This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Hr Policies and Procedures'.


Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
 
Service Instruction 0854 
 
Conduct (Discipline) 
 
 
 
Document Control 
Description and Purpose 
This document is intended to advise Managers of the process and procedures relating to conduct issues
 
 
Active date 
Review date 
Author 
Editor 
Publisher 
09.04.15 
10.05.19 
Amanda Cross 
Philomena Dwyer 
Sue Coker 
Permanent 
 
Temporary 
 
If temporary, review date must be 3 months or less. 
 
Amendment History 
Version  

Date 
Reasons for Change 
Amended by 
1.1 
07.04.16  Review and deletion of Appendix 
Amanda Cross 
1.2 
10.05.18  General Data Protection Regulation update 
Amanda Cross 
 
 
 
 
 
Risk Assessment (if applicable) 
Date Completed 

Review Date 
Assessed by 
Document location 
Verified by(H&S) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equalities Impact Assessment 
Date  

Reviewed by 
Document location 
12.04.16 
 
E&DPortal/EIAs/EIA2014/POD/Capability 
 
Civil Contingencies Impact Assessment (if applicable) 
Date 

Assessed by 
Document location 
 
 
 
 
Related Documents 
Doc. Type 

Ref. No. 
Title 
Document location 
Policy 
PROPOL11  Conduct and Capability 
Portal/POD/Policies and Service Instructions 
Instruction  SI 0853 
Capability 
Portal/POD/Policies and Service Instructions 
 
 
 
 
 
Contact 
Department 

Email 
Telephone ext. 
POD 
xxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
0151 296 4358 
 
Target audience 
All MFRS 


Ops Crews 
 
Fire Protection 
 
Fire Prevention 
 
Principal officers 
 
Senior officers 
 
Non uniformed 
 
 
 
 
 
Relevant legislation (if any) 
 
 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 1 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
 
Introduction  
The aim of this Service Instruction is to ensure consistent, fair and treatment for all employees through 
the application of a consistent procedure for the management of Conduct (discipline) in the workplace. 
 
Procedures that can be demonstrated to be fair, transparent and consistently applied promote good 
staff and employment relations which improves performance and contribute to the Mission of creating 
and maintaining Safer Stronger Communities and Safe Effective Firefighters. 
 
This procedure has been prepared to reflect and improve on the statutory provisions and ACAS Code 
of Practice and National and Local Government Conditions of Service. It has the status of a collective 
agreement with the representative bodies and as such is deemed contractual. 
 
Clear rules and procedures set standards of conduct at work and help to ensure that those standards 
are understood and adhered to whilst providing a transparent method of dealing with any alleged failure 
to observe them. These are represented by the ground rules, employees’ code of conduct and through 
the personal values adopted by the Authority that under pin all we do. 
 
Purpose of Procedure  
This procedure applies in cases of conduct. The basis of this procedure is that the principle of natural 
justice applies, at every stage, in a framework which also ensures fairness for both employees and 
managers. A guiding principle of the procedure is to obtain improvement and remedy problems. 
 
Scope of the Procedure  
The procedure, which reflects and improves on the statutory provisions and the ACAS Code on 
Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures, is designed to help and encourage all  * employees to achieve 
and maintain the standards of conduct expected by the Service.  The aim is to ensure consistent and 
fair treatment for all employees in the organisation. 
 
* The Monitoring Officer will be dealt with under the Local Authority Standing Orders Regulations (2001) 
Principles  
All  disciplinary  procedures  are  designed  to  be  corrective,  not  punitive  and  to  indicate  to  employee’s 
what is required to meet the standards expected by the Authority. 
 
  The procedure is designed to establish the facts without undue delay and to deal consistently with 
conduct issues. Where external information is required, for example from the police or courts, these 
agencies will be advised of the necessity to provide information in a timely manner. No disciplinary 
action will be taken until the matter has been investigated.  
 
  The employee will be advised of the nature of the complaint, and following the principle of natural 
justice, be given the opportunity to state their case. 
 
  The employee can be represented or accompanied by a Trade Union representative or by a fellow 
employee/ friend of their choice. 
 
  An  employee  will  not  be  dismissed  for  a  first  breach  of  discipline,  except  in  the  case  of  Gross 
Misconduct, when after investigation, the penalty may be dismissal without notice and without pay 
in lieu of notice. 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 2 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
 
When deciding whether a disciplinary penalty is appropriate and what form it should take, the Authority 
will bear in mind the need to act reasonably in all the circumstances.  
 
Factors which might be relevant include, 
 
  The extent to which standards have been breached, 
  Precedents, 
  The individual’s general record, position and length of service 
  Whether any special circumstances might make it appropriate to adjust the severity of the penalty. 
 
The  individual  has  a  right  to  appeal  against  any  disciplinary  action  taken  against  them  subject  to 
compliance with specific timescales. 
 
 
Level of Management Matrix 
In  most  cases  investigation  is  undertaken  by  the  employee’s  line  manager.  However,  there  may  be 
circumstances  where  this  is  not  appropriate  e.g.,  where  the  line  manager  may  be  involved  in  the 
alleged  misconduct,  or  has  commitments  or  absences,  which  may  unreasonably  delay  the 
investigation.  
Therefore,  the  Service  has  the  right  to  appoint  a  different  person  other  than  the  line  manager  to 
undertake the investigation as the “Investigating Manager”.  
 
