This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'ICT Strategy'.


 
 
ICT Strategy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
ICT Strategy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 1 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
ICT STRATEGY INDEX 
 
 
Executive Summary 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
1.  ICT Strategy - Introduction 
11 
 
2.  Corporate aims & objectives for ICT  
12 
 
3.  Corporate Business Drivers 
14 
 
4.  ICT Infrastructure 
16 
 
4.1 
Network Configuration 
16 
4.2 
UNIX platform 
16 
4.3 
Network infrastructure 
16 
4.4 
Network Server Configuration 
17 
4.5 
Windows networking Software 
18 
4.6 
Network Upgrades 
18 
4.7 
IP Telephony 
19 
4.8 
Storage Strategy 
20 
4.9 
Virtual Desktop Integration 
21 
4.10 
Backup Strategy 
22 
4.11 
Database Software 
22 
4.12 
Email Facilities 
23 
 
5.  ICT Software 
24 
 
5.1 
Development Standards 
24 
5.2 
Workstation Application Software 
24 
5.3 
Microsoft Workstation Software 
24   
5.4 
Packaged Software 
25 
5.5 
Software Upgrades 
27 
5.6 
Software Deployment 
 
 
 
 
 
27 
5.7 
Open Source  
 
 
 
 
 
 
28 
 
 
6.  ICT Hardware 
29 
 
6.1 
Workstations 
29 
6.2 
Printers 
30 
6.3 
IP Telephones 
30 
6.4 
Mobile Phones 
30 
 
 
6.5 
Mobile Devices 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30 
 
 
6.6 
End User Device Selection 
 
 
 
 
31 
 
7.  Security 
 
34 
 
   
 
7.1 
Protocols, Standards and procedures 
34 
 
7.2  
Protection from malicious software (Virus Controls) 
34 
7.3 
Vulnerability and Patch Management 
35 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 2 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
7.4 
Government Public Services Network (PSN) 
35 
7.5 
Email Anti-Virus 
36 
7.6 
Firewalls 
36 
7.7 
Encryption 
36 
7.8 
Virus Alerts 
37 
7.9 
Dual Authentication  
 
 
 
 
 
37 
7.10 
Mobile Device Management 
 
 
 
 
37 
7.11 
Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard(PCI-DSS)  38  
7.12 
Social Networking 
38 
 
8 
Roles and Responsibilities 
 
39 
 
   
 
 
8.1 
The Cabinet 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  39 
 
8.2 
Corporate Management Team  
 
 
 
  39 
 
8.3 
IT Manager 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  39 
 
8.4 
ICT development group 
 
 
 
 
  40 
 
9.  ICT Purchasing 
41 
 
 
9.1 
Acquisition Policy  
41 
 
10.  Technical & User Support 
42 
 
10.1 
Hardware 
42 
10.2 
Software 
42 
 
11.  Risk assessment and risk management 
 
 
 
  44 
 
12.  Green ICT 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
45 
 
12.1 
Printer Consolidation 
45 
12.2 
LCD Monitors 
45 
12.3 
Power Efficient Hardware 
45 
12.4 
Server Virtualisation 
45 
12.5 
Storage Virtualisation 
46 
12.6 
Virtual Desktop Integration 
46 
12.7 
PC Energy Saving measures 
46 
12.8 
Replacement of equipment 
47 
12.9 
Mobile devices 
47 
12.10 
ICT Equipment Recycling and Disposal 
47 
 
 13  GIS 
 
48 
 
 
13.1 
Definition 
 
48 
 
13.2 
Standards 
 
48 
 
13.3 
Maintenance and Development 
 
48 
 
13.4 
Benefits 
 
49 
 
 
13.5 
Training and User Support 
50 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 3 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
14  Web Development 
 
51 
 
 
14.1 
Definition 
51 
14.2 
Standards 
51 
14.3 
Accessibility 
51 
14.4 
Maintenance and Development 
51 
14.5 
Training and User Support 
52 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 4 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
Executive Summary 
 
 
This  strategy  defines  the  Council’s  strategic  approach  to  the  development  of 
Information  and  Communications  Technology  (ICT).  This  will  ensure  that  these 
systems  both  contribute  to  and  underpin  the  delivery  of  the  Council’s  Strategic 
Objectives and Service Delivery Plans. 
 
 
The aims of the strategy are: 
 
  Provide a solid, secure and reliable computer infrastructure. 
  Set standards. 
  Provide a high quality ICT environment. 
  Comply  with  Government  IT  standards  and  best  practice  guidelines,  Payment 
Card  Industry  Data  Security  Standard  (PCI-DSS)  and  international  security 
management standards. 
  Ensure that ICT facilities are secure and protected from security risks. 
  Provide a corporate and community-wide Geographical Information System.  
  Provide a Local Land & Property Gazetteer (LLPG). 
  Provide a web development function.  

 
 
Corporate aims & objectives for ICT 
 
The success of most organisations is dependent on their ability to develop effective 
information  systems,  which  support  major  goals  and  objectives  with  timely  and 
accurate  information.  For  local  authorities,  information  technology  has  become  a 
corporate asset of strategic importance.  
 
An  ICT  strategy  is  concerned  with  aligning  the  needs  of  the  organisation  with  the 
provision  of  information  systems  through  the  application  of  ICT.  Underpinning  the 
strategy  is  the  selection  of  a  strategic  ICT  platform,  capable  of  supporting 
customers  and  users,  and  providing  for  opportunities  in  a  flexible,  unrestrictive 
fashion. 
 
The ICT strategy supports, and is appropriately aligned with, the Councils Corporate 
Plan and enables the authority to achieve elements of the corporate plan, any future 
strategies and projects which support the Council’s Priorities.  
An  ICT  strategy  defines  the  building  blocks  necessary  to  achieve  a  transparent 
infrastructure,  on  which  applications  are  placed,  and  also  defines  the  processes 
required to ensure that security and data communication are effective and efficient. 
 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 5 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
The corporate objectives of the strategy are: 
 
  To integrate complex multi-vendor software and hardware. 
  To be able to integrate information from several sources. 
  To have the ability to re-align technology quickly. 
  To  have  the  ability  to  expand  and  change  easily  without  affecting  other 
components. 
  To have portable systems. 
  To have an infrastructure capable of supporting shared services. 
  To  provide  ICT  facilities  and  an  infrastructure  which  addresses  the  Councils 
operational needs. 
  To provide online facilities and develop customer focused services. 
  To provide an ICT architecture that enables mobile working. 
  To provide a Local Land & Property Gazetteer (LLPG). 
  To provide an integrated GIS resource.  
  To provide  Metadata which  is  INSPIRE  compliant  and  complies with  the  EU 
Directive. 
 
Corporate Business Drivers  
 
The  corporate  business  drivers  reflect  the  pressures  faced  by  the  Authority  to 
deliver  efficiencies,  meet  Central  Government  directives  and  continue  to  deliver  a 
high quality public service and include the following:  
 
  Business Continuity 
  Efficiency Savings 
 
  Change for the future 
  Mobile and Flexible Working  
  Government Public Services Network (PSN) 
  Customer self-service 
 
ICT Infrastructure 
 
 
The ICT infrastructure is the platform upon which ICT systems are run and consists 
of hardware and software.  Standards are essential in order to ensure consistency, 
compatibility, efficiency and flexibility and is made up of the following components:    
 
  Network Configuration 
  UNIX platform   
  Network infrastructure  
  Network Server Configuration 
  Windows networking Software 
  Network Upgrades 
  IP Telephony 
  Storage Strategy 
  Virtual Desktop Integration 
  Backup Strategy 
  Database Software 
  Email facilities 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 6 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
 
 
ICT Software 
 
 
Software  is  the  essential  component  which  sits  on  top  of  the  infrastructure  to 
provide  user  facilities.  It  is  imperative  that  standards  are  adhered  to  in  order  to 
provide  systems  which  are  stable,  compatible,  portable  and  maintainable.  The 
essential components are:    
 
  Development Standards 
  Workstation Application Software 
  Microsoft Workstation Software  
  Packaged Software 
  Software Upgrades 
  Software Deployment 
  Open Source 
 
 
 
ICT Hardware 
 
 
Hardware works with the infrastructure and software to provide users with facilities 
to  use  ICT  systems.  It  is  imperative  that  standards  are  adhered  to  in  order  to 
provide  users  with  facilities  which  are  stable,  compatible,  portable,  efficient,  cost 
effective and maintainable. The essential components are:    
 
  Workstations 
  Printers 
  IP Telephones 
  Mobile Phones  
  Mobile Devices  
  End user device selection 
 
Security 
 

 
Security is essential in order to protect the Councils information processing facilities, 
hardware,  software  and  data,  which  are  important  assets.  Confidentiality,  integrity 
and  availability  of  information  are  essential  to  the  operation  of  the  Council.  The 
essential components are:    
 
  Protocols, Standards and procedures 
  Protection from malicious software (Virus Controls) 
  Vulnerability and Patch Management 
  Government Public Services Network (PSN) 
  Email Anti-Virus 
  Firewalls 
   
  Encryption 
  Virus Alerts 
  Dual Authentication 
  Mobile device management 
  Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS)  
  Social Networking 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 7 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
 
Roles and Responsibilities 
 
There is a need for clear governance arrangements to ensure that the Council’s ICT 
strategy  and  projects  are  delivered  effectively,  with  sufficient  priority  within  the 
Council. 
 
The  following  structure  encompasses  staff  from  all  levels  within  the  authority  to 
ensure full ownership of the ICT strategy.  
 
 
The Cabinet 
 
The  portfolio  holder  for  corporate  issues  is  the  member  responsible  for  ICT.  The 
role  of  the  Cabinet  is  to  approve  the  initial  and  future  developments  of  the  ICT 
strategy. 
 
 
Corporate  Leadership Team 
 
The  responsibility  of  this  team  is  to  support  the  ICT  strategy,  policies  and 
procedures,  by  ensuring  that  all  directorates  participate  in  the  identification  of 
requirements for, and the development of the strategy. The team will be responsible 
for  ensuring  that  all  projects  within  their  directorate  and  cross  cutting  projects  are 
adequately resourced and that staff are given  appropriate priorities for all projects.  
 
 

IT Manager 
 
The  responsibility  of  the  IT  Manager  is  to  develop  the  ICT  strategy  and  its 
associated  policies  and  procedures.  The  IT  manager  will  report  to  the  Corporate 
Management  Team  to  gain  approval  for  developments  of  the  strategy.  The  IT 
Manager  will  be  the  lead  officer  of  the  ICT  development  group    and  will  be 
responsible for the development and delivery of ICT projects. 
 
 

ICT development group 
 
The responsibility of this group is to develop and manage ICT projects.  
 
 
ICT Purchasing 
 

 
Acquisition Policy 
 
An acquisition policy is necessary to ensure that computer equipment and software 
purchased  meets  the  ICT  strategy  requirements  and  is  in  line  with  the  Council’s 
procurement policies.  
 
The  Computer  section  is  responsible  for  ordering  all  computer  equipment  and 
software  and  any  associated  maintenance,  this  ensures  that  the  necessary 
standards are adhered to. 
 
ICT  will  use  buying  solutions  framework  and  any  other  Council  approved  framework 
wherever possible.  
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 8 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
 
 
Technical & User Support 
 
The technical support strategy is divided into the following areas :- 
 
  Hardware - Maintenance contracts should be arranged for the core computer 
equipment  in order to minimise down time for critical applications. Equipment 
not  covered  by  maintenance  agreements  will  be  repaired  on  a  time  and 
materials basis. 
 
  Software  -  Software  support  contracts  should  be  arranged  for  critical 
application packages. 
 
 
Risk assessment and risk management 
 
ICT projects are not without risk and therefore it is imperative that the Council has a 
risk  assessment  and  risk  management  procedure  which  will  identify  the  critical 
areas of risk under the following headings : 
  IT Infrastructure  
  Culture  
  Resources  
  Skills  
  Corporate planning / management   
  Technical risk  
  Security  
  Legislation  
 
 
Green ICT 
 
Faced  with  increasingly  urgent  warnings  about  the  consequences  of  the  projected 
rise in both energy demands and greenhouse gas emissions, ICT are focusing more 
attention  than  ever  on  the  need  to  improve  energy  efficiency.  Green  technologies 
exist  today  to  help  optimise  space,  power,  cooling  and  resiliency  while  improving 
operational management and reducing costs. 
 
