This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Surrey Cycling Strategy'.



 
 
Local Cycling & Walking 
Infrastructure Plans 
Expression of Interest 
Submission to Department for Transport 
 
Surrey County Council  
30th June 2017
 



 
 
  
 


 
Local Cycling and Walking 
Infrastructure Plans  
Expression of Interest form for technical support  

 
Guidance on the Expression of Interest process has been provided alongside this 
form. An Expression of Interest should be no more than 8 pages. Please include 
all relevant information when completing the form. If you have any questions about 
the LCWIP process or guidance please email: xxxxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
 
Please note that this is an Expression of Interest and that technical support is not 
guaranteed. 
 
SECTION A - Applicant Information 
 
A1. Local authority name(s): 
 
Surrey County Council 
 
If the expression of interest is a joint proposal, please enter the names of all participating local 
authorities and specify the lead authority
      
 
 
 
 
      
A2. Project Lead  
 
Name: Lyndon Mendes 
 
Position: Transport Policy Team Manager 
 
Contact telephone number: 020 8541 9393 
 
Email address: xxxxxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
 
 
 
A3. Senior Responsible Owner  
 
Name: Trevor Pugh  
 
Position: Strategic Director Environment and Infrastructure 
 
Contact telephone number: 020 8541 7694 
 
Email address: xxxxxx.xxxx@xxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
 
 
 
 
 

 

SECTION B - Project Description 
 
B1. Type of Support 
 
This Expression of Interest is for: 
 
 Technical Support to prepare an LCWIP.  
 
 Technical Support to update existing walking and cycling plans and programmes. 
 
 
B2. Total number of support days requested: 80 
 
B3. Project Summary  
 
Please outline why you require technical support and how it will help you prepare a 
LCWIP or update existing walking and cycling plans and programmes. 
 
   
In 2014 Surrey consulted on and published the Surrey Cycling Strategy. Recognising 
that a one size fits all approach will not work, a key objective was to develop local 
cycling plans for each of Surrey’s 11 districts and boroughs to ensure that solutions 
are tailored to local needs. Following this we developed local cycling plans for six of 
the 11 Surrey district and boroughs.  These cover Elmbridge, Epsom and 
Ewell, 
Guildford, Mole Valley, Reigate and Banstead, and Waverley.  
 
The local cycling plans identify long-term proposals for a comprehensive cycle 
network identifying routes to the places people want to get to.  As Surrey has many 
rural areas the network looks to connect towns and villages as well as providing 
infrastructure for those making journeys by bike around town centres.   
 
The local cycling plans also cover promoting cycling, cycle training, safety 
campaigns and data on levels of cycling and casualties. In the plans we have 
developed so far we have liaised with local planning authorities and other 
stakeholders. 
 
We have also started to develop a walking strategy but due to recent funding cuts 
and the loss of associated resources it has never been completed.  Some pro-
walking policies have been devised such as ‘Safety Outside Schools.’  We have also 
carried out several town centre access studies which look particularly to improve 
access for those with disability impairments. We are working with Living Streets to 
promote walking but have no over-arching strategy.   
 
We are seeking assistance with the preparation of the remaining five local cycling 
plans and guidance on developing a walking strategy.   
 
If we are successful we plan to use the tools and training from the LCWIP to help us 
update the six existing local cycling plans.  We can apply the learnings to further 
refine the existing plans and incorporate the walking into them. 

 

 
Our resources are stretched and having up to 80 days to develop these plans would 
ensure they are well thought out, strategic and in a strong position to include in 
future transport planning. 
 
We are also keen to benefit from the technical expertise offered and understand the 
LCWIP recommended approach. We want to increase understanding of walking and 
cycling schemes to be more succesful with future DfT bids. Well-developed plans will 
help us make the case for future investment and identify short, medium and long-
term plans. 
 
Using the Welsh Active Travel Design Guide we have also been updating our own 
Surrey standards.  If we are successful in this bid we would seek advice on technical 
guidance for infrastructure as well as support on how to include planning for walking. 
 
The technical support on offer will enable us to develop comprehensive plans to take 
to the relevant Local Committee to be approved.  Once adopted they will be 
published on the popular Travel SMART website and be used to inform cycling and 
walking programmes going forward as covered in C2. 
 
