This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'ICT Strategy'.

 
IT Strategy 
 
 ‘Maximise the use of Technology to provide 
Customer choice, improve access and make 
Services better and easier to use’  
 
The main objectives of this Strategy are to: 
 
  Reduce risk by providing principles to guide and ease decision-making 
  Ensure proper allocation of resource 
  Develop and maintain skills across the organization 
  Document decisions about strategic choices and standards 
  Provide leadership and a framework to achieve objectives 
  Manage change and provide direction and focus 
Target Audience 
 
This Strategy Document has been produced for a target audience comprising: 
 
  The Council’s Elected Members 
  The Senior Management Team 
  Service Managers 
  The ICT Team 
  Employees 
  The Council’s partners 
  The Council’s suppliers 
  Customers 
 
The strategy to achieve that vision is: 
 
o  To strive towards a ‘paperless office’ environment, where work can be shared and 
stored electronically 
 
o  To use ICT to improve our processes, identifying where activities can be carried 
out electronically and implementing these with rigor 
 
o  To eliminate any duplication of work by streamlining electronic processes and 
paper based systems until these can be made electronic 
 
o  To provide all employees with easy access to a computer.  Where employees are 
office based, they should be able to access a computer for all of their working 
time, for employees working remotely or not office based, there will be a computer 
for their use available at their base site. 
 
o  To integrate systems where-ever possible to streamline processes and to make 
such services both internal and external as seamless as possible. 

 
o  To use ICT to seek efficiencies, reduce costs and improve services 
 
High Level Principles 
 
The following key principles will form the basis of the Strategy: 
1.  Driven by the needs and benefit of the Customer.  
 
In this context, the term customer includes citizens and internal council services.  The 
strategy recognises the importance of customers and that any ICT decision should be 
based on an assessment of their requirements rather than the technology itself.  In 
support of this principle when making ICT decisions the relevant actions are to: 
 
  Define the customer 
  Establish the customer needs 
  Determine the customer benefits 
  Maximise the use of electronic access channels 
  Use Management Information to ensure aims are satisfied 
  Seek ideal solutions, recognising that these may ultimately be constrained 
by technology and/or integration limitations 
  Acquire products that meet anticipated future needs 
  Use consultation techniques  that provide evidence of customer needs 
 
2.  Solutions will be fit-for-purpose and exploit available procurement options  
 
In making decisions about procuring ICT systems, a clear understanding of what is 
required needs to be established at the start.  This will be the measure against which 
the proposed solution is evaluated to ensure it is fit for the defined purpose.  As part 
of the decision making process, acquisitions must be supported by a Business Case. 
Selection of systems will be dependent on immediate and longer term internal and 
external needs, part of the business case being to determine future demands.  As a 
consequence, a proposed purchase may not necessarily be the lowest cost option 
but most ‘economically advantageous’ for the defined purpose.  This principle will be 
achieved by the following actions:  
 
  All procurement processes will be Business Case led which will include 
consideration of the following factors: 
   
a) The assessment and evaluation of the various procurement options 
which may be available 
 
o  Partnership 
o  Selected supplier 
o  Frameworks 
o  Formal tender  
 

b) The determination of ‘whole-life’ costs (5 /10 year projections) 
 
Initial costs 
o  Hardware 
o  Software 
o  Implementation 
  Project management 
  Data conversion 
  Interfaces 
  Training 
  Staffing 
Ongoing costs 
o  Hardware maintenance & renewal 
o  Software maintenance 
o  Consumables 
o  Staffing 
Realisation benefits 
o  Projection of efficiency savings 
  Cashable 
  Non-cashable 
 
 
c) How the Council’s existing strengths in terms of size, knowledge and 
ongoing relationships with suppliers can best be utilised 
 
d) The evaluation of formally specified requirements against pre-
determined criteria supported by researching the market 
 
  The above process will ensure a match with required functionality, clear 
identification of costs both capital and revenue, and savings.   In addition to 
which there may be added benefits arising from functionality such as: 
 
o  Integration 
o  Web services 
o  Remote access 
o  Future needs 
o  Ease of use 
o  Additional benefits 
 
  Using the introductory checklist for the procurement of ICT systems. 
3.  Maximisation of System Functionality 
 
The introduction of any new system or technology will challenge the ways in which 
work is carried out currently.  It is essential that the core functionality of third-party 
products be explored prior to any local customisation.  This of itself may require some 
business process re-engineering in terms of the way that work flows and is 
processed.  In general terms it will be more effective to change existing processes to 
match new systems than to endeavour to graft existing processes onto new systems.  