Investigation 
Meeting/Action 
Maximum 
Appeal 
Sanction 
Informal 
Line Manager or 
N/A 
None - Note  
N/A 
above 
for Case 
recorded 
Stage 1 
Line Manager 
Station Manager (or 
6 Months First 
Group Manager (or 
Watch Manager 
equivalent) or above  Written 
equivalent) 
/Station Manager 
warning 
(or equivalent) or 
above 
Stage 2 
Station Manager 
Group Manager (or 
18 Months 
Area Manager/ Director 
(or equivalent) or 
equivalent or above)  Final Written 
above 
Warning  
Stage 3 
Group Manager 
Area Manager/ 
Dismissal   
Principal Officers 
(or equivalent)  or 
Director or above 
Or 
above 
18 Months 
Final Written 
Warning 
13 days 
Stoppage of 
Pay 
Demotion 
Disciplinary 
Transfer 
 
 
 
 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 3 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
The Procedure 
 
Informal Stage  
Managers have a right to manage and to hold informal management meetings with employees. A 
management meeting does not require Trade Union representation and tends to be a one to one 
informal discussion with the line manager. 
 
If during an informal management meeting, it becomes obvious that the matter may be more serious, 
the meeting should be adjourned. The employee may then be told that the matter may be confirmed 
under the formal conduct procedure. 
 
The separate formal stages of initiating action, investigation, hearing, and decisions are not relevant at 
this stage. The informal approach means that minor problems should be dealt with quickly and 
confidentially. The line manager will speak to the employee about their conduct, and may put this in 
writing although it would not form part of the formal disciplinary record. This Note For Case should be 
shared with the employee and a copy kept in case it is required at a later stage.  
At the informal stage, the manager will ensure that employees are clear on the expected outcomes and 
the process by which they will be achieved. If the employee’s conduct fails to improve or is not 
maintained, or if during the course of the informal action, it becomes apparent that the issue warrants a 
formal approach, the formal conduct procedure may be initiated. 
 
Formal Process  
First formal stage
An employee’s line manager, for example the Watch Manager (or equivalent) or above, may initiate the 
conduct process and investigate. Following full investigation and a disciplinary hearing, if the employee 
is found on the balance of probability to have committed an act of misconduct; the usual first step would 
be to give them a warning.  
 
A warning must give details and an explanation of the decision. It should make it clear to the employee 
that failure to improve or modify behaviour may lead to further disciplinary action, and advise them of 
their right of appeal. A warning will be no longer be live disregarded for disciplinary purposes after six 
months, subject to satisfactory conduct.  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 4 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
 
Second Formal Stage 
Where there is a failure to improve or the improvement is not sustained in the timescale set at the first 
formal stage, or where the offence is sufficiently serious, the sanction may be no greater than a final 
written warning. This sanction may only be issued following a full investigation and disciplinary hearing. 
 
A final written warning must give details and an explanation of the decision. It should make it clear to 
the employee that failure to improve or modify behaviour may lead to dismissal or to some other 
sanction, and advise them of their right of appeal. A final written warning should be disregarded for 
disciplinary purposes after eighteen months. Where a lesser sanction is issued, the same right of 
appeal applies.  
 
A final written warning may only be given to an employee by their Group Manager (or equivalent) or 
above.  
 
Third Formal Stage  
Where an employee fails to improve or where the offence is sufficiently serious, there should be an 
investigation and formal hearing. The sanctions available may include dismissal.  As an alternative to 
dismissal the outcome may be-  
 
  A warning 
  Demotion – either within grade/ role or no more than one grade/ role. A demotion of more than one 
grade/ role can only be done with the agreement of the employee. 
  Disciplinary transfer.  
  Loss of pay up to a maximum of thirteen days pay.  
 
Employees will be informed of their right to appeal and details of the appeals process.  
 
Only Area Manager, Director or above have delegated powers to dismiss employees. 
 
 
 
 
 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 5 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
Advising the employee 
Employees will be invited to all formal meetings in writing to advise them of the allegation and their right 
to representation.  
 
They will be advised of the time, date and location of hearings and any special reporting instructions, 
especially where this is not the employee’s normal location. 
 
Where one of the potential outcomes is dismissal for Gross Misconduct or  the employee is on a final 
written warning, the employee will be advised of this fact. 
 
The employee will be furnished in advance with any documentation pertaining to that hearing. 
 
Timescales 
The timing and location of the hearing should (wherever practicable) be agreed with the employee and / 
or  their  representative.  The  length  of  time  between  the  written  notification  and  the  hearing  should  be 
long enough to allow the employee and/or their representative to prepare and shall in any event be not 
less than:  
 
  Ten working days for First Formal Stage 
  Ten working days for Second Stage  
  Twenty One working days for the Third Stage. 
 
These periods are changeable by mutual consent.  
 
