  Fig  14).    However,  the  CLmax changes  with  increasing  Mach  number.  
Therefore if, at a given speed, the CL is less than expected, then less lift is generated and, as can be seen 
in Fig 13, the centripetal force is reduced; less bank can be applied and so the minimum radius starts to 
increase as speed is increased beyond a certain value.  The overall result of this reduction in CLmax on the 
minimum radius is shown in Fig 15. 
1-15 Fig 14 Theoretical Radius of Turn 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 11 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
1-15 Fig 15 Variation in Minimum Radius Turns with Speed and Altitude 
Optimum
Increasing 
Minimum
Altitude
Radius
s
iu
d
a
R
Practical
MSL
Theory MSL
at infinite Mach
35.  Altitude.  Fig 15 shows that there is an increase in the minimum radius with increase in altitude.  This 
is commonly explained as being due to the EAS/TAS relationship.  An additional increase in minimum radius 
is also caused by the greater reduction in CLmax because the Mach number is higher at altitude for a given 
TAS.  In addition it should be remembered that thrust is also reduced at altitude, although so far thrust has 
been ignored.  These factors combined give an optimum speed for minimum radius which is slightly higher 
than the ideal. 
The Maximum Rate Turn 
V
36.  The rate of turn is 
 radians per second.  To achieve a maximum rate turn it can be shown that 
r
the following must be satisfied (see Volume 1, Chapter 16): 
a. 
Wing loading must be as low as possible. 
b. 
The air must be as dense as possible, ie at MSL. 
c. 
The maximum value of the product of angle of bank, speed and CL value must be obtained.  
Again note that this does not say maximum angle of bank for the following reason.  The angle of 
bank is increased to provide the increased lift force which is needed to give the centripetal force 
towards  the  centre  of  the  turn.   To do this when already at the critical angle of attack the speed 
must  be  increased.    An  increase  in  speed  may  cause  a  fall  in  the  maximum  value  of  CL  (see 
Fig 6).  Thus bank, speed and CL may not all be at maximum value at the same time. 
The speed for a maximum rate turn will be where a tangent from the origin just touches the minimum radius 
curve (see Fig 16).  On the theoretical curve, with CLmax constant, the tangent is at infinite speed which is the 
same  as  the  speed  for  minimum  radius.    However,  when  the  practical  reduction  in  CLmax  with  increasing 
Mach number is taken into account, the speed for a maximum rate turn is found to be somewhat higher than 
that for minimum radius.  Increasing altitude will cause the rate of turn to decrease. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 12 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
1-15 Fig 16 Variation in Maximum Rate Turns with Speed and Altitude 
Increasing 
Optimum
Altitude
Maximum
Rate
s
iu
d
a
R
Practical
MSL
Theory 
0
Mach
37.  Maximum  g  Loading.   The  speed  for  maximum  g  loading  is  higher  than  the  speed  for  a 
maximum rate turn (see Volume 1, Chapter 16). 
Effect of Thrust 
38.  So far the effect of thrust on level turns has been ignored.  However, the thrust, or lack of thrust, 
may be the determining factor as to whether the optimum speeds referred to in paras 34 to 37 can even 
be  attained;  this  will  depend  on  the  thrust  boundary  (see  para  29).    Even  in  level  flight  it  can  be  seen 
clearly  with  some  aircraft  that  a  component  of  thrust  is  acting  in  the  same  direction  as  lift  due  to  the 
inclination  of  the  thrust  line  from  the  horizontal.    This  effect  becomes  more  pronounced  as  the  critical 
angle of attack is approached (see Fig 17).   
1-15 Fig 17 Thrust Vectors 
Lift
Thrust
T
Drag
2 15o
Flight
Path
T1
Weight = Lift + T2
Weight
In the minimum radius and maximum rate turns discussed, the aircraft is flown for CL max which is obtained 
at the critical angle.  The thrust component assists lift so that either less lift is required from the wing  (as 
simple turning theory requires for a particular turn) or the turn can be improved beyond that indicated by 
simple  theory.    Just  as  lift  was  split  into  two  components  in  Fig 13,  one  to  oppose  weight  and  one  to 
provide centripetal force, so the component of thrust that acts in the same direction as lift can also be split 
into  two  similar  components  (see  Volume  1,  Chapter  16).    This  is  the  reason  for the remarkably small 
radius of turn of which some high performance aircraft are capable.  However, the reduction of thrust with 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 13 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
increasing  altitude  will  cause  a  reduction  in  turning  performance  in  addition  to  that  caused  by  the 
TAS/EAS relationship and the greater CLmax reduction. 
39.  It  should  be  realized  that  many  aircraft  do  not  have  sufficient  thrust  to  reach  and  sustain  the 
optimum  speed for a minimum radius turn at constant altitude.  In this case the speeds for minimum 
radius,  maximum  rate  and  maximum  g  will  all  be  the  same  at  the  maximum  speed  that  can  be 
sustained at constant altitude. 
Effect of Flap 
40.  The  lowering  of  flap  produces  more  lift  but  also  more  drag  at  any  given  EAS.    A  smaller  radius 
turn may be obtained when flap is lowered provided the flap limiting speed is not a critical factor and 
provided that there is sufficient thrust to overcome the extra drag. 
Nomogram of Turning Performance 
41.  Fig  18  is  a  nomogram  applicable  to  any  aircraft,  from  which  considerable  information  can  be 
obtained on turning performance.  Some examples of the use of the nomogram are given below. 
1-15 Fig 18 Nomogram of Turning Performance 
True Air Speed
MPH
1600 Knots
Mach No
Angle of
Rate
Bank 
of Turn
Degrees
1600
1400 
Deg Per Min
800
0.4
1400
1200
Rate 4
700
85
1 Knot       1.689 fps
1200
600
1000
0.5
8g
Rate 3
7g
500
900
1000
6g
0.6
80
800
5g
400
900
Rate 2
4g
0.7
75
800
700
Height
3g
300
0.8
70
1
Rate 1
700
Thousands of Feet
2.75g
2
600
0
10
2.4g
20
0.9
30
36.09
600
2g
60
and above
200
500
1.0
1.75g
Rate 1
1.5g
50
500
1.2
150
400
1.3g
40
Rate 34
1.2g
1.4
400
1.15g
30
1.6
100
1
300
1.10g
Rate 2
1.8
20
300
2.0
10
200
2.5
50
180
200
Revised Mar 14   
Page 14 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
42.  If the TAS and altitude are known, then the Mach number can be determined.  Assume a TAS of 400 kt 
at 30,000 ft; the Mach number is found by placing a rule so that 400 kt (on the TAS scale) and 30,000 ft (on 
the “height in thousands of feet” scale) are in alignment and then reading off the Mach number from its scale.  
This example is shown by the upper dashed line on the nomogram and gives a Mach number of 0.68M.  The 
example can equally well be worked in reverse, ie the altitude and Mach number can be used to determine 
the TAS. 
43.  If the TAS and bank angle are known then the rate of turn can be found.  Assume a TAS of 400 kt 
and an angle of bank of 60º, place a rule on the nomogram to align these figures and then read off the 
rate  of  turn,  in  this  case  284º  per  min,  about  rate  1½  .    The  bank  scale  also  shows  the  g  realized  in  a 
sustained turn at that angle of bank.  The Mach scale has no significance in these examples.  Any two 
known  factors  can  be  aligned  to  determine  the  unknown  third  factor;  eg  to  find  the  bank  angle 
corresponding to a rate 1 turn at 500 kt TAS the rule is aligned on these figures and the bank angle read 
off  from  its  scale.    The  nomogram  shows  clearly  that  as  speed  increases  the  angle  of  bank  must  be 
increased to maintain a constant rate of turn (see examples in Table 1). 
Table 1 Increase of Bank Angle 
Rate of Turn 
Speed to 
Bank angle 


200 
28º 
1.15 

400 
48º 
1.5 

600 
58º 

Angle of Bank Vs Rate of Turn 
44.  Volume 1, Chapter 16 gives a mathematical explanation of turning.  Pilots may need to be able to 
calculate quickly and easily the angle of bank (AOB) required for a standard rate of turn. 
45.  An exact formula for converting rate of turn into AOB for a standard rate turn (3º/sec) is: 
AOB = 57.296(arctan(0.0027467 x TAS))   
(1) 
46.  The above formula is not particularly user friendly to the pilot in the cockpit.  The Federal Aviation 
Authority have published the following rule of thumb which states that: 
To determine the approximate angle of bank required for a standard rate turn use 15% of the TAS.  
Thus: 
AOB ~ 0.15 TAS   
(2) 
(Where ~ means approximately equal to). 
e.g. At 100 kt approximately 15º angle of bank is required (15% of 100). 
47.  An alternative approximation is: 
AOB ~ (0.1 TAS) + 5 
 
(3) 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 15 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
48.  AOBs  for  a range of TAS values are shown in Table 2.  The values have been calculated using 
each of the three formulas given above.  Percentage differences from the exact value (formula 1) are 
given for the approximate formulas, (2) and (3).  The data is presented graphically in Fig 19. 
Table 2 Values of Angle of Bank Required for a Range of TAS Values Using Approximations 
TAS
200 
250 
275 
300 
350 
400 
450 
500 
550 
600 
650 
700 
Formula 
(1) 
28.7 
34.5 
37.1 
39.5 
44.0 
48.0 
51.0 
54.0 
56.5 
59.0 
61.0 
62.5 
(2) 
30 
37.5 
41.2 
45 
52.5 
60 
67.5 
75 
82.5 
90 
97.5 
105 
% diff (2) 
4.5 
8.7 
11.4 
13.9 
19.3 
25.0 
32.4 
38.9 
46.0 
52.5 
59.8 
68.0 
from (1) 
(3) 
25 
30 
32.5 
35 
40 
45 
50 
55 
60 
65 
70 
75 
% diff (3) 
12.9 
13.0 
12.2 
11.4 
9.1 
6.3 
2.0 
1.9 
6.2 
10.2 
14.8 
20.0 
from (1) 
Note:  The values relate to a standard rate of turn of 3º/sec. 
Formulas used: 
Angle of Bank = 57.296(arctan(0.0027467 x TAS))   
(1) 
Angle of Bank ~ 0.15 TAS 
 
(2) 
Angle of Bank ~ (0.1 TAS) + 5 
 
(3) 
1-15 Fig 19 Graph of AOB Against TAS 
90
80
70
k
AOB ~ (0.1 TAS) + 5
n 60
a
B
f
o 50
AOB = 57.296(arctan(0.0027467 x TAS))
le
g 40
n
A
30
20
10
0
200
300
400
500
600
700
TAS kt
49.  It can be seen from Table 2 and Fig 19 that up to 280 kt, formula 2 is the closest fit to formula 1.  
Above 280 kt, formula 3 is the closer fit, up to a speed approaching 600 kt where the divergence of the 
values  becomes  more  significant.    Above  600  kt  neither  of  the  approximations  will  give  reasonable 
results. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 16 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-15 - Manoeuvres 
SUMMARY 
Manoeuvring Considerations 
50.  During  a  manoeuvre  an  aircraft  is  not  in  a  state  of  equilibrium  since  an  out-of-balance  force  is 
required to deflect it continuously from a straight line.  This force is called centripetal force. 
51.  The manoeuvre envelope is used: 
a. 
To specify design requirements for a new aircraft. 
b. 
By manufacturers to illustrate the performance of their products. 
c. 
As a means of comparing the capabilities of different types. 
52.  The axes of the manoeuvre envelope are load factor and velocity, and from it can be read: 
a. 
Basic stalling speed. 
b. 
Available load factor at any height and speed. 
c. 
Maximum EAS at any height. 
d. 
Stalling speed at any height and load factor. 
e. 
Maximum permitted load factor. 
f. 
Maximum EAS. 
g. 
Compressibility Mach number. 
h. 
Rolling g limits. 
53.  Variations in CLmax are caused by: 
a. 
Compressibility effects: 
(1)  Separation behind shockwaves. 
(2)  Reduction of control effectiveness behind shockwaves. 
(3)  Buffet on the tailplane making it impossible to hold an accurate angle of attack. 
b. 
Change in Reynolds number. 
c. 
Increase in the adverse pressure gradient with speed. 
54.  For minimum radius turns the following must be satisfied: 
a. 
Wing loading must be as low as possible. 
b. 
The air must be as dense as possible. 
c. 
The maximum value of the product of CL value and angle of bank must be obtained. 
55.  For maximum rate turns the following must be satisfied: 
a. 
Wing loading must be as low as possible. 
b. 
The maximum value of the product of angle of bank, speed and CL value must be obtained. 
In both cases the use of thrust will improve turning performance. 
Revised Mar 14   
Page 17 of 17 

AP3456 - 1-16 - Mathematical Explanation of Turning 
CHAPTER 16 - MATHEMATICAL EXPLANATION OF TURNING 
Minimum Radius Level Turns 
1. 
From Fig 1 it can be seen that: 
WV2
V2
tan φ  =
=
Wgr
gr
where φ is the angle of bank 
V is the TAS in mps 
r is in m 
g is 9.8ms2
V 2
∴   r  =
g tan ϕ
1-16 Fig 1 Forces in a Turn 
1
W
L
ϕ
ϕ
CPF
2
CPF W V
gr
W
ϕ
= Angle of Bank
W1
= Vertical Component of Lift = W
CPF
= Horizontal Component of Lift = Centripetal Force
However, not all aircraft can achieve the same angle of bank at the same TAS and so the equation for 
radius may therefore usefully be broken down further: 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 4 

AP3456 - 1-16 - Mathematical Explanation of Turning 
The V in the formula is the manoeuvre stalling speed (VM). 
V
= V
load factor
M
B
= V
n.
But
= L
n
=
1
B
  (from Fig 1) 
W
cos ϕ
∴ V 2 = V 2 1
M
B
cos ϕ
2
So r = V
1
B
g tan ϕ cos ϕ
2