In particular to drive efficiency, then as far as possible, manual systems should be 
replaced with electronic processes and manual recording keeping or support systems 
be eliminated. 
 
It has to be acknowledged that this can be difficult, as changing existing processes 
means redefining roles, changing duties and challenging information flows.  However 
when third-party products are purchased, their functionality is usually the product of 
user reviews and refinements to the system over a number of years and therefore 
well tested in terms of work flow efficiency. 
 
After a system has been installed, there will be opportunities to continually review 
processes, ensuring that the functionality of any system is used to its maximum 
potential.  New software releases may make changes to systems and these must be 
integrated into work processes to ensure the benefits are realised. 
 
To achieve this principle the following actions are required: 
 
  System owners actively engage with user groups, attending meetings as 
frequently as possible and implementing best practice 
   At the start of any implementation all existing key processes to be 
mapped in order to identify where changes will be required 
  When implementing a new system, the process of mapping can be used to 
challenge existing assumptions about workflow etc. 
  There will be a presumption against making bespoke adjustments to third-
party systems, and against developing standalone solutions internally 
  Ensure that any bespoke customisation of a system is formally justified 
within the Business Case 
   
4.  Formal periodic reviews of major applications 
 
The Council’s historical arrangements for the acquisition of application systems 
together with the need to respond to the e-Government led to capacity issues during 
2003/06. In an effort to streamline and effectively pre-plan and manage future 
renewal programmes so there are no periods of high demands a phased approach is 
essential. This approach will assist in ensuring that the resources available from 
within ICT are managed effectively to match demand, by eliminating (as far as 
possible) peaks and troughs in workload.  The forward planning of this work will 
enable programme management to be more effective, better planning of budgets and 
a more structured decision-making process.  
 
Formal reviews should take the format of a business case as detailed above.  Where 
the review is at first renewal, a full business case is not necessary.  However at 
second renewal or within 10 years of a rolling contract, this case needs to be made 
following all the principles of this strategy and a formal decision made on the 
outcome.  For some of the contracts in place, the work on the business case will be 
carried out solely within ICT.  However to review some of the systems with wider, or 
more significant corporate impact, the process of establishing a project team to 
develop the business case will be appropriate. 
 

In support of this Principle the actions are to: 
 
  Ensure that systems which do not have fixed term contracts are subject to 
formal review every 5 – 7 years 
  Ensure that systems which have fixed term contracts are formally reviewed 
before the 2nd renewal  
  Ensure that in any event, systems will not run for more than 10 years 
without formal review  
  Reviews to be carried out in sufficient time before renewal is due in order 
to plan the most advantageous procurement method. 
  Ensure that a schedule of major applications is maintained which will feed 
the review process  
  Where possible smooth out renewal peaks  
  Include all relevant parties in building up the business case and ensuring 
that the principles of this strategy are met when recommending a decision 
 
5.  Consultation and agreement prior to procurement 
 
When making a procurement decision with regard to ICT, it is important that all 
affected stakeholders are involved.  For some of these acquisitions, they may be 
confined to one service area, but stakeholders such as ICT will need to be consulted 
on any decision.  Other systems impact on users in more than one Department, 
where these systems are under review, it is important that the consultation process 
also includes all users. 
 
The use of ICT is a key driver of how work is carried out in terms of resources, 
processes and information. In this respect, where more than one department uses a 
specific system, they need to be consulted on any changes/replacements or 
renewals.  Their views and needs must be taken into account when making a 
decision to procure a solution. 
 
In support of this principle the actions are: 
 
  Appropriately consult with relevant stakeholders prior to acquisition of 
solutions either new or at renewal 
  Document corporate systems and standards and the rationale for the 
adoption of these 
  Recognise that those consulted, who will be users of the system, have a 
responsibility to input into the decision making process 
  Once determined and where applicable, ensure a Council wide adoption 
and adherence to implementing any new system/changes in accordance 
with the principles above regarding maximising functionality 
 
6.   Ensure Integrity and Security  
 
There will always be a balance to be drawn between maintaining the integrity and 
security of the ICT infrastructure, and ensuring that systems are accessible and easy-

to-use.  In this respect, access to systems is limited to access through a permission 
structure of user-ids and time-limited passwords determined by the System Owner.  
These restrictions can be viewed as frustrating for users and System Owners, 
however any relaxation of security processes may bring with it risks in terms of 
unauthorised access, introduction of viruses and system corruption. 
 