The green ICT strategy is divided into the following areas :- 
 
  Printer Consolidation 
  LCD Monitors 
  Power Efficient Hardware 
  Server Virtualisation 
  Storage Virtualisation 
  Virtual Desktop Integration 
  PC Energy Saving measures 
  Replacement of equipment 
  Mobile devices 
  ICT Equipment Recycling and Disposal 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 9 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
GIS 
 
The  Geographical  Information  Systems  (GIS)  is  a  data  management  technology 
that incorporates and combines mapping, database, query and analysis tools.  It is 
used as a tool for sharing and manipulating information from different sources to aid 
the decision making process. 
 
The Local Land & Property Gazetteer (LLPG) forms the definitive address gazetteer 
for  the  Authority  which  links  to  or  forms  the  basis  of  the  Councils  address 
databases.  It is compiled to meet the Council’s obligations under the Public Sector 
Mapping Agreement (PSMA) to form a National Address database used to meet the 
business requirements of the Public Sector. 
 
The GIS ICT strategy is divided into the following areas :- 
 
  Standards 
  Maintenance and development 
  Benefits 
  Training and user support 
 
 
Web Development 
 
The web development service provides the infrastructure for the Internet, Intranet 
and  Extranet  functions.    Programming  languages  are  used  to  create  the 
functionality  of  the  web  pages  and  integrates  with  the  Content  Management 
Systems (CMS’s) in providing data, information and services to the end user. 
 
The Web ICT strategy is divided into the following areas :- 
 
  Standards 
  Accessibility 
  Maintenance and development 
  Training and User Support 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 10 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
1. 
ICT Strategy - Introduction 
 
This  strategy  defines  the  Council’s  strategic  approach  to  the  development  of 
Information  and  Communications  Technology  (ICT)  systems  and  related 
technologies.  This  will  ensure  that  these  systems  both  contribute  to  and  underpin 
the delivery of the Council’s Strategic Objectives and Service Delivery Plans. 
 
The aims of the strategy are : 
 
  Provide a solid, secure and reliable computer infrastructure which is capable 
of running all of the Council’s current and future business applications. 
 
  Set standards which will ensure that network integrity  and the synergy of the 
network is maintained. 
 
  Provide  a  high  quality  ICT  environment  that  supports  the  Council’s  strategic 
and  service  priorities,  and  enables  the  Council  to  improve  its  operational 
performance. 
    Comply  with  Government  ICT  standards,  best  practice  security  guidelines, 
Payment  Card  Industry  Data  Security  Standard  (PCI-DSS)  and  international 
security  management  standards  in  order  to  provide  a  solid  foundation  which 
will ensure that information held on ICT facilities is secure and protected. 
 
  Ensure that ICT facilities are secure and protected from security risks such as 
viruses, distributed denial of service attacks, and the potential for system and 
network compromise. 
 
  Provide  a  corporate  and  community-wide  Geographical  Information  System 
(GIS) which integrates all information resources into a seamless system. 
    Provide a fully maintained Local Land & Property Gazetteer (LLPG) as part of 
the Councils obligations under the Data Co-operation Agreement to form part 
of the National Land & Property Gazetteer (NLPG). 
 
  Provide  a  web  development  function  responsible  for  the  programming, 
development and maintenance of the Council’s intranet, extranet, internet sites 
and online forms. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 11 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
2. 
Corporate aims &  objectives for ICT 
 
The success of most organisations is dependent on their ability to develop effective 
information  systems,  which  support  major  goals  and  objectives  with  timely  and 
accurate  information.  For  local  authorities,  information  technology  has  become  a 
corporate  asset  of  strategic  importance.  The  availability  of  timely  and  accurate 
information is also essential to corporate decision making.  
 
An  ICT  strategy  is  concerned  with  aligning  the  needs  of  the  organisation  with  the 
provision  of  information  systems  through  the  application  of  ICT.  Underpinning  the 
strategy  is  the  selection  of  a  strategic  ICT  platform,  capable  of  supporting 
customers  and  users,  and  providing  for  opportunities  in  a  flexible,  unrestrictive 
fashion. 
 
The ICT strategy supports, and is appropriately aligned with, the Councils Corporate 
Plan and enables the authority to achieve elements of the corporate plan, any future 
strategies and projects which support the Council’s Priorities.  
The  Council  has  adopted  an  open  systems  strategy,  which  will  protect  the 
investment  in  ICT  by  providing  a  flexible  platform  for  the  future,  capable  of 
accommodating change without losing past investment in ICT. 
 
An information technology strategy defines the building blocks necessary to achieve 
a transparent infrastructure, on which applications are placed, and also defines the 
processes  required  to  ensure  that  security  and  data  communication  are  effective 
and efficient. 
 
The corporate objectives of the strategy are as follows :- 
 
  To  integrate  complex  multi-vendor  software  and  hardware  into  a  synergetic 
corporate  facility,  so  that  the  organisation  can  respond  better  to  external 
pressures. 
 
  To  be  able  to  integrate  information  from  several  sources,  to  produce 
management  and  operational  reports  and  assess  the  performance  of  the 
Council, as well as enabling on-line access to corporate databases. 
 
  To have the ability to re-align technology quickly,  in  response to unexpected 
and economic, political or legislative changes. 
 
  To  have  the  ability  to  expand  and  change  easily  in  required  areas  without 
affecting  other  components,  providing  savings  in  both  costs  and 
implementation time. 
 
  To have portable systems in order to achieve flexibility. 
    To provide ICT facilities and an infrastructure which addresses the Councils 
operational  needs  with  appropriate  performance and  availability  at  the  lowest 
possible cost. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 12 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
  To provide online facilities which will enable the Council to develop customer 
focused services and information. 
 
  To provide an ICT architecture that enables mobile working. 
 
  To  provide  a  Local  Land  &  Property  Gazetteer  (LLPG)  which  forms  the 
definitive  address  gazetteer  for  the  Authority  and  will  link  to/update  and  form 
the basis of all of the corporate address databases. 
 
  To provide an integrated GIS resource, incorporating mapping and associated 
data to enable the Council to produce spatial information which can be used in 
the decision making process.  
 
  To  provide  Metadata which  is  INSPIRE  compliant  and  complies with  the  EU 
Directive. 
 
 
 
The overall objectives of the Council's information and communications technology 
are to minimise costs, provide higher level management information and to support 
service delivery to the public and users taking due regard of the Council’s equalities 
policy. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 13 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
3. 
Corporate Business Drivers 
 
 
There are a range of business drivers that have an implication on the development 
and delivery of ICT Services.  In addition to the Council’s own priorities, there are 
significant  external  drivers  that  impact  on  the  direction  the  Council  must  take  over 
the coming years and that have direct implications for the delivery of ICT Services. 
 
Business Continuity 
 
The growing reliance on ICT systems means that greater emphasis must be placed 
on  service  availability,  business  continuity  and  disaster  recovery  options.  The 
existing  joint  authority  contract  has  proved  a  cost  effective  and  service  efficient 
option. 
 
Efficiency Savings 
 
 
The  continuing  requirement  on  Councils  to  cut  budgets  and  produce  efficiencies 
whilst still providing a high level of service to the public means greater pressure will 
be  applied  on  ICT  to  deliver  more  efficient  ways  of  working  ensuring  that  the 
Councils ICT facilities are provided with appropriate performance and availability at 
the lowest possible cost. 
 
Change for the future 
 
The  Council  is  undergoing  a  process  of  change  to  become fit for  the future. We 
need  to  address  financial  challenges  and  ensure  our  services  are  customer 
focussed. There is an intensive programme of service reviews, income generation 
projects,  theme  reviews  budget  desktop  reviews  which  will  all  contribute  to 
achieving  the  aims  of  this  initiative.  ICT  will  support  all  of  the  reviews  and 
projects. 
 
Mobile and Flexible Working 
 
Staff and office accommodation are critical resources for the Council and there are 
also  environmental  pressures  to  reduce  travel  through  more  flexible  ways  of 
working. 
 
The  Council’s  ICT  facilities  are  being  developed  to  enable  them  to  support  more 
flexible working arrangements to assist in staff retention, reduction of officers travel 
time,  reduction  in  travel  costs,  enable  home-working,  implementing  hot  desking 
facilities and releasing office accommodation.  
 
A  wireless  network  for  the  Civic  Centre  has  been  implemented.  The  wireless 
network  is  be  capable  of  being  extended  to  all  offices  on  the  Councils  network, 
dependent  on  available  bandwidth  and  coverage.  This  will  enable  new  mobile 
technologies, guest access and flexible working. 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 14 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
Customer Self-Service 
 
The  Councils  customer  focus  change  for  the  future  team  has  identified  the 
requirement  for  online  services  to  be  developed  for  our  customers  who  wish  to 
use  self-service  facilities,  transforming  the  way  in  which  Council  provides  its 
customer services.  
 
Government Public Services Network (PSN)  
 
The  Government  Public  Services  Network  (PSN)  is  a  secure  communications 
network between central government and all other government bodies. Its’ purpose 
is  to  help  government  bodies  to  improve  their  efficiency  and  connect  more 
effectively  with  their  customers,  with  each  other  and  with  central  government. 
Connection to the Public Services Network (PSN) is mandatory.  
 
The  Council  has  successfully  achieved  compliance  with  the  PSN  Code  of 
Connection (CoCo). A revised version of the CoCo is released annually. This will be 
an  ongoing  annual  process  to  achieve  compliance  against  the  security  criteria 
issued  by  central  government.  Changes  to the ICT  service  which  affect  any  of  the 
COCO conditions cannot be implemented without a revised COCO being accepted 
by the Government before implementation.    
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 15 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
4. 
ICT Infrastructure 
 
4.1.  Network  configuration 
 
The  Council’s  computer  network  is  a  high  quality  technically  advanced  structure 
encompassing  IP  telephony,  fully  integrated  voice  and  data  networks,  internet 
facilities, web site, remote working facilities, GIS and e-business functionality.  
 
The network infrastructure provides the backbone of the computer facilities, and as 
such  should  be  maintained  and  updated  in  order  to  retain  the  synergy  of  the 
network as a whole. Future development relies on the network being flexible. 
 
4.2.  UNIX platform 
 
The  Council  has  standardised  on  a  virtualised  UNIX  platform  running  AIX.  The 
advantages  of  this  configuration  is  that  additional  virtual  machines  can  be  added 
without disruption to other services. 
 
4.3.  Network infrastructure 
 
The network infrastructure is the backbone of all of the Council’s computer facilities 
and as such must be solid, secure, flexible and reliable. The network infrastructure 
consists of the following : 
 
  A fully integrated voice and data network. 
 
  High quality private network connections to remote sites. 
 
  A 1Gb backbone connecting the servers and switches and 100Mb to PCs and 
printers and multi-function devices. 
 
  Network switches, all IP capable with UPS and in-line power. 
 
  Contact centre technology. 
 
  A demilitarised zone to isolate publicly accessible facilities and remote working 
access points. 
    Firewalls to protect the internal network, systems and data from intrusions and 
viruses.    
 
  A  Local  Area  Network  (LAN)  which  connects  all  of  the  Councils  computer 
equipment to form a fully functioning computer network. 
 
  A Wide Area Network (WAN) which connects the Councils buildings together, 
connects  to  the  PSN  and  therefore  all  Government  bodies  and  connects  to 
service providers for external services such as the internet. 
 
  A wireless network. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 16 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
4.4.  Network Server Configuration 
 
The server configuration supplies the network with software and data which can be 
shared  by  all  users  on  the  network.  There  are  three  distinct  technologies  and 
methodologies which make up the network server configuration: 
 
Server Virtualisation 
 
Server  virtualisation  has  been  adopted  by  the  Council  and  is  a  method  of  running 
multiple  independent  virtual  operating  systems  on  a  single  physical  server.  It  is  a 
way of maximising physical resources to maximise the investment in hardware. 
 
It  should  be  noted  that  not  all  servers  can  be  virtualised.  Some  applications  and 
services  cannot  work  in  a  virtualised  environment  and  some  would  not  operate 
efficiently.   
 
The major benefits of server virtualisation are: 
 
  Lower number of physical servers. 
 
  Reduction in hardware maintenance costs. 
 
  Improved space utilisation within the server room. 
 
  Reduction of power requirements and usage. 
 
  Less cooling required. 
 
  Multiple  operating  system  technologies  can  be  deployed  on  a  single 
hardware platform. 
 
  Virtual servers can be copied from one server to another easily and quickly 
aiding business continuity and server maintenance. 
 
  Reduced number of SQL database servers to reduce database management 
and support. 
 
 
Server virtualisation improves the efficiency of the data centre, as well as lowering 
the cost of ownership. 
 
