This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'TMB Minutes and Papers'.


  
  
  
  
  
  
 

School Evaluation Form 
(11-16) 
  
2018 – 2019 
 
 
  

Context: 
Longsands Academy was opened in September 1960 as "Longsands School", a Secondary 
Modern, under its original headmaster Harold K Whiting. The academy’s motto, “​Donata 
reponere laeti
​”, translates as 'rejoice to repay the gift', highlighting the academy’s belief that the 
learning of powerful knowledge is a gift which should be enjoyed by students and staff alike. 
This is reflected in our core purpose: ​to secure the best possible experience, learning and 
outcomes for each young person for whom we have responsibility. 

In addition, staff and students adhere to a set of core values: 
● care and respect for self and others; 
● honesty; 
● creativity; 
● clear and open communication; 
● high aspirations and the determination to fulfil  them; 
● strong relationships and shared goals achieved through teamwork. 
Today, Longsands Academy is a successful, ful y inclusive secondary school which holds a 
respected position at the heart of its community, St Neots, a market town in the South west of 
Cambridgeshire, with a population of over 30,000. In September 2018, Longsands Academy 
joined the Astrea Academy Trust, whose mission: ‘Inspiring Beyond Measure’, reflects our 
approach that an exceptional education is rich and empowering beyond the narrow confines of 
formal examination success. Al  schools within the Trust, therefore, focus on encouraging and 
nurturing Resilience, Empathy, Aspiration, Contribution and Happiness in al  of our children and 
young people.  
The Astrea Principles of Learning state that​ ​al  children, regardless of background, have an 
entitlement to an education that extends their potential and equips them to be successful 
citizens…through the highest standards of learning, facilitated by the very best adults working 
with them. As such, staff at Longsands Academy, pride themselves on providing an engaging 
and supportive environment in which our students feel empowered to reach and embrace their 
ful  potential with confidence.  Our staff are committed to nurturing the abilities of every child 
with a curriculum which promotes academic excel ence and recognises the distinct uniqueness 
of our students. The opportunities we provide al ow al  students to showcase their talents, 
whether through the traditional school day or as a result of the wealth of extra-curricular 
activities that we provide.  We are extremely proud of the achievements of our students that are 
a result of the high expectations of behaviour, learning and teaching and the strong, supportive 
relationships that exist between staff, students and their parents/carers.  Furthermore, in order 


to develop the important qualities of independent learning and resilience, our students are 
encouraged to take responsibility for their learning both in and out of lessons.  
The Academy has approximately 1450 students on rol  in Years 7-11 with a further 420 students 
attending the St Neots Sixth Form Centre and partner providers of post-16 education - 
Stageworks and the St Neots Footbal  Club. The make-up of students in Years 7-11: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Summary: Overall Effectiveness 
Self-evaluation grade: ​Good (2) 
When  considering  al   criteria  within  this  section,  the  best  fit  is  good.  There  is  evidence  of 
outstanding  practice  in  several  key  areas,  including  policies  and  procedures to keep students 
safe,  establishment  of  the  Academy’s  core  values  and  culture,  the  transition  of  students 
between k
  ey s
  tages, c
  urrent a
  nd p
  rojected w
  ork for C
  EIAG (
  including a
   0% p
  ost-16 N
  EET figure 
for the 2015-16 and 2016-2017 Year 11 cohorts, ​2017-18?​), s
  trong levels o
  f o
  veral a
  ttendance 
and  the  work  done  to  ensure  students  learn  to  respect  others  and  develop  into  positive 
members of modern Britain. In addition, there is strong f ocus o
  n o
  ur c
  urriculum both i n t erms o
  f 
appropriate  pathways  and  the  development  of  subject-specific  pedagogy  within  a 
knowledge-rich  curriculum.  This  is  supported  by  our  Curriculum  Vision,  our  commitment  to 
department-led  CPD  and  a  review  &  development  process  which  aims  to  develop  individuals 
through a col aborative approach to classroom observations. As a result, t here i s a c
  onsistency 
of effective or highly effective teaching across the curriculum a
  t al k
  ey stages, a
  s highlighted i n 
staff observations as wel  as quality assurance practices throughout the academic year. 
  
Outcomes  are  good  because,  in  2018,  KS4  results  outperformed national averages at grades 
9-7/A*A,  9-5  and/or  9-4/A*-C  in  a  significant  number  of  subject  areas  including  English 
Language,  Maths,  Further  Maths,  Biology,  Physics,  Art  Photography,  Child  Development, 
History, Latin, Media, French, Music and RE. Despite the introduction of a more rigorous s
  et of 
GCSEs,  2018  results  improved  in  12  of  the  18  new,  linear  qualifications.  Our  strong 
performance  in  English  and  maths in 2017 held up in 2018 with Eng 4+ = 77.4%, 5+ = 61.6% 
and maths 4+ = 74.9%, 5+ =48.7%.  
 
This feeds into an overal  Basics 4+ figure of 67.7% , 5+ = 42.7% and 5A*-CEM (4+) = 6
  2.7%; 
our Ebacc % at 4+ improved to 2
  3.3% (
  21.1%). O
  ur Attainment 8 f igure improved t o 46.8 (
  45.9) 
whilst  the  number  of  students  achieving  a  positive  Progress  8  figure  improved by 8.0%. As a 
result, our overal  Progress 8 figure improved to 0.01 and contains positive figures in 3 o
  f the 4 
elements  (2017  in  brackets):  Eng  =  0.03  (0.14),  ma  =  0.29  (0.31),  Ebacc  =  0.26  (0.14);  in 
addition,  Science  VA  =  0.19  (0.04),  Languages  VA  =  0.07  (0.07)  and  Humanities  VA  =  0.29 
(0.02).  Whilst  our  P8  score  for  the  open  element  shows  a  -0.14  figure,  this  is  a  significant 
improvement on the 2017 figure of -0.46.  
  