 
B4. Geographical Area:  
 
Please provide a map and a short description of the area that will be covered by the 
LCWIP. This section should include information about the population covered, 
current levels of cycling and walking and the number of short trips.   
 
 
This expression of interest is to create LCWIPs for the five areas which don’t 
currently have a local cycling plan.  These are Runnymede, Spelthorne, Surrey 
Heath, Tandridge and Woking and the planning authorities are supportive of seeing 
LCWIPs developed in their areas.   
 
This bid is also to develop our countywide walking strategy and furnish us with the 
tools and information to update plans with strategic walking infrastructure.   
 
A map of the areas is attached as Annex A and census data on each area is in the 
table below. They are five very different areas with their own challenges and 
opportunities.  The Propensity to Cycle Tool shows that under the government target 
scenario there is the greatest scope to increase cycling in Spelthorne, eastern 
Runnymede, parts of Surrey Heath and the Woking suburbs. 
 
Runnymede has some good cycle infrastructure but with gaps in the network.  
Planned improvement works at Runnymede roundabout will remove some current 
gaps in the network. Within Runnymede, Egham has recently benefitted from a 
£1.775m Sustainable Transport Package which was completed in January 2017.  
This has included new sections of shared cycle footway, toucan crossings and raised 
tables at junctions.   
 
 

 

Spelthorne is very urban and many routes are severed by trunk and busy roads, 
railway lines and reservoirs.  Staines has been awarded funding from Enterprise M3 
LEP together with a substantial contribution from Heathrow Airport for Phase 1 of a 
Sustainable Transport Package.  This will improve walking and cycling facilities for 
travel between Staines town centre railway station and Heathrow and nearby 
businesses. 
 
Surrey Heath also has very low levels of cycling.  Several major schemes around 
Camberley and the Blackwater Valley will hopefully lead to improved cycle routes to 
the town centre and business parks in the west of the Borough.  Camberley is also 
planning significant public realm improvements within the town centre. 
 
Tandridge
 is very rural and has the lowest levels of bike ownership and utility 
cycling in Surrey (according to our 2015 monitoring survey mentioned below).  
National Cycle Route 21 goes through the district but doesn’t connect to any towns.  
The Oxted regeneration provides opportunities for walking and public realm 
improvements. 
 
Woking was previously a Cycle Town (2008-11) so has a well established and well 
signed network.  The borough council are keen to develop this further and more can 
be done to connect surrounding villages into the town centre.  A business case 
submission to the EM3 LEP is planned for early 2018. 
 
Area 
Population  Number who 
Number who 
Number who’s 
(census 
walk to work 
cycle to work 
commute is less 
data) 
(census data)  (census data)  than 10km 
(census data) 
Woking 
99,435 
4,567 (4.6%) 
1,368 (1.4%) 
22,593 (22.7%) 
Spelthorne 
98,469 
3,158 (3.2%) 
1,337 (1.4%) 
27,903 (28.3%) 
Surrey Heath  88,067 
3,268 (3.7%) 
784 (0.9%) 
17,852 (20.3%) 
Tandridge 
86,025 
2,913 (3.4%) 
368 (0.4%) 
14,601 (17.0%) 
Runnymede 
85,594 
4,005 (4.7%) 
1,186 (1.4%) 
19,884 (23.5%) 
Total 
457,590 
17,911 (3.9%) 
5,043 (1.1%) 
102,833 (22.5%) 
 
In 2015 we carried out our own interview-based monitoring survey.  This was to 
provide survey data identifying the proportion of Surrey cycling, journey purpose, 
locality and demographic characteristics, and satisfaction with provision for cycling. 
We also wanted to find out current travel patterns and what influences journey 
choice as well as what would get people cycling who aren’t already.  The findings 
have been used to support schemes and inform business cases. 
 
We learnt that 39% of Surrey residents are lapsed cyclists, i.e. don’t cycle now but 
have done in the past.  This suggests there is significant potential to encourage 
these to cycle again.  We also found the most influential aspect in encouraging non-
cyclists to start cycling is cycle paths separated from traffic.  Most who said they 
would consider cycling again was to increase their health and fitness. 
 
Levels of bike ownership are higher than the national average in Surrey and many 
people have cycled at some point in the past 12 months (see table below).  However 

 

leisure cycling is the most popular form of cycling with very low numbers chosing to 
commute by bike.   
 