Gross Misconduct  
If after investigation, it is deemed that an employee has committed an offence which constitutes Gross 
Misconduct, the normal consequence will be dismissal. Acts which constitute Gross Misconduct are 
those resulting in a serious breach of contractual terms and thus potentially liable for summary 
dismissal.  
Examples (but not an exhaustive list) of Gross Misconduct are:-  
 
  Serious bullying or harassment based on the protected characteristics detailed in the Equality Act 
2010;  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 6 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
  Theft, fraud, bribery; 
  Action endangering life and limb;  
  Assault or physical violence;  
  Deliberate damage to Authority property; 
  Serious unauthorised disclosure of information or breach of confidentiality;  
  Deliberate falsification of records;  
  Serious incapability for work through alcohol or illegal drugs;  
  Offences of a sexual nature or sexual/race discrimination within the workplace;  
  Serious negligence which causes or might cause unacceptable loss or injury;  
  Failure to comply with a significant or reasonable order, instruction or contractual requirement;  
  Unauthorised absence from work;  
  Serious insubordination;  
  Commission of criminal offences outside work, which have a substantial impact upon the 
employee’s ability to perform their duties or are relevant to the employees employment;  
  Serious breach of health and safety rules.  
 
Suspension 
This is a neutral act. In situations where the allegations are such that it would be inappropriate for the 
employee to remain at the workplace, the Professional Standards Manager may consider it appropriate 
to suspend the employee to facilitate a speedy and unhindered investigation and/or to alleviate any 
potential intimidation of staff. Such suspension is not to be regarded as a form of disciplinary action and 
will be for as short a period as possible. Employees will receive their full contractual pay for the duration 
of the suspension. 
 
Grievances 
In the course of the conduct process an employee may raise a grievance that is related to the case. If 
this happens, Professional Standards may consider suspending the disciplinary proceedings for a short 
period while the grievance is dealt with. Depending on the nature of the grievance, Professional 
Standards may need to consider bringing in another Manager to deal with the conduct issue. 
 
 
 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 7 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
Appeals  
An employee has a right of appeal against any formal disciplinary action taken against them, within 14 
days  of  the  decision  as  to  such  action  being  communicated  to  them,  and  to  be  represented  at  an 
appeal hearing by a Trade Union representative or work colleague. 
 
The appeal must include the specific grounds of appeal. These will normally be one of the following:  
 
  There was a procedural defect,  
  The issue is not proven on the balance of probabilities, 
  The disciplinary sanction was too severe,  
  New evidence has come to light since the hearing which will have an impact on the decision.  
 
 
Dealing with Special Situations  
 
Trade Union Officials  
Disciplinary action against a trade union official can lead to a serious dispute if it is seen as an  attack 
on the union’s functions. Although the normal disciplinary process should apply, if disciplinary action is 
contemplated then the case should additionally be discussed with a senior Trade Union representative 
or full-time official. 
 
Criminal Charges or Convictions outside Employment  
See Service Instruction SI 0771 Notification to the Service by an Individual Subject to Police 
Involvement or Criminal Investigation 
 
Failure to notify Professional Standards may result in disciplinary action being taken. 
 
These should not be treated as automatic reasons for dismissal. The main consideration should be 
whether the offence is one that makes workers unsuitable for their type of work. In all cases, the 
Authority, having considered the facts, will need to consider whether the conduct is sufficiently serious 
to warrant starting the disciplinary procedure. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 8 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
General Data Protection Act 
 
The Authority treats personal data collected in accordance with its data protection policy and 
related service instructions. Information about how your data is used and the basis for 
processing your data is provided in the Authority’s employee privacy notice 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Conduct (Disciplinary) Guidance  
 
The Guidance  
This does not form part of the conduct procedure, and should not be regarded as such. Discipline is 
the  responsibility  of  line  managers;  this  guide  has  been  designed  to  offer  practical  advice  to  all 
employees to understand the handling of conduct issues at work.  
Further  advice  and  guidance  is  available  from  the  HR  Department,  either  by  email  to  Professional 
Standards or by calling 0151 920 4320.  
Confidentiality  
All  discipline  records  and  notes  should  be  kept  confidential  and  in  accordance  with  the  Data 
Protection Act 1998.  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 9 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
 
Equal Opportunities 
It  is  essential  that  conduct  proceedings  are  applied  in  a  non-discriminatory  way.  Equality 
considerations will be made, as appropriate, throughout the application of the procedure (e.g. taking 
into  account  an  employee's  disability  when  arranging facilities for  discussions,  interviews,  hearings, 
or  awareness  of  potential  language  difficulties  where  an  employee's  first  language  is  not  English). 
This aspect of the procedures is carefully monitored.  
 
Human Rights  
The  provisions  of  the  Human  Rights  Act  1998  should  be  considered  when  applying  the  conduct 
procedures. For example, particular care needs to be taken to meet an employee's “right to respect 
for private and family life”, when carrying out disciplinary investigations and gathering of evidence in 
relation to an employee's conduct. As a general principle, consent is required before surveillance or 
monitoring  of  communications  is  undertaken,  however  express  consent  is  not  always  required.  Any 
investigation should be compatible with the Service Instruction 0810
Advice should be sought before embarking on investigations involving surveillance, direct monitoring 
of telephone calls or e-mails.  
 
