This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Protection from governmental abuse and oppression.'.

 
What are my Human Rights and how are they protected? 
 
Human rights are the basic rights and freedoms that belong to every person in the 
world simply because they are human.  You have human rights regardless of where 
you are from, how old you are, what you believe, or how you choose to live your life. 
 
Your rights cannot be taken away, though they can sometimes be restricted for 
particular reasons – for example if a person breaks the law, or in the interests of 
national security, or to protect other people's rights and freedoms.  
 
Human rights are protected by international law, such as United Nations treaties, and 
by national law. Your rights can be grouped into two categories, though neither is 
more important than the other: 
 
"Civil and political" rights, such as: 
  the right to life 
  the right to a fair trial  
  the right to privacy 
  the right to vote  
  freedom of expression  
  freedom of religion or conscience  
  freedom of assembly  
  freedom from torture, inhuman or degrading treatment and slavery  
 
In Scotland civil and political rights are protected by the Scotland Act 1998 and the 
Human Rights Act 1998. The Scotland Act means that all laws passed by the 
Scottish Parliament and all actions of Scottish Ministers must be compatible with the 
European Convention on Human Rights. The Human Rights Act brings the European 
Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) into domestic law, which means that all public 
authorities must respect and protect your rights, and enables courts in the UK to 
hear cases about alleged breaches of human rights. For more information on the 
ECHR please see http://www.coe.int/en/web/human-rights-convention  
 
"Economic, social and cultural" rights, such as: 
  the right to an adequate standard of living  
  the right to the highest possible standard of physical and mental health 
  the right to education  
  the right to work and to decent working conditions 
  the right to social security 
  the right to participate in cultural life and to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress 
 
Scotland, via the UK, is signed up to 7 core UN human rights treaties, including the 
International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, which contains the 
above rights.  The UK has made a formal commitment to honour these treaties and 
both the UK and Scottish Governments must uphold the rights contained in them. 
The UK's progress on its human rights obligations is monitored by International and 
European organisations. 
 
 

 

 
How to get advice on Human Rights or report a possible 
breach of your rights 
 
Advice services and other human rights groups can give free advice to help you 
work out what to do. 
 
You can get independent advice from Citizens Advice Bureaux across Scotland in 
person or via Citizens Advice Scotland 
https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/scotland/about-us/get-advice-s/ 
Write:  Brunswick House, 51 Wilson Street, Glasgow G1 1UZ 
Call:   Freephone 0808 800 9060 
Email: xxxx@xxxxxx.xxxx  
 
The Equality Advisory Support Service can give information and advice about 
discrimination or human rights issues https://www.equalityadvisoryservice.com/  
Write:  FREEPOST EASS HELPLINE FPN6521 
Call:  Freephone 0808 800 0082 
Email: via ‘contact us’ enquiry form on website 
 
The Scottish Independent Advocacy Alliance can help you find a local advocacy 
service that may be able to help you and speak up for you if you are disadvantaged 
by your situation or condition http://www.siaa.org.uk/ 
Write:  Mansfield Traquair Centre, 15 Mansfield Place, Edinburgh EH3 6BB  
Call:   0131 524 1975 
Email: xxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx  
 
Human rights groups are often charities that have nothing to do with the 
government or any other public bodies, so can give free, independent information, 
help or advice. Some of the groups that might be able to help are:  
 
  Liberty https://www.liberty-human-rights.org.uk/get-advice  020 3145 0461 
  Amnesty International  https://www.amnesty.org.uk/issue/scotland  0131 718 
6076 xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xx  
  Scottish Human Rights Commission (cannot provide advice but can signpost to 
specific organisations that can) http://www.scottishhumanrights.com/help-advice/  
0131 297 5750 xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx  
  Equality and Human Rights Commission (advice and guidance online only) 
https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/advice-and-guidance  
 
You can also seek support and assistance from your local members of both the 
Scottish Parliament and the UK Parliament. They are able to raise matters on your 
behalf with relevant public bodies or UK government departments.  Further 
information can be found at: 
http://www.parliament.scot/msps.aspx and http://www.parliament.uk/mps-lords-and-
offices/mps/.
 