This principle recognises the potential for conflict and in terms of the ICT strategy any 
decision must balance the differing needs and following risk assessment principles. 
 
In support of this principle the actions are: 
 
  Maintain electronic information in accordance with legislation, recognised 
security standards and Council Policy (e.g. The Retention Policy) 
  Ensure that access to systems will only be available to authenticated and 
authorised users. This will be managed by System Owners in accordance 
with the Council’s standards and protocols 
  Maintain an ICT Security Policy which will detail current procedure 
 
 
7.  Commitment to Training   
 
To ensure that all the principles above are met, it is essential that employees are trained.  
To achieve this following training will be provided: 
 
 
o  Systems implementation 
o  Project management 
o  Business process re-engineering 
o  Use and management of business applications 
o  Security awareness 
o  Use of Microsoft Office products 
o  Keyboard skills 
 
This will be through a combination of internal training/coaching and external provision.  It 
is the responsibility of the employee and the line manager in accordance with the 
Council’s Training and Development Policy to ensure that needs are identified and met. 
 
Although ICT will assist in delivering training where appropriate, they cannot take 
responsibility for ensuring this principle is met.  That rests with line managers, System 
Owners and individuals. 
 
In support of this principle the actions are: 
 
  Ensure that employees have the core basic ICT related skills and 
knowledge, either at appointment or through training 
  Maintain skill levels and ‘succession plan’ where individuals have specific 
systems or technical knowledge 
  Employees to be encouraged to take responsibility for their own training 

and development, to identify their training needs and to attend training 
events provided to address these 
  Employees need also to be encouraged to use functionality within all 
systems, and where they have knowledge gaps to take steps to address 
these. 
 
Roles and Responsibilities 
 
The following table provides an overview of the strategic, developmental and operational 
roles for each identified stakeholder 
 
 
Roles & Responsibilities 
System 
System 
Member 
SMT 
ICT 
Supplier 
Partner 
Citizen 
Owner 
User 
Strategic 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agree/review strategy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ensure compliance 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Promotion, commitment & 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
leadership 
Identification of ICT related 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
service needs 
Allocation and prioritising 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
resources 
Feedback customer 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
experience and expectation 
Compliance with 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
contract/agreement 
Harmonise with corporate 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
objectives 
Ensure appropriate 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
integration 
Conduct periodic system 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
reviews 
Ensure budgetary control 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ensure data integrity 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plan future infrastructure 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
needs 
Introduce appropriate 
security standards and 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
continually assess risk 
 
Developmental 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Develop processes to 
unlock maximum potential of 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
the system 
Lead functionality 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Roles & Responsibilities 
System 
System 
Member 
SMT 
ICT 
Supplier 
Partner 
Citizen 
Owner 
User 
enhancement 
Ensure harmonisation with 
Integrated and associated 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
systems 
 
Roles & Responsibilities 
System 
System 
Member 
SMT 
ICT 
Supplier 
Partner 
Citizen 
Owner 
User 
Advise line managers of 
available functionality and 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
where BPR may assist 
Ensure training provided 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Identify faults and 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
improvements 
Active involvement in User 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Groups 
Engage in BPR 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Develop the infrastructure 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Develop appropriate system 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
integration 
 
Operational 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lead and support the 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
introduction of systems 
Maintain the infrastructure 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Have core ICT competence 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Get properly trained 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Use and exploit systems 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Control system access 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Authorise software loads, 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
dial-ins and fixes 
Supplier and ICT liaison 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ensure data integrity 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ensure documentation and 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
procedure notes are current 
Have due regard to system 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
access and security of data 
Observe data sharing 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
protocols 
 
The System Owner shall endeavor to ensure that appropriate arrangements are made to 
provide cover for the Roles & Responsibilities defined within the above table.  It is 
recognised that the customer will in some situations be providing information directly, 
especially as more web-enabled self-service is developed.  Effective processing of this 
information is dependent on this being correct.  There will also be opportunities for the 
customers to give feedback, it will be important to seek this to enable the better 
development of systems.