With low levels of utility cycling but high congestion, bike ownership and a desire to 
be fit and healthy there is significant scope to increase levels of cycling with good 
quality cycle infrastructure.  
 
Area 
% who own or have 
% who have cycled at some point 
access to a bike 
in past 12 months 
Runnymede 
69% 
44% 
Surrey Heath  65% 
49% 
Spelthorne 
59% 
44% 
Woking 
58% 
42% 
Tandridge 
41% 
41% 
 
SECTION C – Strategic Narrative 
 
C1. The Strategic Case   
 
Please outline your authority’s ambition in terms of walking and cycling. In this 
section you should explain how producing a LCWIP will support your wider local 
policy aims as well as the objectives set out in the Cycling and Walking Investment 
Strategy.  
 
Following the success of the 2012 Olympic Games Cycling Road Events, Surrey has 
been on the ‘map’ as a destination for cycling. Every weekend hundreds of people 
head to the Surrey Hills to cycle through our beautiful countryside. But a true 
Olympic legacy would see every child in Surrey learning to ride a bike and being able 
to cycle safely to school. It would mean that many more of our residents cycle for 
transport and leisure, reducing congestion and reliance on cars and reaping the 
considerable health and economic benefits this brings. And it would mean that 
people without access to a car can travel safely and affordably around the county. 
 
The Surrey Cycling Strategy was developed in 2014 and forms part of the Surrey 
Transport Plan. It covers cycling as a means of transport – i.e. for journeys to work 
and school, and business and shopping trips. It also covers cycling for leisure and as 
a sport. The strategy sets out our aim for cycling in Surrey for the period to 2026 and 
our approach to achieving the aim. 
 
In the UK and internationally, cycling is increasingly seen as an integral element of 
solutions to support economic growth, tackle congestion and poor air quality, 
improve personal mobility and address health problems associated with obesity and 
lack of physical activity. We recognise the great potential to capture these benefits in 
Surrey. We also recognise the urgent need to tackle an increasing number of cyclist 
casualties. 
 
Therefore our aim is: more people in Surrey cycling, more safely. 
 

 

The success of the British cycling team in the Tour de France and during the 2012 
Olympic Games, where part of the route passed through Surrey, has generated a 
noticeable increase in the popularity of cycling, in particular sports cycling. This 
provides a unique opportunity to build on this interest and enthusiasm to create a 
lasting Olympic legacy as well as a new challenge to manage the impact of large 
numbers of people and events in the more popular locations. 
 
Surrey has already achieved some significant success in encouraging cycling in key 
locations. The Cycle Woking initiative, part of the Department for Transport’s Cycle 
Demonstration Towns initiative, demonstrated the potential for a comprehensive 
approach – including joined up cycle routes, parking at key destinations and well 
signed networks indicating travel times. This was coupled with measures to promote 
cycling in schools and businesses as well as high profile events. This resulted in an 
overall 27% increase in cycling rates, importantly without an increase in casualty 
rates. Subsequently the County Council secured £18m from the Department for 
Transport’s Local Sustainable Transport Fund which included around £2.5m for cycle 
infrastructure and promotion. 
 
The Cycling Strategy sets out how we plan to build on these successes. To achieve 
real impact, our approach needs to be as inclusive as possible, ensuring that groups 
including children, young people, older people and people with disabilities are able to 
benefit from opportunities to cycle safely. We also need to ensure that local needs 
and issues are considered and addressed. Money is scarce and we need to focus 
our resources on interventions that deliver greatest benefit, working in partnership 
with the many organisations in Surrey that have an interest in cycling. 
 
Our Cycling Strategy recognises that a one size fits all approach will not work: the 
issues in rural Surrey are not the same as those in the urban fringe. For that reason, 
we are developing local plans for each of the Surrey boroughs and districts, to 
ensure that solutions are tailored to local needs. 
 
The Surrey Transport Plan also acknowledges the importance of walking as a means 
of travel and identifies the need for a walking strategy.  If we are successful in this 
submission we would look integrate our walking programmes into a comprehensive 
strategy. 
 
The LCWIPs will support wider local policy aims: 
 
The vision of the Surrey Transport Plan is to help people to meet their transport and 
travel needs effectively, reliably, safely and sustainably within Surrey; in order to 
promote economic vibrancy, protect and enhance the environment and improve the 
quality of life. 
 