Application procurement must take into account server virtualisation and preference 
should  be  given  to  suppliers  which  support  their  applications  in  the  virtualised 
environment for the following reasons: 
 
  Business  continuity  purposes:  as  the  virtualised  environment  enables 
virtual servers to be moved from one physical server to another simply 
and  quickly.  It  is  not  feasible  or  cost  effective  to  create  duplicate 
servers to provide business continuity. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 17 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
  Support  purposes:  to  provide  support  for  completely  new  network 
segments and new technologies with additional backup requirements to 
support  specific  applications  is  not    supportable  when  resources  are 
limited  and  cost  efficiencies  continuously  sought.  Should  this  be 
deemed  necessary  or  the  only  viable  option  then  ICT  will  advise  the 
users  that  a  hosted  solution  is  the  preferred  method  of  provision  and 
support for the application.     
 
Server virtualisation is implemented using VMware vSphere. 
 
Virtual Desktop Servers 
 
The  virtual  desktop  technology  requires  dedicated  servers  to  host  the  virtual 
desktops.  Business  continuity  is  provided  by  a  number  of  servers  which  can  be 
used by the desktops and servers at a remote Council site. The remote site servers 
will not provide capacity for all of the Councils desktops but will provide enough for 
the essential services until additional servers can be purchased. The servers do not 
need  backing  up  as  the  virtual  desktops  are  transient  and  all  data  is  held  on  the 
network servers and storage devices. 
 
Standalone Server Environment 
 
Not all servers can be virtualised. Some applications and services cannot work in a 
virtualised environment,  some  would  not  operate efficiently  and  some  would  affect 
the  running  of  the  rest  of  the  ICT  network.  These  systems  should  be  kept  to  a 
minimum and should be self-contained applications e.g. telephony, BACS and anti-
virus management servers. 
 
4.5.  Windows networking Software 
 
Microsoft  Windows  is  the  standard  workstation  and  networking  software  for  the 
Council.  TCP/IP  (network  transportation  software)  is  the  network  communication 
product. Windows provides all of the above mentioned facilities, TCP/IP provides a 
communications facility between the UNIX processors and all of  the other units on 
the network. 
 
The  network connects and manages computing devices, applications and services 
that  users  require.  Network  software  provides  the  layer  of  consistency  that  is 
required  to  mask  users  from  the  underlying  complexity  of  the  technology  and  will 
enable  users  to  perform  their  functions  more  efficiently  through  easy,  seamless 
access to critical information regardless of where users or information are located. 
 
4.6.  Network Upgrades 
 
In  order  to  sustain  maximum  performance  and  benefit from  the  Computer network 
there  is  a  continuing  requirement  to  take  advantage  of  supplier  operating  system 
technological  advances.  Critically  but  not  exclusively  this  will  include  operating 
system  and  network  management  software.  This  is  particularly  relevant  where 
supplier support is withdrawn for current versions of software. Upgrades should be 
applied in all areas, where there is a necessity or there are advantages to do so, in 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 18 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
order  to  retain  the  synergy  of  the  network  and  to achieve a flexible  network  which 
can readily respond to change. 
 
It will be critical in the context of supporting an upgrading policy to allow for planned 
budgetary  support  for  multi  user  network  hardware  and  software  upgrades  which 
will  be  essential  to  ensure  the  continuing  development  of  the  network.  The 
Computer  budget  has  no  ongoing  provision  for  upgrades.  Where  the  pace  of 
technology  necessitates  expenditure  the  appropriate  reports  to  cabinet  will  be 
prepared to identify further funding requirements. 
 
Multi user network hardware and software upgrades would cover the following: 
 
  UNIX and central PC network server hardware and software upgrades. 
  Switches, used for IP telephony, workstations and peripheral connection.  
  Telecommunications cabinets containing switches and cabling. 
 
4.7  IP Telephony 
 
The  Council  has  implemented  IP  telephony,  with  a  single  voice  and  data  network 
which  improves the Council’s ability to scale for the future and quickly react  to the 
dynamically  changing  needs  of  the  Council.  Enhanced  telephony  facilities  lay  the 
foundation for future telephony based service development and operation. 
 
IP Telephony has a direct impact in creating a ‘Customer First’ culture which is one 
of the primary elements of the Corporate plan. 
 
The primary outcomes of IP Telephony are : 
 
  Call centre technology supplies call queuing and statistics which will enable a 
sophisticated  level  of  call  evaluation  and  should  ultimately  result  in  service 
improvements.  
 
  A  converged  data  and  voice  network  which  reduces  equipment  and 
maintenance  costs  by  combining  the  multiple  network  infrastructures  into  a 
single IP-based network.  
 
  IP  (Internet  Protocol)  Telephony  centralises  call  processing,  thus  eliminating 
the  need  for  separate  units  at  off  site  locations,  resulting  in  a  reduced 
investment in equipment. 
 
  A reduction in the number of wiring drops and hardware connection costs.  
 
  Expenditure associated with moves adds and changes are minimised. 
 
  An integrated network improves the ability to scale for the future and its ability 
to quickly react to the dynamically changing needs of the Council. 
 
  A converged network enhances the Council’s communications capabilities by 
facilitating  employee  mobility  and  providing  a  solid  foundation  for  the 
deployment  of  advanced,  feature-rich  services  and  solutions.  IP  telephony, 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 19 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
extension  mobility,  unified  messaging,  and  multi-channel  contact  centre 
applications are just a few examples of such solutions. 
 
4.8  Storage Strategy 
 
Storage  network  devices  with  duplicate  devices  off  site,  in  conjunction  with  server 
virtualisation,  is  used  as  the  Council’s  primary  data  store  and  consolidates  data 
resulting in more efficient use of servers. 
 
Data  growth  has  become  an  area  for  concern  in  ICT.  Research  shows  that  in  all 
industries storage is increasing,  on average,  about  45 percent per year. Based on 
this level of growth, storage capacities double every 18 months. Recent evaluations 
of  cloud  storage  and backup  solutions  has shown  that  at  this  time  these  solutions 
are unaffordable.  
 
A  storage  strategy  is  essential  in  order  to  optimise  the  storage  infrastructure  to 
provide users and applications with access to the data they need, when they need 
it, and with the lowest complexity and cost. It is no longer acceptable to simply keep 
buying  more  storage as  it  is  not  a  limitless  resource  and  it  is  not  cheap,  therefore 
storage needs to be managed. 
  
A storage strategy should match data to storage with the appropriate performance, 
availability and cost to provide an infrastructure that addresses the business needs, 
and does so at the lowest possible cost.  
 
A  storage  strategy  is  not  just about  ICT  it  is  also  about  users managing  their  own 
data and ensuring that housekeeping is regarded as an essential part of their jobs. 
 
In order to define a storage strategy data needs to be classified by business value, 
this can be done by usage, type and age: 
 
  Usage  would  identify  the  importance  of  the  data,  for  example  business 
critical application data. 
 
  Type can identify, for example, archived data and backup data which would 
likely have less business value than other forms of live data.  
 
  Age is a useful indicator because business value typically declines over time. 
Data  tends  to  be  most  heavily  used  immediately  after  creation,  when  the 
information  contained  within  it  is  most  relevant,  and  it  depreciates  quickly 
after that. Age can be identified by the date it was last modified or the date is 
was created. 
 
A storage strategy should result in placing high value data on high performance or 
highly available, but  also high cost, storage resources, and placing low  value data 
on  resources  with  lower  performance  and  availability,  but  also  with  lower  costs. 
Less time and resources than backing up high value data could be spent backing up 
low value data.  
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 20 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
Instead  of  having  a  single  homogeneous  approach  to  all  data,  a  storage  strategy 
should  map  business  value  to  different  tiers  of  storage.  Once  data  has  been 
classified each class can be assigned to a different storage tier based on its specific 
performance and availability requirements. Each storage tier can then be optimised 
for the mix of attributes that is appropriate for that level of business value. 
 
A storage environment incorporating three different tiers would be ideal: 
 
  Tier  1.  Application  data  and  virtual  machines  should  be  placed  on  storage 
that  emphasises  higher  performance  and  availability.  The  storage  medium 
would  be  Storage  Attached  Network  (SAN)  devices  and  Solid  State  Disks 
(SSD).  
 
  Tier 2. General user files constantly accessed and generally files under two 
years  old  should  be  placed  on  storage  that  balances  performance  and 
availability  with  lower  costs. The  storage  medium  would  be  SCSI  disks  and 
serially attached SCSI disks. 
 
  Tier 3. Archive and backup files and generally user files over two years old 
should  be  placed  on  low  cost  storage.  The  storage  medium  would  be 
Network Attached Storage (NAS) with SATA disks and server storage. 
 
4.9  Virtual Desktop Integration 
 
Virtual Desktop Integration (VDI)  technology is used to replace traditional PC’s with 
virtual desktops that run on servers in the data centre. Administrators can provision 
new desktops in minutes, giving users their own personalised desktop environments 
while  eliminating  the  need  for  retraining  and  application  sharing.  This  approach 
helps  to  reduce  the  total  cost  of  ownership  (TCO)  for  the  desktop  infrastructure, 
extends  the  life  cycle  of  the  hardware  and  helps  ICT  to  respond  more  quickly  to 
business needs.  
 
VDI  provides  flexibility  by  enabling  users  to  access  their  virtual  desktops  and 
applications from a Laptop, PC, mobile device, thin client and home PC and obtain 
the full features  as  if  the  applications  were  loaded  on  their  local  systems,  with  the 
difference being that the applications are centrally managed.  
 
VDI  offers  many  benefits.  Specifically,  desktop  administrative  and  management 
tasks  are  significantly  reduced;  applications  can  quickly  be  added,  deleted, 
upgraded, and patched; security is centralised, and data is easier to safeguard and 
back  up.  Flexibility  within  the  workplace  is  one  of  the  major  advantages  as  users 
can logon to any workstation and have access to their full application suite. It should 
be noted that from information gathered from site and supplier visits, to virtualise all 
applications may not be 100% possible and will take some years to fully achieve. It 
has been estimated that 70% of users could be transferred to VDI technology in the 
initial phase. The remaining users will be evaluated for further development. 
 
Thin client devices can be used with VDI instead of the traditional PC’s and laptops, 
these  terminals  are  cheaper  to  purchase  than  PCs  and  Laptops  and  have  a  far 
longer  lifespan,  between  10  to  15  years.  Replacement  of  a  thin  client  device  is 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 21 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
simply to plug it in instead of the laborious process of installing and setting up a PC 
for  a  user  with  all  of  their  associated  software,  directory  access  and  system  links. 
These devices  also  use  less  power.  It  is  not  necessary  to  replace PC’s  initially  as 
these can be repurposed to act as thin clients therefore VDI extends the life of PC’s 
as  the  PC  no  longer  contains  the  software  or  even  the  full  operating  system  and 
therefore is not dependent on its memory or disk space.  The majority of  PC’s and 
laptops will in the future be replaced by thin client devices. 
 
VDI brings a whole new dimension to business continuity. A number of servers over 
different  sites provides continuity of service  in  that any server can be used by any 
user, therefore should a server break the user will simply log on to another server.  
In  the  case  of  the  loss  of  a  site  particularly  the  Civic  Centre  the  replacement  of 
workstations  with  no  installation  required  would  reduce  the  redeployment  of 
workstations to days instead of months. 
 
The  advantages  summarised  are  reduced  power  usage,  increased  equipment  life 
spans,    portability,  flexibility  in  the  office  and  remotely,  reduced  cost  of  hardware 
purchases,  reduced  and  more  efficient  ICT  support,  business  continuity  benefits, 
reduced  desktop  downtime  and  increased  availability,  new  users  can  be  up  and 
running quickly.  
 
4.10  Backup Strategy 
 
Data  and  systems  require  a  backup  strategy  to  ensure  that  in  the event  of  loss  of 
hardware or corruption of data systems and data can be restored.  
 
Due  to  the  increasing  storage  requirements  data  backup  has  become  a  matter  of 
concern  in  ICT.  The  available  window  of  time  for  backups  is  reducing  and  the 
amount of data to backup is increasing. 
 
The  Council  has  adequate  backup  facilities  at  this  time.  If  data  increases  as 
predicted  then  this  will  need  to  be  reviewed.  Alternative  solutions  and  backup 
strategies will need to be considered. 
 
4.11  Database Software 
 
Microsoft  SQL  server  is  the  standard  database  software  for  the  Council.  This 
software  underpins  software  applications  and  is  the  mechanism  by  which  data  is 
held and managed in order to capture and data analysis in a structured format. 
 
Standardisation  is  necessary  to  ensure  the  synergy  of  the  network,  applications  
must be open to each other, allowing software links, data analysis and data sharing. 
This is essential to the future development and maintenance of applications. 
 