V
r =
B
g sin ϕ
At the basic stalling speed: 
1
L = W = C
V 2
ρ
S
L max
B
2

2
2W
V
=
B
C
S
ρ
L max


1
 W   1   2 
∴ r = 
  
 C
sin ϕ 
   
L max
 S 


 ρ   g 
This means that for minimum radius: 


1
1
a. 



must be a minimum.  
 reduces towards unity as φ increases towards 90º.  
C
sin ϕ 

sin ϕ
L max

This  requires  an  increase  in  speed  to  obtain  the  necessary  increased  lift.  The speed should be 


1
increased up to that speed where  


 stops decreasing because of a reducing CLmax. 
C
sin ϕ 
 Lmax

 W 
b. 
Wing loading  
  must be minimum. 
 S 
c. 
ρ must be maximum; this occurs at MSL. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 4 

AP3456 - 1-16 - Mathematical Explanation of Turning 
Maximum Rate Turns 
2. 
From Fig 1: 
CPF
W V 2 1
sin ϕ =
=
L
g
r
L
Rate of turn ( )
V
ω = r
L sin ϕ g
1
∴ω =
. But L = C
ρ V2 S
L
WV
2
1
C
ρV2 S sin ϕg
L 2
∴ω =
WV
 S   g 
= (C Vsin ϕ ρ
) 
  
L
 W   2 
This means that for a maximum rate turn:  
a. 
(C V sin )
ϕ must  be  a  maximum.    Sin  φ increases as φ increases towards 90º.  This bank 
L
increase  requires  more  speed,  so  speed  should  be  increased  as  long  as  CL  does  not  decrease 
faster than (V sin φ) is increasing. 
 W 
b. 
Wing loading  
  must be minimum. 
 S 
c.  ρ must be maximum; this occurs at MSL. 
Maximum g Loading 
3. 
If  CLmax  were  constant,  the  speed  for  minimum  radius,  maximum  rate  and  maximum  g  loading 
would  be  the  same.    However  CLmax  decreases  with  increasing  Mach  number;  maximum  g  loading 
 V2 
(or n


max)  depends  on  the  lift  produced;  the  acceleration  towards  the  centre  of  the  turn  
   is 
 r 
V 2
proportional  to  this  lift  (see  Fig  1).    Therefore,  if  the  speed  for  maximum 
  is  found,  this  will  give 
r
r
nmax.  In Fig 2, 
 is plotted against V.  The speed at which the tangent from the origin just touches 
V
V 2
this curve will be that for maximum 
 and therefore maximum g loading.  This is clearly at a higher 
r
r
V
speed than the minimum 
 (or maximum 
 which is maximum rate). 
V
r
Revised Mar 10   
Page 3 of 4 

AP3456 - 1-16 - Mathematical Explanation of Turning 
1-16 Fig 2 Variation of r/V with V 
r
V
2
V
Max V
Max
r
r
0
V
Effect of Thrust 
4. 
The  thrust  line  of  an  aircraft  is  vectored  inwards  in  a  turn  so  that  thrust  assists  the  lift  in 
overcoming weight and centripetal force. 
Use of Flap 
5. 
The  lowering  of  flap  produces  more  lift  but  also  more  drag  at  any  given  EAS.    A  smaller 
radius  turn  may  be  obtained  when  flap  is  lowered  provided  that  the  flap  limiting  speed  is  not  a 
critical  factor  and  provided  that  there  is  sufficient  thrust  to  overcome  the  extra  drag.    The 
V
2
theoretical  absolute  minimum  radius  will  have  been  decreased  since  it  depends  on 
Bf
  where 
g
VBf is the new stalling speed with flap (Volume 1, Chapter 15, para 34).  Two possible cases, one 
where lowering flap is beneficial and one where it is not, are illustrated in Fig 3. 
1-16 Fig 3 Comparison of Turning Radius with and without Flap 
With
Clean
Flap
s
iu
d
a
R
a
2
b
VB
g
c
V 2
Bf
g
V
V
Bf
B
EAS
Revised Mar 10   
Page 4 of 4 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
CHAPTER 17 - STABILITY 
Introduction 
1. 
The study of aircraft stability can be extremely complex and so for the purpose of this chapter the 
subject  is  greatly  simplified:  stability  is  first  defined  in  general  terms  and  it  will  then  be  seen  how  the 
aircraft  designer  incorporates  stability  into  an  aircraft.    The  subject  is  dealt  with  under  two  main 
headings: static stability and dynamic stability.   
STATIC STABILITY 
Definitions 
2. 
To quote Newton’s first law again, "a body will tend to remain in a state of rest or uniform motion 
unless disturbed by an external force".  Where such a body is so disturbed, stability is concerned with 
the  motion  of  the  body  after  the  external  force  has  been  removed.    Static  stability  describes  the 
immediate  reaction  of  the  body  after  disturbance,  while  dynamic  stability  describes  the  subsequent 
reaction.  The response is related to the original equilibrium state by use of the terms positive, neutral 
and  negative  stability.    Positive  stability  indicates  a  return  towards  the  position  prior  to  disturbance, 
neutral  stability  the  taking  up  of  a  new  position  of  a  constant  relationship  to  the  original,  whereas 
negative  stability  indicates  a  continuous  divergence  from  the  original  state.    Note  that,  in  colloquial 
usage, positively stable and negatively stable are usually 'stable' and 'unstable', respectively. 
3. 
In  order to relate the response of a body to its initial equilibrium state it is useful at this stage to 
use an analogy; the 'bowl and ball' can be used to illustrate this idea (see Fig 1).  If the ball is displaced 
from  its  initial  position  to  a  new  position,  the  reaction  of  the  ball  will  describe  its  static  stability.    If  it 
tends to roll back to its original position, it is said to have positive stability; if it tends to roll further away 
from its original position, it has negative stability and if the ball tends to remain in its new position, it has 
neutral stability. 
1-17 Fig 1 Static Stability Analogies 
Positive Stability Neutral Stability Negative Stability
Initial Position
New Position
4. 
The  concept  of  stability  'degree'  can  be  expressed  more  usefully  in  graphical  form  (Fig  2).  
Displacement, plotted on the vertical axis, may refer to any system, e.g. distance, moments, volts, etc.  
No scale is given to the horizontal axis which may vary from microseconds to hours, or even years. 
Revised May 11   
Page 1 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
1-17 Fig 2 Graph of the Degrees of Stability 
Negative Slope
Negative Static Stability
Disturbance
Removed
t
n
Neutral Static
e
Stability
m
e
c
la
p
Positive Slope
is
Positive Static Stability
D
Time
Disturbance Applied
5. 
Plotting the response in this form makes it possible to measure the actual degree of stability using 
the following two parameters: 
a. 
The sign of the slope indicates whether the response is favourable or unfavourable.  
b. 
The slope of the curve is a measure of the static stability. 
6. 
Before considering the response of the aircraft to disturbance it is necessary to resolve the motion 
of the aircraft into components about the three body axes passing through the CG. 
Axis
Motion (About the Axis)
Stability
Longitudinal (x) 
Roll (p) 
Lateral 
Lateral (y) 
Pitch (q) 
Longitudinal 
Normal (z) 
Yaw (r) 
Directional 
(Weathercock) 
7. 
It is important to realize that the motion involved is angular velocity and the disturbance assumed 
is an angular displacement.  In the first instance it is helpful to consider these components separately 
although, in other than straight and level flight, the motion of the aircraft is more complex, eg in a level 
turn the aircraft is pitching and yawing. 
Directional Stability 
8. 
A  simple  approach  to  both  directional  and longitudinal stability is to consider a simple dart.  The 
flights or vanes of a dart ensure that the dart is aligned with the flight path.  Consider first the pair of 
vanes  which  impart  positive  directional  stability  to  the  dart;  these  may  be  referred  to  as  the  vertical 
stabilizers.  Fig 3 shows how a displacement in yaw through an angle β, resulting in sideslip, produces 
a restoring moment and therefore positive directional (static) stability.  Two pointsare worth noting: 
a. 
The dart rotates about the centre of gravity (CG). 
b. 
The momentum of the dart momentarily carries it along the original flight path, ie the Relative 
Air Flow (RAF) is equal and opposite to the velocity of the dart. 
Revised May 11   
Page 2 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
1-17 Fig 3 The Positive Stability of a Dart 
Restoring
Sideslip
Moment
Angle (β)
Force
β
Relative Air Flow
Vertical
CG
Stabilizer
(Plan View)
9. 
An  aerodynamic  shape  like  a  fuselage  or  drop-tank  may  be  unstable.    Reference  to  Fig  4 
shows that this occurs when the centre of pressure (CP) is in front of the CG. 
1-17 Fig 4 The Negative Static Stability of a Streamline Body when CP is ahead of CG 
Force
β
Flight Path
CG
CP
Unstable
Moment
(Plan View)
It  is  necessary  therefore  to  add  a  vertical  stabilizer  or  'fin'  to  produce  positive directional stability and 
this  has  the  effect  of  moving  the  CP  behind  the  CG  (Fig  5).    In  general,  it  may  be  said  that  the  keel 
surface of the fuselage (ahead of the CG) has an unstable influence, while the keel surface behind the 
CG has a stable influence.  For simplicity, the rudder is considered to be 'locked'. 
1-17 Fig 5 Positive Static Stability with the Addition of a Fin 
Fig 5a Plan View 
Fig 5b Side View 
Restoring
Moment
Force
CG
Flight Path
Relative Air Flow
CP
CG
Unstable
Stable
Influence
Influence
CG
Vertical
Stablizer
Revised May 11   
Page 3 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
10.  For a given displacement, and therefore sideslip angle, the degree of positive stability will depend 
upon the size of the restoring moment which is determined mainly by: 
a. 
Design of the vertical stabilizer. 
b. 
The moment arm. 
11.  Design  of  the  Fin  and  Rudder.    The  vertical  stabilizer  is  a  symmetrical  aerofoil  and  it  will 
produce an aerodynamic force at positive angles of attack.  In sideslip, therefore, the total side force on 
the fin and rudder will be proportional to the 'lift coefficient' and the area.  The lift coefficient will vary, as 
on any aerofoil, with aspect ratio and sweepback.  At high angles of sideslip it is possible for the fin to 
stall  and  to  avoid  this  the  designer  can  increase  the  stalling  angle  by  increasing  the  sweepback, 
decreasing the aspect ratio, or by fitting multiple fins of low aspect ratio. 
12.  Moment Arm The position of the centre of gravity, and therefore the distance between the CG 
and  the  centre  of  pressure  of  the  vertical  stabilizer,  may  be  within  the  control  of  the  pilot.    Forward 
movement  of  the  CG  will  lengthen  the  moment  arm  thereby  increasing  the  directional  stability;  aft 
movement will decrease the directional stability. 
Longitudinal Stability 
13.  The  analogy  used  in  para  8  can  usefully  be  used  to  introduce  the  concept  of  static  longitudinal 
stability.  In this case the dart is viewed from the side and the horizontal stabilizers produce a pitching 
moment (M) tending to reduce the displacement in pitch. 
14.  On an aircraft, the tailplane and elevators perform the functions of a horizontal stabilizer and the 
conclusions reached in para 10 will be equally valid.  For simplicity, the explanation is limited to stick 
fixed static stability, i.e. elevators locked. 
15.  Fig 6a shows a wing with the CP forward of the CG by the distance x.  A nose-up displacement 
will increase the angle of attack, increase the lift (L) by the amount dL and increase the wing pitching 
moment by the amount dLx.  The result is to worsen the nose-up displacement, an unstable effect.  In 
Fig  6b,  the  CP  is  aft  of  the  CG  and  the  wing  moment  resulting  from  a  displacement  in  pitch  will  be 
stabilizing  in  effect.    The  pitching  moment  is  also  affected  by  the  movement  of  the  CP  with  angle  of 
attack and it follows therefore that the relative positions of the CP and CG determine whether the wings 
have a stable or unstable influence.  Taking the worst case, therefore, the wing may have an unstable 
influence and the horizontal stabilizer must be designed to overcome this. 
1-17 Fig 6 Variations in the Position of CP and CG 
Fig 6a Unstable Contribution 
Fig 6b Stable Contribution 
dL
dL
L
L
x
x
d x
d
L
Lx
CG
CP
CP
CG
Revised May 11   
Page 4 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
16.  The simplified diagram at Fig 7 illustrates a system of forces due to displacement in pitch, in this 
case an increase in angle of attack.  The tail contribution must overcome the unstable wing (and any 
other) contribution, for positive static longitudinal stability. 
1-17 Fig 7 Changes in Forces and Moments due to a Small Nose-up Displacement(dα
Tailplane
dL wing
Wing
L wing
x
y
CPwing
α+dα
Flight Path
Aircraft CG
dLtail
CP
L
tail
tail
α +dα
17.  The degree of positive stability for a given change in angle of attack depends upon the difference 
between the wing moment and the tail moment.  This difference is called the restoring moment, 
i.e. (Total Lift tail)y – (Total Lift wing)x = Net pitching moment. 
18.  The main factors which affect longitudinal stability are: 
a. 
Design of the tailplane. 
b. 
Position of the CG. 
19.  Design of the Tailplane The tailplane is an aerofoil and the lift force resulting from a change in 
angle  of  attack  will  be  proportional  to  the  CLtail  and  the  area.    The  increment  in  lift  from  the  tail  will 
depend upon the slope of its CL curve and will also be affected by the downwash angle behind the wing 
(if the downwash changes with angle of attack).  The tail design features which may affect the restoring 
moment are therefore: 
a. 
Distance from CPtail to CG (moment arm). 
b
Tail Area.  The total lift provided by the wing = CLwing qS and the total lift produced by the tail 
= CLtail qS.  For a given aerofoil of given planform, the CL varies with angle of attack at a constant 
q  (EAS).    Therefore,  in  comparing  tail  moments  with  wing  moments,  it  is  necessary  only  to 
compare the respective area(s) and moment arms (CG position). 
c
Tail Volume.  The product of the tailplane area × moment arm is known as the tail volume.  
The  ratio  of  the  tail  volume  to  the  wing  volume  is  the  main  parameter  used  by  the  designer  in 
determining the longitudinal stability of the aircraft. 
d.
Planform.  As was seen in Volume 1, Chapter 4, the slope of the CL curve for a lifting surface 
is affected by aspect ratio, taper and sweepback.  The planform of the tailplane therefore affects 
the  change  in  CL  with  change  in  angle  of  attack  caused  by  a  disturbance.    For  example,  the  CL
increments will be lower on a swept-back tail than on one of rectangular planform. 
Revised May 11   
Page 5 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
e
Wing  Downwash.    Where  a  disturbance  in  angle  of  attack  results  in  a  change  in  the 
downwash  angle  from  the  wings,  the  effective  angle  of  attack  at  the  tail  is  also  changed.    For 
example,  if  the  aircraft  is  displaced  nose-up  and  the  downwash  angle  is  increased,  then  the 
effective  angle  of  attack  on  the  tailplane  is  reduced.    The  total  tail  lift  will  not  be  as  great  as  it 
would otherwise have been and so the restoring moment is reduced.  This decrease in stability is 
compensated for by moving the CG further forward, thereby increasing the moment arm. 
20.  Position  of  the  CG.    The  position  of  the  CG  may  be  marginally  under  the  control  of  the  pilot.  
From Fig 7 it can be seen that its position affects the ratio of the tail moment to the wing moment and 
therefore the degree of stability.  In particular: 
a. 
Aft movement of the CG decreases the positive stability. 
b. 
Forward movement of the CG increases the positive stability. 
Because  the  position  of  the  CG  affects  the  positive  longitudinal  stability,  it  also  affects  the  handling 
characteristics in pitch.  The aerodynamic pitching moment produced by deflecting the elevators must 
override  the  restoring  moment  arising  from  the  aircraft’s  positive  stability,  i.e.  the  stability  opposes 
manoeuvre.  For a given elevator deflection there will be a small response in an aircraft with a forward 
CG (stable condition) and a large response in an aircraft with an aft CG (less stable condition). 
21.  Neutral  Point.    Aircrew  Manuals  for  every  aircraft  give  the  permitted  range  of  movement  of  the 
CG.    The  forward  position  is  determined  mainly  by  the  degree  of  manoeuvrability  required  in  the 
particular aircraft type.  Of greater importance to the pilot is the aft limit for the CG.  If the CG is moved 
aft,  outside  the  permitted  limits,  a  position  will  eventually  be  reached  where  the  wing  moment 
(increasing) is equal to the tail moment (decreasing).  In this situation the restoring moment is zero and 
the aircraft is therefore neutrally stable.  This position of the CG is known as the neutral point.  The aft 
limit for the CG, as quoted in the Aircrew Manual, is safely forward of the neutral point.  If the loading 
limits for the aircraft are exceeded, it is possible to have the CG position on, or aft of, the neutral point.  
This unsafe situation is aggravated when the controls are allowed to 'trail', i.e. stick free. 
22.  CG Margin (Stick Fixed) The larger the tail area, the larger the tail moment, and so the further 
aft is the CG position at which the aircraft becomes neutrally stable.  The distance through which the 
CG  can  be  moved  aft  from  the  quoted  datum,  to  reach  the  neutral  point,  is  called  the  static  or  CG 
margin,  and  is  an  indication  of  he  degree  of  longitudinal  stability.    The  greater  the  CG  margin,  the 
greater  the  stability,  e.g.  a  training,  or  fighter  aircraft,  may have a margin of a few inches but a large 
passenger aircraft may have a margin of a few feet.  For stability in pitch it is necessary that when the 
angle  of  attack  is  temporarily  increased  a  correcting  force  will  lower  the  nose  to  reduce  the  angle  of 
attack.    As  illustrated  in  Fig  6,  if  the  CG  is  behind  the  centre  of  pressure  an  increase  in the angle of 
attack results in a pitch-up or positive pitching moment coefficient.  Thus the mainplane on its own has 
an unstable influence.  If the CG is forward of the centre of pressure the pitching moment coefficient 
will be negative, a stable contribution.  Fig 8  plots the coefficient of pitching moment (CMCG) against the 
coefficient of lift, CL for the mainplane only. 
Revised May 11   
Page 6 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
1-17 Fig 8 CMCG Against CL - Mainplane Only 
CMCG
Wing Contribution
+
(Unstable)
CL
23.  Longitudinal Dihedral.  Longitudinal dihedral means that the tailplane is set at a lower angle of 
incidence than the mainplane, as illustrated in Fig 9.  The  effect  of longitudinal dihedral  is shown in 
Fig 10, where it can be seen that when the mainplane is at zero lift angle of attack, the tailplane is at a 
negative angle of attack at which it produces a downward force which tends to pitch the aircraft nose-
up.  When the mainplane is at a small positive angle of attack, such as is normally to be expected in 
straight  and  level  flight,  the  tailplane  produces  no  pitching  moment.    When  the  mainplane  angle  of 
attack increases the tailplane produces a nose-down pitching moment.  Thus if the aircraft is disturbed 
in pitch, the tailplane will tend to restore it to level flight.  The longitudinal dihedral therefore provides a 
stabilizing influence. 
1-17 Fig 9 Longitudinal Dihedral 
0oα
−5o  
α (Tailplane)
1-17 Fig 10 CMCG Against CL - Tailplane Contribution
Pitching
Mainplane 
Tailplane
C MCG
Moment Angle of Attack
Effect
+
a
a
Down
Zero Lift α
Load
b
C
b
L
0
Small Positive α
Zero Load
c
Up
Load
c
Large Positive α