Based on this vision there numerous strategies to help achieve this of which the 
Cycling Strategy is one and the Walking Strategy will form another. 
 
 
 
 
 


 

Air Quality Strategy 
Air quality is key to the health of humans and ecosystems. Surrey's borough and 
district councils have a statutory duty to identify Air Quality Management Areas 
where current or future air quality is unlikely to meet the Government's national air 
quality objectives. There are twenty four such areas in Surrey, and the main source 
of the pollutants in these areas is road traffic.  
 
A key objective of this strategy is to incorporate physical transport measures in the 
borough or district council’s Infrastructure Delivery Plan and support smarter travel 
choices, for future implementation as and when funding becomes available, in order 
to reduce air pollution from road traffic sources. 
 
Climate Change Strategy 
The climate change strategy of the Surrey Transport Plan sets out our ambition to 
reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from transport in Surrey and to manage 
risks posed to the transport network arising from climate change. Our aim is to 
develop a lower carbon transport system that is more resilient to future climate risks 
and higher energy prices.  The LCWIP will support this as an objective of the 
strategy is to increase the proportion of travel by sustainable low carbon modes. 
 
Congestion Strategy 
Surrey’s highway network is extremely busy and travel demand is increasing as a 
result of additional development, both within and outside the county’s boundaries. 
Given that providing additional capacity is no longer considered to be the best 
solution a mix of solutions are required involving a wide range of tools including 
promoting alternatives to car travel.  The LCWIP will identify the infrastructure 
needed to provide viable alternatives to car travel in some of the most congested 
core zones. 
 
Passenger Transport Strategy 
The local bus network is an integral part of the transport system in Surrey. Buses 
provide access to schools and colleges for young people, to shopping and leisure 
facilities at the evenings and weekends and are a vital lifeline for older people who 
wish to maintain their independence.  
 
Walking facilities are key to supporting bus travel as very few people have a bus stop 
immediately at the start and end of their journey.  The LCWIP will encourage 
combining walking with bus travel to extend where people can travel to sustainbly. 
 
Travel Planning Strategy 
Travel planning has an important role to play in ensuring effective, reliable, safe and 
sustainable travel behaviour is embedded in the culture of organisations and schools 
in Surrey.  This will encourage active travel supporting the LCWIP and highlight 
where walking and cycling facilities are poor. 
 
Rail strategy 
The county has a generally comprehensive rail network and a large number of rail 
stations, however many services are at capacity and suffer from peak time 
overcrowding.     
 

 

There is also considerable opportunity in Surrey to encourage more cycling and 
walking to the rail stations.  We monitor the levels of cycle parking at various rail 
stations and while it is on the increase it is still very low relative to the numbers using 
the station.  In our 2015 monitoring survey we asked residents how they generally 
travelled to the rail station.  Out of 1524 asked 57% walked and 4.7% cycled. 
 
Rights of Way Improvement Plan 
There are 3,444km of rights of way in Surrey and they are an invaluable asset. The 
revised Rights of Way Improvement Plan (ROWIP) considers the status of the 
network, the needs of its users, and investigates how the network could be improved 
to reflect changing patterns of use and the changing requirements placed upon it.  
With so many busy roads in Surrey the ROW network can provide attractive walking 
and cycling routes as well as convient short-cuts. 
 
Drive SMART Road Safety & Anti-Social Driving Strategy 
Although Surrey has been relatively successful in reducing casualties in recent 
years, speeding and anti-social driving have remained a prime concern of Surrey’s 
residents and discourages walking and cycling. Therefore care has been taken in the 
development of this strategy to build upon the successful delivery of the recent Drive 
SMART initiative to tackle anti-social driving. 
 
Public Health framework and the Heath and Wellbeing Board 
The Surrey Health and Wellbeing Board is a group of NHS commissioners, public 
health, social care, local councillors, Surrey Police, borough and district council and 
public representatives that work together to improve the health and wellbeing of 
people in Surrey. It is about bringing people together, influencing and identifying 
areas of work that can be done better together.  Getting active is a key element of 
health and wellbeing and therefore we have been collaborating with our public health 
colleagues to promote active travel. 
 