 
 
 
 


 

 
Legal Advice 
 
The bodies referred to above cannot provide legal advice. If you need expert legal 
advice you should consult a qualified solicitor. The Law Society of Scotland 
(http://www.lawscot.org.uk/) can help you find a solicitor or organisation to give legal 
advice about human rights issues in your particular situation.  
Write:  Atria One, 144 Morrison Street, Edinburgh EH3 8EX 
Call:  0131 226 7411 
Email: xxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xx  
 
The Scottish Legal Aid Board can give information on legal aid to pay for a 
solicitor’s time. 
 
Write:  Thistle House, 91 Haymarket Terrace, Edinburgh EH12 5HE 
Call:  0131 226 7061 Main switchboard  
 
0845 122 8686 Legal Aid information line 
Email: xxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx  
 
Alternatively, a community law centre might be able to assist you. Law centres are 
charities that aim to tackle the unmet legal needs of those in poverty and 
disadvantage in areas including social welfare and housing law, debt, immigration, 
rights of victims, education law, and discrimination law. Further information can be 
found through the Scottish Association of Law Centres 
(http://www.govanlc.com/salc). 
 
The Scottish Legal Services Agency focuses on the rights of people who are 
disadvantaged through mental illness, dementia, vulnerability resulting from youth or 
old age, poverty, debt and threatened homelessness. It has offices in Edinburgh, 
Glasgow and Greenock (http://www.lsa.org.uk/) 
 
Write:  Legal Services Agency Ltd, Fleming House, 134 Renfrew Street, Glasgow, 
G3 6ST 
Call:  0141 353 3354 
Email: xxx@xxxxxxxxx.xxx 
 
The  Scottish Child Law Centre provides free legal advice for, and about, children 
(http://www.sclc.org.uk/) 
 
Write:  Scottish Child Law Centre, 54 East Crosscauseway, Edinburgh, EH8 9HD   
Call:   Advice Line Mon-Fri 9.30am-4.00pm T. 0131 667 6333  
 
Freecall Under 21s  (landlines) 0800 328 8970 (mobiles) 0300 3301421   
 
Admin Line 0131 668 4400  
Email: General enquiries: xxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx  
 
Legal advice: xxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx  
 
The Ethnic Minorities Law Centre (EMLC) specialises in immigration, asylum, 
employment, discrimination and human rights law. It provides legal advice and 
representation to ethnic minority individuals across Scotland – Glasgow 0141 204 
2888, Edinburgh 0131 229 2038 (http://emlc.org.uk/contact-us) 
 

 

 
Human rights abuses and crimes 
 
A lot of human rights abuses are also crimes. This includes things like assault or 
someone being sexist or racist to you in the street. In these cases you can report 
what's happened to the police. 
 
Some human rights abuses aren't matters for the police. These can include things 
such as being treated badly by: 
 
the Scottish Government 
 
British security services like MI5 
 
the NHS 
 
universities and colleges 
 
housing associations 
 
prisons 
 
local councils 
 
How to make a complaint 
 
Most of the time you can make a direct complaint to the public body that you believe 
has breached your human rights. Most public bodies should have a review process 
for complaints that is separate to the part you are making a complaint about - this 
means your complaint should be looked at without any bias. 
 
1. 
Police Scotland 
 
You should make your complaint to Police Scotland in the first instance using the 
online form https://www.scotland.police.uk/secureforms/police-complaints/  
 
If you are unsatisfied and wish your complaint (or handling of the complaint by Police 
Scotland) to be reviewed you can contact the Police Investigation & Review 
Commissioner (PIRC) http://pirc.scotland.gov.uk/how_to_request_a_review  
 
Write:  PIRC, Hamilton House, Hamilton Business Park, Caird Park, Hamilton  
 
ML3 0QA 
Call:  01698 542 900 
Email: xxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xxx.xx  
 
The PIRC does not have the power to review a complaint which suggests that a 
police organisation, officer or civilian staff member has committed a crime.  These 
complaints are considered by the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service.  
 