Revised May 11   
Page 7 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
24.  The combined effects of wing and tail are shown in Fig 11.  The negative slope of the graph shows 
C
positive longitudinal stability.  The amount of longitudinal stability is measured by the slope of 
MCG . 
CL
1-17 Fig 11 Combined Effects of Wing and Tail 
+CMCG
Wing-Unstable Slope
Trim Point
0
−C L
Complete 
Aircraft
Stable

Tailplane - Very Stable Slope
CMCG
25.  Trim  Point  (Stick  Fixed).    Trim  point  is  the  CL   or  angle  of  attack  at  which  the  overall  moment 
about  the  CG  is  zero.    This  is  where the wing moment is equal to the tail moment and the aircraft is 
then 'in trim'.  The angle of attack or level flight speed at which this occurs is determined by the degree 
of longitudinal dihedral. 
26.  Elevator  Angle  to  Trim.    If  the  angle  of  attack  is  increased  from  the  trim  point,  the  aircraft’s 
longitudinal stability will produce a stable, nose-down pitching moment.  To maintain the new angle of 
attack,  an  equal  and  opposite  moment,  nose-up,  will  be  required  from  the  elevators.    When  this  is 
achieved, by raising the elevators, a new trim point is established, ie at the higher angle of attack on 
the mainplane, the tail has been made to produce a greater nose-up moment by altering the effective 
camber on the tail.  The reverse applies when the angle of attack on the mainplane is reduced.  This 
does not usually affect the positive longitudinal stability. 
Aerodynamic Centre 
27.  In  text  books  on  stability  it  is  usual  to  find  that  the  aerodynamicist  writes  of  the  'aerodynamic 
centre'  (AC),  rather  than  the  centre  of  pressure.    The  AC  is  a  point  within  the  aerofoil,  and  usually 
ahead of the CP, about which the pitching moment is independent of angle of attack; it is a convenient 
and calculated datum for the mathematical treatment of stability and control, and a full explanation may 
be found in Volume 1, Chapter 4. 
Stick-free Longitudinal Stability 
28.  If the elevator is allowed to trail freely, the change in tail force due to a displacement will depend 
on the position taken up by the floating elevator.  Usually the elevator will trail with the relative airflow 
and this will reduce the tail moment. 
29.  Under  these  conditions,  with  the  tail  moment  reduced,  the  balance  between  the  tail  and  wing 
moments is changed and so the position for the CG, about which the moments are equal, will be further 
forward, because the less effective tail requires a longer moment arm.  That is, the neutral point is further 
forward, so reducing the stick-free CG margin.  Since this margin is a measure of the longitudinal stability, 
it follows that when the elevators are allowed to float free the longitudinal stability is reduced. 
Revised May 11   
Page 8 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
Manoeuvre Stability (Steady Manoeuvres Only) 
30.  In  the  preceding  paragraphs,  the  longitudinal  static  stability  was  discussed  with  respect  to  a 
disturbance  in  angle  of  attack  from  the  condition  of  trimmed  level flight.  A pilot must also be able to 
hold an aircraft in a manoeuvre and the designer has to provide adequate elevator control appropriate 
to the role of the aircraft.  The following paragraphs consider the effects on an aircraft of a disturbance 
in angle of attack and normal acceleration. 
31.  It  should  be  carefully  noted  that  the  initial  condition  is,  as  before,  steady  level  flight.    The 
difference between static and manoeuvre stability is that manoeuvre stability deals with a disturbance 
in angle of attack (α) and load factor (n) occurring at constant speed, whereas static stability deals with 
a disturbance in angle of attack at constant load factor (n = 1). 
32.  If  an  aircraft  is  trimmed  to  fly  straight  and level (the initial condition, Fig 12a), and is then climbed, 
dived and pulled out of the dive so that at the bottom of the pull-out it is at its original trimmed values of 
speed and height (Fig 12b), then the aircraft can be considered as having been 'disturbed' from its initial 
condition in two ways, both contributing to the overall manoeuvre stability: 
a. 
It  now  has  a  greater  angle  of  attack  to  produce  the  extra  lift  required  to  maintain  a  curved 
flight path (L = nW).  This is the same as the static stability contribution discussed earlier. 
b. 
It has a nose-up rotation about its CG equal to the rate of rotation about its centre of pull-out. 
1-17 Fig 12 Forces Acting on an Aircraft in a Steady Manoeuvre
Fig 12a Level Flight 
Fig 12b Pull-out 
L = nW
L
Increased
Flight
Angle of Attack
Angle of Attack
Nose-up
Path
Rotation
Flight
Path
W
W
33.  Because  the  aircraft  is  rotating  about  its  own  CG,  the  tailplane  can  be  considered  to  be  moving 
downwards relative to the air or, alternatively, the air can be considered to be moving upwards relative 
to  the  tailplane.    In  either  case  the  effective  angle  of  attack  of  the  tailplane  will  be  increased 
(see Fig 13); thus the manoeuvre stability is greater than the static stability in level flight. 
1-17 Fig 13 Increase in Tailplane Angle of Attack Due to its Vertical Velocity 
Rotary Movement
about CG
V
Vertical
Velocity
Increased
Angle of Attack
Effective RAF
Revised May 11   
Page 9 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
34.  If the aircraft’s longitudinal stability is greater in manoeuvre, the position of the CG which achieves 
neutral stability will be further aft than for the straight and level case.  This position of the CG is called 
the  manoeuvre  point  (corresponding  to  the  neutral  point)  and  the  distance  between  the  CG  and  the 
manoeuvre  point  is called the manoeuvre margin.  It will be seen that for a given position of the CG, 
the manoeuvre margin is greater than the CG margin. 
35.  Effect of Altitude.  Consider an aircraft flying at two different heights at the same EAS and apply 
the  same  amount  of  up  elevator  in  each  case.    The  elevator  produces  a  downward  force  on  the 
tailplane  to  rotate  the  aircraft  about  its  centre  of  gravity  and  increase the angle of attack of the wing.  
The  rate  of  change  of  pitch  attitude  is  dependent  upon  the  magnitude  of  the  force  applied  to  the 
tailplane and also the TAS.  As shown in Fig 14 the force is proportional to EAS2 but its effect upon the 
EAS2
change in angle of attack of the elevator is a function of the 
 ratio.  Fig 14 shows that the change 
TAS
in angle of attack at sea level is greater than at altitude and therefore the elevator is less effective at 
altitude and stability is decreased. 
1-17 Fig 14 Effect of Altitude on Tailplane Contribution 
Vertical
Velocity
∝  EAS2
TAS High
TAS Low
Effective RAF
Change in angle of
Change in angle of
attack at low altitude
attack at high altitude
Lateral Stability (Stick Fixed) 
36.  When  an  aircraft  is  disturbed  in  roll  about  its  longitudinal  axis  the  angle  of  attack  of  the  down-
going  wing  is  increased  and  that  on  the  up-going  wing  is  decreased,  (see  Fig  15).    As  long  as  the 
aircraft is not near the stall the difference in angle of attack produces an increase of lift on the down-
going  wing  and  a  decrease,  on  the  up-going  wing.    The  rolling  moment  produced  opposes  the  initial 
disturbance and results in a 'damping in roll' effect. 
Revised May 11   
Page 10 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
1-17 Fig 15 The Damping in Roll Effect 
Fig 15a Roll to Starboard 
L
L
Roll Components
Fig 15b Up-going Wing 
Fig 15c Down-going Wing 
V
V
Roll
Angle of Attack Reduced
Angle of Attack Increased
Components
Roll
Components
37.  Since the damping in roll effect is proportional to the rate of roll of the aircraft, it cannot bring the 
aircraft  back  to  the  wings-level  position;  thus  in  the  absence  of  any  other  levelling  force,  an  aircraft 
disturbed in roll would remain with the wings banked.  Therefore, by virtue of the damping in roll effect, 
an  aircraft  possesses  neutral  static  stability  with  respect  to  an  angle  of  bank  disturbance.    However, 
when  an  aircraft  is  disturbed  laterally  it  experiences  not  only  a  rolling  motion  but  also  a  sideslipping 
motion caused by the inclination of the lift vector (see Fig 16a). 
38.  The  forces  arising  on  the  different  parts  of  the  aircraft  as  a  result  of  the  sideslip  produce  a 
rolling  moment  tending  to  restore  the  aircraft  to  its  initial  wings-level  position.    It  is  seen  therefore 
that  the  lateral  static  stability  of  an  aircraft  reacts  to  the  sideslip  velocity  (v)  or  a  displacement  in 
yaw,  see  Fig 16b.    This  effect  has  a  considerable  influence  on  the  long-term  response  (lateral 
dynamic stability) of the aircraft. 
1-17 Fig 16 Vector Action of Forward and Sideslip Velocities 
Fig 16a 
Fig 16b 
Resultant
RAF
Sideslip
Angle
Sideslip
Velocity
Revised May 11   
Page 11 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
39.  Each  different  part  of  the  aircraft  will  contribute  towards  the  overall  value  of  the  lateral  static 
stability and these contributions will be of different magnitude depending on the condition of flight and 
the particular configuration of the aircraft.  The more important of these contributions are: 
a. 
Wing contribution due to: 
(1)  Dihedral. 
(2)  Sweepback. 
b. 
Wing/fuselage interference. 
c. 
Fuselage and fin contribution. 
d. 
Undercarriage, flap and power effects. 
40.  Dihedral  Effect.    Dihedral  effect  can  be  explained  in  a  number  of  ways  but  the  explanation 
illustrated at Fig 17 has the advantage of relating dihedral effect to sideslip angle.   It will be seen that 
due  to  the  geometric  dihedral,  a  point  nearer  the  wing  tip  (A  or  D)  is  higher  than  a  point  inboard 
(B or C).  Therefore, a sideslip to starboard will produce the following effects: 
a.
Starboard Wing.  The relative airflow will cross the wing (from A to B) at an angle equal to 
the sideslip angle.  Since point A is higher than point B, this will produce the same effect as raising 
the leading edge and lowering the trailing edge, i.e. increasing the angle of attack.  So long as the 
aircraft is not flying near the stalling speed, the lift will increase.  
b.
Port Wing.  Similarly, the angle of attack on the port wing will reduce and its lift decrease. 
A stable rolling moment is thus produced whenever sideslip is present (i.e. following a disturbance in 
yaw).  This contribution depends on the dihedral angle and slope of the lift curve.  It will therefore also 
depend  on  aspect  ratio  being  increased  with  an  increase  in  effective  chord  length  (see  Volume  1, 
Chapter 4, Fig 11).  It is also affected by wing taper.  This is one of the most important contributions to 
the  overall  stability  and,  for  this  reason,  the  lateral  static  stability  is  often  referred  to  as  the  'dihedral 
effect' although there are a number of other important contributions. 
1-17 Fig 17 Dihedral Effect 
D C
B A
Flight Path
Sideslip
Angle
RAF
RAF
D
C
B
A
Section Through CD
Section Through AB
C
A
D
B
C Lower Than D
(Decreased Angle
of Attack)
Revised May 11   
Page 12 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
41.  Sweepback.    Wing  sweepback  has  the  effect  of  producing  an  additional  stabilizing  contribution 
thus  increasing  the  'effective'  dihedral  of  the  wing  (10°  of  sweep  has  about  the  same  effect  as  1°  of 
dihedral).  Fig 18 illustrates the principal effects on the wing geometry of sideslip. 
a
Angle of Sweep.  The component of flow accelerated by the section camber is proportional 
to  the  cosine  of  the  angle  of  sweep  (Volume  1,  Chapter  9).    The  angle  of  sweep  of  the  leading 
(low) wing is decreased and that of the trailing wing is increased by the sideslip angle.  A stable 
rolling moment is therefore induced by the sideslip. 
b.
Aspect  Ratio.    On  the  leading  (low)  wing  the  span  is  increased  and  the  chord  decreased 
which is an effective increase in aspect ratio.  On the trailing (high) wing, the span is decreased 
and the chord is increased resulting in a reduction in aspect ratio.  This again produces a stable 
rolling moment because the more efficient (low) wing produces more lift. 
c.
Taper Ratio.  Another, smaller effect, arises from a tapered wing.  An increase in taper ratio, 
defined  as  tip  chord:root  cord,  affects  the  lift  coefficient  and  also  produces  a  small stable rolling 
moment in sideslip. 
1-17 Fig 18 Effect of Sideslip on a Swept Planform 
Sideslip
Velocity
CL
Forward
High
Velocity
RAF
Leading
Sideslip
Flight
Angle
Path
Low
Trailing
Angle of Attack
Effect of Aspect Ratio
CL
Small
Sweep
Leading
Sweep
Large
Trailing
b
2
b
Angle of Attack
2
Effect of Sweepback
42.  Variation with Speed The changes in the slope of the lift curve associated with changes in aspect 
ratio and sweep result in variations in lift forces of the 'leading' and 'trailing' wings.  It follows, therefore, that 
the contribution of sweep to the lateral (static) stability becomes more important at the higher values of CL, ie 
at the lower forward speeds, because the CL curves are divergent.  This is very important because it means 
that  the  'dihedral  effect'  varies  considerably  over  the  speed  range  of  the  aircraft.    At  high  speeds  a  lower 
angle of attack is needed than for low speeds, therefore the stability at high speeds is much less than at low 
speeds.    To  reduce  the  stability  to  a  more  reasonable  value  at  the  higher  angles  of  attack,  it  may  be 
necessary to incorporate some negative dihedral (ie anhedral) on a swept-wing aircraft. 
Revised May 11   
Page 13 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
43.  Handling Considerations It has been shown that the 'dihedral effect' of sweepback in sideslip 
produces a strong rolling moment.  This has been referred to somewhat imprecisely as roll with yaw.  
Two applications of this effect at low speeds, where it is strongest, are worth considering: 
a.
Crosswind Landings.  After an approach with the aircraft heading into a crosswind from the 
right,  the  pilot  must  yaw  the  aircraft  to  port  to  align  it  with  the  runway  prior  to  touchdown.    This 
action will induce a sideslip to starboard and the pilot must anticipate the subsequent roll to port, 
in order to keep the wings level. 
b.
Wing Drop.  The greater tendency of a swept-wing aircraft to drop a wing at a high angle 
of  attack  (aggravated  by  a  steep  curved  approach)  may  be  further  increased  by  a  large 
deflection of corrective aileron.  In such cases, the dihedral effect of sweepback may be utilized 
by applying rudder to yaw the nose towards the high wing - sideslip to the left, roll to the right.  It 
must be said, however, that modern design has reduced the tip-stalling tendency and improved 
the effectiveness of ailerons at high angles of attack and the problem is not as acute as it might 
have been in the 'transonic era'. 
44.  Wing/Fuselage Interference
a.
Shielding  Effect.    Most  aircraft  will  be  affected  by  the  shielding  effect  of  the  fuselage.    In  a 
sideslip the section of the trailing wing near the root lies in the 'shadow' of the fuselage.  The dynamic 
pressure over this part of the wing may be less than over the rest of the wing and therefore produces 
less  lift.    This  effect  will  tend  to  increase  the  'dihedral  effect'  and  on  some  aircraft  may  be  quite 
considerable. 
b.
Vertical  Location.    A  stronger  contribution  towards  lateral  stability  arises  from  the  vertical 
location of the wings with respect to the fuselage.  It is helpful to start by considering the fuselage 
to be cylindrical in cross-section.  The sideslip velocity will flow round the fuselage, being deflected 
upwards  across  the  top  and  downwards  underneath.    Superimposing a wing in this flow has the 
following effect, illustrated in Fig 19: 
(1) High  Wing.    A  high-mounted  wing  root  will  lie  in a region of upwash on the up-stream 
side of the fuselage tending to increase its overall angle of attack.  Conversely, on the down-
stream side of the fuselage the wing root is influenced by the downwash tending to reduce its 
angle of attack.  The difference in lift produced by each wing will cause a restoring moment to 
increase  with  sideslip.    This  effect  has  been  demonstrated  to  be  equivalent  to  1°.to  3°  of 
dihedral. 
(2) Low  Wing.  The effect of locating the wing on the bottom of the fuselage is to bring it into a 
region of downwash on the up-stream side and into upwash on the down-stream side of the fuselage.  
The angle of attack of the leading (low) wing wil  be decreased and that of the trailing wing increased.  
This gives rise to an unstable moment equivalent to about 1° to 3° anhedral. 
From these facts it can be seen that there is zero effect on lateral stability when the wing is mounted 
centrally on the fuselage.  The effect is lessened as separation occurs at the wing/fuselage junction. 
45.  Fuselage/Fin  Contributions.    Since  the  aircraft  is  sideslipping,  there  will  be  a  component  of  drag 
opposing the sideslip velocity.  If the drag line of the aircraft is above the CG the result will be a restoring 
moment tending to raise the low wing.  This configuration is therefore a contribution towards positive lateral 
stability.  Conversely, a drag line below the CG will be an unstable contribution.  The position of the drag line 
is determined by the geometry of the entire aircraft but the major contributions, illustrated in Fig 19, are: 
Revised May 11   
Page 14 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
a. 
High wing. 
b. 
High fin and rudder. 
c. 
Tee-tail configuration. 
The tee-tail configuration makes the fin more effective as well as contributing its own extra drag. 
1-17 Fig 19 Wing/Fuselage Configurations 
Fig 19a High Wing 
Drag
CG
Fig 19b High Fin 
Fig 19c Tee-tail 
Drag
Drag
CG
CG
46.  Slipstream and Flap Contributions.  Two important effects which reduce the degree of positive 
lateral stability are illustrated in Fig 20: 
a.
Slipstream.    Due  to  sideslip  the  slipstream  behind  the  propeller  or  propellers  is  no  longer 
symmetrical about the longitudinal axis.  The dynamic pressure in the slipstream is higher than the 
free  stream  and  covers  more  of  the  trailing  wing  in  sideslip.    The  result  is  an  unstable  moment 
tending to increase the displacement.  This unstable contribution is worse with flaps down. 
b.