NB/  It  should  also  be  noted that official DfE (ASP) and Ofsted (IDSR) data for this year group 
includes up to 8 ‘outliers’ (EOTAS students) who w
  ere e
  ducated at P
  rospect House, our o
  ff-site 
provision  (which  achieved  a  top  grade  4  rating  fol owing  a  LA  audit  in  October  2017).  These 
students  faced  a  range  of issues and chal enges which meant that mainstream education was 
not  appropriate  for  them  to  ensure  their  safety  &  wel -being  or  achieve  a  positive  academic 
outcome. ​Despite this, they have al  secured a post-16 pathway? ​a
  nd, as s
  uch, s
  uccess f or t his 
cohort  can  be  evidence  in  individual  case  studies.  Our  own  2018  figures  do  not  include  this 
cohort (outliers) for these reasons. 

  
Current priorities: 
A​t GCSE, a focus for senior and middle leaders at the academy is to ensure that al  students 
attain  and  make  excel ent  progress across the whole curriculum with a particular emphasis on 
the  performance  of  sub-groups,  most  notably  students  designated  as  disadvantaged.  Whilst 
measures employed during 2017/18 have had a measurable impact on the performance of the 
cohort,  the  data  below  (excluding  8  outliers  in  2018,  3  of  whom  were  disadvantaged  and  13 
students in 2017, 5 of whom were d
  isadvantaged) indicates that f urther w
  ork is n
  eeded t o c
  lose 
the attainment and progress gap between this cohort and their non-disadvantaged peers: 
  
KPI 
2018 (49 students, 17.6%) 
2017 (48 students, 17.5%) 
  
Disadv. 
In-house gap 
Disadv. 
In-house gap 
outcome 
outcome 
Attainment 8 
36.8 
-12.18 
33.82 
-14.72 
Progress 8 
-0.43 
-0.64 
-0.43 
-0.51 
Basics 4+ 
46.9% 
-25.3% 
41.7% 
-37.6% 
Basics 5+ 
20.4% 
-27.0% 
18.8% 
-29.2% 
5A*CEM 
44.9% 
-21.6% 
39.6% 
-31.8% 
P8 English 
-0.39 
-0.50 
-0.15 
-0.35 
P8 maths 
-0.30 
-0.72 
-0.13 
-0.54 
P8 EBacc 
-0.34 
-0.72 
-0.30 
-0.53 
P8 Open 
-0.63 
-0.59 
-0.93 
-0.56 
VA Science 
-0.36 
-0.67 
-0.36 
-0.49 
VA Languages 
-0.08 
-0.16 
-0.59 
-0.75 
VA Humanities 
-0.41 
-0.84 
-0.43 
-0.53 
  
  
A range of planned interventions for t he c
  oming y
  ear are d
  etailed i n o
  ur P
  upil Premium S
  trategy 
Statement  and  subsequent  Action  Plan  which  have  been  careful y  chosen  in  response  to 
feedback from recent scrutiny visits as wel a
  s o
  ur own i nvestigation i nto f urther m
  easures used 
to  engage  and  extend  these  students  and,  subsequently,  improving  their  final  outcomes.  A 

CCC  Performance  Review  visit in January 2018 highlighted the progress made in this area as 
wel  as identifying areas to develop further. Our immediate r
  esponse t o t his w
  as t o e
  nhance the 
governance  and  leadership of this aspect of our work as wel  increasing the capacity available 
to support this cohort of students in their academic and extra-curricular endeavours. Our focus 
on a knowledge-rich curriculum, planned work with an external agency, Learning P
  erformance, 
as  wel   as  col aborative  support from partner schools within our new MAT, Astrea, wil  provide 
invaluable support for this academy priority. 
  
Work  wil   also  continue  to  maximise  the outcomes of students classified as SEN. In 2018, the 
cohort of 16 students achieved an overal  P8 s
  core of -
  0.95 w
  ith 4
   students a
  chieving a p
  ositive 
P8  and  individual  outcomes  ranging  from  -3.09  to  +0.90.  Our  SEN  department,  with  support 
from our Astrea partners, wil  continue to provide bespoke learning packages to suit the needs 
of this cohort and ensure we maximise their academic and non-academic outcomes. 
  
In  addition,  our  work  to  ensure  students  wil   low  levels  of  numeracy  and  literacy  on entry wil  
continue to be a similar focus so that al  are ful y supported to make progress in their learning. 
The  remit  of  our  Interventions  Director  has  been  extended  to  include disadvantaged students 
and  we  are  determined  to  build  on  a  successful  programme  of  interventions  in  2017-2018  in 
order to close the gap further between these students and their non-disadvantaged peers. 
  
We  continue  to  focus  on  supporting  student  outcomes  in  the  open  element  suite  of 
qualifications.  Our  work  during  the  2017/18  academic  year  improved  outcomes  within  this 
element  as  evidenced  by  an  improved  P8  figure  of  -0.14,  from  -0.46  in  2017.  This  has  been 
achieved  by  targeting the support of our PiXL Associate, Lisa Goodship, and by enhancing an 
established  system  of  SLT  link  meetings  to include rigorous quality assurance mechanisms in 
order  to  ensure  subject  leaders  establish  targeted  and  effective  support  to  underperforming 
students. 
  
Cautious forecasts f or o
  ur c
  urrent Y
  ear 11 c
  ohort, b
  ased o
  n S
  eptember 2018 P
  R1 d
  ata, i ndicate 
a Progress 8 figure for ma of 0.47, Eng -
  0.14, Ebacc 0.09, O
  pen 0
  .01, overal 0
  .10 (
  target 0
  .30) 
whilst  Basics  at 5+ is forecast 50.9% (target 50%). Our  disadvantaged cohort is forecasted to 
achieve  a  Progress  8  score  of  -0.18  vs  in-house non of 0.16 (gap reduced from 0.64 to 0.34) 
and  a  Basics  at  5+  of  23.4%  (target  35%).  NB/  data  excludes  4  outliers,  educated  at our AP 
provision. 
  