Communicating the required standards  
If  the  standards  are  to  be  fully  effective,  they  need  to  be  clearly  communicated  to  all  employees, 
understood by them, and accepted as reasonable. This can be done in a number of ways.  
During recruitment  
It  is  important  to  make  prospective  employees  aware  of  the  standards  expected  within  their  new 
employment.  
During induction and the probationary period  
This  stage  sets  standards  immediately  so  the  new  employee  is  fully  acquainted  with  the terms and 
conditions  of  their  employment,  codes  of  conduct,  details  of  their  duties  and  responsibilities  and 
expected standards.  
Job Descriptions/ role map  
It  is  important  that  employees  have  access  of  their  job/role  description  and  understand  what  is 
expected of them in work. 
 
Appraisals 
It is important for both employee and line manager to meet to review, monitor and positively reinforce 
standards of conduct.  
 
Checking the facts on employee conduct  
Managers  need  to  refer  to  various  documents,  records,  and  files,  as  relevant  (e.g.  working  time 
records,  service  instructions,  work  files,  absence  records,  correspondence,  existing  personnel 
records, and files for any relevant information and background, financial records etc.)  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 10 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
 
Informal Action  
Minor breaches of conduct, unless persistent, are usually best dealt with via an informal discussion 
between the immediate line manager and the employee. Such discussions are effective in achieving 
necessary improvements and are an important management practice. 
The informal discussion is essentially a two-way problem-solving exercise, where emphasis is placed 
on finding ways in which the employee can remedy any shortcomings.  
There is no need for trade union representation at this stage, because such meetings are an integral 
part of the line manager/employee relationship.  
How to conduct an informal discussion  
If a timely and quiet word has not resolved the issue a Manager may wish to hold a more structured 
informal meeting and the following should be undertaken. 
Managers should organise a mutually convenient time with their employee advising that they want to 
discuss an issue in private.  
  Managers should collate relevant information pertinent to the issue with specific examples where 
appropriate 
  They should explain their reasons for calling the meeting. 
  Managers should use an open questioning technique to encourage discussion 
  Managers should establish why there have been any shortcomings by exploration of the facts.  
  Managers should listen to employee explanations.  
Only where the problem is identified to be more serious misconduct should the issue continue to be 
dealt with as a formal conduct matter.  
Agree an Improvement Plan  
If  the  employee's  conduct  has  fallen  below  acceptable  standards,  managers  should  consider 
agreeing an improvement plan with the employee where a structured approach is required. It should 
include :  
•  The improvement which is required and by when  
•  Any actions agreed which will facilitate the necessary improvement  
•  Clear information as to who will do what and when.  
•  When the issue will be reviewed, in accordance with the plan.  
One copy of this should be given to the employee and the original securely retained by the Manager 
as it may be referred to at any subsequent disciplinary hearing if the misconduct persists 
Monitor progress and review  
The  plan  must  be  monitored  and  reviewed  to  check  that  the  necessary  improvement  has  been 
achieved. The outcomes of the review may be one of the following; 
•  If the improvements have been achieved, these must be recognised and the employee informed 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 11 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
that their efforts have been successful, and the improvements must be maintained.  
•  If the improvements have not been achieved, depending on the circumstances, further 
discussion, or formal disciplinary action may be needed.  
If the misconduct is considered more serious, or where the employee has already had an informal 
discussion and failed to achieve the required level of improvement, the formal stages of the conduct 
procedure should be invoked.  
It would not be appropriate to either commence or continue with an informal approach if there is 
already sufficient reason to consider that there has been a breach of the Service's rules or other act 
of more serious misconduct. In such circumstances, a formal investigation should be conducted in 
accordance with the conduct procedure.  
Formal Process  
The need for investigation  
A  fair  handling  of  disciplinary  matters  requires  a  thorough  and  prompt  fact  finding  and  information 
gathering exercise through :  
•  Enquiring into the circumstances surrounding the alleged misconduct.  
•  Giving the employee a chance to offer an explanation.  
•  Taking a balanced view of the information that emerges.  
•  Ensuring that all relevant or potential witnesses are interviewed.  
•  Accurate recording of all relevant information arising from the investigation.  
•  Reaching a decision as to whether or not there are sufficient grounds for an allegation of 
misconduct.  
Conducting an investigation  
In  most  cases,  this  is  undertaken  by  the  employee’s  line  manager.  However,  there  may  be 
circumstances  where  this  is  not  appropriate  e.g.,  where  the  line  manager  may  be  involved  in  the 
alleged  misconduct,  or  has  commitments  or  absences,  which  may  unreasonably  delay  the 
investigation.  
Therefore, the Service has the right to appoint a different person other than the line manager to 
undertake the investigation as the “Investigating Manager”.  
The role of the Investigating Manager  
The Investigating Manager's task is to :-  
•  Establish relevant facts  
•  Assemble evidence, which may or may not support the allegation. 
•  Decide whether the matter should go to a formal disciplinary meeting and notifying the Director of 
People and Organisational Development of this need.  
•  Prepare a detailed report of the allegations and collate supporting documents, ensuring these are 
submitted to Professional Standards who will share this with the employee and Disciplinary 
Manager.  
•  Present the case together with appropriate evidence at the disciplinary hearing.  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 12 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
Fact finding 
It is vital that the Investigating Manager undertakes a thorough investigation into the facts by asking 
open questions to elicit information, for example: 
What? 
•  What actually happened, in as much detail as possible or, perhaps  
•  What should have happened?  
•  What were the required standards?  
Who?  
•  Who else is involved? Is there more than one person? 
•  Are there any witnesses?  
•  Who else may know something or have a relevant opinion?  
When?  
•  When did the potential misconduct happen?  
•  Was it on more than one occasion?  
Where?  
•  Was it at their place of work?  
•  Where were they, where should they have been? 
Why?  
•  Why did the employee behave in that way? 
•  Are there any mitigating circumstances?  
 