Flaps.  Partial-span flaps alter the spanwise distribution of pressure across a wing.  The local 
increase in lift coefficient near the root has the effect of moving the 'half-span' centre of pressure 
towards the fuselage (in a spanwise sense).  The moment arm of the wing lift is thus reduced and 
a given change in CL due to the dihedral effect will produce a smaller moment. 
The overall lateral stability is therefore reduced by lowering inboard flaps.  The design geometry of the 
flap  itself  can  be  used  to  control  this  contribution.    In  particular,  a  swept-back  flap  hinge-line  will 
decrease the dihedral effect, whereas a swept-forward hinge-line will increase it. 
Revised May 11   
Page 15 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
1-17 Fig 20 Destabilizing Effect of Flap and Slipstream 
Fig 20a Destabilizing Effect of Slipstream 
Fig 20b Destabilizing Effect of Flaps 
L
y
Increase in Lift
Due to Dihedral
Effect
Increased
Low Wing
Dynamic Pressure
L
y
47.  Design  Problems.    It  is  desirable  that  an  aircraft  should  have  positive  lateral  static  stability.    If, 
however,  the  stability  is  too  pronounced, it could lead to the dynamic problems listed below, some of 
which are discussed later: 
a. 
Lateral oscillatory problems, i.e. Dutch roll. 
b. 
Large aileron control deflections and forces under asymmetric conditions. 
c. 
Large  rolling  response  to  rudder  deflection  requiring  aileron  movement  to  counteract  the 
possibility of 'autorotation' under certain conditions of flight. 
DYNAMIC STABILITY 
General 
48.  When  an  aircraft  is  disturbed  from  the  equilibrium  state,  the  resulting  motion  and  corresponding 
changes in the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the aircraft may be quite complicated.  This is 
especially true for displacement in yaw which affects the aircraft in both yawing and rolling planes. 
49.  Some of the factors affecting the long-term response of the aircraft are listed below: 
a. 
Linear velocity and mass (momentum). 
b. 
The static stabilities in roll, pitch and yaw. 
c. 
Angular velocities about the three axes.   } 
     }   Angular Momentum 
d. 
Moments of inertia about the three axes.  } 
e. 
Aerodynamic damping moments due to roll, pitch and yaw. 
50.  Consider  a  body  which  has  been  disturbed  from  its  equilibrium  state  and  the  source  of  the 
disturbance then removed.  If the subsequent system of forces and moments tends initially to decrease 
the displacement, then that body is said to have positive static stability.  It may, however, overshoot the 
Revised May 11   
Page 16 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
equilibrium  condition  and  then  oscillate  about  it.    The  terms  for  possible  forms  of  motion  which 
describe the dynamic stability of the body are listed below: 
a. 
Amplitude increased - negative stability. 
b. 
Amplitude constant - neutral stability. 
c. 
Amplitude 'damped' - positive stability. 
d. 
Motion heavily damped; oscillations cease and the motion becomes 'dead-beat' positive stability. 
e. 
Motion diverges - negative dynamic stability. 
Fig 21 illustrates these various forms of dynamic stability; in each case shown, the body has positive 
static stability. 
51.  Dynamic stability is more readily understood by use of the analogy of the 'bowl and ball' described 
and illustrated at para 3.  For example, when the disturbance is removed from the ball, it returns to the 
bottom of the bowl and is said to have static stability.  However, the ball will oscillate about a neutral or 
equilibrium position and this motion is equivalent to dynamic stability in an aircraft. 
1-17 Fig 21 Forms of Motion 
 Fig 21a Negative Dynamic Stability 
Displacement
t
Initial
Disturbance
Fig 21d Positive Dynamic Stability 
Fig 21b Neutral Dynamic Stability 
(Dead Beat Convergence/Subsidence) 
t
t
Fig 21c Positive Dynamic Stability 
Fig 21e Negative Dynamic Stability 
(Damped Phugoid) 
(Divergence) 
t
t
Revised May 11   
Page 17 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
52.  If the oscillations are constant in amplitude and time then a graph of the motion would be as 
shown in Fig 22.  The amplitude shows the extent of the motion, and the periodic time is the time taken 
for one complete oscillation.  This type of motion is known as simple harmonic motion. 
1-17 Fig 22 Simple Harmonic Motion 
B
B
Total
Amplitude
of Oscillation
A
A
A A
A
t
Periodic Time
B
B
53.  Periodic Time The time taken for one complete oscillation will depend upon the degree of static 
stability, ie the stronger the static stability, the shorter the periodic time. 
54. Damping.    In  this  simple  analogy  it  is  assumed  that  there  is  no  damping  in  the  system;  the 
oscillations will continue indefinitely and at a constant amplitude.  In practice there will always be some 
damping,  the  viscosity  of  the  fluid  (air)  is  a  damping  factor  which  is  proportional  to  the  speed  of  the 
mass;  damping  can  be  expressed  as  the  time  required  (or  number  of  cycles)  for  the  amplitude  to 
decay to one half of its initial value (see Fig 21 - Damped Phugoid).  An increase in the damping of the 
system (e.g. a more viscous fluid) will cause the oscillations to die away more rapidly and, eventually, a 
value of damping will be reached for which no oscillations will occur.  In this case, after the disturbance 
has been removed, the mass returns slowly towards the equilibrium state but does not overshoot it, i.e. 
the motion is 'dead-beat' (see Fig 21d - Positive Dynamic Stability). 
Dynamic Stability of Aircraft 
55.  The dynamic stability of an aircraft depends on the particular design of the aircraft and the speed 
and  height  at  which  it  is  flying.    It  is  usually  assumed  that  for  'conventional'  aircraft  the  coupling 
between  the  longitudinal  (pitching)  and  lateral  (including  directional)  motions  of  an  aircraft  can  be 
neglected.  This enables the longitudinal and lateral dynamic stability to be considered separately. 
56.  Design  Specification.    Oscillatory  motions  which  have  a  long  periodic  time  are  not  usually 
important;  even  if  the  motion  is  not  naturally  well  damped,  the  pilot  can  control  the  aircraft  fairly 
easily.    To  ensure  satisfactory  handling  characteristics,  however,  it  is  essential  that  all  oscillatory 
motions  with  a  periodic  time  of  the  same  order  as  the  pilot’s  response  time  are  heavily  damped.  
This is because the pilot may get out of phase with the motion and pilot-induced oscillations (PIOs) 
may  develop.    The  minimum  damping  required  is  that  oscillation  should  decay  to  one  half  of  their 
original  amplitude  in  one  complete  cycle  of  the  motion.    Some  modern  aircraft  however,  do  not 
satisfy  this  requirement  and  in  many  cases  it  has  been  necessary  to  incorporate  autostabilization 
systems to improve the basic stability of the aircraft, eg pitch dampers or yaw dampers. 
Longitudinal Dynamic Stability 
57.  When an aircraft is disturbed in pitch from trimmed level flight it usually oscillates about the original state 
with variations in the values of speed, height and indicated load factor.  If the aircraft has positive dynamic 
stability, these oscillations will gradually die away and the aircraft returns to its initial trimmed flight condition.  
The oscillatory motion of the aircraft in pitch can be shown to consist of two separate oscillations of widely 
differing characteristics; the phugoid and the short-period oscillation, (Fig 23). 
Revised May 11   
Page 18 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
1-17 Fig 23 Basic Components of Longitudinal Dynamic Stability 
Displacement
Phugoid
t
Short
Period
Oscillation
58.  Phugoid.    This  is  usually  a  long  period,  poorly  damped  motion  involving  large  variations  in  the 
speed and height of an aircraft but with negligible changes in load factor (n).  It can be regarded as a 
constant  energy  motion  in  which  potential  energy  and  kinetic  energy  are  continuously  interchanged.  
The  phugoid  oscillation  is  usually  damped  and  the  degree  of  damping  depends  on  the  drag 
characteristics of the aircraft.  The modern trend towards low drag design has resulted in the phugoid 
oscillation becoming more of a problem. 
59.  Short-Period  Oscillation.    This  oscillatory  motion  is  usually  heavily  damped  and  involves  large 
changes  of  load  factor  with  only  small  changes  in  speed and height.  It can be regarded simply as a 
pitching oscillation with one degree of freedom.   In para 53 it was stated that the time taken for one 
complete oscillation will depend upon the static stability, in this case it is the periodic time of the short-
period oscillation (See Fig 24). 
1-17 Fig 24 Short-Period Oscillation 
Short Period
Oscillation
Damping
in Pitch
RAF
60.  Stability  Factors.    The  longitudinal  dynamic  stability  of  an  aircraft,  i.e.  the  manner  in  which  it 
returns to a condition of equilibrium, will depend upon: 
a. 
Static longitudinal stability. 
b. 
Aerodynamic pitch damping. 
c. 
Moments of inertia in pitch. 
d. 
Angle of pitch. 
e. 
Rate of pitch. 
Revised May 11   
Page 19 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
Lateral Dynamic Stability 
61.  When an aircraft in trimmed level flight is disturbed laterally, the resulting motion can be shown to 
consist of the following components: 
a.
Rolling  Motion.    Initially  the  roll  will  only  change  the  angle  of  bank  and  will  be  rapidly 
damped as explained in para 36. 
b
Spiral  Motion.    A  combination  of  bank  and  yaw  will  result  in  a  gradually  tightening  spiral 
motion  if  the  aircraft  is  unstable  in  this  mode.    The  spiral  motion  is  not  usually  very  important 
because,  even  if  it  is  divergent,  the  rate  of divergence is fairly slow and the pilot can control the 
motion. 
c.
Dutch Roll.  This is an oscillation involving roll, yaw and sideslip.  The periodic time is usually 
fairly  short  and  the  motion  may  be  weakly  damped  or  even  undamped.    Because  of  these 
characteristics  of  the  Dutch  roll  oscillation,  lateral  dynamic  stability  has  always  been  more  of  a 
problem than longitudinal dynamic stability. 
Spiral Stability 
62.  The lateral stability of an aircraft depends on the forces that tend to right the aircraft when a wing 
drops.  However, at the same time the keel surface (including the fin) tends to yaw the aircraft into the 
airflow,  in  the  direction  of  the  lower  wing.    Once  the  yaw  is  started,  the  higher  wing,  being  on  the 
outside of the turn and travelling slightly faster than the lower, produces more lift.  A rolling moment is 
then set up which opposes, and may be greater than, the correcting moment of the dihedral, since the 
roll due to yaw will tend to increase the angle of bank. 
63.  If the total rolling moment is strong enough to overcome the restoring force produced by dihedral 
and the damping in yaw effect, the angle of bank will increase and the aircraft will enter a diving turn of 
steadily  increasing  steepness.    This  is  known  as  spiral  instability.    A  reduction  in  fin  area,  reducing 
directional  stability  and  the  tendency  to  yaw  into  the  sideslip  results  in  a  smaller  gain  in  lift  from  the 
raised wing and therefore in greater spiral stability. 
64.  Many  high  performance  aircraft  when  yawed,  either  by  prolonged  application  of  rudder  or  by 
asymmetric  power,  will  develop  a  rapid  rolling  motion  in  the  direction  of the yaw which if uncorrected 
may cause it to enter a steep spiral dive due to the interaction of its directional and lateral stability. 
Dutch Roll 
65.  Oscillatory  instability  is  more  serious  than  spiral  instability  and  is  commonly  found  to  a  varying 
degree  in  combinations  of  high  wing  loading,  sweepback  (particularly  at  low  IAS)  and  high  altitude.  
Oscillatory  instability  is  characterized  by  a  combined  rolling  and  yawing  movement  or  'wallowing' 
motion.    When  an  aircraft  is  disturbed  laterally  the  subsequent  motion  may  be  either  of  the  two 
extremes.    The  aerodynamic  causes  of  oscillatory  instability  are  complicated  and  a  simplified 
explanation of one form of Dutch roll is given in the following paragraph. 
66.  Consider a swept-wing aircraft seen in planform.  If the aircraft is yawed, say to starboard, the port 
wing  generates  more  lift  due  to  the  larger  expanse  of  wing  presented  to  the  airflow  and  the  aircraft 
accordingly rolls in the direction of yaw.  However, in this case the advancing port wing also has more 
drag because of the larger area exposed to the airflow.  The higher drag on the port wing causes a yaw 
to  port  which  results  in  the  starboard  wing  obtaining  more  lift  and  reversing  the  direction  of  the  roll.  
Revised May 11   
Page 20 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
The  final  result  is  an  undulating  motion  in  the  directional and lateral planes which is known as Dutch 
roll.  Since the motion is caused by an excessive restoring force one method of tempering its effect is 
to reduce the lateral stability by setting the wings at a slight anhedral angle. 
67.  The lateral dynamic stability of an aircraft is largely decided by the relative effects of: 
a. 
Rolling moment due to sideslip (dihedral effect). 
b. 
Yawing moment due to sideslip (weathercock stability). 
Too much weathercock stability will lead to spiral instability whereas too much dihedral effect will lead 
to Dutch roll instability. 
SUMMARY 
Static and Dynamic Stability of Aircraft 
68.  Stability is concerned with the motion of a body after an external force has been removed.  Static 
stability describes its immediate reaction while dynamic stability describes the subsequent reaction. 
69.  Stability may be of the following types: 
a. 
Positive - the body returns to the position it held prior to the disturbance.  
b. 
Neutral - the body takes up a new position of constant relationship to the original. 
c. 
Negative - the body continues to diverge from the original position. 
70.  The factors affecting static directional stability are: 
a. 
Design of the vertical stabilizer. 
b. 
The moment arm. 
71.  The factors affecting static longitudinal stability are: 
a. 
Design of the tailplane. 
(1)  Tail area. 
(2)  Tail volume. 
(3)  Planform. 
(4)  Wing downwash. 
(5)  Distance from CPtail to CG. 
Revised May 11   
Page 21 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-17 - Stability 
b. 
Position of CG. 
(1)  Aft movement of the CG decreases the positive stability. 
(2)  Forward movement of the CG increases the positive stability. 
72.  Manoeuvre stability is greater than the static stability in level flight and a greater elevator deflection 
is necessary to hold the aircraft in a steady pull-out. 
73.  The factors affecting static lateral stability are: 
a. 
Wing contributions due to: 
(1)  Dihedral. 
(2)  Sweepback. 
b. 
Wing/fuselage interference. 
c. 
Fuselage and fin contribution. 
d. 
Undercarriage, flap and power effects. 
74.  Some of the factors affecting the long-term response of the aircraft are: 
a. 
Linear velocity and mass. 
b. 
The static stabilities in roll, pitch and yaw. 
c. 
Angular velocities about the three axes.   } 
     }   Angular Momentum 
d. 
Moments of inertia about the three axes.  } 
e. 
Aerodynamic damping moments due to roll, pitch and yaw. 
75.  The longitudinal dynamic stability of an aircraft depends upon: 
a. 
Static longitudinal stability. 
b. 
Aerodynamic pitch damping. 
c. 
Moments of inertia in pitch. 
d. 
Angle of pitch. 
e. 
Rate of pitch. 
76.  The lateral dynamic stability of an aircraft is largely decided by the relative effect of: 
a. 
Dihedral effect. 
b. 
Weathercock stability. 
Revised May 11   
Page 22 of 22 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
CHAPTER 18 - DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION 
Introduction 
1.
The preceding contents of this manual explain the principles of flight without regard to the strength 
or method of construction of the aircraft.  This chapter is intended to be a brief introduction to the study 
of airframes from the designer's point of view, including some of the general problems confronting him, 
and the procedure required to obtain a new type of aircraft for the Service. 
2. 
To  avoid  misconceptions  of  the  engineering  terms  used  in  this  chapter  the  following  list  of 
definitions is included: 
a.
Stress.  Stress is defined as the load per unit area of cross-section. 
b.
Strain.    The  deformation  caused  by  stress.    It  is  defined  as  the  change  of  size  over  the 
original size. 
c.
Elastic  Limit.    When  stress  exceeds  the  elastic  limit  of  a  material,  the  material  takes  up  a 
permanent 'set', and on release of the load it will not return completely to its original shape. 
d.
Stiffness or Rigidity.  The ratio of stress over strain - Young’s Modulus. 
e.
Design  Limit  Load.    The  maximum  load  that  the  designer  would  expect  the  airframe  or 
component to experience in service. 
THE DESIGN PROCESS 
Military Aircraft Procurement 
3. 
In  the  UK  aircraft  projects  developed  independently  by  aircraft  manufacturers  are  known  as 
private  venture  projects.    Generally,  military  aircraft  are  developed  in  conjunction  with  MOD.    Major 
aircraft  projects  are  complicated  by  the  necessity  of  obtaining  agreement  between  the  aircraft 
manufacturers,  armed  forces  and  governments  of  two  or  more  countries.    Simpler  aircraft  projects 
would normally follow the path shown below: 
a. 
The Idea.  The Air Staff identify a possible need for a new aircraft in the future and initiate an 
investigation. 
b.
Preliminary Study.  A study is performed for the Air Staff, by, for instance, the Operational 
Requirements Branch, to identify more closely the best way of meeting the need. 
c.
Staff Target (Air).  Following on from the Preliminary Study the Air Staff publish a Staff Target 
(Air)  (STA)  which  is  a  document  that  briefly  states  the  performance  requirements  of  the  proposed 
aircraft.  This is issued to aircraft companies who express a desire to tender for the project. 
d.
Feasibility Study.  On the Government side, the management of an aircraft project is carried 
out  by  MOD  Procurement  Executive  (MOD  (PE))  and,  after  the  issue  of  an  STA,  they  may  fund 
feasibility studies for a new project by one or more companies.  
e.
Staff  Requirement  (Air).    With  more  information  available  on,  for  instance,  the  cost 