A key focus for the academy during 2018/19 is the continued development o
  f a
  k
  nowledge-rich 
curriculum which ful y reflects o
  ur c
  ore purpose a
  nd v
  alues. T
  his w
  il h
  ave a
   focus across a
  l  key 
stages  but  most  notably  KS3,  where  departments wil  continue to review their curriculum offer 
including  the key knowledge which is taught and how it is sequenced as wel  as the pedagogy 
applied to its delivery. I n 2
  017/18, we began a
   Key S
  tage 4
  c
  urriculum review a
  imed a
  t e
  nsuring 
al   students  fol ow  appropriate  curriculum  pathways  which  enables  them to enjoy and achieve 
across  al   subject  areas. This wil  gather pace this year and we are determined to make this a 

routine  aspect  of  our  work  so  that  our  curriculum  offer  is  responsive  to national changes and 
ful y supportive of our core purpose and CLFP protocols. 
  
A  key  feature  of  our  curriculum  vision  is  the  development  of  our  staff  whether  this  is  their 
leadership competency, subject expertise or p
  edagogical p
  ractice. T
  here i s s
  til  work t o b
  e done 
to  achieve  complete  consistency  within  and  across  departments  with  regard  to  the  quality  of 
teaching and learning, as evidenced in the 2018 Department Reviews and confirmed in quality 
assurance  mechanisms.  Our  focus  on  cognitive  science  &  research-based  evidence, 
department-led  CPD  to  develop  subject  specialism  and  col aborative  work  within  the  Astrea 
MAT  wil   support  this  academy-wide  priority  which  is  at  the  heart  of  our  school  improvement 
plans. 
  
Lastly,  the  academy  is  not  yet  outstanding  because  there  is  stil   work  to  be  done  to  further 
improve students’ behaviour to the point where it can be described as ‘impeccable’ at al  times 
during the day with a focus on a smal  cohort of persistent concerns. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Effectiveness 
of 
Leadership 
and 
Management 
Key Challenges: 
 
As evidenced in the 2018 GCSE outcomes, a key priority for the academy is to accelerate the 
attainment and progress of our disadvantaged cohort in al  year groups. Our actions fol ow an 
audit by the CCC Performance Review in February 2018 which focussed on our disadvantaged 
provision, an Ofsted Section 8 inspection in May as wel  as our own analysis of the impact of 
existing strategies. Subsequent measures to address the gaps include improved leadership 
and accountability and increased capacity to support our growing disadvantaged cohort. This 
has enabled our Director of Interventions to now have a complete overview of al  support 
provided for al  cohorts of students in need including SEN, disadvantaged and catch-up literacy 
& numeracy. We have increased our engagement with ‘Learning Performance’ (external study 
guides) to include al  year groups and targeted parents. Col aborative work with our Senior 
Assistant Principal for KS4 is supporting a number of actions targeted at our current Year 11 
disadvantaged cohort. Whilst time is needed for the impact of these actions to be ful y felt, 
forecasts for the 2018-19 Year 11 cohort indicate a Progress 8 score of -0.18, improved from 
-0.43 and a Basics 9-5 figure of 23.4%, up from 19.2% in 2018.  
 
As highlighted in the May Ofsted letter, the disadvantaged strategy fal s under a general 
academy priority which is to ensure that teaching is responsive to the needs of al  learners, 
especial y disadvantaged, SEN and boys which are al  cohorts which under-perform in aspects 
of their studies. This is being addressed by the measures outlined above plus an increased 
focus on the curriculum in terms of pathways, content and pedagogy. A refreshed curriculum 
vision was presented to staff in September 2018 and senior leaders are focussed on 
supporting middle leaders/subject leads in developing their own curricula using an agreed, 
common language. This includes regular quality assurance support, curriculum chal enge, time 
to discuss and develop subject-specific expertise and LPD which incorporates col aborative 
lesson planning and observations. This is further supported by a programme of ‘Seen Working 
Wednesdays’, a weekly T&L blog and our growing LPD library. In addition, our growing 
col aborative work with partner academies within the Astrea Trust wil  is already supporting our 
curriculum thinking. 
 
Our AP provision (shared with Ernulf Academy) has, in recent years, been a strength of the 
academy, as evidenced in our most recent review in November 2017 when our AP base, 
Prospect House, was graded at Stage 4 in the Local Authorities Alternative Provision County 
Directory, the highest level of quality assurance. In September 2018, the shared AP unit 
moved into a larger site on the Ernulf campus, making use of a vacated sixth form building. 
This resource has afforded us the opportunity to work col aboratively both with Ernulf and 

Astrea in order to ensure that the KS4 curriculum enables al  students, who receive their 
education through our AP team, to maximise their attainment and progress. Whilst 
acknowledging that the provision caters for our most chal enging, and often vulnerable, 
students with a wide range of needs, outcomes in 2018 (8 students, 6 PPI) gave individual 
Progress 8 scores ranging from -1.8 to -7.7 (average -3.7).  
Progress and Impact: 
Improved governance via a ‘Transitional Management Board’ fol owing our transfer to the 
Astrea Academy Trust. 
 
A further developed culture of high expectations delivered via ambitious targets for al  students 
in Years 7-11. Current Year 11 continue to use FFTD20 targets which, if achieved, would give 
an estimated Attainment 8 of 52.1, Progress 8 of +0.45 and Basics at 5+ of 54.9. Astrea-set 
targets for Years 7-10 are aimed to give an estimated Progress 8 score of +0.5 (Year 10), rising 
to +0.81 for the current Year 7.  
 
Routine evaluation and development of our system of department QA checks via SLT link 
meetings, HoD QA mechanisms, department reviews and department SEF & improvement plan 
reviews have ensured that our middle leaders have a growing insight and body of evidence 
which informs improvements in teaching, learning and subsequent outcomes. 
 
Attendance data for 2017-2018 
 
Our increased focus on social behaviour, respect and courtesy has involved the use of 
achievement and behaviour points, SLT behaviour walks, centralised detentions and an 
increased use of our Senior Prefect body to model exemplary conduct and behaviour. Our 
analysis of achievement and behaviour points by individual, sub-group, subject and class al ows 
us to target interventions to further support this aspect of our work. This is supported by 
analysis of internal isolation and exclusion data. 
 