An  open  policy  on  database  software  would  be  impossible  to  provide  support  for 
when  resources  are  limited  and  cost  efficiencies  continuously  sought.  Database 
software  for  larger  databases  is  a  specialist  area  and  requires  a  team  of  trained 
staff  simply  to  manage  the  database  from  a  software  aspect,  from  a  network 
support  aspect  it  would  result  in  an  increase  in  network  complexity  and  technical 
support  requirements.  Should  an  application  selected  require  alternative  database 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 22 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
software then a hosted solution may be the only method of provision and support for 
the application.     
 
4.12  Email facilities 
 
Email  is  generally  considered  as  the  mission  critical  system  for  all  modern 
enterprises and needs to be reliable, scalable and secure.  
 
The Council utilises Microsoft Exchange to provide Email, Contact and Calendar 
functionality. 
 
Mobile  workers  are  supported  through  laptops,  mobile  devices  or  thin  client 
technologies to securely access emails. 
 
 
Email archiving has been implemented as  the volume of email data continues to 
increase year on year and it is necessary for the Council to reduce the impact of 
the storage required to store emails. The potential ramifications of this growth are 
many, including: 
 
  Decreased performance of the email system due to the size of the storage 
required. 
 
  Prolonged backup and restore processes. 
 
  Additional  costs  to  upgrade  the  email  system  and/or  acquire  additional 
storage. 
 
  Extended eDiscovery processes – more data stored means more data to 
search. 
 
To counter this growth the following has been put in place: 
 
  Old email is regularly moved to a dedicated email archive server (currently 
older than 7 days). 
 
  Emails older than 3 years are automatically deleted. 
 
  Items moved to deleted items older  than 30 days are deleted. 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 23 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
5. 
ICT Software 
 
5.1.  Development Standards 
 
Standards are essential for software development and maintenance to be efficiently 
and  effectively  controlled.  Standards  should  include  documentation  standards  for 
specifications  and  programs,  and  programming  standards  which  take  into  account 
machine and language efficiencies and deficiencies. Standards produce conformity, 
enabling efficient and effective development and maintenance. 
 
The  Council  operates  its  own  systems  and  programming  standards.  These 
standards  were  introduced  in  1982,  and  have  been  updated  regularly  to  take  into 
account new working practices and hardware and software changes.  
 
5.2.  Workstation Application Software 
 
Standardisation is necessary to ensure the synergy of the network, all units on the 
network must be open to each other, allowing software links and document transfer. 
This is essential to the future development of the network, allowing growth to take 
place instead of a rebirth for new projects. 
 
In order to enable the Council to adopt flexible working practices it is necessary to 
consolidate  server  and  PC  applications  i.e.  software.  The  Council’s  applications 
need to be standardised and simplified to have a successful flexible working system 
otherwise  specialist  workstations  instead  of  standard  ones  will  be  the  majority. 
Software  applications  must  be  supported  by  suppliers  in  order  to  comply  with  the 
Governments  PSN  Code  Of  Connection  security  requirements,  therefore  older 
versions  of  software  no  longer  supported  should  be  upgraded,  replaced  by  a 
corporate solution or removed if not utilised. 
 
5.3.  Microsoft Workstation Software 
 
The Council has in place a Microsoft rental agreement which will allow the Council 
to upgrade all of its workstation Microsoft products when new versions are released 
and old ones retired. The rental agreement includes  licenses for Windows desktop 
operating  systems,  Microsoft  Office  suites,  and  the  Core  client  access  license 
(CAL).  The  Core  CAL  includes  CAL’s  for  Windows  Server,  Microsoft  Exchange 
Server,  Microsoft  Office  SharePoint,  Configuration  Manager  and  virtual  desktop. 
This agreement allows the Council to pay annually for only the number of licenses it 
is  using,  total  licensing  costs  can  decline  in  years  if  and  when  the  user  and 
workstation count declines. The rental agreement will give the Council the flexibility 
to upgrade all desktops at once or to upgrade gradually at no additional cost as the 
Council  will  have  new  version  rights  to  upgrade  to  the  latest  version  of  Microsoft 
software at no extra charge.  
 
The  rental  agreement  allows  a  user  to  log  on  anywhere  with  no  additional  office 
licenses required.   
 
VDI  combined  with  a  rental  agreement  allows  the  Council  to  test  new  versions  of 
software e.g. Windows 7 without having to purchase new licenses and then deploy 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 24 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
it without having to wait for departments to find the required budget  or the Council 
having to find the capital to upgrade all workstations. The rental agreement means 
that the software is not owned by the Council and therefore should the Council wish 
to  cancel  the  agreement  then  the  licenses  will  have  to  be  bought  out  if  continuing 
with them. 
 
5.4.  Packaged Software 
 
The  main  factors  which  should  be  taken  into  consideration  when  selecting 
packaged software should be suitability for the Councils ICT infrastructure, support 
requirements,  cost  effectiveness,  efficiency,  benefits  and  the  ability  to  perform  the 
required functions. 
 
The following guidelines, shown below, should ensure that software packages meet 
the Council's needs. 
 
The  Council’s  corporate  project  management  procedures  must  be  followed  and 
project approval gained before a specification is produced. 
 
The  guidelines  to  package  selection  where  the  functionality  is  common  and 
packages are already available are as follows :- 
 
  An  outline  system  specification  should  be  produced  by  the  user  in  the  first 
instance to determine their specific requirements. 
 
  All  corporate  and  major  ICT  developments  will  be  reported/presented  to  the 
ICT development group. 
 
  ICT must be involved with the outline system specification in order to ensure 
that  the  interfaces  with  other  systems  are  fully  specified,  and  that  the 
requirements of the ICT strategy and all ICT policies and standards are met. 
 
  That  evaluation  criteria  must  be  established  before  commencing  the  product 
investigation  and  will  generally  include  costs,  performance,  functionality  and 
benefits. 
 
  The level of software integration requirements must be investigated by ICT. 
 
  Detailed supplier statement of the software facilities to be provided. 
 
  Where  interfaces  to  other  systems  are  required  the  supplier  must  provide 
reference sites, where available, for verification by users and ICT. 
 
  The  interfacing  requirements  must  be  included  in  the  contract  when 
purchasing products.  
 
  A  questionnaire  should  be  sent  to  the  existing  users  of  the  packages  being 
evaluated, in order to gain a view of users opinions. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 25 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
  The  supplier  must  provide  full  support  of  the  package  and  the  supporting 
database  if  it  is  not  Microsoft  SQL  server,  this  must  include  a  Council 
approved  remote  access  connection  for  the  support  of  all  elements  of  the 
package.  Should  alternative  database  software  be  required  then  a  hosted 
solution may be the only method of provision and support for the application.     
 
Local Authorities are often  required by  government  to perform functions  which  are 
operationally  new  areas  of  activity  and  in  some  cases  where  legislation  is  not 
available  until  the  nth hour.  In  these  cases  it  may  not  be  possible to find  a  readily 
available package and therefore a different set of guidelines will apply. 
 
The guidelines to package selection in this case are as follows :- 
 
  A trusted supplier should be selected with a large portfolio of local government 
applications. 
 
  An  agreement  should  be  made  which  will  allow  the  Authority  to  exit  at  any 
stage should the project fail to meet the Authorities requirements.   
 
  An  outline  system  specification  should  be  produced  in  the  first  instance,  to 
determine the users specific requirements. If this area of activity is new and a 
specification cannot be fully determined then external help should be obtained. 
The  agreement  should  be  tailored  to  allow  the  authority  to  use  the 
specification  as  an  evaluation  document  for  other  suppliers  should  the 
authority not wish to proceed with the selected supplier. 
 
  ICT must be involved with the outline system specification in order to ensure 
that  the  interfaces  with  other  systems  are  fully  specified,  and  that  the 
requirements of the ICT strategy and all ICT policies and standards are met. 
 
  That  evaluation  criteria  must  be  established  before  commencing  the  product 
investigation, if the decision is made not to go ahead with the original supplier, 
and will generally include costs, performance, functionality and benefits. 
 
  The level of software integration requirements must be investigated by ICT. 
 
  Detailed  supplier  statement  of  the  software  facilities  to  be  provided  before 
signing up for the final product production stage. 
 
  The  interfacing  requirements  must  be  included  in  the  contract  when 
purchasing products.  
 
  The  supplier  must  provide  full  support  of  the  package  and  the  supporting 
database  if  it  is  not  Microsoft  SQL  server,  this  must  include  a  Council 
approved  remote  access  connection  for  the  support  of  all  elements  of  the 
package.  Should  alternative  database  software  be  required  then  a  hosted 
solution may be the only method of provision and support for the application.     
 
  Where there is a requirement for multiple users of the software package LAN 
licences must be purchased not “dongles”. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 26 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
 
5.5.  Software Upgrades 
 
Suppliers frequently upgrade software for some or all of the following reasons :- 
 
Technological advancement 
User demand 
Legislation 
Supplier competition 
 
Software  upgrades  should  only  be  applied  where  necessary,  not  just  because  an 
upgrade is available. It may be necessary to upgrade for some or all of the following 
reasons :- 
 
Legislation 
Dependence on other software which has been upgraded 
Additional functionality 
Performance improvements 
Fault rectification 
Maintenance on the current version ceasing 
 
It should not be a practise of this Council to install software versions which have not 
been vigorously tried and tested, and working in a live environment for at least six 
months. Only in the following exceptional circumstances should this practise not be 
followed :- 
 
  Legislation.  
 
  Organised Beta site testing. 
 
  Software development, working in partnership with suppliers, where there is a  
new ground breaking area of activity or new legislation. 
 
5.6  Software Deployment 
 
Wherever  possible  software  is  deployed  using  group  policies.  This  means  that 
replacement  machines  will  be  delivered  with  exactly  the  same  software  as  the 
predecessor  and  that  software  deployment  can  occur  quickly  and  be  managed 
effectively. 
 
Software deployment is also used for the delivery of new or updated software and it 
maintains  a  consistent  implementation  and  reduces  the  man  hours  required  long 
term  for  software  installation,  thereby  allowing  fewer  resources  in  ICT.  This 
approach does have some overheads. It does require that software is supplied in a 
specific  format  and  any  software  that  is  not  supplied  in  this  format  has  to  be 
‘repackaged’,  which  requires  a  specific  skill  set  and  takes  time,  but  the  benefits 
make this the correct approach to take. 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 27 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
5.7  Open Source  
 

Open  source  software  refers  to  applications  where  the  ‘source  code’  is  available 
freely to a developer community, so they can scrutinise, and if willing, edit the code 
to suit their needs. It is generally ‘free’ software in terms of initial outlay and ongoing 
licensing.  More  solutions  are  being  made  available  for  large  organisations  and 
many  open  source  providers  often  offer  an  enterprise  model  as  well  where  they 
charge  a  software  licence  for  ongoing  support  and  maintenance    which  allows  an 
organisation to benefit from product support, i.e. freely available access to the most 
up-to-date releases as well as patches and fixes to the existing application. 
 
The key consideration for open source is that it requires the council to proactively 
review the offering that an open source solution has. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 28 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
6. 
ICT Hardware 
 
6.1.  Workstations 
 
Workstations  currently  are  made  up  of  PC’s,  laptops  and  thin  client  devices.  Thin 
client  devices  can  be  used  with  VDI  instead  of  the  traditional  PC’s  and  laptop’s, 
these  devices  are  cheaper  to  purchase  than  PC’s  and  Laptops  and  have  a  far 
longer  lifespan,  between  10  to  15  years.  Replacement  of  a  thin  client  device  is 
simply to plug it in instead of the laborious process of installing and setting up a PC 
for  a  user  with  all  of  their  associated  software,  directory  access  and  system  links. 
These devices also use less power. VDI extends the life of PC’s and laptops as they 
no  longer  contain  the  software  or  even  the  operating  system  and  therefore  is  not 
dependent  on  its  memory  or  disk  space.  PC’s  and  laptops  will  in  the  future  be 
replaced  by  thin  client  devices  where  there  is  no  need  for  a  full  device  i.e.  no 
requirement for portability and no heavy application usage unsuitable for VDI. 
 
The high population of workstations is resulting in a continuing increase in network 
complexity  and  technical  support  requirements.  While  an  open  policy  on  
workstation selection would truly support an open systems policy, the resulting mix 
of hardware would be impossible to support. Another result of such an open policy 
would  be  a  proliferation  of  low  quality  equipment  which  could  prove  expensive  on 
external maintenance costs and time consuming on internal support.  
 
In  order  to  achieve  openness  in  the  area  of  workstation  selection  and  to  create  a 
supportable environment, workstations must satisfy the following criteria :- 
 
  Must be totally compatible with the existing population of workstations. 
 
  Must be totally compatible with network operating system software. 
 
  Manufacturers selected must be high volume suppliers and provide technical 
support. 
 