implications  of  possible  alternatives,  a  Staff  Requirement  (Air)  (SRA)  for  the  project  aircraft  is 
produced.  The SRA is much more detailed a document than the STA and it leads to the Aircraft 
Specification, which forms the basis of contracts that are awarded to the aircraft manufacturer. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 1 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
f.
Project  Definition.    The  project  definition  stage  may  include  any  research  necessary  to 
complete the detail design, and also includes production of the Aircraft Specification.  
g.
Full Development.  The development stage includes the detail design and the setting-up of 
manufacturing  facilities  and  may  include  the manufacture of prototype aircraft.  This stage leads 
on to testing and trials. 
h.
Acceptance and Approval.  Aircraft will not be accepted into service until they satisfy flight 
trials testing by MOD at DTEO Boscombe Down. 
i.
Production.
The Design 
4. 
Def  Stan  00-970  contains  the  design  and  airworthiness  requirements  for  UK  military  aircraft.  
Contractual references to Def Stan 00-970 control and guide the translation of the Aircraft Specification 
into a finalized design (see also The Military Aviation Authority (MAA) 4000/5000 series of documents).  
The contents cover: 
a. 
A series of design cases which define the extreme conditions that the aircraft is expected to 
encounter  during  its  service  life.    For  example,  gust,  manoeuvre  and  ground  loads  may  be 
specified,  together  with  the  margins  required  to  cater  for  structural  variables  and  occasional 
excesses of normal operating limits. 
b. 
The testing to be carried out to prove both static and fatigue strength, and the methods to be used 
to enable reliable estimates of fatigue lives to be made. 
c. 
Provisions  to  guide  the  selection  of  materials  and  protective  finishes  which  enhance  long 
term durability. 
5. 
Not all aircraft in service with the RAF were designed with reference to UK military requirements.  
Aircraft  originating  from  other  countries  or  from  multi-national  projects  may  be  designed  to  other 
national  standards  such  as  the  American  range  of  military  specifications  (Mil  Specs).  Civil  designs 
meet  British-Civil  Airworthiness  Requirements  (BCARs),  Joint  Airworthiness  Requirements  (JARS)  or 
foreign equivalents. 
OPERATING CONDITIONS FOR AIRFRAMES 
Static Strength and Stiffness 
6. 
Static strength requirements determine the design of a large proportion of aircraft structure.  They 
are specified by applying specific safety factors to the design limit loads (DLLs) which result from each 
design case: 
a.
Proof Load.   Proof load is normally 1.125 × DLL.  When proof load is applied, the aircraft 
structure  must  not  suffer  any  permanent  deformation  and  flying  controls  and  systems  must 
function normally. 
b.
Design  Ultimate  Load.    The  design  ultimate  load  (DUL)  is  1.5  ×  DLL.    The  structure  must 
withstand DUL without collapse. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 2 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
7. 
Static strength is proved by loading a representative airframe to, first, proof load and then to DUL in 
the critical design cases.  Such static strength testing is carried out before the type is released to service.  
Structural failure beyond DUL (as is usual) implies that the structural reserve factor is greater than 1.0. 
8. 
Aeroelastic effects (in particular flutter) often set limits to the maximum speed of fixed wing aircraft 
in  each  configuration.    Structural  stiffness  is  normally  checked  during  static  and  ground  resonance 
testing.    A  flight  flutter  investigation  is  included  in  the  development  programme.    Flutter  is  a  violent, 
destructive vibration of the aerofoil surfaces, caused by interaction of their inertia loads, aerodynamic 
loads and structural stiffness. 
9. 
When structures incorporate fibre-reinforced composite materials, design calculations and testing 
have to take account of additional environmental factors such as; temperature, moisture uptake, ultra-
violet ageing and the potential effects of accidental damage. 
10.  Temperature,  Corrosion  and  Natural  Hazards.
Airframes  need  to  contend  with  elevated 
temperatures  from  two  causes;  local  heating  of  the  structure  near  to  engines,  heat  exchangers,  hot 
gas  ducts  etc  and  kinetic  heating  of  the  outside  surface  of  the  airframe  at  high  Mach  numbers.  
Corrosive conditions, caused by fluids such as water and general spillages, are a sizeable problem for 
airframe  maintainers  and  corrosion  is  exacerbated  by  damage  to  paint  and  other  protective  finishes.  
Some  materials,  particularly  certain  aluminium  alloys  and  steels,  are  susceptible  to  stress  corrosion 
cracking  where  cracks  grow  in  a  stressed  component  from  corrosion  on  the  surface.    New  designs 
should,  wherever  possible,  exclude  the  use  of  materials  known  to  be  highly  susceptible  to  stress 
corrosion  cracking  or  exfoliation  corrosion  and  eliminate  undesirable  features  such  as  water  traps, 
dissimilar metal contact or ineffective protective coatings. 
11.  Environmental  Conditions.    Operating  conditions  also  affect  material  choice  and  component 
design.  In addition to the natural hazards of lightning and bird strikes, design attention must be paid to 
the effects of flight in saline environments and flight through erosive, sand laden atmospheres.  Man-
made  hostile  environments,  such  as  atmospheric  industrial  pollution,  also  influence  the  range  of 
materials which can be used in airframe construction. 
Material Requirements 
12.  The  ideal  properties  of  an  airframe  material  would  include:  low  density,  high  strength,  high 
stiffness, good corrosion resistance, high impact resistance, good fatigue performance, high operating 
temperature, ease of fabrication and low cost.  This list is not exhaustive, and needless to say, there is 
no perfect material.  Each material choice is a compromise which attempts to find the best balance of 
the  most  important  requirements  of  the  component.    There  is  always  a  mix  of  materials  on  any 
particular aircraft type. 
13.  It  is  generally  found  that  the  stronger  and  stiffer  an  engineering  metal  is  the  more  dense  it  is; 
therefore the strength/weight and stiffness/weight ratios for the commonly-used aircraft metals are similar. 
The  increasing  use  of  composite  materials  reflects  their  inherent  advantages  over  metals.    First,  within 
their  physical  capabilities,  they  can  be  readily  engineered  to  meet  any  specific  requirement.    Secondly, 
composite components can be designed and manufactured to complex shapes.  For example, the weight 
and size of a gearbox casing can be minimized by the use of a skeletal composite structure in which each 
stress is reacted to by a specific feature of the structure, thus eliminating surplus material.  This is almost 
impossible  to  achieve  with  conventional  metal  manufacture,  although  integral  machining  or  chemical 
etching techniques can be used to manufacture minimalized metal components of such simple geometric 
shapes as wing and skin panels. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 3 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
14.  For  each  metal  there  may  be  dozens  of  different  specifications,  each  with  its  own  characteristics.  
The strength, hardness and ductility can vary greatly but the stiffness varies little.  The 'specific' properties 
of a material, ie strength/weight and stiffness/weight ratios are important because the designer is always 
seeking to minimize mass.  High stiffness of a material is important because we normally wish structures 
to  deflect  as  little  as  possible.    Even  if  two  materials  have  similar  specific  properties,  the  less  dense 
material may be the better choice as it will have a greater volume for a given load and the extra thickness 
is of advantage for components in compression or shear (doubling the thickness quadruples the load at 
which a sheet will buckle).  However, the space available may, in some circumstances, restrict the use of 
the less dense materials.  
Use of Materials 
15.  Since  the  first  days  of  aviation,  the  manufacture  of  safe  and  effective  aircraft  structures  has 
demanded  the  use  of  the  highest  contemporary  technology.    Indeed,  the  majority  of  technological 
advances can be attributed to aviation.  Early aircraft were constructed by the most skilled craftsmen 
using  the  best  timber  and  other  materials  available.    The  need  for  more  consistent  and  stronger 
materials led to developments in aluminium alloys during the 1930s, although wood and canvas were 
still  widely  used  even  during  the  Second  World  War.   Arguably the first totally composite aircraft, the 
DH 98 Mosquito, owed much of its high performance and subsequent success to the ingenious use of 
a hard wood and balsa wood sandwich composite in its structure.  Aircraft constructed since the War 
have relied almost entirely upon aluminium, magnesium, titanium and steel, although the structures of 
current aircraft, such as the EFA, make extensive use of advanced composite materials.  Several all-
composite aircraft are in production, and the trend towards their greater use is likely to continue. 
16.  The  most  commonly  used  material  in  the  current  generation  of  airframes  is  still  aluminium  alloy.  
Titanium alloy is used for structure adjacent to engines, heavily loaded fuselage frames and items like flap 
tracks,  which  are  subject  to  wear  and  not  easily  protected  against  corrosion.    Magnesium  alloy  is  very 
rarely used except for small items like control-run brackets, and for helicopter transmission cases.  Steel 
is sometimes used for heavily-loaded parts like wing attachments and undercarriage components, and of 
course  for  bolts  and  other  hardware.    Carbon  Fibre  Composites  (CFC)  are  now  common  on  large 
passenger transports for components such as control surfaces, fairings and even fins.  Modern combat 
aircraft, such as the Typhoon and the Lightning II have a high proportion of CFC components. 
17.  Aluminium alloy is cheap, and is easy to produce, to machine and to fabricate.  Pure aluminium 
has good natural corrosion resistance but is very weak.  The stronger aluminium alloys have poorer 
corrosion  resistance  which  is  sometimes  improved  by  cladding  the  alloy  with  a  thin  layer  of  pure 
aluminium.   In any case,  they  are  normally  protected  with  a  paint  scheme.  Components like wing 
skins, spars, ribs and fuselage frames are often machined by integral milling, where up to 90% of the 
material is removed (see Fig 1). 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 4 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
1-18 Fig 1 Machined Skin Wing Construction 
Machined Skin
Thinner skins may be chemically etched to remove the metal for weight saving.  Many small parts are 
made by cutting from a sheet and bending to shape.  Final assembly can be by adhesive bonding but 
is  usually  by  riveting  and  bolting.    The  very  highest  strength  aluminium alloys (with about 7% zinc as 
the main alloying ingredient) are often used for wing upper skins but they have a relatively poor fatigue 
performance.  Slightly less strong, but more commonly used, are the Duralumin alloys with 4% copper.  
These  alloys  have  to  be  heat-treated  to  produce  the  required  properties  and  this  means  that  their 
service  temperature  is  limited  to  120°  C;  if  the  material  is  accidentally  heated  above  this,  by  fire  for 
instance, it may have to be renewed.  Under development is a series of aluminium alloys which contain 
about  3%  lithium.    These  have  about  10%  increase  in  both  specific  strength  and  stiffness  over 
established alloys, and may well compete with CFC. 
18.  Magnesium  alloy  is  not  as  easy  to  work  as  aluminium,  although  it  machines  and  casts  quite 
readily.  Its two major disadvantages are its reactivity (which means that it burns easily) and its extreme 
susceptibility to corrosion.  Magnesium must be protected extremely well against corrosion and should 
be used only where it can be inspected easily. 
19.  Titanium is very expensive indeed owing to its natural scarcity and the difficulty of extraction from 
its  ore.    Titanium  alloy  is  not  easy  to  form  or  machine  but  it  can  be  welded  and  cast  with  care.    The 
advantages of titanium alloy are that it has a high specific strength, maintains its properties well up to 
400°  C,  and  has  very  good  corrosion  resistance  (it  needs  no  protective  coating).    It  is  used  for  fire-
walls, helicopter rotor hubs and wing carry-through sections (e.g. on aircraft like Tornado, B-1 and F-
14) and many other applications.  Welding is generally done by the electron beam method. 
20.  Superplastic Forming/Diffusion Bonding (SPF/DB).  SPF/DB is a relatively new process which 
is being used at the moment to make production items, like a Tornado heat exchanger, out of titanium.  
It is also being developed for future use on aluminium.  At about 900 °C, titanium will deform steadily 
under  constant  load  to  a  strain  of  several  hundred  per  cent;  this  is  superplasticity.    At  the  same 
temperature,  if  two  clean  titanium  surfaces  are  pressed  together  they  will  weld  by  atomic  diffusion 
across the joint line; this is diffusion bonding.  SPF/DB combines the two processes in one operation.  
SPF/DB  can  save  cost,  weight  and  production  time  compared  to  alternative  methods  and  can  give  a 
better finished product with less fasteners and excellent welds. 
21.  Steel.  There are hundreds of different specifications of steel with widely varying properties; wide use 
is made of many different alloying constituents and various heat treatments.  It is comparatively easy to 
machine,  form  and  weld, except for the very high strength and stainless versions.  Low alloy steels are 
used for fasteners and highly-loaded brackets. Steel has to be protected against corrosion by painting or 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 5 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
plating with cadmium or chromium.  Stainless steels with upwards of 12% chromium are used infrequently 
in airframes. 
22.  Non-metallic Composites.  The term 'composite' is usually taken to mean a matrix of a thermo-
setting  plastic  material  (normally  an  epoxy  resin)  reinforced  with  fibres  of  a  much  stronger  material 
such as glass, Kevlar (a synthetic filament), boron or carbon.  Glass provides a useful cheap material 
for the manufacture of tertiary components, whereas Kevlar, boron and carbon fibre composites (CFC) 
are used in the manufacture of primary structures such as control surfaces or helicopter rotor blades.  
23.  Advantages  of  CFC.    The  main  advantages  of  CFC  are  its  increased  strength/weight  and 
stiffness/weight  compared  to  the  normal  airframe  materials.    This  results  in  lighter  structures  and 
hence performance benefits; the usual weight saving is about 20%.  CFC is very resistant to corrosion 
and  does  not  necessarily  have  to  be  protected.    Complex  shapes  can  be  made  more  easily  than  in 
metal.  Large structures can be manufactured in one piece, thus saving machining and assembly time. 
CFC  has  a  very  good  fatigue  performance,  especially  at  the  stress  levels  used  in  the  present 
generation of CFC structures. 
24.  Disadvantages of Composite Materials.  Current composite materials have inherent drawbacks 
which limit their use, although continuing research and development will solve these problems in due 
course.  Almost all such disadvantages result from limitations of the matrix materials used.  The most 
relevant of these drawbacks are: 
a. 
Most composite materials are relatively elastic, and unless adequately reinforced they tend to 
fail prematurely at such features as fastener holes. 
b. 
Their use is limited to ambient temperatures below about 120° C. 
c. 
Unless adequately protected, they tend to absorb atmospheric moisture. 
d. 
They  have  poor  impact  resistance,  the  main  effect  of  which  is  poor  resistance  to  erosion 
caused by hail or sand.  Leading edges of composite flying surfaces are frequently fitted with a 
titanium or stainless steel sheath to overcome this problem. 
e. 
They are more difficult to repair than comparable metal structures.  Curing the resins during 
manufacture  and  repair  must  be  carried  out  within  a  narrow  range  of  temperature  and  humidity 
conditions, and this requires the use of environmentally controlled facilities. 
WING STRUCTURES 
Design Considerations 
25.  A design to meet both subsonic and supersonic requirements must be less efficient in both modes 
of  flight.    The  aircraft  will  be  heavier  and  more  expensive  than  one  designed  for  a  single  role  but 
nevertheless  may  be  more  useful  overall.    Even  though  a  higher  proportion  of  flying  time  is  spent 
subsonic it will be supersonic considerations which control the design, since the price of inefficiency in 
that role, in terms of thrust and fuel required, is greater. 
26.  One  obvious  solution  is  to  use  variable  sweep,  if  this  is  justified  by  combat  endurance  and/or 
radius  of  action  requirements.    Otherwise  there  will  be  penalties  in  weight  and  complexity.  
Alternatively,  thin  wings  of  moderate  sweep  may  be  provided  with  combat  high  lift  devices,  such  as 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 6 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
flaps  and  slats  or  leading  edge  droop,  which  reduce  the  drag  at  high  lift.    Additionally,  leading  edge 
strakes  give  more  lift  and  reduced  drag  at  high  angles  of  attack  (α)  and  at  the  same  time  delay  the 
drag rise at low α.  Practical limits to thinness are set by considerations of wing structure weight and 
fuel and undercarriage stowage volume. 
Wing Loads 
27.  The  loading  on  aircraft  wings  originates  in  airloads  arising  from  the  air  pressure  distribution  and 
inertia  loads due to the mass of the wing structure, fuel, stores and fuselage.  This loading results in 
shear forces, bending moments and torques on the main structural box of the wing. 