Our work to improve strategic planning at a senior level has ensured that the academy’s SEF & 
SIP priorities are informed by data and external audit. Academy priorities were communicated to 
staff in June 2018 to enable Department Improvement Plans and individual objectives to 
support the academy SIP. 
   
Academy priorities fol owing the Ofsted visit in May 2018 were communicated to HoDs in June 
and signal ed an academy-wide focus on curriculum. A re-launched Curriculum Vision 
document was presented to to al  staff in September 2018 and key aspects communicated to 
students and parents. Actions to support this priority are detailed in the previous section.  
 
We continue to invest time, energy and resources into our extensive extra-curricular 
programme; most recent acknowledgements of our curriculum are from Camps International 

and the National Citizenship Service who, in September 2018, awarded the academy the Silver 
Engagement Award. 
 
We continue to strongly promote British Values via the work of our Citizenship Coordinator. In 
September 2018 we launched a revamped PSHE curriculum under the banner ‘Learning for Life 
and Work’. This is organised into 3 strands (‘Living in the Wider World’, ‘Relationships’ and 
‘Health & Wel being’) which further develop our teaching in this area. 
 
We have worked hard to develop effective systems to monitor the progress made by students 
across al  year groups. Our feedback policy is bespoke to individual departments and their 
particular context in terms of curriculum time and content. We have an established system of 
quality assurance which involves lesson visits, book-looks and student voice feedback as wel  
as weekly RSL meetings focussed on the attainment and progress of our Year 11 cohort. 
Recent developments include the introduction of Doddle which enhances monitoring of home 
learning tasks and subsequent feedback and the move to Heads of Year in KS3 who have a 
clear achievement and progress focus. 
  
Staff at the academy engage daily with parents via traditional media as wel  as more recent 
developments including Facebook, Twitter, Doddle and the SIMS Parents’ app (by 25/9/18, 87% 
of Year 7 parents had signed up to the app). Parents are also invited to complete the Ofsted 
questionnaire after each consultation evening and this is an area we are hoping to develop 
further. 
 
Student wel -being and equality continues to have a high profile at Longsands Academy and our 
commitment to Student Voice continues to be a key vehicle for ensuring that students are 
heard, understood and supported. We now have SV leads in each Key Stage as wel  as Student 
Leaders in Year 9 and our Year 11 Prefect body led by a Head Boy and Girl and their deputies. 
Our Young Carers programme continues to be wel  attended and has recently received national 
recognition via the Bronze YC Award. Staff lead a weekly LGBTQ meeting and we have 
recently introduced changing and toilet facilities for transgender students. In 2018, we were 
delighted to achieve the ‘Quality in Careers Standard’ for our work with CEIAG and our 
destinations data has, in recent years, shown a 0% NEET figure which includes data for 
students at our AP provision. The Vice-Principal is our designated safeguarding lead and there 
are 5 further DPs within our key stage student support teams. Our systems were described as 
effective during the Ofsted visit in May 2018 acknowledging that ‘students and parents agree 
that they feel safe and wel  cared for at the academy’. In September 2018 we adopted the 
‘MyConcern’ online recording system.  
Self-evaluation grade: 2 

Priorities: 
a.  The design, implementation and evaluation of a knowledge-rich and careful y 
sequenced curriculum. 
b.   A curriculum review at Key Stage 4 in line with CLFP process and procedures. 
c.   Effective and efficient use of public funds to support our core purpose and ensure 
long-term financial security. 
d.   Effective literacy support and intervention for students in Years 7-9. 
e.   Effective numeracy support and intervention for students in Years 7-9. 
f.    Promoting positive staff wel -being. 
g.   Positive community engagement and fund-raising. 
 
 ​Quality of Teaching and Learning 
Key Challenges: 
 
Lesson  observation  data  from  2017-18  provided  a  picture  of  the  quality  of  teaching  and 
learning  that  was  more  positive  than  examination  outcomes  would  suggest.  Our  chal enge, 
and  request  from  middle  leaders,  is  for  effective  teachers  to  have  extended  opportunities to 
work  alongside,  and learn from, highly effective teachers in their subject area. In response to 
the request for more time t o d
  evote to o
  ur core p
  urpose o
  f i mproving learning a
  nd t eaching w
  e 
have  developed  the  scope  of  departmental  QA  processes  and  support  for middle leaders to 
‘Unleash  Great  Teaching’  and  become  rigorous in reviewing how to lead the development of 
teaching.  The  LPD  programme  for  18-19  provides  calendered  time  to  ensure  subject 
communities  can  observe  one  another  teach  and  develop  consistently  outstanding  teaching 
through jointly planned lessons which are evaluated with Heads of subject and SLT l inks, a
  nd 
providing  opportunities  to  ensure  R  and  D  teaching  targets  align  with  departmental  learning 
and  teaching  priorities.  With  our  transfer  to  the  Astrea  Trust  teaching  principal  guidance, 
appraisal  processes  and  training  opportunities  wil   be accessed to further raise the quality of 
teaching and learning standards. 
 
In Spring 2018, fol owing meetings to review p
  rogress t owards R
   and D t argets, b
  ook s
  crutinies 
and  learning  walks,  Heads  of  subject  evaluated  the quality of teaching, feedback and student 
progress. 8 members of staff were identified as needing s
  upport i n o
  ne o
  r m
  ore o
  f t hese a
  reas; 
of  these  3  left  in  July  2018,  1  returned  from  sick  leave  in  September  and  is  being  closely 
monitored,  1  has  become  part  time  (only  teaching  in  the  Key  Stage  in  which  he  was 
successful),  2  are  receiving  coaching  and  support  from  experienced  col eagues  and  one  is 
completing our Developing Teacher Programme.  
 