 
ICT  are  responsible  for  workstation  specifications  and  these  will  be  based  on  the 
users  requirements  but  also  with  future  developments  in  mind  to  ensure  that 
appropriate equipment is purchased. 
 
Users who have a Council laptop allocated personally to them cannot also  have a 
PC or a thin client device, this will reduce future costs of  licences and replacement 
costs. The only exception to this is where the user cannot use all of their software 
on a laptop and they also use their laptop regularly for remote working.  
 
Departmental shared laptops should be rationalised to reduce the costs of licences 
and future replacement costs. 
 
Old  PCs,  laptops,  thin  client  devices  and  screens  must  not  be  stored  by 
departments after replacements have been made, they must be returned to ICT, as 
this will result in additional licence costs being incurred. PC’s, laptops and thin client 
devices which are fit for purpose will be redeployed by ICT where users have older 
equipment.  
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 29 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
 
 
Issuing  laptop  docking  stations  is  not  cost  effective  as  different  models  of  laptops 
use  different  docking  stations,  therefore  when  laptops  were  renewed  the  docking 
stations also were replaced as they were no longer suitable.  The associated costs 
of  replacing  the  docking  stations  are  not  cost  effective  and  therefore  docking 
stations will not be purchased with the exception of where recommended for health 
and safety reasons. 
 
6.2.  Printers 
 
The  Council  has  adopted  a  printer  consolidation  policy  which  is  that  in  the  main 
networked printer photocopiers are used and only  where absolutely necessary are 
other  printing  devices  allowed.  There  are  still  a  significant  number  of  printing 
devices being used and these need to be consolidated to reduce future costs. 
 
Printers,  other  than  the  networked  printer  photocopiers  will  only  be  purchased 
where the requirements fall into one of the following categories : 
 
 
Highly  sensitive  information  being  printed  on  a  regular  basis  e.g. 
 
personnel. 
 
 
High  volume  application  printing  required  e.g.  Council  tax,  Housing, 
 
Elections. 
 
 
 
Specialist  printing  of  high  quality  or  large  scale  prints  e.g.  photographs, 
 
maps and plans. 
 
Locations  either  behind  locked  doors  or  remote  from  the  photocopiers  e.g. 
CCTV, Central Control. 
 
 
6.3  IP Telephones 
 
 
ICT  will,  on  a  regular  basis,  evaluate  its  recommended  IP  telephone  models 
against  market  developments.  Accessibility  issues,  with  an  associated  risk 
assessment, will be the only exceptions. 
 
6.4  Mobile Phones  
 
 
ICT  will,  on  a  regular  basis,  evaluate  its  recommended  mobile  phone  models 
against  market  developments.  Accessibility  issues,  with  an  associated  risk 
assessment, will be the only exceptions. 
 
6.5  Mobile Devices 
 
It  is  essential  to  limit  which  devices  are  to  be  supported,  and  ultimately  allow 
corporate  access  to.  While  wanting  to  provide  options  for  employees  it  is 
important  to  draw  a  line  in  the  sand  and  not  allow  anything  and  everything 
otherwise the ICT department will be spread too thin and support levels will suffer. 
A quality over quantity approach has been considered as the correct approach. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 30 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
The CESG have provided Mobile device security guidance on a number of mobile 
devices  with  recommendations  on  the  security  measures  they  require  and  their 
evaluation of  the devices  using  twelve  security  recommendations.  The  guidance 
has been used to select the standard devices and these the Council will deploy, 
these will only be deviated from when suppliers have specific requirements, in the 
case  where  standard  devices  are  not  purchased  then  a  fully  managed  solution 
must be provided by the supplier.  
 
The selected mobile devices to be supported are: 
 
Tablet: Apple IOS 6.0 and upwards iPad. 
  
Smartphones: Apple IOS 6.0 and upwards iPhone and Samsung galaxy S4 
Android 4.2 and upwards with SAFE API.  
 
 
6.6  End User Device Selection 
 
CESG  guidance  has  been  used  to  identify  role  types  and  appropriate  device 
types for that role, devices also include desktops, mobile phones and thin clients 
as all user roles are included. 
 
User  Segmentation  is  a  process  of  defining  categories  of  employees  based  on 
how they use IT as part of their day to day job. Users in the same segment share 
similar characteristics so that recommended technology solutions can be tailored 
to their specific needs and requirements.  
 
The  goal  of  segmenting  the  user  population  is  to  provide  users  with  better 
solutions matched to their computing needs while providing increased capabilities 
at lower costs.   
 
Seven main user profiles have been identified: 
 
User Profiles 
Characteristics 
Primarily use rich productivity tools e.g. email and word 
Chief Executive  processing to perform core activities. They work primarily from a 
and Directors 
fixed office location but will regularly work from other locations or 
at home. 
Typically performs a small number of dedicated processing tasks 
from a Council location with no requirement for mobility. For 
Line of Business  example, users who work in a contact centre or back office 
user 
processing role such as HR. They use Line of Business 
applications, which serve a specialist customer transaction or 
business need. 
Primarily use rich productivity tools e.g. email and word 
processing to perform core activities. They work primarily from a 
Knowledge 
fixed office location but will occasionally work from other 
User 
locations or at home. Examples of knowledge workers might 
include policy workers and managers. 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 31 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
A Field user needs access to Line of Business and productivity 
applications, which are available on the move (including offline). 
A Field user might be a visiting officer, investigator or 
Field User 
caseworker who needs to access or update customer records 
both online and offline as well as create documents and 
manipulate data. 
Occasional Users have no reliance on IT to complete their core 
activities and only need access to systems to carryout 
Occasional 
supporting tasks such as viewing their payslip or booking annual 
User 
leave. These tasks could be carried out on a device shared with 
other users in the category. 
Permanent 
A user who works from home permanently. 
Homeworker 
A mobile phone only user does not need access to any ICT 
Mobile phone 
service but requires a mobile phone for telephony services when 
only user 
mobile. 
 
Mapping  technology  to  user  segments  is  the  process  of  evaluating  technologies 
and  devices,  against  defined  selection  criteria  to  find  the  best  fit  for  each  user 
segment,  this  allows  the  provision  of  the  right  technology  solution  per  segment, 
ensuring the proper balance of IT capability with end-user needs.  
 
The following table provides the technologies that have been identified as a best 
fit  for  a  particular  user  profile.  There  may  be  exceptional  cases  where  the 
technology  identified  is  not  adequate  for  a  particular  usage  scenario.  In  such 
cases, technology outside the scope might be considered if supported by a strong 
business case and it may be necessary to source an external support contract.  
 
The  technology  mapping  process  provides  a  method  by  which  tailored  solutions 
can be managed and re-evaluated in a logical and methodical way. Providing one 
solution across all user roles will not deliver the right computing power to the right 
people. Similarly, providing unlimited, unique computing solutions for all users will 
be  cost  prohibitive  and  unmanageable.  Therefore,  establishing  a  model  where 
each user segment is assigned an optimal technology solution  enables a simple 
and cost effective method to match the right devices to the right people.  
 
It must be clear that this methodology aims to provide the tools appropriate to the 
role it is not a pick list or a user choice. Costings and life spans of equipment are 
also  provided  to  enable  managers  to  ensure  that  costs  do  not  outweigh 
efficiencies.   
 
User Profiles 
Recommended Device 
Choice of the following as per their requirements: 
Chief Executive and 
 
Directors 
Tablet, Thin Client in the office, Laptop, PC, Smartphone,  
Mobile phone 
PC or Thin Client. Thin client if applications allow, PC if 
Line of Business user  applications cannot be run on a thin client. 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 32 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
The equipment for a knowledge user will fall under one of 
the following categories dependent on the requirements: 
Tablet , a mobile phone if required, a Thin Client in the 
office – shared if possible. 
 
Knowledge User 
Laptop, a mobile phone or smartphone if required. 
 
PC, a mobile phone or smartphone if required. 
 
Thin Client, a mobile phone or smartphone if required. 
Shared PC or Thin Client for working in the office shared if 
possible or a Laptop 
 
And 
 
Tablet and mobile phone for mobile working dependent on 
Field User 
requirements 
 
Or  
 
Mobile phone or smartphone for mobile working 
dependent on requirements 
Occasional User 
Shared PC or Thin Client 
Permanent 
PC or Thin Client. Thin client if applications allow, PC if 
Homeworker 
applications cannot be run on a thin client. 
Mobile phone only 
Mobile phone 
user 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 33 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
7.  
Security 
 
Security is essential in order to protect the Councils information processing facilities, 
hardware,  software  and  data,  which  are  important  assets.  Confidentiality,  integrity 
and availability of information are essential to the operation of the Council. 
 
7.1  Protocols, Standards and procedures 
 
 
The  Council  has  adopted  protocols,  standards  and  procedures,  in  particular  the 
Information  Security  Management  Standards  based  on  ISO27001  and  ISO27002, 
which support the following objectives:- 
  
  To ensure that the Authority’s ICT assets - hardware, software and data - are 
protected  against  theft,  loss,  damage,  corruption  and  any  unauthorised 
actions. 
 
  To ensure that all employees of the Authority are aware of the risks to which 
ICT systems may be subjected and of their responsibilities  to minimise  those 
risks. 
 
  To ensure the authority complies with the many and varied laws surrounding 
Information and communications. 
 
All  protocols,  standards  and  procedures  are  reviewed  annually  to  adapt  to  new 
threats,  reflect  current  working  practices  and  recommendations  by  internal  and 
external auditors. 
 
7.2   Protection from malicious software (Malware & Virus Controls) 
 
It is essential to ensure that the Councils network remains malware & virus free, and 
that any penetration by any malware or virus is immediately detected and the threat 
is contained and dealt with before any damage can occur.  This is achieved through 
a multi-tiered approach to the threat: 
 
  Ensuring current anti-virus software is always in place right across all Council 
Information Technology Assets 
  Ensuring  that  all  users  of  Council  Information  Technology  Assets  follow  
procedures to reduce the risk of malware & viruses accidentally being let in to 
the organisation. 
  Ensuring  that  the  vulnerabilities  that  malware  &  viruses  generally  exploit  are 
not present anywhere on the Council network. 
  Ensuring  that  appropriate  processes  are  in  place  to  minimise  loss  and  deal 
effectively with malware & viruses that are detected 
 
Standard  anti-virus  software  shall  be  installed  on  all  of  the  Council’s  servers, 
workstations,  PC’s,  laptops,  virtual  desktops,  tablets  and  mobile  devices  (where 
available),  and  automatic  scanning  for  malware  &  viruses  shall  be  activated 
whenever such equipment is in use, the exception is thin client devices as they do 
not need anti-virus software. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 34 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
 
If  (notwithstanding  the  protective  measures  being  taken)  malware  or  a  virus  does 
enter the Council’s network then this shall be dealt with effectively and promptly by 
ICT so as to minimise risk to the Council. 
 
Additionally,  all  users  of  Council  Information  Technology  Assets  have  a  personal 
responsibility to play their part in protecting the Council’s network against malicious 
software. 
 
In particular, users are responsible for ensuring that: 
 
  They  do  not  inadvertently  introduce  malware  or  a  virus  from  an  external 
source into the Council’s network. 
 
  When using Council Information Technology Assets, the equipment that they 
are  using  is  running  anti-virus  software  with  up  to  date  file  definitions,  the 
exception is thin client devices as they do not need anti-virus software. 
 
  They report any suspicious incidents immediately by contacting ICT. 
 
  They follow any instructions received from ICT regarding dealing with malware 
or a virus threat. 
 
7.3  Vulnerability and Patch Management 
 
ICT are responsible for keeping abreast of identifications of new vulnerabilities that 
could impact Council Information Technology Assets and for implementing patches 
accordingly.  ICT is responsible for ongoing monitoring of new vulnerabilities. 
 
For  Microsoft  Windows  products  Microsoft  Software  Update  Services  will  be  used 
for automatic updates.   
 
For  all  other  products  periodic  checks  will  be  conducted  on  a  regular  basis    to 
ensure that new vulnerability threats are identified and dealt with in a timely manner.   
 
Patch implementation shall be conducted taking into account the need to minimise 
system  downtime  whilst  still  ensuring  implementation  of  patches  to  all  potentially 
impacted machines in a timely manner. 
 
If  there  is  not  a  patch  available  immediately  mitigating  action  will  be  identified  to 
reduce  the  threat,  this  may  result  in  disabling  services  or  reducing  access  to  the 
vulnerable services until a patch is available.  
 
7.4  Government Public Services Network (PSN) 
 
The  Cabinet  Office  have  implemented  the  PSN,  which  is  a  secure  network 
delivering  a  secure  infrastructure,  linking  all  local  authorities  to  each  other  and  to 
central government departments and agencies.  
 