28.  To a first approximation, the shear forces are reacted by the shear webs of the spars; the bending 
moments  by  the  skin,  stringers  and  spar  booms,  and  the  torque  by  the  skin  and  shear  webs.  
Composite  wings,  tailplanes,  fins  and  fuselages  have  a  similar  basic  structure  to  the  metal  versions 
described in the following paragraphs.  Depending upon the required performance of the structure, a 
variety  of  composites  or  metals  and  composite  hybrids  are  used  to  construct  integrated  skins, 
stringers, frames, ribs, spars and webs which are needed for the structures described. 
1-18 Fig 2 Stressed-Skin Wing Construction 
Light Alloy Fabricated
Stressed Skin
Structural Design 
29.  In more detail, the jobs of the various parts of the wing main structure are as follows: 
a.
Skin.    The  skin  is  subject  to  the  pressure  differences  due  to  the  air  pressure  and  the 
pressure caused by the inertia forces of any fuel in the wing tanks.  It reacts the bending moment 
by generating direct stresses (either tension or compression) in the spanwise direction.  It reacts 
torsion by generating shear stresses. 
b. 
Stringers.  The stringers, provided that they are continuous in the spanwise direction, react 
bending  moment  in  the  same  way  as  the  skin.    They  also  stiffen  the  skin  in  compression  and 
shear by increasing the stress at which the skin buckles. 
c.
Ribs.  The ribs maintain the aerodynamic shape of the wing, support the spars, stringers and 
skin  against  buckling,  and  pass  concentrated  loads  (from  stores,  engines,  undercarriages  and 
control surfaces) into the skin and spars. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 7 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
1-18 Fig 3 Typical Spar Sections 
A
B
C
d.
Spars.  The webs of the spars react the applied shear forces by generating shear stresses.  
They  also  combine  with  the  skin  to  form  torsion  boxes  to  react  to  torque  by  generating  shear 
stresses.  The spar booms (also known as flanges or caps, particularly if they are relatively small) 
react bending moment in a similar way to the skin.  A conventional structure would consist of front 
and rear spars, the metal skin attached to the spar flanges forming a torsion box (Fig 4).  There is 
a  form  of  construction  that  uses  a  series  of  small  spars  to  replace  the  two  main  spars.    This 
results in a very rigid structure with good fail-safe characteristics. 
1-18 Fig 4 Torsion Box 
e.
IntercostalsIntercostals are short stringers which run between ribs.  They do not go through 
the ribs and therefore do not transmit any end load.  They act as local skin formers and stiffeners.  
They are not present on all aircraft. 
30.  Honeycomb Construction.  Honeycomb construction (see Fig 5) is an efficient way of stabilizing 
(ie stiffening) relatively thin skins which are in close proximity. It is used on wing and tail trailing edges 
and  access  panels  on  many  aircraft  types.    The  honeycomb  material  is  usually  manufactured  from 
strips of aluminium foil or resin impregnated Nomex cloth.  The strips are bonded together alternately 
into  a  large  block  which  can  be  machined  to  any  desired  shape.    After  machining,  the  block  is 
stretched, and the strips deform into a matrix of hexagonal cells - similar to a honeycomb.  These may 
then be bonded between two sheets of aluminium, or a composite material such as Kevlar, to form a 
light  stiff  sandwich.    Sandwich  panels  are  made  using  a  variety  of  skin  materials  including  stainless 
steel,  titanium  and  CFC,  and  often  with  expanded  foams  instead  of  honeycomb.    Such  high strength 
materials are used extensively in current aircraft primary structures. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 8 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
1-18 Fig 5 Honeycomb Sandwich Panel 
Honeycomb core
of thin sheet
Skins
Layer of bonding or
brazing material making
a perfect seal
TAILPLANE, CANARD AND FIN 
Design Considerations 
31.  The  purpose  of  the  tailplane  is  to  provide  longitudinal  stability  and  control.    Considerable 
improvements  in  agility  and  reduction  of  overall  size  and  weight  are  available  in  making  a  neutrally 
stable  aircraft  with  computer-driven  active  controls  to  maintain  the  desired  flight  attitude.    Large  and 
rapid  control  movements  are  necessary  with  such  aircraft,  as  they  are  with  many  current  high 
performance aircraft when flying at the extremes of their flight envelopes.  For this reason, most such 
aircraft have "all flying" tailplanes giving much greater control forces than are feasible with a separate 
tailplane and elevator. 
32.  With tailless aircraft, control power is provided by trailing edge elevators or elevons.  Wing trailing 
edge flaps, however, cannot therefore be used. 
33.  Compared with a conventional aircraft, the tailless aircraft suffers from lift losses due to trimming 
and  restricted  supersonic  manoeuvring  resulting  from  the  relative  ineffectiveness  of  trailing  edge 
controls at supersonic speeds.  The trimmed lift of a tailless aeroplane can be improved by providing a 
canard, or foreplane. 
34.  The fin is sized to give the required level of directional stability and must be adequate to correct 
sideslip  rapidly.    This  can  be  difficult  to  achieve  at  high  angles  of attack.  An upper limit is set to the 
height of a tall fin by stiffness and strength in bending.  Alternatives to a tall fin are the use of twin fins, 
the addition of aft strakes, or by forebody shaping to reduce the effect of body vortices. 
35.  The detailed structural components of tails and fins are similar to those of wings. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 9 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
FUSELAGE DESIGN 
Introduction 
36.  Unlike  the  wings,  the  shape  of  the  fuselage  is  governed  primarily  by  the  load  it  has  to  carry.  
Aerodynamic features are secondary to the necessity to accommodate the payload. 
37.  Apart from payload there is the requirement to provide for pilot and crew, so visibility has also to 
be  considered.    Engine  and  jet  pipe  installation,  particularly  on  combat  aircraft,  have  an  important 
effect on fuselage shaping. 
38.  Another  aspect  is  the  aircraft  attitude  in  landing.    For  example  if  the  landing  attitude  has  a  high 
angle  of  attack  then  either  a  long  main  undercarriage  is  required,  or  the  tail  must  be  swept  up  for 
ground clearance, or a combination of both. 
39.  The  shape  of  the  fuselage  is  very  much  a  function  of  what  it  is  asked  to  do,  and  in  this  respect 
there are some fundamental differences between combat and transport aircraft. 
Combat Aircraft 
40.  Introduction.    The  main  features  influencing  fuselage  design  for  a  combat  aeroplane  will  be 
powerplant  installation,  fuel  and  undercarriage  stowage  and  weapon  carriage.   Stealth technology (i.e. the 
avoidance of a recognizable infra-red and radar signature ) will play an increasing role in future designs. 
41.  Area Ruling.  In following the area rule to minimize drag, the design will aim at a low frontal area 
with  a  smooth  build-up  of  cross-section  area  over  the  forebody,  canopy  and  wings,  followed  by  a 
gradual decrease over the afterbody and tail surfaces, the whole being spread over a length defined by 
fuel volume requirements. 
42.  Powerplant  Installation.    The  choice  of  the  number  of  engines  has  an  important  effect  on 
fuselage  shaping  and  directly  influences  the  fuselage  cross-section  shape.    The  decision  is  largely  a 
policy one, influenced by airworthiness, cost and maintainability factors. 
43.  Intake  Design.    The  number  of  engines  will  also  dictate  the  disposition  of  intake  ducts  and  fuel 
tanks,  again  influencing  fuselage  shape.    Intake  design  is  governed  by  speed  considerations  and 
engine  size,  since  the  intake  must  deliver  air  to  the  engine  with  minimum  pressure  loss,  evenly 
distributed  over  the  engine  face  and  free  from  turbulence.    This  is  of  particular  importance  at  high 
supersonic speeds where the air must be slowed to subsonic speed. 
44.  Weapon  Carriage.    Internal  weapon  stowage  has  the  advantage  that  area  ruling  is  unchanged, 
whatever  the  aircraft  role.    Additionally,  the  external  surfaces  are  aerodynamically  clean.    However, 
during the life of an aircraft, weapon requirements are likely to be diverse and to alter several times. 
45.  Stowage  Points.    External  stowage  is  more  adaptable  to  different  roles  and  customer 
requirements, and may be under the fuselage or under or on top of the wings. The pros and cons of 
alternative methods of external stowage are shown in tabular form in Table 1. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 10 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
Table 1 Features of External Store Positions 
Position 
Under fuselage 
Under or overwing
Performance 
Tandem carriage possible: 
Side-by-side  carriage  gives  unfavourable 
reduces drag of rear stores. 
interference  drag,  big  stores  sometimes 
affect induced drag adversely.
Stability and Control 
Forward 
stores 
destabilizing  Destabilizing  in  pitch  when  in  front  of  a  low 
directionally;  stores  remote  from  C  tailplane. 
Asymmetric 
carriage 
causes 
of  G  can  cause  large  pitch  rolling moment - can limit g on pull out.
disturbances.
Loads and Flutter 
Generally  free  from  flutter  and  Generally  causes  flutter  problem:  requires 
flexibility problems.
big tanks to be compartmentalized to control 
C of G. Response to jettison of heavy stores 
can cause severe loads.
Release 
and  Usually good.
Release  of  light  stores  difficult;  wing  flow 
Jettison 
causes 
pitch 
disturbances: 
requires 
accurate  store  C  of  G  control  -  can  conflict 
with flutter considerations.
Accessibility 
Generally  satisfactory  if  pylon-
Usually good.
mounted. 
46.  Front  Fuselage  Structure.    For  most  types  of  interceptor/attack/strike  aircraft  the  fuselage  is  a 
conventional  stressed  skin,  stringer  and  longeron  arrangement  with  frames  and  bulkheads.    The  front 
fuselage, forward of the wing/fuselage joint, contains the small pressurized area of the crew compartment.  
This is confined by a small front bulkhead, cockpit floor and a larger rear bulkhead.  The forward pressure 
bulkhead  carries  the  weapons  system  radar  or  weather radar, whilst the rear pressure bulkhead, which 
may  slope,  normally  carries  ejection  seat  attachment  points,  and  may  also  accept  nose  undercarriage 
mounting  loads.    The  fuselage  upper  longerons,  taking  end  loads  due  to  bending,  may  also  carry  the 
canopy rails and/or fixing points.  This is the conventional front fuselage layout. 
47.  Wing/Fuselage  TransferThe  manner  in  which  the  wing  loads  are  transferred  to  the  fuselage 
will depend to a large extent upon engine and wing position. 
a. 
Wing  Configuration.    A  low  wing  gives  a  shorter  undercarriage  and  good  crash  protection 
whereas  a  high  wing  can  give  a  better  aerodynamic  performance.    A  mid-wing  position  is 
attractive aerodynamically for supersonic performance. 
b. 
Light Loading.  If the wing structure is lightly loaded it is possible to transmit the loads to the 
fuselage through heavy root ribs and strong fuselage frames. 
c. 
Heavy Loading.  With a heavier loaded wing structure it is usual to make the whole centre 
section  box  continuous  across  the  fuselage,  thus  avoiding  transmitting  primary  wing-bending 
loads to the fuselage. 
48.  Centre  and  Rear  FuselageThe  volume  aft  of  the  rear  pressure  bulkhead  is  available  for  the 
avionics  bay,  fuel  stowage,  engines  and  jetpipes.    The  strength  and  stiffness  necessary  for  taking 
tailplane and fin bending and torsional loads will depend upon the particular design layout, for example 
one fin or two, or whether the aircraft is of tailless design.  If deck landings are envisaged, then the rear 
structure must be capable of accepting loads from the arrester hook. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 11 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
49.  Variable  Wing  Geometry.    The  design  of  a  variable  wing  geometry  aircraft  invariably  leads  to 
problems of cost and weight penalties which must be traded off against the better overall performance 
gained.    The  wing  carry-through  box  and  the  wing  attachment pivots must be adequately stiff, strong 
and  crack  resistant.    Apart  from  the  complexity  of  the  wing  sweep  actuators  there  is  the  problem  of 
providing  the  mechanism  necessary  to maintain parallel pylons.  For good aerodynamic performance 
the  seals  between  wing  and  glove  must  be  effective  over  the  full  sweep  range  and  allow  for  any 
structural  flexibility.    The  pivot  bearings  themselves  are  in  a  highly  loaded  region,  yet  they  must 
maintain low friction properties under dynamic loads in varying temperature conditions. 
Transport Aircraft 
50.  Pressurized FuselageFor a large pressurized fuselage the problem is complicated by the presence 
of cut-outs from windows, doors and undercarriage stowage and by the interaction effects at the wing/body 
junction.    Adequate  provision  must  be  made  against  catastrophic  failure  by  fatigue  and  corrosion  and  the 
task is further complicated by safeguarding against accidental damage.  In practice the present trend is to 
design a fuselage in which structural safety is provided by the fail-safe concept.  In detail, all fuselages are 
greatly different in design, but pressure cabins have a number of principles in common: 
a. 
Low stress levels due to pressurization loads. 
b. 
Cut-outs, such as doors and windows, are reinforced so that the fatigue life is at least equal 
to the basic fuselage. 
c. 
Materials  are  chosen  for  good  fatigue  properties  and  the  fuselage  is  provided  with  crack-
arresting features. 
51.  Fuselage  Shape  and  Cross-sectionThe  use  of  a  parallel  fuselage  eases  seating  and stowing 
arrangements.    It  also  permits  stretching  of  the  fuselage,  as  development  of  the  engine  and  airframe 
proceeds, to extend the life of the basic design.  Usually the parallel part of the fuselage is continued as 
far aft as is consistent with tail clearance.  There are four main factors which determine fuselage size: 
a. 
Cabin length and width (i.e. usable floor area). 
b. 
Freight volume. 
c. 
Passenger and freight distribution to maintain the correct CG position (a serious problem with 
random seat loading). 
52.  Wing Position.  A high-wing aircraft generally has a lower floor to ground height than a low-wing 
aircraft, which eases loading and may result in a reduction of weight.  The overall height will be less, 
which eases ground maintenance.  However, a low-wing aircraft provides a better cushion in case of a 
crash landing, whereas for a high-wing aircraft it is necessary to strengthen the main fuselage frames 
to prevent collapse of the wing.  The problems of main undercarriage attachment and stowage are less 
for a low-wing aircraft. 
Fuselage Structural Components 
53.  The function of the main structural components of the fuselage are: 
a.
Skin.    The  skin  is  the  primary  structural  part  of  the  fuselage  and  thicknesses  are  usually 
determined  by  hoop  tension  and  shear  forces.    The  skin  is  usually  wrapped  on  the  fuselage  in 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 12 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-18 - Design and Construction 
sheets.    This  is  convenient  for  a  long  parallel  fuselage  but  becomes  difficult  in  regions  of  double 
curvature where the sections of skin have to be preformed to shape. 
b.
Stringers.  The function of the stringers is to stabilize the skin.  Extruded stringers have good 
properties (due to extra material at the corners) and are more suitable for bonding since the round 
corners  of  rolled  stringers  are  liable  to  cause  peeling.    Closed  section  stringers  are  not  subject  to 
instability  and  are  even  more  suitable  for  bonding.    The  current  trend  for  large  aircraft  is  towards 
integral  skin/stringer  construction,  particularly  in  areas  of  stress  concentration  such  as  the  window 
band, in which case the necessary additional reinforcement is also machined into the panel. 
c.
Longerons.  Longerons  are  heavy  longitudinal  members  taking  concentrated  loads  in direct 
tension  and  compression,  usually  replacing  several  stringers  at  cut-outs  etc.    They  accept 
longitudinal loads due to fuselage bending. 
d.
Frames and Bulkheads.  The function of the frames is to maintain the shape of the fuselage 
cross-section and to improve the stability of the stringers, particularly open section stringers, which 
are cleated to the frames.  The frames also distribute local loading into the fuselage section, assist in 
carrying  pressurization  loads  and  act  as  crack  stopping  devices.    Heavier  frames  and  partial 
bulkheads  will  be  used  to  transmit  large  concentrated  loads  into  the  fuselage  section,  eg  wing, 
tailplane  and  fin  connections,  and  at  the  undercarriage  attachments.    Pressure  bulkheads  can  be 
either  of  the  curved  membrane  type  and  react  loads  in  tension,  or  flat  and  react  loads  in  bending.  
The former are lighter but the difficulty of the circumferential join may preclude their use. 
e.
Floors.  Floors give rise to both a local and an overall problem.  Local loads are sufficiently 
high  to  require  a  robust  construction,  especially  on  freighter  aircraft.    These  floors  often  tend  to 
pick up loads in the longitudinal direction, and thus cause an overall problem when the fuselage is 
bending.  As they are displaced from the neutral axis, the tendency is for the stress in the upper 
skin to increase.  This is undesirable and hence the floor is often designed in short portions and 
supported  laterally  off  the  frames.  Composite  honeycombs  are  frequently  used  for  the 
manufacture  of  floor  panels.    Their  light  weight  and  high  stiffness  are  particularly  suitable  in this 
role, and flush repairs of the scuff and tear damage which is often inflicted on floors can be made 
more easily than with metals. 
Revised Mar 2010 
Page 13 of 13 