We  continue  to  develop  our  successful  NQT  programme  ensuring  teachers  new  to  the 
profession  are  supported  to deliver high quality lessons: our retention rate is very high, due in 
part to a highly effective RQT programme. We h
  ave r
  etained 9
  1% of t he 63 t eachers employed 
as  NQTs  since  2009 for 3 years or more. Our links with Cambridge University provide us with 
wel   qualified  staff,  often  in  shortage  curriculum  areas  including  Science,  maths  and  Modern 
Foreign Languages. 
 
Further  development  of  effective  feedback  and  responsive  teaching  is  a  key  chal enge  for 
teaching  and  learning  to  become  outstanding:    ​whilst  evidence  from  learning  walks,  student 
panels and feedback from Ofsted reveals that the majority of t eaching s
  taff p
  rovide a
  ppropriate 
written  ​feedback  to  learners  in line with Academy guidance, verbal feedback to chal enge and 
develop  progress  during  lessons  is  an  area  for  development.  ‘Active  learners,  responsive 
teachers’  -  was  a  training  focus  delivered  direct  response  to  SLT  departmental  reviews.  To 
support the development of responsive teaching HODs have audited t heir practice u
  sing S
  SAT 
research  by Dylan W
  iliam. T
  he r
  esearch o
  f P
  rofessor R
  obert Coe a
  nd D
  aisy Christadoulou has 
also  been  shared  to  support  teachers  to  develop  their  use  of  active  learning  strategies  and 
increase levels of student independence, and engagement. 
 
Development  of  a  knowledge  rich  curriculum  is  a key chal enge for 2018-19:  middle leaders 
have  begun  using  the  Doddle  platform  to  provide  resources  to  increase  low-stakes  testing 
championed  by  Dylan  and  Christadoulou  research,  and  curriculum  review  is  encouraging  the 
development  of  programmes  of  study  that  interleave  topics,  provide  opportunities  for  spaced 
repetition  and  knowledge  organisers  for  al   topic  areas  over  the  coming  year.  Some  middle 
leaders  have  already  demonstrated  and  shared  emerging  practice,  and  are  using  their  up  to 
date  engagement  with  local  and  national  subject  communities  to  engage  their  teams  with 
emerging  teaching  pedagogies.  Other  middle  leaders  are  being  supported to become equal y 
outward looking by their SLT l ink: s
  hared f rames of r
  eference with the Longsands w
  eekly blogs, 
and  Seen  Working  effective  practice  shared  on  Wednesdays  are  areas  we  are  developing. 
Similarly,  DTT  and  Power  to  Perform  strategies  used  by  2,000  schools,  many  of  which  are 
developing outstanding practice, is available to col eagues in the form of  our PiXL m
  embership 
which  provides  staff  with  access  to  outstanding  resources,  subject  conferences,  ,  and  the 
support of our PiXL associate Lisa G
  oodship whose s
  uccessful s
  upport to i mprove o
  utcomes in 
MFL  and  Business  Studies  have  been  extended  to  support  al   departments,  and  a  remit  to 
support  PE,  Geography  and  History  departments  to  improve  level  5-9  GCSE  outcomes,  and 
improved  A*  -  B  outcomes  at  KS5.  The  evidence  of  impact  on  outcomes  from  those 
departments  who  ful y  engaged  with  and  accessed  PiXL  support  strategies  and  resources  is 
encouraging  and  needs  to  accessed  more  consistently  by  al   departments,  particularly  in  the 
light of concerns regarding workload. 
 
We  are  proud  to  have  accessed  places  for  our  most  able  disadvantaged  learners  to  attend 
residentials a
  t Portsmouth, L
  ancaster, W
  arwick and Cambridge U
  niversity s
  ummer s
  chools, a
  nd 
have  supported  Year  12  and  13  students  to  secure  Arkwright  University  Scholarships.  In 

addition  wins  at  national  Vex  Robotics  competitions  and  Business  Enterprise  awards,  and 
international  success  with  Maths  chal enges  are  further  evidence  of  enabling  our  most  able 
learners  to  access  success  beyond  the  classroom. Nonetheless, we are aware that these are 
able  learners  with  a  ​desire  to  fulfil   potential.  In  response  to  Ofsted  feedback  regarding 
chal enging  ​all  our  ​most  able  students  a  Most  Able  Champion  has  been  appointed  to further 
support and chal enge the most able s
  tudents w
  ho l ack t he m
  otivation i s a
  nother key p
  riority f or 
the year ahead. Alongside this focus we continue supporting tutors and teachers with p
  ractical 
and proven strategies to promote self-belief, resilience and growth mindset approaches critical 
for  success  in  life,  as  wel   as  school-work.  Al   students,  including  the  much  referenced  PP 
cohort,  continue  to  be  supported  in  these  areas  as  we  extend  the  walking  talking  mock  and 
power to perform approaches used in Year 1
  1 t o other year g
  roups, a
  nd p
  romote t he s
  trategies 
to our parents and carers. 
Progress and impact: 
 
In response to the research recommendations of Professor R
  obert Coe t eachers h
  ave m
  et and 
jointly  planned  lessons  in  response  to  departmental priorities in  groupings devised by HODs; 
the  groups  wil   conduct  lessons  observations  by  mid  November,  and  wil   then  meet  again  to 
review  progress  towards  agreed  targets.  On  16th  January  teachers  wil   formal y present their 
insights  and  reflections  on  pedagogy  within  teams,  joined  by  SLT  links.  ‘Time  to  talk  about 
teaching’  is  a  much  heard  cry  in  education:  feedback  from  staff  about  this  developmental 
approach to the first observation of the year has been very positive indeed. Ful  evaluation w
  il  
take place in the S
  pring term, w
  ith t raditional ‘ high s
  takes’ observations s
  cheduled t o take place 
as part of the Spring Departmental review. 
 
Al  Heads of Subject have met with SLT links to d
  iscuss t he c
  oncept ‘ building l earning cultures’ 
in  their  teams,  and  to  review  their  leadership  of  innovation  in  response  to  ideas  from  David 
Weston  (Teacher  Development  Trust)  and  Bridget  Clay  (Teach  First).  ‘Unleashing  Great 
Teaching:Secrets  to  the  most  effective  teacher  development’  is  providing  thought  provoking 
and shared frames of reference to devlelop middle leaders. 
 