 
C2. Integration  
 
Please describe how the LCWIP will integrate your existing and future local transport 
and planning policies and strategies. 
 
All of the LCWIPs will form an important element of the over-arching Cycling 
Strategy and future Walking Strategy which sit under the Surrey Transport Plan 
(LTP3). By having comprehensive walking and cycling plans we can ensure that 
these modes are considered in all transport planning and policies going forward. 
 
Infrastructure plans from these documents feed into the Local Transport Strategies 
(LTS’s) for each district and borough.  These are statutory documents that identify 
issues on the highway network and link with borough and district local plans.  They 
are used to form packages of schemes and projects and are the starting point for 
bids for funding.  As such any LCWIPs will be fully integrated into the LTS’s to 
provide a comprehensive schedule for each borough/district for the entire county and 
enable us to have a prioritised programme for future investment. 
 

 

 
C3. Current Walking and Cycling Policies, Strategies and Programmes  
 
Please provide information on existing cycling and walking policies, strategies and 
programmes.  
 
Cycling and walking feature heavily in the Surrey Transport Plan (Local Transport 
Plan 3).  The plan sets out the council’s objectives to help people meet their 
transport and travel needs effectively, reliably, safely and sustainably within Surrey, 
in order to promote economic vibrancy, protect and enhance the environment, 
improve the quality of life, and reduce carbon emissions. 
 
To address current transport issues and support growth set out in Local Plans each 
district or borough has a Local Transport Strategy (LTS) and forward programme.  
One of the key objectives of the transport strategies are to encourage more 
sustainable travel and improve air quality.  Walking and cycling schemes are listed in 
the forward programme which provide an evidence base for future funding bids.  The 
forward programme helps the county council and borough/district councils to identify 
strategic infrastructure delivery priorities and guide future investment from a range of 
funding sources. 
 
The County Council has developed the Surrey Cycling Strategy to support the 
development of cycling as a means of transport and to secure economic, health and 
environmental benefits for Surrey.  The Strategy also sets out plans to address the 
increase in cycle casualty rates and the local impacts of the increase in sports 
cycling and cycling events. 
 
The Strategy’s aim is to get more people in Surrey cycling, more safely and it has a 
series of objectives to support the achievement of this aim: 
 
O1: Surrey County Council and its partners will work together to deliver 
improvements for cycling. 
O2: Surrey Local/Joint Committees will oversee development of Local Cycling Plans 
that reflect local priorities and issues. 
O3: We will develop a comprehensive training offer and ensure that cost is not a 
barrier to learning to ride a bike. 
O4: We will work with partners to ensure that Surrey’s economy benefits from more 
people cycling for every day journeys and from Surrey’s role as a centre for cycling. 
O5: We will seek funding to improve infrastructure to make cycling a safe, attractive 
and convenient mode of transport for people of all ages and levels of confidence. 
O6: We will encourage cycling as an inclusive, healthy and affordable means of 
travel through the provision of information, promotional activities and practical 
support. 
O7: We will work with Surrey Police and other partners to improve cycle safety and 
encourage respect. 
O8: We will promote and encourage cycling for health and leisure. 
O9: We will encourage the provision of off road cycle trails and activities while 
managing the impacts on Surrey’s countryside. 
O10: We will take action to minimise the impacts of high levels of sport cycling on 
some roads and communities in Surrey. 

 

O11: We will lobby central government to ensure that regulations governing events 
on the highway are fit for purpose. 
O12: We will support major cycle sport events which inspire participation and bring 
economic benefit, while minimising impact on affected communities. 
O13: We will use an evidence and data led approach to inform future development of 
the strategy. 
 
Current walking and cycling programmes: 
 
Surrey County Council currently sponsor a Research Engineer undertaking a 
doctorate in the field of cycling at the University of Surrey (until January 2018). Their 
research focus is on understanding area level factors that make specific 
demographics more (or less) likely to cycle to work. Findings are expected to inform 
elements of the Cycling Strategy, specifically around what type of intervention may 
be most appropriate for increasing cycling within each demographic in Surrey.  
 
Surrey County Council provides National Standard cycle training to around 15,000 
Surrey residents each year. As well as Bikeability in schools, customised cycle 
training is available for all ages and abilities.  
 