In high-level terms, the major components of PSN are: 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 35 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
  A core network that enables the linking of Local Authorities to each other and 
to Government departments, therefore providing a foundation for the secure 
exchange of sensitive information. 
 
  Mail – A secure email routing solution between Government bodies. 
 
  Connection  to  the  DWP  for  the  transfer  of  information  to  and  from  Local 
Authorities for benefits information. 
 
In  order  to  gain  connection  the  Council  must  comply  with  the  PSN  security 
standards and submit a return stating compliancy every year.  
 
7.5  Email Anti-Virus 
 
The  Council  utilises  an  Email  Anti-Virus  service  which  protects  the  Council  from 
known and unknown malware & viruses which can be transmitted using emails as a 
medium, and can also block other email based threats such as phishing scams, and 
Trojans.  The  virus  protection  service  offers  protection  from  known  and  unknown 
viruses  using  pattern  protection  techniques.  This  service  is  essential  in  order  to 
enable the Council to avoid, as much as is possible, malware & virus related costs 
such as system down-time, lost productivity and reputation damage. This protection 
cannot cater for zero day malware as pattern protection cannot detect these as they 
are unknown. 
 
7.6  Firewalls 
 
The  Council  deploys  firewalls  between  the  Councils  network  and  the  Internet  and 
external  users  in  order  to  protect  the  Network,  providing  protection  against  
intrusions, targeted attacks and vulnerabilities. 
 
Intrusions and targeted attacks may result in: 
 
  Loss of data 
  Loss of reputation 
  Loss of time 
  Loss of service availability 
 
7.7  Encryption 
 
The  Council  deploys  encryption  technologies  to  protect  the  confidentiality, 
authenticity and integrity of information.  
 
The following encryption facilities in place are: 
 
 
Full-disk encryption to ensure that information remains secure when stored 
  
on  laptops,  tablets,  and  mobile  devices  (where  available).  This  would 
ensure  that  data  on  any  of  these  devices  if  lost  or  stolen  would  remain 
secure.  
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 36 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
  Removable device encryption is provided using hardware encrypted devices 
with  a  key  code  to  unlock  them  for  security.  Designated  devices  in  service 
areas,  usually  laptops  and  PC’s  which  are  not  thin  clients  will  have 
removable  device  encryption  software  to  ensure  that  information  remains 
secure  when  stored  on  removable  devices  e.g.  CD’s  to  ensure  that  data 
taken  from  Council  systems  can  only  be  read  using  Council  owned 
equipment.  
 
  Portable encryption software is used to allow the transfer of data to another 
establishment  by  encrypting  the  data.  Email  attachments  may  also  be 
encrypted in this way.    
 
  Devices such as cameras, card readers and Dictaphones etc. will be enabled 
on all workstations and thin clients for reading only.  
 
 
7.8  Malware & Virus Alerts 
 
On receipt of malware or a Virus alert for a new destructive malware or virus, users 
will be notified and the external Email and Internet system will be shut down while a 
full  network  scan  can  be  made  and  investigations  made  as  to  the  origin  and 
methods  of  dispatch  and  detection  of  the  virus.  The  external  Email  and  Internet 
system will be re-opened when a satisfactory resolution has been implemented. 
 
 
7.9  Dual Authentication 
 
The  Council  has  implemented  dual  authentication  for  remote  access  in  order  to 
comply with the PSN Code of Connection and to ensure that the network is secure 
from unauthorised access.  
 
 
7.10  Mobile Device Management 
 
One of the Public Services Network (PSN) security requirements is that if mobile 
devices are utilised by a government body then they  must have a mobile device 
management solution in place in order to protect the Councils information. Central 
Government  have  produced  guidance  on  mobile  devices  and  the  associated 
security  measures  which  we  must  comply  with.  The  Council  has  implemented  a 
mobile device management system which implements the security measures this 
guidance defines. 
 
Mobile  device  management  is  essential  when  deploying  a  number  of  mobile 
devices  to  ensure  that  they  are  centrally  managed  to  enable  the  deployment  of 
applications, software updates and security.  
 
The twelve security recommendations and guidance on the deployment  of mobile 
devices  provided  by  the  CESG  will  be followed  on  implementing mobile devices 
with the MDM solution to ensure that it is PSN compliant. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 37 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
7.11  Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS)  
 
All  card  processing  activities  and  related  technologies  must  comply  with  the 
Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS) in its entirety to enable 
the  Council  to  take  card  payments.  PCI-DSS  is  a  set  of  comprehensive 
requirements  for  ensuring  payment  account  data  security.  It  was  developed  by 
the  founding  payment  brands  of  the  PCI  Security  Standards  Council,  including 
American  Express,  Discover  Financial  Services,  JCB  International,  MasterCard 
Worldwide and Visa Inc. Inc. International, to help facilitate the broad adoption of 
consistent data security measures on a global basis. 
 
The  Council  must  comply  with  these  standards  and  is  required  to  register 
compliance. 
 
7.12  Social Networking 
 
Social  Networking  has  been  one  of  the  growth  areas  of  ICT  over  the  last  few 
years  and  is  expected  to  be  a  key  component  of  the  Councils  communication 
strategy.    However,  with  social  networking  comes  an  enormous  risk  of  data 
leakage of sensitive information leading to fines or reputational damage. 
 
The  Council’s  security  policy  has  adapted  to  the  risks  so  that  limited  social 
networking access is permitted but the use of social networking by the Council is 
expected  to  expand  over  the  coming  years  and  will  need  to  adapt  further.  It  is 
hoped that new technologies will be developed as social networking adapts as a 
tool to be used by companies so that it can be implemented in a secure manner. 
The  Council’s  new  internet  platform  will  have  social  networking  components  so 
these  will  need  to be  investigated  to  look at  the  viability  of  implementing  secure 
social networking for use by the Council. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 38 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
8. 
Roles and Responsibilities 
 
There is a need for clear governance arrangements to ensure that the Council’s ICT 
strategy  and  projects  are  delivered  effectively,  with  sufficient  priority  within  the 
Council. 
 
The  following  structure  encompasses  staff  from  all  levels  within  the  authority  to 
ensure full ownership of the ICT strategy. This structure will not only deliver the ICT 
strategy  and  projects  but  will  continue  to  deliver  future  ICT  programme  plans  and 
strategies. 
 
8.1.  The Cabinet 
 
The  portfolio  holder  for  Corporate  issues  has  been  nominated  as  the  member 
responsible  for  ICT.  The  role  of  the  Cabinet  will  be  to  approve  any  additional 
budgetary provisions required. 
 
8.2.  Corporate Leadership Team 
 
The responsibility of this team primarily is to support the ICT strategy, policies and 
procedures,  by  ensuring  that  all  directorates  participate  in  the  identification  of 
requirements for, and the development of the strategy. The team will be responsible 
for  ensuring  that  all  projects  within  their  directorate  and  cross  cutting  projects  are 
adequately resourced and that staff are given  appropriate priorities for all projects. 
This  team  will  be  ultimately  responsible for  the  success  or failure  of  the  Council’s 
achievement of its ICT strategy.  
 
8.3.  IT Manager 
 
The  responsibility  of  the  IT  Manager  is  to  develop  the  ICT  strategy  and  its 
associated  policies  and  procedures.  The  IT  Manager  will  report  to  the  Corporate 
Management  Team  to  gain  approval  for  developments  of  the  strategy.  The  IT 
Manager  will  be  the  lead  officer  of  the  ICT  development  group    and  will  be 
responsible for the development and delivery of the programme plan. 
 
Developments will be identified initially from a number of different sources, such as 
internal service developments, consultancy and audit reviews and specific changes 
in policy. The initial interpretation and assessment of requirements should be made 
by  the  IT  Manager  who  will  decide  the  appropriate  course  of  action.  In  order  to 
maximise  general  performance,  all  minor  projects,  amendments  or  enhancements 
to  existing  systems  within  budget  will,  subject  to  the  approval  of  the  relevant 
Director, be undertaken by the IT Manager for expediency. Major corporate projects 
will be referred to the  ICT development  group.  Major departmental projects  will be 
managed  by  the  appropriate  group  member,  departmental  representatives  and 
appropriate ICT staff. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 39 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
8.4  ICT development group 
 
The responsibility of this group is to develop and manage the ICT strategy and ICT 
projects.  
 
The ICT Development Group Remit is as follows : 
 
Meetings 

 
Monthly  meetings  will  be  held  to  discuss  progress,  achievements,  proposed 
developments and issues. These meetings will have circulated minutes with actions 
agreed  and  designated  to  officers.  Attendance  at  meetings  should  be  formally 
arranged well in advance and be mandatory for all members. 
 
Standards, Policies and Procedures 
 
The group will: 
 
Work together to develop and review ICT related standards, policies and 
procedures. 
 
Be  responsible  for  the  adoption  and  dissemination  of  these  throughout 
the Authority. 
 
Competence, awareness and training 
 
The  ICT  development  group  will  identify  appropriately  experienced  staff  when 
project  teams  are  defined,  where  gaps  are  identified  staff  will  be  appropriately 
trained. 
 
The ICT development group should formulate a training plan to be included in their 
appraisals.      
 
Developments 
 
The ICT development group will co-ordinate and approve ICT developments.  
 
Developments  must  be  presented  to  the  IT  Manager  for  consideration,  minor 
developments may be approved at this stage, major developments will be referred 
to  the  ICT  development  group  for  approval.  A  proforma  will  be  created  which  will 
contain the following: 
 
Project definition 
Costs 
Staffing implications 
Benefits 
Efficiencies 
Outcomes 
Corporate implications 
Timescales 
 
The  group  will  have  input  to  the  yearly  review  of  ICT  and  will  inform  the  service 
development plan and the work force plan. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 40 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
9. 
ICT Purchasing 
 
9.1 
Acquisition Policy 
 
An acquisition policy is necessary to ensure that computer equipment and software 
purchased  meets  the  ICT  strategy  requirements  and  is  in  line  with  the  Council’s 
procurement  policies.  Volume  purchase  orders,  which  reduce  costs,  are  also  a 
benefit of central purchasing. 
 
The  Computer  section  is  responsible  for  ordering  all  computer  equipment  and 
software  and  any  associated  maintenance
  this  ensures  that  the  necessary 
standards are adhered to. The only exception is mobile phones for Vale Road and 
Hermitage  Lane  where  designated  staff  purchase  their  phones  due  to  the 
efficiencies of the service. 
 
ICT will use the government procurement service framework and any other Council 
approved framework wherever possible. 
 
Breaches  of  this  policy  will  be  treated  as  per  the  Information  Technology  security 
protocol and may result in disciplinary action being taken.  
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 41 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
10.  Technical & User Support 
 
Technical  support  for  the  maintenance  and  operation  of  the  Council's  network  is 
provided by the PC / Network Support Manager and team. Technical support for the 
UNIX applications is provided by the ICT development manager and team. 
 
The technical support strategy is divided into the following areas :- 
 
 
10.1. Hardware 
 
Maintenance  contracts  should  be  arranged  for  the  core  computer  equipment  in 
order to minimise down time for critical applications. 
 
The core equipment is as follows : 
 
UNIX Processor 
Telecommunications Lines 
Network Servers 
Storage Area Network devices (SAN’s and NAS’s) 
Backup solution 
Telephony equipment  
 
 
 
New items of core equipment are typically purchased with a three year hardware 
support pack that covers 5 days a week, 8 hours a day (between 9am and 5pm) 
with a four hour response time. Ongoing maintenance after this time is arranged 
with  a  third  party  maintenance  company  which  continues  until  the  server  is 
replaced. 
 
Equipment  faults  or  installations  not  covered  by  maintenance  agreements  will  be 
repaired on a time and materials basis, the cost of which will be the responsibility of 
the department concerned. 
 
 
10.2. Software 
 
Software  support  contracts  should  be  arranged  for  systems  software  and 
application packages, it should be noted that smaller workstation applications may 
not have maintenance agreements and in these cases users will need to purchase 
new versions when the current version is no longer supported.  
 
 
a) UNIX application packages. 
 
  The  ICT  Development  team  will  provide  assistance  to  users  in  order  to 
resolve problems and where necessary contact the package provider when 
the responsibility lies with the supplier. The maintenance contracts are the 
responsibility of ICT. 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 42 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
b) Systems software - UNIX and network software. 
 
  The ICT Development team and PC / Network Support Manager and team 
will  provide  assistance  to  users  in  order  to  resolve  problems  and  where 
necessary contact the support provider. 
 
c) Workstation software applications. 
 