Evidence of developing knowledge rich curriculum approaches has been delivered in the form 
of one Head of Subject sharing a two year curriculum plan with interleaved revisiting of topics 
built in at our first Heads of Department meeting.  In terms of low-stakes testing the first 17 days 
of Doddle use has seen over 1500 homeworks set: many using low stakes tests have been 
completed, and next lessons planned in response to areas of misunderstanding. Our first Seen 
Working Wednesday saw the Head of History model how he used test data to plan a lesson. 
 
Our PiXL associate has met with Heads of Subject to outline a number of strategies and 
resources which can be accessed to raise standards and levels of engagement: during the 
meeting our Head of Business and MFL talked about forensic use of data to diagnose student 
misunderstandings, offer ‘therepies’ and re-test students, and the creation of personalised 

learning checklists to support students.  The ICT, Geography, History and PE departments are 
working with her on strategies to increase 5-9 and PP performance. 
 
Our most able champion has identified underperforming students in Year 11, and has met their 
tutors to share insights into barriers to achievement.  Coaching of the students is already 
underway, and a presentation on barriers and strategies to overcome them wil  be delivered 
later in the term to the students themselves.  In a similar vein Year 8 parents have fedback 
positively in response to how Doddle works and a presentation on helping your child develop 
self- belief: guidance on growth mindsets, including VR links to Carol Dweck and the 
opportunity to buy discounted copies of Matthew Syed’s You are Awesome (al  year 7s wil  read 
the book and engage with concepts in the Spring term).  
Self-evaluation grade: 2 
Priorities: 
a.    Routine use of research-based evidence and cognitive science to support the 
development of subject-specific pedagogy. 
b.    CPD which develops reflective and highly effective classroom practitioners who 
are confident pedagogical experts within their discipline and responsive to the 
needs of al  learners. 
c.    CPD which develops reflective and effective middle and senior leaders who 
discharge their responsibilities in accordance with the Astrea Value Partners. 
d.    Effective use of ICT to support highly effective teaching and learning. 
e.       Effective quality assurance mechanisms which support developments in 
teaching & learning. 
 
 
 
 

Personal Development, Behaviour and 
Welfare 

Key Challenges: 
  

The last academic year saw an introduction of a new system for monitoring behaviour and 
attendance across the Academy. The system, based within our SIMS package, enabled us to 
monitor behaviour concerns and achievement success across year groups, gender and vulnerable 
groups. The numbers of points awarded spiked in the first term and then settled in terms 2 and 3; 
therefore we are looking forward to seeing a more consistent picture in the coming year. However, 
there were some clear areas identified on which to focus this year. The first is the awarding of 
achievement points. In both years 7 and 8 achievement points exceeded 14,000 but by year 11 this 
had fal en to 4,500 therefore a more consistent approach is needed by staff. Secondly, the gender 
gap between boys and girls was marked, particularly in behaviour points therefore this wil  also be a 
focus. Final y, the number of achievement points awarded to disadvantaged students was 
proportionate in relation to achievement points compared to non-disadvantaged but the percentage 
was too high for behaviour points.  
 
Attendance continues to be good but we did have a chal enging year in terms of il ness and the 
number of weeks in the school year that students (and staff) continued to be significantly unwel . 
Overal  attendance for the year (removing year 11 once their examination season had started) was 
95%. Further work is needed with our KS4 year groups to improve this overal  figure; they did not 
have the benefit of new attendance systems when they joined the school and, therefore, as year 
groups their attendance fel  short of 95%. There were some improvements in the attendance of 
disadvantaged students but this remains an area of focus for us in the coming year. 
 
Analysis of attitude to learning data identify a number of priorities including a reduction in the 
number of 3s awarded across al  year groups especial y in years 9, 10 and 11. Fewer than 12% of 
grades awarded were a 3 in years 7 and 8 but in years 9 upwards this rose to just under 15% in 
year 9 and up to almost 19% in year 11. The other area for improvement relates to our 
disadvantaged cohort whose percentage of ATL 1 is significantly lower than for non-disadvantaged 
across al  year groups, by over 10% in al  year groups. 
 

Progress and impact: 
 
Our new system for awarding achievement and behaviour points provided us with much more data 
which enabled us to work with students who were causing particular concern last year. The most 
notable success was from a targeted group of year 7 and 8 students, mainly boys, who were able 
to reduce the number of behaviour points they col ecting in response to a rewards system. The 
scheme was extended throughout the remainder of the year as student feedback was so positive 
therefore we were able to reward more students. This year we have introduced badges in each 
key stage to recognise students whose scores for achievement points minus behaviour points are 
high. Consideration of attendance and punctuality is also given to those chosen to receive badges. 
 
Two year ago we introduced a new attendance strategy and attempted to change the mind-set of 
both parents and and students in relation to absence from school. Evidence of the impact is clear 
within years 7 and 8 who benefited from this as their attendance, as individual year groups, last 
year was over 1% higher than students in the upper year groups.  
 
Attitude to learning data showed an overal  improvement from the first data col ection point in the 
Autumn Term to the final one in the Summer. Particular improvements were seen in the number of 
1s awarded to students in years 7 and 9 which rose by around 10% in both years groups. Rises of 
7% were seen in years 7 and 10, also very positive, and year 11 also saw an improvement albeit 
smal er.  
 
We have recently introduced a new electronic system in to monitor our safeguarding concerns. 
The new system is al owing us to monitor concerns more closely and ensures the whole DP team 
of six col eagues are able to view every concern and every update to these as they occur. This 
enables us to work more col aboratively and provides added security that if a DP is absent, any 
one of us could pick up a concern and demonstrate detailed knowledge of it. A local authority audit 
of our Safeguarding provision in the summer of 2018 found our procedures to be strong and 
robust. 
 