We have benefitted from the recent Access Fund through a partnership with Living 
Streets.  Our dedicated Living Streets officer works with schools, businesses and 
communities countywide on programmes encouraging walking as a form of 
travel.  They are also soon to be expanding their offer to include cycling through the 
Cycling UK network.  By joining the network groups will have access to inspiration 
and practical support to promote and encourage cycling. 
 
Travel SMART is a promotion and engagement programme designed to provide 
people with more travel choices. While engagement activities have had to cease due 
to lack of funding, the website continues with relevant information and a journey 
planner to encourage sustainable choices. 
 
Surrey Wheels for All is a charity (funding bodies include Surrey County Council) 
offering inclusive cycling sessions on adaptive bikes.  They deliver sessions in 
various locations around Surrey. 
 
Drive SMART is a partnership between Surrey Police and Surrey County Council 
(including Surrey Fire and Rescue Service), with the aim of reducing road casualties, 
tackling anti-social road behaviour and making the county's roads safer and less 
stressful for everyone. It includes cycle safety campaigns. 
 
Active Surrey is the County's Sports Partnership, developing sport and physical 
activity. Amongst other aims, Active Surrey seek to increase participation and 
develop clubs.  We continue to work with Active Surrey to promote active travel. 
 
We also carry out various monitoring cycling and walking across Surrey.  This 
includes manual and automatic cycle counts, cyclist casualties, cycle parking at 
selected railway stations, 
and have also undertaken an interview survey of a cross-
section of the Surrey population exploring the propensity to cycle. The 2011 census 
10 
 

collected journey to work information including walking and cycling. The Surrey-i 
website 
shows this data broken down for local areas in Surrey. 
 
Further to the behaviour change programmes above we are also working on a 
number of Sustainable Transport Packages (STPs) and major schemes with funding 
from the Local Enterprise Partnerships.  The schemes aim to make it easier to travel 
by bus, by bike and on foot. Schemes include making improvements to, and creation 
of, cycle lanes and footways, making bus stops better and more accessible, and 
improved access to railway stations. 
 
Currently STPs/transport schemes with benefits for walking and cycling that are 
ongoing, nearing completion or planned to start shortly (subject to a successful  
Business case) are: 
 
EM3 LEP Area 
• 
A331 Walking and Cycling Corridor Camberley (Surrey Heath) 
• 
Camberley Town Centre Public Realm (Borough Council leading project) 
(Surrey Heath) 
• 
Egham Phase 1 (Runnymede) 
• 
Runnymede Roundabout Egham (Runnymede) 
• 
Wider Staines Phase 1 (Spelthorne 
• 
Woking Town Centre Regeneration and Public Realm (Woking – Borough 
Council leading project). 
• 
Woking (Phase 1) (Business case to EM3 LEP early 2018) 
• 
Brooklands Business Park Accessibility (Elmbridge) (Business case to EM3 
LEP early 2018) 
• 
Guildford town centre transport package (Guildford) 
 
C2C LEP Area 
• 
Epsom-Banstead (Epsom and Ewell/ Reigate and Banstead) (Business case 
to C2C LEP July 2017) 
• 
Dorking Transport Package Phase 1 (Mole Valley) 
• 
Greater Redhill (Phase 1) (Reigate and Banstead) 
 
 
SECTION D – Management Case  
 
D1. Delivery 
 
Please provide details of those who will be responsible for delivering the LCWIP as 
well as the amount of local resources (in officer days) that will be made available. 
 
Becky Willson is the Surrey County Council Cycling Officer and will be supported by 
a Graduate Transport Planner.  Between them, they will also be available for 80 days 
over the same period. 
 
Paul Fishwick is the Programme Manager (LTS and Major Schemes) and located 
within the Transport Policy Team. 
 
11 
 

 
D2. Governance 
 
Annex B provides details of how key decisions will be made including information 
about the relevant governance and reporting processes. 
 
For each of the areas which currently do not have any form of LCWIP we will agree a 
local approval process with the Local/Joint Committees.  This has been done with 
the existing local cycling plans and has varied according to the area and level of 
involvement the Local Committee has wanted to have.   
 
However for all of them it has involved the following steps: 
 
- Regularly meeting with relevant local councillors or Task Groups to discuss issues 
and talk through the plans and update when necessary.  
 