  Users  select  applications  for  their  Workstations  based  on  functionality, 
therefore  the  resulting  mix  of  applications  throughout  the  Council  is  very 
diverse.  It  would  be  an  impossible  task  to  support  all  of  the  applications 
centrally, therefore users selecting applications must be in a position to take 
ownership and support  themselves, with help from the supplier and the in-
house technical support team where the interface between the package and 
the  systems  software  is  involved.  The  maintenance  contracts  are  the 
responsibility of the department managing the application. 
 
d) GIS software. 
 
  The GIS and web development team will set up and configure the software 
and provide assistance to the user in order to resolve problems and where 
necessary contact the software provider when the responsibility lies with the 
supplier. The maintenance contracts are the responsibility of ICT. 
 
e) Web development. 
 
  The GIS and web development  team will provide assistance to the user in 
order  to  resolve  problems  and  where  necessary  contact  the  software 
provider  when  the  responsibility  lies  with  the  supplier.  The  maintenance 
contract  for  the  internet  software  is  the  responsibility  of  ICT.  The 
maintenance  contract  for  the  intranet  software  is  the  responsibility  of 
Marketing & Communications 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 43 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
11.  Risk assessment and risk management 
 
ICT projects are not without risk and therefore it is imperative that the Council has a 
risk assessment and risk management procedure. 
 
At  the  project  definition  stage  a  Risk  Assessment  Management  Form  will  be 
completed by the project manager and the IT Manager. This form will be retained in 
a  Risk  Register  file.  The  IT  Manager/  ICT  Development  Manager/  PC/Network 
Support  manager  as  appropriate  will  review  and  update  the  risk  register  monthly 
with  the  project  managers  in  order  to  monitor  the  implementation  plans  to  ensure 
that any problems or delays are notified to the appropriate groups and that the plans 
are adjusted or additional resources obtained as appropriate.  
 
The  Risk  Assessment Management  Form  will  identify  the  critical areas of  risk  with 
an indication as to whether the risks are low, medium or high. 
  
The critical areas of risk identified are : 
 
IT Infrastructure – A technical infrastructure that is capable of handling the volume 
and type of transactions associated with the project.  
 
Culture – The ability of the organisation to make the changes to incorporate the 
culture needed to sustain the project.  
 
Resources – The ability of MDC to maintain business as usual whilst implementing 
the project and the current lack of  available funds.  
 
Skills  –  Especially  the  specialist  skills  required  to  implement  the  project.  A  skills 
audit  should  be  carried  out  in  order  to  identify  suitable  staff  for  training  and 
additional staff requirements.  
 
Corporate planning / management
 – To ensure projects are appropriately aligned 
with the rest of the business of the Council. 
  
Technical  risk  –  The  delivery  of  the  project  depends  on  implementing  technical 
solutions which are new to the Council and in some cases  may not yet completely 
defined or indeed available 
 
Security
 – The project poses new risks regarding the security of systems and the 
confidentiality  of  the  information  held  within  systems.  Delivery  of  new  information 
services  that  provide  better  access,  ‘depth’ of  access  and flexible  geography  may 
pose  problems  in  ensuring  that  the  disclosure  of  information about  individuals  and 
businesses does not compromise confidentiality. 
 
Legislation  –  Electronic  provision  of  some  services  that  could  be  offered  by  the 
Council  may  require  primary  legislation  e.g.  online  voting.  This  may  delay  the 
implementation and effectiveness of some projects. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 44 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
12.  Green ICT 
 

Faced  with  increasingly  urgent  warnings  about  the  consequences  of  the  projected 
rise in both energy demands and greenhouse gas emissions, ICT are focusing more 
attention than ever on the need to improve energy efficiency. 
 
The  message  is  clear:  Energy  costs  are  rising,  supply  is  limited.  Green  strategies 
and technologies exist today to help optimise space, power, cooling and resiliency 
while improving operational management and reducing costs. 
 
12.1  Printer Consolidation 
  
Printer  consolidation has  been  implemented with  the  use  of  MFD’s  (multi  function 
devices)  to  reduce  paper  usage  by  enforcing  duplex  printing,  restrictions  of  colour 
printing,  cartridge  costs,  toner  costs,  maintenance  costs,  power  consumption, 
number of network switches, replacement printer costs. 
 
12.2  LCD Monitors 
 
Only LCD monitors will now be purchased as they use less power.  
 
12.3  Power Efficient Hardware 
 
Hardware replacements are being made with more power efficient units. These are 
only  being  made  when  replacement  is  necessary  as  to  do  so  at  once  would 
increase the manufacturers’ carbon emissions unnecessarily. 
 
12.4  Server Virtualisation 
 
Server  virtualisation  is  a  technology  designed  to  enable  multiple  application 
workloads – each having an independent computing environment and service level 
objectives – to run on a single machine. This eliminates the approach of dedicating 
a  single  workload  to  a  single  server  –  a  practice  that  yields  low  utilisation  rates  – 
and  allows  virtualised  servers  to  function  near  maximum  capacity.  A  virtualised 
environment also is more resilient than a dedicated server environment. Component 
failures can be automatically managed, and the workload restarted. Resources in a 
virtualised  environment  can  be  managed  from  a  single  point  of  control,  improving 
operations. 
Virtualisation is a tremendous ally in reducing heat and expense—simply because it 
means  that  fewer  servers  are  needed.  Servers  use  energy  and  give  off  heat 
whether  they’re  in  use  100  percent  of  the time or  15  percent  of  the  time,  and  the 
actual  difference  in  electrical  consumption  and  heat  generated  between  those  two 
points is not significant. This means a server that is only 15 percent utilised will cost 
as much to run as a server that is fully utilised. 
 
The  Council  has  virtualised  all  appropriate  severs.  Some  servers,  due  to 
functionality  or  supplier  support,  cannot  be  virtualised  at  this  time.  The  process  is 
not  as  simple  as  it  may  appear  as  full  user  testing  needs  to  take  place  and  load 
balancing between virtual and actual servers is extremely important  to ensure that 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 45 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
applications are working at their maximum capacity. In addition some suppliers will 
not support their software in a virtualised environment. 
  
 
12.5  Storage Virtualisation 
 
Storage  virtualisation  is  used  to  combine  storage  capacity  from  multiple  systems 
and  severs  into  a  single  reservoir  of  capacity  that  can be managed from  a  central 
point.  Just  as  server  virtualisation  reduces  the  number  of  servers  needed,  storage 
virtualisation reduces the number of spindles required,  increasing the total amount 
of  available  disk  space  and  optimising  utilisation  rates.  Storage  virtualisation  can 
also improve application availability by insulating host applications from changes to 
the physical storage infrastructure. 
The Council has virtualised the majority of all appropriate data. It is now necessary, 
using a storage strategy, to rationalise the data and ensure that tier 1 storage only 
Is  placed  on  the  storage  network  device  (SAN)  to  ensure  that  this  expensive 
storage  is  used  appropriately  due  to  the  exponential  growth  of  storage  in  the  last 
few years.  
 
 
12.6  Virtual Desktop Integration 
 
Virtual Desktop Integration (VDI) is used to replace traditional PCs and laptops with 
virtual desktops that run on servers in the data centre and use thin client devices to 
access  them.  Administrators  can  provision  new  desktops  in  minutes,  giving  users 
their  own  personalised  desktop  environments  while  eliminating  the  need  for 
retraining  and  application  sharing.  This  approach  helps  to  reduce  the  total  cost  of 
ownership  (TCO)  for  the  desktop  infrastructure,  extends  the  life  cycle  of  the 
hardware and helps ICT to respond more quickly to business needs. 
 
Thin  client  devices  use  less  power  and  their  replacement  cycle  is  10-15  years 
instead  of  5,  thereby  reducing  power  usage,  manufacturing  power  and  fewer 
disposals in replacing units less often.  
 
 
12.7  PC Energy Saving measures 
 
The Council has implemented software which will query all PC’s on the network and 
shut  down any left  switched on, as applicable.  Some PC’s need to be left on e.g. 
CCTV,  therefore  care  must  be  taken  to  ensure  that  the  essential  PC’s  are  not 
switched off. 
 
The  only  screen  saver  allowed  is  the  windows  locked  screen  combined  with 
monitor’s being switched automatically to standby if not used for a time limit. 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 46 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
12.8  Replacement of equipment 
 
Avoid  unnecessary  replacement  of  equipment  to  reduce  the  environmental  impact 
of emissions from manufacturing. 
 
The Council has always had a policy of replace when broken or beyond economic 
repair  where  operationally  possible.  This  policy  may  not  be  possible  when  new 
software  requires  hardware  replacement  or  the  upgrade  of  a  core  part  of  the 
network  requires  updates  in  other  areas  in  order  to  operate.  A  supply  of  old 
equipment  is  kept  to  be  cannibalised  for  repairs.  Equipment  replaced,  where 
upgrades are required for operational reasons, may be suitable for other uses and if 
so then the equipment is re-used. VDI will aid this process by introducing equipment 
with longer life spans. 
 
Next  generation  ICT  equipment  is  now  being  produced  which  has  the  ability  to 
switch off lights when in use. This reduces power usage and heat production. This 
equipment will be purchased when replacements are made.   
 
12.9  Mobile devices 
 
Mobile devices, in particular phones, have a relatively short life due to users wishing 
to exchange old models for new. Mobile devices are not replaced unless broken or 
unsupported.  
 
12.10 ICT Equipment Recycling and Disposal 
 
The Council commits that all disposal of the authorities ICT equipment conforms 
to: 
 
  European  Regulations  on  Waste  Electrical  and  Electronic  Equipment 
(WEEE) 2003 and any national UK legislation / regulation related to this.  
  Data Protection Act 1998.  
  Environmental Protection Act 1990.  
  Landfill Regulations 2002.  
  Electricity at Work Regulations 1989.  
  Hazardous Waste Regulations 2005. 
 
The Council and its employees have a responsibility under the above, to ensure that 
the final disposal and recycling of all Waste Electronic and Electrical Equipment  is 
responsible and traceable.  
 
The Council has full asset registers and a disposal protocol which complies with the 
WEEE directive.  
 
The  Council  uses  a  3rd  Party  to  collect  equipment,  resell  where  possible  or 
dispose of in an appropriate manner. The 3rd party used is thoroughly checked for 
compliancy with all relevant regulations and security best practice.    
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 47 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
13.  GIS 
 
13.1. Definition 
 
The  Geographical  Information  Systems  (GIS)  is  a  data  management  technology 
that incorporates and combines mapping, database, query and analysis tools.  It is 
defined as a computer based system used to create, store, manipulate and display 
spatial data (where things are), related attribute data (what they are), and Metadata 
(information about the data) so as to represent the real world through a computer. 
 
The Local Land & Property Gazetteer (LLPG) forms the definitive address gazetteer 
for  the  Authority  which  links  to  or  forms  the  basis  of  the  Councils  address 
databases.  It is maintained and regularly updated for new and changed properties 
linked in to the Planning and Development and Election processes.  This dataset is 
also externally used by the emergency services and statutory undertakers so places 
a responsibility on the Council to produce an accurate dataset as lives may depend 
upon it.  It is developed based upon the improvement schedules within the Data Co-
operation Agreement. 
 
NRSWA  data  is  supplied  under  national  agreements  for  usage/access  to  by  the 
Council.  It is made available to any officer requiring information about the Statutory 
Undertakers equipment or data for the area. 
 
13.2  Standards 
 
The  GIS  uses  the  British  National  Grid  as  the  common  referencing  system  and 
follows  data  standards  such  as  BS7666(2006)  -  Spatial  Data-Sets  for  Geographic 
Referencing,  the  INSPIRE  directive  –  Metadata  Standards  (adopted  into  British 
Law) and Crown copyright.  
 
The  LLPG  is  compliant  with  BS7666(2006)  -  Spatial  Data-Sets  for  Geographic 
Referencing,  DEC(2011)  –  Data  Entry  Conventions  and  DTF  7.3  v3.1.  -  data 
transfer formats.  
 
The  Public  Sector  Mapping  Agreement  (PSMA)  and  the  Data  Co-operation 
Agreement covers the licenses for the mapping, derived data and LLPG data usage 
under  Crown  copyright  and  the  Authority  must  comply  with  these  requirements  in 
order to continue to receive and use the mapping data. 
 
The Authority must comply with all Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) associated with 
the usage of the data supplied to it and created by it. 
  
13.3  Maintenance and Development 
 
There  are  many  tasks  associated  with  maintaining  and  developing  the  GIS  and 
LLPG including: 
 
  Continual improvements to the LLPG and its associated attribute data will be 
undertaken  to  meet  the  Council’s  requirements  and obligations  in line  with 
the  national  improvement  target  dates  specified  within  the  Data  Co-
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 48 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
operation  Agreement  and  to  amalgamate  the  data  with  Ordnance  Surveys 
Addressbase products. 
 