How?  
•  How did the employee act?  
Each case must be investigated and assessed on the individual circumstances, and may require the 
collection of evidence from a range of sources. Investigations should include :-  
•  An examination of evidence which may either corroborate or refute the employee’s response 
during investigation.  
•  An examination of any other relevant evidence, which may be identified from other sources of 
enquiry, for example, signed witness statements. 
•  A review of the employee’s record, for example informal action and improvement plans 
•  The employee's statements 
Holding an investigatory interview  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 13 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
The Investigating Manager will convene an investigatory interview with the employee, in order to put 
questions to them and provide an opportunity for the employee to answer and explain their actions.  
Natural justice requires that an employee should have sufficient details of the nature of the alleged 
misconduct to enable them to prepare, and employees have the right to be accompanied if they so 
wish.  
If an employee's trade union representative/work colleague is not available on the date given, an 
alternative date should be sought within a reasonable timescale.  
At the interview  
The  Investigating Manager will, 
•  Introduce everyone in the room (where necessary) explaining their role, explain that the interview 
is investigative and is not a formal disciplinary hearing, and at the end of the interview, no 
immediate disciplinary action will be taken. However, the information provided by the employee 
may influence whether to proceed to a formal disciplinary hearing or not.  
•  Confirm that an unaccompanied employee does not want to have representation. If they do want 
a representative, ascertain why that person is not at the meeting. If a reasonable explanation is 
provided, it may be necessary to permit one adjournment, to allow a representative to attend.  
•  Explain the nature of the potential misconduct in detail, for example, dates, location, number of 
occasions etc.  
•  Ask any relevant questions relating to the potential misconduct, giving the employee every 
opportunity to respond, at the end of each question.  
Investigatory Managers should: 
•  Keep an open mind.  
•  Remain calm throughout.  
•  Listen carefully to what the employee says.  
•  Ask searching questions as detailed above 
•  Avoid accusatory statements and questions.  
•  Allow the employee to talk without interruption 
•  Avoid being critical or judgmental during the interview. 
•  Conclude the interview when satisfied that all the pertinent information has been gathered.  
When concluding the interview  :-  
•  The Manager should ascertain whether there is anything else the employee or representative 
would like to say, which is pertinent to the investigation.  
•  Advise the employee that their representations will be considered and any further/ necessary 
enquiries will be undertaken. 
•  Advise the employee what will happen next.  
After the interview the Investigating Manager should, 
•  Ensure that the interview notes are written up to form a statement.  
•  Investigate fresh issues which have been raised or evidence which needs to be examined,  
•  Decide on the balance of probabilities whether or not the employee has a case to answer and 
what should happen next. This will depend on the evidence and the options will fall into one of 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 14 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
three categories.  
1.  A conclusion that there is no formal case to answer  
The employee has not committed misconduct, or there is a lack of evidence to justify such a 
conclusion. The employee should be informed as soon as possible that the matter will not be 
progressed and the relevant information sent to HR for reference purposes.  
2.  Alternatively where there are minor breaches of conduct not requiring formal action, an 
informal discussion should be initiated,  
3.  A firm conclusion that there is a formal disciplinary case to answer  
 
The Formal Disciplinary Hearing  
Purpose  
The purposes of a formal disciplinary hearing is to :-  
•  Hear the allegations of misconduct and evidence relating to it.  
•  Give the employee a fair opportunity to answer the allegations.  
•  Decide whether misconduct has been committed by the employee.  
•  Consider the action to be taken.  
•  Inform the employee of that decision, and if appropriate their right of appeal  
Moving to the hearing stage 
Once the Investigating Manager has completed their investigations, and following consultations with 
an HR Adviser concluded that the matter should be dealt with formally;  an appropriate Disciplinary 
Manager will be appointed by Professional Standards to chair the meeting  
Normally the Manager who has investigated the case will present management's case in the 
disciplinary hearing. However, in exceptional circumstances this might not be appropriate and advice 
should be sought from the HR Department. The Disciplinary Manager should be  an equivalent rank 
or role or above as that of the Investigation Manager  
Making arrangements for the hearing 
The Investigating Manager: 
•  Will forward to the employee and Disciplinary Manager via Professional Standards, all the 
relevant information.  
•  Will ensure that their witnesses are appropriately informed of the hearing details, providing them 
with a copy of their statement and documents which may be referred to at the hearing.  
•  Prepare their own statement for the hearing to present to the Disciplinary Manager. 
•  Place documents in chronological order with each page of the bundle numbered consequentially 
for ease of reference. 
 Conducting an effective disciplinary hearing  
The Disciplinary Manager  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 15 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
Introduces those present  
•  Checks the employee has received correct notification of the hearing,  
•  Ascertains whether the employee is represented, and if not accompanied is aware of their right to 
representation  
•  Explains the purpose of the hearing is to consider fully the allegations and to decide whether 
disciplinary action is appropriate.  
•  Explains the issue has not been prejudged; the aim is to explore the facts.  
•  Explain how the hearing will be conducted.  
•  Ask if there are any questions about the procedure.  
 