- Meeting with interested local residents and cycle forums to understand issues in 
the area and get their ideas for the network. 
 
- Cycling site visits to map and review the existing cycle infrastructure and identify 
missing links in the network as well as minor improvements which could be quick-
wins to be completed by Highways. 
 
- Identifying strategic links for cycle improvements and producing a draft webpage as 
a one-stop-shop for all cycle plan areas in the district or borough. 
 
- Taking the plan to the Local/Joint Committee for members to agree and approve 
the publication of the information online on the Travel SMART website. 
 
- Sharing the webpage which includes the cycle infrastructure map (Annex C) which 
shows existing and suggested routes.  The webpage includes an online form where 
residents can leave their comments or suggest new ideas.  This means we are 
constantly consulting on the plans and seeking feedback.  These ideas are then 
regularly fed back to the Local/Joint Committee Task Groups to review as necessary 
and in conjunction with the Local Transport Strategy. 
 
 
D3. Management Case - Stakeholder Management
 
 
Please outline the key stakeholders that will be engaged with during the LCWIP 
process and indicate if the Local Enterprise Partnership is supportive. 
 
The appended flowchart (Annex D) shows the end to end process we take when 
producing and reviewing a Local Transport Strategy.  This is done in consultation 
with the relevant borough/district.  The end to end process also lists all the 
stakeholders involved in the development of the strategy and all the sources that 
information is drawn from.   
 
12 
 


The development of the cycling plans and LCWIPs will mirror this approach.  The 
district and borough councils are the key consultees within this process and we want 
them to have ownership of their plans.  
 
In the development of the existing cycling plans we have also worked closely with 
local members, the area highway teams, planning officers, transport policy transport 
studies and road safety. 
 
External groups we have engaged with includes any local cycle forums and/or 
bicycle user groups, Sustrans, Cycling UK, Surrey Wheels for All and neighbouring 
borough councils. 
 
 
 
SECTION E: Declaration 
 

E1. Senior Responsible Owner Declaration 
As Senior Responsible Owner, I hereby submit this Expression of Interest for LCWIP 
support on behalf of Surrey County Council and confirm that I have the necessary 
authority to do so. 
Name: Trevor Pugh 
Signed: 
Position: Strategic Director Environment and 
Infrastructure 
 
Submission of proposal: 
Applications must be submitted by 4pm 30th June 2017 
Submissions should be sent electronically to xxxxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
 
 
13 
 

 
 
 
 
 
Annex A 
 
Surrey’s Borough and District areas 
 

















Hounslow
Bexley
Wandsworth
Richmond
Lewisham
upon Thames
Sp el
tho rne
Merton
Bracknel
Wokingham
Kingston
Forest
upon
Runnymede
Thames
Bromley
Sutton
Elmb ridge
Ep so m
Croydon
Surrey
and
Heath
Ewel
Wo k ing
Reigate and
Hart
Banstead
Rushmoor
Mo l
e
Valey
Guildford
Tandridge
Waverley
Crawley
East
Hampshire
Expression of interest for LCWIP technical 
support for Spelthorne, Runnymede, Surrey 
Heath, Woking and Tandridge.
©  Crown co p yright and datab ase rights 2017 OS 100019613. Use of this data is sub ject to  terms and co nditions (see bel
o w). Excep t A-Z Street 
Atlas © 
Co p yri
ght of the Pub lishers 
Geo grap hers’ A-Z Map  Co mp any Ltd.
Contains OS data © Crown Copyright and database right 2017
OS terms & conditions: You are permitted 
Printed By:     BW
to use this data solely to enable you to 
respond to, or interact with, the organisation  Printed On:     June 2017
± that provided you with the data. You are not 
Surrey 
Di
stricts and Bo roughs
permit ed to copy, sub-licence, distribute or  Project No:     DfT LWCIP EoI
sel  any of this data to third parties in any form. Scale:
1:250,000 Original Size A4

 
 
 
 
 
Annex B 
 
Project Governance 
 

Approval bodies
SCC – Cabinet Members
• Economic Prosperity
• Environment & Transport
Approve
• Highways
Department of 
Transport/ LEP/ LTB
Infrastructure Board –
Monitor
Directorate Management Team [DMT]
Scrutiny
SCC Cabinet 
SCC – Cabinet Members
• Economic Prosperity
Transport Infrastructure 
Monitor