In January of 2018 we achieved an award for our Careers Education, Information, Advice and 
Guidance which recognised the quality of our provision and plans for the future. Our PSHE 
curriculum has been renamed ‘Learning for Life and Work’ (LLW) restructured into three strands 
with strand leaders having reviewed our previous provision in each of their areas. Staff have 
received training prior to delivery of their strand and this is already having an impact in the quality 
of teaching and learning seen during recent informal observations. 
 
Whilst the introduction of a new school uniform was only compulsory for the new year 7 cohort, the 
numbers of students in older year groups wearing the new uniform has increased dramatical y 
since the start of term. Student and parent feedback, and that from our community has been 
overwhelmingly positive and we have only had to work with a very smal  number of parents to 
ensure students are complying with our expectations. The number of students being spoken to in 

relation to negative behaviour on learning walks by senior staff has decreased compared to last 
year which we believe is, at least in part, related to the new smarter look. 
Self-evaluation grade: 2 
Priorities: 
a.    Effective safeguarding practices. 
b.    Impeccable behaviour demonstrated within classrooms and corridors by al  students  
c.    High levels of attendance and punctuality by al  students. 
d.    Positive student wel -being. 
e.    Highly effective CEIAG which ensures no student becomes NEET post-16 or post-18. 
f.     Al  students wear the uniform with pride. 
g.    Effective PSHE through our Learning for Life and Work programme. 
h.   High attitude to learning grades  
 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Outcomes & Achievement 
Key Challenges: 
 
Not al  students in al  subjects, e
  special y a
  cross the ‘open bucket’ subjects in Key S
  tage 4
  , make 
consistently  strong  progress,  nor  develop  secure  knowledge,  understanding  and  skil s, 
considering their different starting points. This has been an ongoing priority. Our work during t he 
2017/18 academic year significantly  improved outcomes within this element as e
  videnced b
  y a
  n 
improved  P8  figure  of  -0.14,  from  -0.46  in  2017.  Indeed,  the  Key  Stage  4  Curriculum  Review 
implemented  for  2018  ensured  that  students  now  receive  enhanced  advice,  information  and 
guidance  in  making  their  Key  Stage  4  subject  preferences  and  the  Review  also  facilitated 
subjects  more  curriculum  time  to  teach  the  more  rigorous  9-1  Key  Stage  4 qualifications. The 
move  to  embrace  a  knowledge-rich  curriculum  should  also,  in  turn,  support  improved  progress 
and a
  ttainment in t hese s
  ubject a
  reas b
  y ensuring students are e
  quipped w
  ith t he s
  ubstantive a
  nd 
disciplinary knowledge in each subject area as the curriculum is sequenced t o al ow t his learning 
to be embedded.  
 
Currently, not al s
  tudents m
  ake outstanding p
  rogress f rom t heir g
  iven s
  tarting p
  oints. A
  s our m
  ost 
recent  Ofsted  report  commented,  Leaders  have  ensured  ‘that  teachers prioritise disadvantaged 
pupils  within  lessons,  when  asking  questions  or  providing  feedback’.  However,  the  same 
document  referenced  the  fact  that  ‘disadvantaged pupils made too little progress overal  in both 
2016  and  2017’.  While  some  progress  was  made  with  disadvantaged  attainment  in  2018,  the 
progress  of  students designated as PPI or SEN does not yet match that of other pupils with the 
same starting points. In addition, the progress and attainment of b
  oys continues t o b
  e a f ocus f or 
Longsands  Academy  in  2018  (girls’  P8  =  0.41,  boys  =  -0.22).  Final y,  we  wil   concentrate  on 
ensuring  that  students  from  al   bands  in  KS2  are  chal enged  to  make  more  than  expected 
progress,  most  notably  those  with  a  high  band  designation.  This  is  a  feature  of  our  more  able 
student focus (2018 P8 lower = -0.08, middle = 0.21, higher = 0.04). 
 
A key chal enge for KS3 this academic year is assessing and reporting progress.  It is our 
intention to adopt a new system of assessment, fol owing the removal of National Curriculum 
levels.  Whilst in this period of transition, Longsands has been continuing with ‘Longsands Levels’ 
which are a paral el grade system similar to NC levels. In conjunction with the Astrea data 
provided, plus MiDYIS and KS2 scores we wil  be finalising and adopting a new KS3 assessment 
system this academic year.  We aim to have the new system in place for September 2019, and 
embedded within al  SoL in al  departments.  We want to ensure that we can monitor and 
establish the progress of al  students in KS3 in a robust manner. 
  

Progress and impact: 
 
Outcomes  are  good  because,  in  2018,  KS4  results  outperformed  national  averages  in  a 
significant  number  of subject areas. Moreover, from different starting points, progress in English 
and  in  mathematics  is  close  to  or  above  national  figures.  At  grades 9-4 or A*-C these subjects 
included  Biology  (91.7%  v  74.8%),  Child  Development  (69.4%  v  53.4%),  Drama  (75%  v  74%), 
English Language (71.7% v 62%), F
  rench (
  84.8% v
  6
  9.7%), M
  aths (
  73% v
  5
  9.7%), Further M
  aths 
(96.6% v 95.5%), Media Studies (71.4% v 64.6%), Music (80% v 74.7%), Photography (92.3% v 
74.8%), Physics (92.6% v 9
  0.6%) a
  nd R
  E (
  76.7% v
  7
  1.8).  At g
  rades 9
  -5, t hese s
  ubjects i ncluded 
English  Language  (53.1%  v  44.6%),  French  (63.6%  v  54.1%),  History  (53.2% v 51.9%), Maths 
(47.7% v 40.3%), Photography (65.4% v 58%) and RE (68.3% v 60.4).  Final y, at grades 9-7 o
  r 
A*-A  these  subjects  included  English  Language  (15.7%  v  13.9%),  History  (28.3%  v  24.7%), 
Maths  (17.5%  v  15.7%),  Further  Maths  (72.4%  v  58%),  Photography  (23.1%  v 22.5%) and RE 
(30%  v  29.9%).  Although  comparison  with  previous  years  is  problematic,  this  builds  on  the 
positive  work  achieved  in  2017,  when  the  Key  Stage  4 results showed a significant increase in 
both  progress  and  attainment  for  students  at  Longsands  Academy.  In  2018,  our  Attainment  8 
figure  improved  to  46.84  whilst  the  number  of  students  achieving  a  positive  Progress  8  figure 
improved by 8.0%. As a result, our Progress 8 figure showed overal  improvement. 
 