Presentation of the facts by the Investigating Manager  
The Investigating Manager’s opening statement specifies details of the alleged misconduct contained 
in the written notice and which Service rule or standard has potentially been breached. The facts of 
the case should be presented clearly and concisely in chronological order.  
The Investigating Manager will call required witnesses and ask relevant questions. However, where a 
written statement from the witness has been included in the written notification this may be 
referenced. 
Witnesses should not attend the whole hearing but will give their factual evidence, and following 
questioning by all parties leave the hearing.  
At the end of the witness' evidence, if anything has arisen which is important and requires further 
questioning, the Disciplinary Manager may be asked for permission to question the witness again on 
a matter which has arisen out of the other party's questioning, or ask questions themselves. 
Adjournments  
Adjournments  may  be  sought  at  any  time  during  the  hearing  where  appropriate.  The  decision  to 
adjourn  rests  with  the  Disciplinary  Manager,  who  may  decide  that  it  would  be  appropriate  in 
circumstances such as :-  
•  To give a cooling off period to all parties.  
•  It is a convenient time for a break.  
•  In exceptional circumstances, when it is necessary for relevant evidence which is not currently 
available to be brought to the meeting e.g. a document or a witness.  
Other parties may ask for an adjournment where there is a good reason e.g. one of the witnesses 
has not arrived. (In such a case, it may be appropriate to proceed with the hearing to deal with all 
matters except the absent witness’ evidence, and then reconvene to a reasonable date to deal with 
that information).  
Summing Up 
The Investigating Manager and the employee and/or their representative (in that order) will be given 
the opportunity to summarise :  
The Investigation Manager should; 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 16 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
•  Be brief  
•  Review the key points of the presentation  
•  Review the key points in the employee's response, highlighting any inconsistencies and 
vagueness.  
•  Prevent the introduction any new evidence at this stage.  
Making an effective decision  
Following the summaries, the Disciplinary Manager will ask all parties, with the exception of the HR 
Adviser to withdraw whilst he/she comes to a decision. Consideration will be given to:  
•  Whether on the balance of probabilities the employee committed misconduct 
•  Whether all the stages of the disciplinary process have been complied with  
•  Whether all relevant facts been established  
•  Any mitigating circumstances  
•  The employee's previous record of conduct and length of service 
•  What action is appropriate and proportionate in the circumstances  
It is the Disciplinary Manager’s responsibility to satisfy him/herself that the relevant facts have been 
sufficiently established, before a decision is made. If there are still unanswered questions, which are 
relevant or require further clarification/investigation these must be followed through. 
For example, it might be appropriate to recall both parties to clarify an issue or direct the Investigating 
Manager to gather a specific piece of evidence. At this stage it is appropriate to adjourn the hearing, 
pending these investigations and re-convene later.  
The Disciplinary Manager must examine evidence given by all parties in a dispassionate manner 
deciding which account they place greater weight on. Where a conflict of evidence exists, it is not 
sufficient to conclude that a decision cannot be made. The Disciplinary Manager must decide which 
evidence they prefer.  
It is not a requirement to find “beyond reasonable doubt” (i.e. the burden of proof in criminal 
proceedings) but one based on the balance of probabilities. 
Mitigating circumstances  
Such circumstances might be :-  
•  The employee's inexperience.  
•  Provocation, sexist/racial abuse, bullying or inappropriate behaviour by colleagues or a line 
manager.  
•  Inadequate explanation of the rules or procedures by the line manager.  
•  Inconsistent enforcement of regulations and standards.  
•  Misunderstanding of instructions caused by language difficulties.  
•  The employee's previous record of conduct  
In taking account the employee's past history with the Service, it is useful to check the :-  
•  employee's length of  service/ tenure in the role  
•  general standard of conduct of the employee  
•  any current disciplinary warnings which need to be taken account of  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 17 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
Taking Action 
The Disciplinary Manager has a number of possible courses of action available :-  
•  To take no action, for example the evidence indicated that there were misunderstandings or the 
allegation did not occur. In such cases, it is appropriate to close the matter, if the Disciplinary 
Manager clearly explains how he/she has come to this conclusion.  
•  To take informal action ( see section above)  
•  To take formal action. This should always be accompanied by an explanation of the desired 
improvement, together with details of any targets, time limits and reviews.  
Giving the decision  
The  primary  purpose  of  a  warning  is  to  be  corrective  and  to  prevent  later  and  more  serious  action 
having to be taken. 
The disciplinary hearing is not complete until the decision is communicated. It is vitally important to :  
•  Tell the employee what the decision is and why 
•  Explain the employee's appeal rights, if appropriate.  
•  Explain the objectives for the future and, if appropriate, agree targets and supportive action.  
•  Confirm the whole position in writing, within 7 days.  
Appeals  
An employee's right of appeal only applies where formal disciplinary action has been taken. The 
function of the Appeal is to :-  
•  Review the case (or in certain circumstances to rehear the case) dependent upon the grounds of 
appeal from when the initial decision was taken.  
•  Consider any other relevant matters which the parties want to raise.  
The  employee should advise in writing:  
•  The disciplinary action being appealed against, e.g. final written warning.  
•  The reason/grounds for the appeal e.g. new evidence.  
•  The name of the employee's representative.  
Appeals may be raised on the following grounds :  
•  A failure to follow the procedure had a material effect on the decision.  
•  The conclusion of the Disciplinary Manager was not supported by the evidence presented.  
•  The action taken was too severe given the circumstances of the case.  
•  New evidence relevant to the case has genuinely come to light since the disciplinary hearing.  
The level of authority at which appeals are heard is set out in the appropriate Grey, Green, and Red 
books and subject to local conditions of service.  
The Appeal  