Direct
Environment & Transport
Assurance Network TIAN
• Highways
SCC – Environment  & 
Infrastructure Select Committee
Local Transport Strategy 
Control
Working Group for 
Local / Joint Committee
Borough / District
Local/Joint Committee 
Member Task Group
Walking/Cycling Working 
Delivery Group for other 
Group for 
schemes in 
Deliver
Borough/District
Borough/District


 
 
 
 
 
Annex C 
 
Cycle Infrastructure map 
 


Annex C 
 

 
 
 
 
 
Annex D 
 
End to End Process  
 

Local Transport Strategy & Forward Programme – end to end process for producing and reviewing LTS 
Live 
Live 
Continue 
Produce LTS
Review
document
document
cycle
Produce draft LTS
Consult
Amend
Publish and formal y adopt
Record necessary 
Review
Record necessary 
Continue 
changes
changes
cycle….
Gather background policy 
Summarise transport issues:
documents

Surrey traffic model ing / 
Identify mitigation measures
Key stakeholders/ 

LEP Strategic Economic 
Local Plan model ing

List in Forward Programme
workstreams

Congestion hotspots / CJAMS
Plans (priority places)

Present on maps if possible

Area highway teams

Local Cycling Plans

record background info to each 

D/B planning officers
Review LTS & FP

Surrey Transport Plan 

Surrey Transport Plan 
scheme on file

D/B Environmental Health 

Account for Local Plan changes
strategies
strategies

Work with key stakeholders to 
officers

Account for latest model ing

Local Plan – Core Strategy

Local Plan – Core Strategy
identify measures, especial y 

Education


Site al ocations
Include progress since last published version

AQMAs (& AQAPs)
where ‘gaps’ exist (aim: al  

Economy team, Chief 


Surrey Infrastructure Study
Update data and broken links

Engage with key stakeholders
issues identified to have a 
Execs

Corporate objectives

Review Forward Plan – what schemes have 

Any assessment work carried 
mitigating measure identified)

Heritage

D/B ASRs (air quality)
been delivered; what new schemes should be 
out by T.Studies for d/bs

Local Members (task 

Trends and opportunities 
added; record background information.
group)
(Tx Studies)


Major schemes
Agree draft with Local/Joint Committee and 
Col ate background info on measures/schemes

Minerals & Waste (SEA 
stakeholders
Public consultation

reference ID
screening*)

Public consultation (6 weeks)

origin

Seek approval from LC/JC to 
Assist in prep of 

Parking

Sign off from Local/Joint Committee
consult

Owner
bids & EoIs

Place & Sustainability (AQ, 

Approval from Cabinet and Ful  Council

Estimate cost, with base year

Undertake 6 week consultation 
travel planning, cycling) 

Current delivery/production stage (in relation to E2E process)
online, using STP platform

Public Health

Feasibility plans/studies

Road Safety

Review comments and amend 

Design drawings

Spatial Planning
Live document
draft LTS

Links to development (schools, houses, businesses etc)

Transport Development 

Use LTS as evidence for bids and business 

Produce consultation report 

Fit with local priorities – LC; d/b; Local Plan, duty to cooperate, 
Planning
and take to Formal Committee
cases
AAPs, IDP

Transport Policy

Record changes as they are needed, though 

Links with NR & HE – proximity, considerations

Transport Studies

make no changes to published document for 
Potential funding sources, and its availability

Travel & Transport

Keep information, or copies of, on file.
2 years (update and review is on a 2-3 year 
cycle)
Publish and adopt LTS & FP into the Surrey Transport Plan
Outputs
1. Gain approval from Committee for final version to be published and 

Approved Local Transport Strategy & Forward 
adopted
Programme
2. Take to Cabinet and Ful  Council for approval of adoption into Surrey 

*SEA screening report – programme in advance
Forward Programme of schemes 
Cycle continues on 2-3 
Transport Plan; Cabinet report needed

EqIA
to be updated yearly, to fit in 
year timeframe
3. Upload to www.surreycc.gov.uk/localtransportstrategies

Consultation report
with Local Committee cycles
4. Relevant pages and sections of STP wil  be amended to reflect adoption.

Cabinet report
6-12 months
2-3 years
6 months
2-3 years

Document Outline