AP3456 - 1-19 - Structural Integrity and Fatigue 
CHAPTER 19 - STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY AND FATIGUE 
Introduction - Structural Integrity 
1. 
Structural  integrity  is  concerned  with  the  structural  airworthiness  of  aircraft.    The  objectives  of 
structural integrity policy are: 
a.
Flight  Safety.    The  principle  aim  is  to  prevent  structural  failure  and  to  maintain  the 
airworthiness of aircraft.  Statistically, the probability of losing an aircraft through structural failure 
must not exceed 0.001. 
b.
Operational  Effectiveness.    Aircraft  must  remain  operationally  effective  with  minimal 
restrictions  on  the  Release  to  Service.    Front  line  availability  should  not  be  compromised  by  the 
need for structural maintenance. 
c.
Life Cycle Costs.  Fatigue life consumption and structural maintenance workloads must be 
kept  low  to  minimize  life  cycle  costs,  particularly  as many aircraft are retained in-service beyond 
originally planned dates. 
2. 
In high performance aircraft, fatigue is a primary threat to structural integrity.  All aircraft structures 
incur insidious fatigue damage in normal service due to the fluctuations and reversals of loads which 
arise  from  flight  manoeuvres,  turbulence,  pressurization  cycles,  landing,  and  taxiing.    This  chapter 
deals primarily with the ways in which the fatigue problem is dealt with in RAF aircraft, but other threats 
to structural integrity which should be noted include: 
a.
Overstressing.    When  loads  in excess  of  design  limitations  are  applied  to  an  airframe 
structure,  damage  may  result  beyond  a  level  that  would  contribute  incrementally  to  fatigue.  
Overstressing can result in irreparable structural damage, necessitating withdrawal of the airframe 
from service, or even in catastrophic failure during flight. 
b.
Operational HazardsOperational hazards include bird strikes, ricochet damage, and battle 
damage.  Aircraft are designed to withstand specified levels of operational damage, based on the 
statistical probability of occurrence. 
c.
Corrosion.  Corrosion is a chemical reaction occurring in metals exposed to water or other 
contaminants  which  not  only  weakens  structures  by  causing  metal  decay,  but  also  introduces 
stress concentrations that reduce fatigue life. 
d.
Stress Corrosion Cracking Stress corrosion cracking occurs when certain metal alloys are 
subjected  to  permanent  tensile  stress  in a corrosive environment.  Such tensile stress is usually 
residual,  as  a  result  of  forging,  interference  fit,  or  malalignment  during  assembly.    The  normal 
atmosphere is often sufficient to destroy the cohesion between individual metal grains, and stress 
corrosion cracking propagates around the grain boundaries. 
Metal Fatigue 
3. 
When  a  load  is  applied  to  a  metal,  a  stress  is  produced,  measured  as  the  load  divided  by  the 
cross-sectional  area.    The  stress  at  which  the  metal  fractures  is  known  as  its  ultimate  stress,  which 
defines its ability to resist a single application of a static load.  However, if a metal structure is loaded 
and  unloaded  many  times,  at  levels  below  the  ultimate  stress,  the  induced  stresses  cause 
accumulative  damage  which  will  eventually  cause  it  to  fail.    This  type  of  damage  constitutes  metal 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 1 of 5 