The person to whom the appeal was directed will write to the employee, acknowledging receipt of the 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 18 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
appeal letter and requesting the following information from the employee :  
•  A statement on the grounds on which he/she is appealing.  
•  Any documents which are to be presented at the meeting in support of the appeal.  
•  If they wish to be represented at the meeting, the name and contact point of their representative. 
•  Any dates when they, or their representative, are not available  
The  Disciplinary  Manager  will  also  be  informed  that  an  appeal  has  been  received.  They  will  be 
requested to provide in a timely manner, 
•  A statement summarising their reasons for taking disciplinary action. 
•  A copy of all documents and statements which were presented at the initial hearing.  
•  A copy record of evidence given at the initial hearing.  
•  The statements/reports from the original disciplinary hearing 
Procedure at the Appeal meeting  
It  is  a  requirement  prior  to  the  meeting  to  determine  whether  the  appeal  is  to  be  conducted  as  a 
review or a rehearing. Normally, the appeal is conducted as a “review”.  
The parties present at the meeting and their role should be clarified.  
If the employee has not attended, the reasons should be sought. If their absence is due to ill health, it 
should be ascertained whether they are fit to attend a re-arranged meeting, even though unfit to 
perform their full duties within a reasonable timescale. Where this is not possible, holding the appeal 
in the absence of the employee should be considered.  
In a review, the employee appeals against the disciplinary sanction. The Appeal Manager examines 
the evidence and submissions that were presented at the original hearing, and thus the decisions 
made at that hearing to see whether the decision was reasonable. If the Appeal Manager considers 
that the decision was within the band of reasonable responses, the Appeal Manager is entitled to 
reject the appeal.  
 A “rehearing” may be appropriate if the employee was absent at the original hearing or where the 
disciplinary process was not followed.  
Conduct of a review  
In a review, the Appeal Manager should ensure they have :-  
•  All documents presented to the initial hearing;  
•  A copy of the record of the hearing;  
•  Letter confirming the outcome of the disciplinary hearing;  
•  The letter of appeal and grounds of appeal;  
•  Any other relevant information.  
The employee (or representative) presents their case referring to documents as appropriate.  
The Disciplinary Manager explains the reason for  the  warning, and responds to the submissions of 
the employee (or representative)  
The  Appeals  Manager  will  consider  their  decision  and  to  promptly  notifies  employee  (and 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 19 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
representative) or decision in writing.  
Conduct of a “Rehearing” or partial “Rehearing”  
This is to address any perceived procedural defects.  
The employee (or representative) presents case in support of their grounds of appeal (Relating to 
documents as appropriate) and introduces their witness for questioning.  
This process is repeated for the Disciplinary Manager. 
The employee (or representative) sums up their case followed by the Manager who sums up the 
explanation for the decision and their response to the grounds of appeal.  
Decision Making 
The Appeal Manager will ask the parties with the exception of the HR Adviser to leave the room while 
they consider their decision.  
They may recall the parties to seek clarification. In such a case, both parties should be present, even 
if clarification is only required from one side.  
The decisions available to the Appeal Manager are :-  
•  To confirm the disciplinary action already taken.  
•  To substitute the disciplinary action for some lesser disciplinary action.  
•  To dismiss the original decision without taking any disciplinary action at all.  
The Appeal Manager will recall the parties to the meeting to give their decision verbally, with brief 
reasons. This will be confirmed in writing to the employee within 7 days. No further right of appeal 
exists. However, the procedure does not limit an employee's right under employment legislation to 
pursue the matter further.  
Precautionary suspension  
Suspension  is  a  neutral  act  and  is  not  a  disciplinary  penalty.  It  is  undertaken  to  enable  a  full 
investigation of the circumstances, where it is not practicable or desirable for the employee to remain 
in the workplace whilst the investigation proceeds. During the period of suspension, the employee will 
receive full pay.  
When to suspend : 
In circumstances where the case has been identified as one of potential gross misconduct.  
•  Where it is necessary to safeguard the personal welfare of employees, or members of the public.  
•  Where it is reasonably considered that the employee may interfere with witnesses or documents 
should they remain at work.  
•  To allow an investigation to take place which could not be undertaken if the employee remained 
in the workplace. 
•  Where the allegations are of a serious nature and the employee's response has not been 
sufficient.  
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 20 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
Who can suspend 
Suspension  can  only  be  carried  out  by  the  Director  of  People  and  Organisational  Development  or 
appropriate Area Manager, Director or above.  
Where it is necessary to make a decision about suspension quickly, Managers have the right to 
proceed with the suspension without employee representation, or notice.  
How to carry out the suspension  
If the employee is in work when the misconduct allegations arise, they should be taken to a private 
area away from their normal workplace and told of the nature of the allegations.  
The manager undertaking the suspension may be accompanied by another management 
representative, who will act as a witness.  
The employee may have a trade union representative or work colleague with them whilst being 
suspended, if one is available. However, it is not considered appropriate to delay a suspension if a 
representative is not available.  
The employee should not be requested to comment on the allegations, and should be told that a 
detailed investigation will follow during which they will have full opportunity to comment on the 
misconduct allegations.  
The employee should also be told that they should not make contact with colleagues during the 
course of the suspension or return to their place of employment unless authorised to do so by an 
appropriate senior manager from their department.  
Sensitivity should be exercised by Managers in assisting the employee to leave the premises 
discreetly. If the employee needs to collect any personal items from work they should be 
accompanied by a senior manager.  
All precautionary suspensions must be subsequently confirmed in writing. 
 