  To manage and develop the GIS functions based upon the Innogistic product 
range as the current corporate GIS solution within the Council. 
 
  To raise the awareness of GIS benefits across all departments of the Council 
through the use of presentations, the intranet and the development of generic 
applications. 
 
  To  develop  a  central  access  point  for  accurate,  consistent  and  up-to-date 
spatial data and to organise and actively manage it. 
 
  To  implement  a  GIS  technical  infrastructure  capable  of  delivering    spatial 
functionality through the use of the internet and intranet to meet the business 
needs of a large number of users. 
 
  To  provide  a  support  structure  that  enables  user  and  GIS  requirements  to 
meet the Council’s business needs, strategic aims and core values.  
 
  To expand the use of the mapping data types supplied to the Council under 
the  Public  Sector  Mapping  Agreement  (PSMA)  and  unify  its  storage  and 
processing. 
 
  To manage and expand the use of  the mapping and data available freely to 
the  Council  via  statutory  undertakers  and  Public  bodies  unifying  its  storage 
and processing. 
 
  Ensure produced maps and data are standardised so that they always include 
the correct copyrights and watermarks making sure that the Council complies 
with Ordnance Survey requirements covering printed and electronic file output. 
 
  To  review  and  develop  the  use  of  3D  mapping,  contouring  and  terrain 
modelling. 
 
  To work towards the INSPIRE directive for the accurate recording of metadata 
and create a discover and view facility of the datasets held by the council and 
the appropriate information about them. 
 
13.4  Benefits 
 
The benefits of GIS include: 
 
  Sharing  of  definitive  digital  datasets  across  service  areas  reducing  the 
duplication  of  data  storage,  maintenance  and  minimising  out  of  date 
information. 
 
  Creating  additional  relationships  between  information  sources  based  upon 
their location, adding value to the data.  
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 49 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
  Presenting  information  in  a  geographical  format  aids  understanding  and 
increases  social  inclusion  by  overcoming  many  communication  barriers 
associated with language and literacy. 
 
  Aiding the decision making process by allowing information from a wide range 
of sources to be combined quickly and easily. 
    Speeding up and extending access to geographical information and a more 
efficient method of information retrieval.  
 
  Identifying  trends  in  information  in  relation  to  their  location  and  the  ability  to 
explore a wider range of ‘what if’ scenarios. 
 
  Improving  mapping  capabilities  –  better  access  to  maps,  improved  accuracy 
and  precision  of  digital  format  compared  to  paper  maps,  and  more  effective 
thematic mapping.  
 
  Promoting computer literacy and good data management practices. 
 
  To  be  able  to  access  the  information  regardless  of  the  user  type,  through  a 
multitude  of  access  channels  such as a  web  browser,  personal  digital  device 
on the street or via a third party such as a call centre operator.  
 
13.5  Training and User Support 
 
The GIS and web development team will provide the following training and user 
support activities: 
    Staff training on the principles, use and benefits of spatial data. 
 
  Develop online user guides and interactive training videos. 
 
  To train staff giving the opportunity to fully exploit the GIS software available. 
 
  Provide training in the use of GIS and in the handling and creation of spatial 
information. 
 
  The integration of the LLPG data into their software systems. 
 
  Progress  any  requests  for  development  of  the  software  with  the  supplier  or 
developer. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 50 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
14.  Web Development 
 
14.1. Definition 
 
The  web  development  service  provides  the  infrastructure  for  the  Internet,  Intranet 
and Extranet functions.  Programming language is used to create the functionality of 
the  web  pages  and  integrates  with  the  Content  Management  Systems  (CMS’s)  in 
providing data, information and services to the end user. 
 
The service maintains the operation and functionality of the: 
 
  Council’s main website 
  Palace Theatre website 
  Museum Website 
  Goldfish Bowl Website 
  Sherwood Forest Housing Market Area Website 
  Intranet 
  Members Extranet 
  Nottinghamshire Extranet 
 
14.2. Standards 
 
Current practices are constantly reviewed in respect of changes in legislation which 
may impact the web.  These include the recent  implementation of the Equality Act 
2010 and the Cookies Law. 
 
The  websites  seek  to  comply  with,  and  Adhere  to  the  National  Standards  for 
accessibility including WAI, W3C, IPSV and Wave Validators. 
 
14.3. Accessibility 
 
To  enable  accessibility  by  users  with  literacy,  hearing  and  visual  impairments,  the 
website  is  integrated  with  Texthelp  software,  alternative  colour  schemes  and  text 
enlargement functions to enable them to access the information more easily.   
 
Site  navigation  should  reflect  the  needs  of  the  visitor  with  clear  navigation  and 
meaningful  web  addresses  (URLs).  The use  of  friendly  URL’s  in un-spaced  lower 
case wording is encouraged. 
 
Content  irrespective  of  its  format  should  be  searchable  giving  an  enhanced  return 
on search queries. 
 
14.4. Maintenance and Development 
 
There are many tasks associated with maintaining and developing the web function 
including: 
 
  Managing the administration of  permissions and user levels of  access to the 
CMS’s. 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 51 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
  Addressing the issues of dead links, template changes and formatting errors. 
 
  The production and monitoring of statistical information. 
 
  Ensure compliance with the Cookies legislation. 
 
  Management of the updates and improvements to the system. 
 
  Investigation and implementation of further developments. 
 
  The design and programming of web pages and functions including the What’s 
on guide. 
 
  To ensure the website is compatible with the current web browsers in use. 
 
  To be compatible with the different screen resolutions and sizes used. 
 
  To build web front ends for applications to allow delivery to wider audiences. 
 
  To create and manage the forms process. 
 
  To  integrate  with  the  GIS  function  for  improvements  to  web  page 
development. 
 
  Be proactive in the evaluation of  new technology  which  may be of  benefit to 
the Authority. 
 
  Improve integration and co-ordination with departmental systems. 
 
  To keep up to date the links supplied to Direct Gov. 
    Configure the new Intranet on behalf of Communications and users. 
 
14.5  Training and User Support 
 
The GIS and web development team will provide the following training and user 
support activities: 
  Provide a support infrastructure for web content editors and authorisers. 
 
  Give staff training on the principles, use and benefits of on-line data. 
 
  Develop  online  user  guides  and  interactive  training  videos  for  users  of  the 
CMS and developed features. 
 
  To  train  staff  on  the  CMS  giving  the  opportunity  to  fully  exploit  the  software 
available. 
 
  Progress  any  requests  for  development  of  the  software  with  the  supplier  or 
developer. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 52 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
Corporate Support Documents 
 
Corporate Plan 
Departmental Service Plans 
ICT Service Plan 
 
Supporting Policies, Procedures, Standards etc. 
ICT Disaster Recovery Protocol 
Email Protocol 
ICT Strategy - User Guidelines 
Information Security Management Standards 
Information Technology Release protocol 
Mobile and Landline Communication Protocol 
ICT Project Management Procedure 
Information Technology Security Protocol  
Systems and programming specification standards 
Software Patch protocol 
ICT Password Protocol 
WEEE Protocol 
Hardware and Software Inventory Procedure 
ICT Ordering & Payment Procedure 
Post Project Review 
Information Security Incident Management Procedure 
ICT Access Control Procedure 
Firewall Policy 
ICT Remote Access Policy 
Members ICT Equipment Procedure 
Router Security Policy 
Log Management Assessment 
ICT Leavers Checklist for managers 
Network Support Service level Agreement 
PCI DSS ICT Protocol 
INSPIRE Directive 
BS7666(2006) 
British National Grid 
DTF 7.3 version 3.1 (2010) 
WAI - Web Accessibility Initiative 
W3C - Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 
IPSV - Integrated Public Sector Vocabulary  
Equality Act (2010) 
Data Entry Conventions v 3.2(2011) 
Public Sector Mapping Agreement (PSMA) (2011) 
Data Co-operation Agreement (2012) 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 53 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
Document Attributes 
Document Information 

Title 
ICT Strategy 
File Location 
H:\STRATEGY\ ICT Strategy v4.6.docx 
This strategy defines the Council’s strategic approach to the 
Description 
development of Information and Communications Technology 
(ICT). 
Author 
IT Manager 
Date Created  
April 2001 
Last Review Date 
April 2017 
Next Review Date  
April 2018 
Document History 
Date 
Summary of Changes 
Version 
April 2001 
Fully revised version 
1.0 
May 2004 
Reviewed – updated for changed circumstances 
1.1 
March 2005 
Reviewed – Future development section added 
1.2 
Fully revised version – Added: 
  Executive Summary 
  E-business 
May 2006 
  GIS 
2.0 
  Roles and responsibilities 
  Channel Strategy 
  Risk assessment & risk management 
Reviewed – updated for changed circumstances and added 
April 2007 
2.1 
ICT purchasing 
April 2008 
Reviewed – updated for changed circumstances 
2.2 
Reviewed – Added: 
  Corporate business drivers 
  Security 
April 2009 

3.0 
  Green ICT 
  Shared services 
  Removed E-business 
Reviewed: 
  Complete review of the GIS section, adding web 
development and incorporating into the main strategy as 
appropriate. 
  Update for flexible working including Virtual Desktop 
Integration (VDI), wireless, Microsoft agreement, 
application consolidation, thin clients, workstation 
August 2011 
rationalisation, mobile devices. 
4.0 
  Add Public Services Network (PSN). 
  Deletion of the renewal budget.  
  Add storage strategy. 
  Add dual authentication. 
  Update corporate support documents 
  Various changes to the establishment and Council 
practices. 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 54 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
Reviewed: 
Replace the Occasional Homeworking Framework with the 
Home Working Policy. 
CAA removed. 
Wireless network to be implemented. 
Email archive and Everyone drive storage issues removed 
April 2012 
4.1 
as these have been resolved. 
Microsoft rental agreement in place. 
Printer consolidation now adopted. 
Data Co-operations Agreement in place. 
NRSWA data/access included. 
Cookies Legislation added. 
Reviewed: 
Replace Government connect with the PSN. 
Amended: Network server configuration: added application 
procurement, virtual desktop servers and standalone server 
environment sections. 
Amended: Storage Strategy: will need to consider hosting 
May 2013 
options if storage continues to grow as projected. 
4.2 
Amended: VDI is no longer in the proof of concept stage and 
is now being rolled out. 
Added: Backup strategy. 
Amended: Mobile Devices: Mobile device support options 
for developments. 
Encryption: New encryption technologies being rolled out 
Reviewed: 
Added: mobile working, new end user, mobile device and 
mobile device management  sections 
Added: PSN connection between Ashfield and Mansfield 
Added: section on database software 
Added: section on email facilities 
April 2014 
Added: section on Software deployment 
4.3 
Added: section on Open Source 
Added: section on PCI DSS standard 
Added: section on social networking 
Removed: channel strategy section 
Various minor amendments for small changes, clarification, 
and removing out of date information 
Reviewed: 
Added: A full business case is being developed for a shared 
ICT service between Ashfield and Mansfield 
Removed: Outlook web access has been retired 
August 2015 
4.4 
Various minor amendments for small changes and 
clarification 
Added: CMT & Heads of Service category for end user 
device selection 
 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 55 of 56 

 
 
ICT Strategy 
Reviewed: 
Amended: Job titles of Corporate Leadership Team 
Delete: Departmental Service Reviews corporate business 
driver. 
April 2016 
4.5 
Added: Change for the future corporate business driver. 
Various minor amendments for small changes, clarification, 
and removing out of date information 
Removed: References to the ICT shared service 
Reviewed: 
Amended: Updated the aims of the strategy to reflect the 
April 2017 
current position. 
4.6 
Added: Customer self-service section into the corporate 
business drivers section 
 
Document Approval 

Date 
Job Title of Approver(s) 
Version 
November 2009  ICT Development Group 
3.0 
December 2009  CMT 
3.0 
September 2011  ICT Development Group 
4.0 
September 2011  CMT 
4.0 
June 2012 
ICT Development Group 
4.1 
June 2012 
CMT 
4.1 
May 2013 
ICT Development Group 
4.2 
June 2013 
CMT 
4.2 
May 2014 
ICT Development Group 
4.3 
June 2014 
CMT 
4.3 
September 2015  ICT Development Group 
4.4 
September 2015  CMT 
4.4 
May 2016 
ICT Development Group 
4.5 
April 2017 
Director of Commerce and Customer Services 
4.6 
April 2017 
IT Manager 
4.6 
 
Distribution 

Name / Group 
ICT Department 
Senior Managers 
 
Coverage 

Groups 
All Senior Managers via email 
All Employees via the intranet 
All Members via the intranet 
Publicly available via the Internet 
 
Filename: ICT Strategy  
 
Version: 4.6 
 
Page 56 of 56