AP3456 - 1-19 - Structural Integrity and Fatigue 
fatigue,  and  it  is  important  to  note  that  eventual  failure  can  occur  at  a  stress  level  well  below  the 
ultimate stress. 
4. 
In metal, it is normally tensile loads that cause fatigue.  Cracks almost always start on the surface 
of  structures  where  there  are  discontinuities  of  shape,  such  as  fastener  holes,  screw  threads, 
machining marks, and sharp corners.  Surface flaws caused by corrosion and fretting can also help to 
initiate fatigue cracks. 
5. 
Composite materials too are subject to fatigue failure, but the failure mechanism is different, and 
is unlikely to pose comparable problems in service.  Reinforcement materials have considerably higher 
inherent  fatigue  strengths  than  conventional  metal  alloys,  and  fatigue  is  not  a  consideration  in 
composite materials at stress cycles below approximately 80% of ultimate stress.  When fatigue does 
occur  in  composites,  its  mechanism  is  a  fracture  of  individual  filaments  of  the  reinforcing  material.  
Because  composite  materials  are  not  homogeneous,  such  fractures  do  not  precipitate  cracking  but 
more  gradual  weakening  of  the  whole  material  mass.    Thus,  whilst  metal  structures  suffering  fatigue 
retain  their  design  strength  until  cracking  reaches  a  critical  point  when  failure  occurs  very  rapidly, 
composite  structures  only  gradually  loose  their  properties.    Such  'soft  failures'  as  they  are  termed 
provide ample evidence to be observed during routine inspection well before critical strength is lost. 
Design Philosophy 
6.
There are basically two design philosophies used to counter the threat to structural integrity from 
fatigue: 
a
Safe-life.    Safe-life  design,  which  is  used  for  most  combat  and  training  aircraft,  aims  to 
ensure that there will be no cracking of significant structure during the specified life of an aircraft.  
Crack arrest is not a feature of safe-life design, and should there be a significant risk that cracking 
has started, the structure is usually retired from service. 
b.
Damage  Tolerant.    The  damage  tolerant,  or  fail-safe  approach,  requires  that  structures 
maintain adequate strength in service until planned inspection reveals unacceptable defects.  Fail-
safe  structures  are  characterized  by  crack-arrest  features,  redundant  load  paths,  and  relatively 
long  critical  crack  lengths.    Fracture  mechanics  analysis  plays  a  large  part  in  damage  tolerant 
design,  and  the  setting  of  inspection  intervals.    Most  transport  type  aircraft  are  designed  to 
damage tolerant principles. 
Establishing Fatigue Life 
7. 
The relationship between various alternating stress levels which can be applied to a material and 
its  endurance  to  failure,  can  be  established  by  testing  a  large  number  of  typical  structural  elements.  
Fig  1  illustrates  such  a  relationship  in  an  'S-N  curve',  which  plots  the  applied  percentage  of  ultimate 
stress against the number of cycles to failure.  It can be seen in this example that if the applied stress 
was 80% of the ultimate stress, the specimen could be expected to fail after 100 applications, but if the 
applied stress was reduced to 20% of the ultimate stress, failure would not occur until there had been 
10 million applications.  The curve also shows that if the stress level in the structural element was to be 
increased by (say) 20% of the ultimate stress (e.g. from 30% to 50%), the life would be reduced by a 
factor of 10. 
Revised Mar 10   
Page 2 of 5 

AP3456 - 1-19 - Structural Integrity and Fatigue 
1-19 Fig 1 S-N Curve 
S
80
Applied
alternating
stress
50
(% age of
ultimate)
30
20
0
2
3
4
7
1
10
10
10
10
No of cycles to failure
N
(drawn to log scale)
8. 
Volume 1, Chapter 20 considers the basic applications of S-N curves to the calculation of fatigue 
life in structures.  In order to apply fatigue formulae the design authority needs to know in considerable 
detail how an aircraft will be used in service.  The range and frequency of 'g' forces which are likely to 
be  applied  during  manoeuvres  have  the  greatest  influence  on  combat  aircraft  and  trainers,  but 
turbulence,  cabin  pressurization,  flying  control  movements,  landings,  vibrations,  and  buffet  are 
examples of other factors which must be taken&#