Questioning Skills  
An  important  part  of  the  fact  finding  and  disciplinary  process  is  the  use  of  skilled  questioning. 
Employees may be reluctant to talk about some aspects of the matter in hand or may have difficulty 
expressing their views or concerns. Four main types of questions are involved.  
The Open Ended Question  
This is particularly useful in the early stages, when asking the employee or a witness to give their 
account of events. It gives no clue to the type of answer expected but simply asks them to tell their 
story. For example:  
What happened in the incident involving a member of the public last Friday?'  
The Probing or Clarifying Question  
The answers to the initial open-ended questions may be inadequate or very general and may need 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 21 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
probing. An example of a short sequence of questions illustrates this: 
Open-ended question
‘What happened in the incident with the member of public?'  
Answer:  ‘I  had  a  bit  of  an  argument  about  our requirement  to  undertake a  routine  inspection  of  the 
premises.' 

First probing question‘How did the argument start?' 
Answer:  ‘I told her that  we needed to update our record on the premises and she told me that she 
hadn't been notified about the visit'.
 
Second probing question‘What did you then say to her?' 
Asking employees and witnesses to repeat what was actually said during a discussion or 
confrontation, rather than accepting a less specific account, often throws valuable new light on the 
situation. 
The Closed Question  
Closed questions can be only answered with a simple yes or no. 
They should be avoided when opening up the interview, but can be useful to confirm single facts. For 
example, in the case above concerning the store employee the employee says, ‘I thought she was 
trying to be obstructive and told her so’. 
Prompting the closed question, ‘did you actual y use the word 
obstructive?' 
 
 
The Playback Question  
This  is  a  variation  on  the  closed  question,  because  it  may  be  answered  satisfactorily  with  a  simple 
‘yes'. It is used to play back to the employee your understanding of what they have said to check that 
this is correct. Some examples: 
‘Are you saying that you have never been told about the Service's time recording procedure?'  
‘Am I right in assuming that the important point in your mind was?’ 
The time for most question of this kind is towards the end of the interview, when clarifying employee's 
statements and views before considering what action to take. 
There are three types of questions to be avoided: 
The multiple question  
Impatience may lead to questions being asked that cover several different topics. For example:  ‘Tel  
me why you failed to report the problem to your supervisor and whether you said anything about it to 
any  of  your  colleagues  –  or  was  it  that  you  could  not  find  anyone  to  talk  to  because  of  the  lunch 
break?'  
.  The  probability  is  that  the  employee  will  respond  to  only  the  last  part  of  this  multiple 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 22 of 23 

Service Instruction 0854: Conduct (Discipline) 
question, leaving the rest unanswered. 
 
The leading question  
This invites the employee to agree with a possible explanation, instead of probing for the employee's 
explanation. ‘You do agree, don't you, that it would have been better to have been more polite to the 
member of public?' 
 
 
The discriminatory question 
Questions regarding any of the protected characteristics in the Equality Act that may be perceived as 
discriminating  against  the  employee  or  any  other  group  must  be  avoided.  For  example, 
questions/statements that make assumptions should not be used e.g. ‘ Did you struggle to read the 
Services' time recording policy because of your disability?'
 
 
Checklist for questioning witnesses 
 
In order to maximise the effectiveness of questioning:  
•  Prepare points which must be taken up. Have a clear indication of the employee's case and have 
some idea which questions will have to be asked to achieve the desired outcome.  
•  Is the question necessary? If the witness has already given the required answer, or one which 
could be interpreted to give the meaning desired, do not pursue the issue.  
•  Evidence in dispute is not the only area which should be subject to questioning. Areas of 
omission or gaps in the evidence may be raised provided they are relevant; for example, where 
one party fails to refer to a written statement of terms and conditions or the lack of such a 
statement.  
•  Never ask a question to which you do not know the answer or have a shrewd idea of the answer.  
•  Keep questions short and sharp so the witness understands the question.  
•  Once you ask the question, you must let the witness have a fair chance to answer and only ask 
one question at a time. 
•  Do not try to discredit a witness because of minor contradictions and discrepancies. 
 
Please refer to : 
 
SI 0771 Notification to Service by an Individual Subject to Police Involvement or Criminal 
Investigation 
 
 
 
Version 1.2 
Review Date: 10.05.19 
Page 23 of 23