A  key  line  of  line  of  enquiry  in  our  most  recent  Ofsted  report  was  to  establish  whether  our 
students,  particularly  the  most  able,  complete  work  that  is  suitably  chal enging.  In  2018,  a 
particularly pleasing a
  spect of t he o
  utcomes was the attainment of o
  ur more able s
  tudents. This is 
evidenced by the f act that 2
  0.9% o
  f a
  l  grades for t he 9
  -1 q
  ualifications w
  ere 9
  -7, c
  ompared t o the 
aspirational FFTD20 target of 21%. Going forward, we wil  continue to ensure that our m
  ost a
  ble 
students are receiving the support they need to reach their ful p
  otential. T
  his w
  ork w
  il b
  e f urther 
supported throughout the Academy by the work of our newly appointment More Able Champion.  
 
The  2018  results  again  confirmed  the  strong  progress,  developing  secure  knowledge, 
understanding  and  skil s  of  students with regards to their progress and attainment in Maths and 
English.  10%  (target  10.4%)  of  students  achieved  grades  9-7  in  English and Maths and 42.3% 
(target 47.3%) of students achieved grades 9-5 in English and Maths. 
 
The accuracy of teacher p
  redictions has i mproved across a
  h
  ost o
  f s
  ubject a
  reas and in 2018  the 
Academy  outcomes  for 5A*CEM (5+) of 40.9% was nearly in line with predictions (42.7%). With 
the benefit of increased knowledge of grade boundaries for new 9-1 G
  CSE q
  ualifications, further 
improving  the  accuracy  of  our  forecasts  to  improve  targeted  interventions  a  key  area  of 
development in 2018. 
 
Students  make  consistently  strong  progress  in  a  wide  range  of  subjects across al  year groups 
based  on  their  starting  points.  Al   students  are  tracked  across  in  terms  of  their  progress  and 
attainment  during  Key  Stage  4.  The  designation  of  each  student  is  checked  and  a  report 
published  for  each  year  group  after  each  progress  review.  Subject  teams  are  required  to 

moderate  al   data  col ection  and  where  appropriate  benchmark  data  against  national  grade 
boundaries.  This  data  is  shared  across  the  SLT  and  the  subject  leaders.  Where 
underperformance  is  identified,  interventions  are  put  in  place  to  support  accelerated  progress. 
This  process  was  further  strengthened  in  2018  with  the  introduction  of  designated  Raising 
Standards  Leader  Meetings  which  sought  to  identify  the  strengths  and  areas  of  improvement 
needed for targeted students in order to improve their a
  ttainment a
  nd p
  rogress. T
  hese m
  easures 
were  positive  feature  of our recent Ofsted inspection, which commented, ‘Teachers are tracking 
these pupils’ progress very careful y; subject and senior leaders are w
  orking together t o review i t 
and  plan  appropriate  support  for  pupils  who  need  it.  This  approach  is  starting  to  remove  the 
barriers to pupils’ learning, particularly at Key Stage 4’. 
 
Key Stage 3 
  
Students in al  Key Stage 3 year groups have now sat the KS2 exams under the new assessment 
system, therefore using NC assessments means that it is difficult to track progress with 
confidence and with any meaning. Equal y, this causes confusion for parents and students who 
are now familiar with the new KS2 assessments. The process of conversion to a more effective 
system has started with Years 7 & 9 having sat MiDYIS tests with Year 8 soon to be completed. 
 
MiDYIS - initial analysis of Year 7 results: 
 
-
15 students are identified as being in the top 2% national y as ‘gifted’ (score over 130) 
-
215+ students are identified as being at or above average, with a mean score of 100 
-
18 students are identified as being below average (score below 90) 
  
The use of baseline testing for Year 7 students was discussed at the first TL3 meeting (teaching 
and learning representatives from each department, with a focus for KS3) during last academic 
year. For subjects not taught and/or tested at KS2 it was agreed that these baseline tests were 
vital to gain a clearer view of what knowledge students had at the start of KS3. The most able, 
gender groups, PPI and disadvantaged students wil  continue to be areas of focus as part of the 
analysis completed on progress and attainment. 
  
TL3 wil  continue to build upon the work completed in the previous year, in particular looking at 
the new assessment system and current SoL and our commitment to a knowledge-rich 
curriculum. The work completed in the summer term, in creating cross-curricular lessons 
delivered to the visiting Year 6 students, were knowledge by students and feeder staff as being 
rich and chal enging. This wil  continue to be an item for discussion at future TL3 meetings 
alongside the consideration to map the KS3 curriculum to ensure rigour, enrichment and progress 
for al . 
 
 
 



Summary of progress for 2017-18: 
 
Students are tracked through each Progress Review, with SLT, HoY and HoD analysing and 
evaluating attainment and progress. In addition, the PPI coordinator for KS3 supports with 
interventions fol owing each data drop. Student making least or no progress across a range of 
subjects, are monitored by the relevant HoY who wil  liaise with al  relevant stakeholders. 
 
Note:   
39 = NC level 6 
33 = NC level 5 
27 = NC level 4 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 

Self-evaluation grade: 2 
Priorities: 
a.  Achievement in Year 11 shows a P8 figure of +0.3 in summer 2019 with Basics 9-5 of 
50%. 
b.  Achieve a Basics figure of 35% for disadvantaged Year 11 students. 
c.  Reduce variance between the attainment and progress of key groups al owing al  
students the same chance of success.. 
d.   Meaningful KS3 assessment and monitoring which effectively tracks students’ 
progress. 
e.  Al  students, in al  subjects, have demonstrated progress in their learning by the end 
of each academic year in Years 7-9.