2. 
The Scottish Government 
 
If you feel that any of the Scottish Government's policies, staff or services have had 
an impact on your human rights, you can make a complaint. Find out more about 
making a complaint to the Scottish Government at 
http://www.gov.scot/Contacts/Have-Your-Say/Making-Complaints  
 
Write:  General Enquiries, St Andrew’s House, Regent Road, Edinburgh EH1 3DG 

 

 
Call:  0300 244 4000 
Email: xxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxxx 
 
3. 
Courts and Judiciary 
 
Information about complaining about the personal conduct of a judicial office 
holder
 can be found at http://www.scotland-judiciary.org.uk/15/0/Complaints-About-
Court-Judiciary 
 
 
Write: Judicial Office for Scotland, Parliament House, Edinburgh, EH1 1RQ 
Email: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
 
 
The Scottish Courts and Tribunals Service also has a complaints procedure: 
http://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/complaints/complaints-and-feedback 
 
Write:  SCTS, Saughton House, Broomhouse Drive, Edinburgh, EH11 3XD 
Call:  0131 444 3300 
Email: xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx  
 
4. 

MPs and MSPs 
 
The Office of the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards
 can consider 
complaints about breaches of the Code of Conduct or the Guide to the Rules for 
MPs.  
 
Write:  House of Commons, London SW1A 0AA 
Call:  020 7219 3738 
Email: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xx  
 
For all other complaints about MPs, please contact the chair of their political party. 
 
Guidance on making a complaint about an MSP is available on the Scottish 
Parliament website http://www.parliament.scot/abouttheparliament/74861.aspx. 
Different types of complaint are dealt with by different offices within the Parliament. 
 
5. 

NHS Scotland 
 
Often, the simplest way to make a complaint about any care you've received from 
the NHS is to make a direct complaint to any NHS staff member who is caring for 
you, such as a GP. If your complaint is about your GP or treatment you have 
received in an NHS hospital please contact your NHS Board 
http://www.scot.nhs.uk/organisations/  
 
 
6. 
Local councils 
 
You can make a complaint direct to your local council. Find contact details for your 
local council at https://www.gov.uk/find-local-council  
 
All councils should have a formal complaints procedure in place and there will be 
information about this on their website.  

 

 
 
7. 
Prisons 
 
You can contact the Scottish Prisons Service (SPS) to make a complaint if you feel: 
 
you've been treated badly while on a visit to a prison 
 
someone in your family is in prison and you feel they're being treated badly 
 
If you are an inmate and you want to make a complaint about your treatment in 
prison you should make a complaint to the staff at your prison. They can refer a 
complaint to the Scottish Prisons Service. 
 
How to raise a complaint to SPS: 
  If, after discussing your issue with a member of frontline staff, you remain 
dissatisfied with the response then you should write to a Senior Manager on a 
complaints form. In prisons this will usually mean the Governor and in SPS 
Headquarters this will mean the relevant Deputy Director.  
  Complaint forms are available in all SPS establishments at the main entrance 
and visitor waiting areas. 
  More information at 
http://www.sps.gov.uk/Families/ContactUsandComplaints/Families-Contact-Us-
and-Complaints.aspx 
 
 
Write: SPS Headquarters, Communications Branch, Room G20, Calton House,  
 
5 Redheughs Rigg, Edinburgh EH12 9HW  
Call:  0131 330 3500 
Email: xxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xxx.xx  
 
8. 
Housing associations, universities or colleges 
 
All housing associations, universities and colleges are regulated by law. This means 
they have to fairly review any complaint you make. You'll need to contact your 
individual housing association, university or college to make a complaint. 
 
If you're not happy with the response to your complaint 
 
If you made a complaint to a Scottish public service, and you don't feel their 
response was good enough, you can make a final stage complaint to the Scottish 
Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) https://www.spso.org.uk/how-complain-about-
public-service 
 
Write:  Freepost SPSO 
In person: Bridgeside House, 99 McDonald Road, Edinburgh EH7 4NS 
Call:  0800 377 7330 
Email:  via ‘contact us’ section on website https://www.spso.org.uk/contact-us  
 
The SPSO will decide whether a Scottish public service has dealt with your 
complaint fairly. You can make a complaint to the SPSO about: 
 
the Scottish Government 
 
the NHS 

 

 
 
universities and colleges 
 
housing associations 
 
prisons 
 
local councils 
 
The UK Ombudsman (https://www.ombudsman.org.uk/) reviews complaints about 
public bodies in the UK not listed above, including UK Government departments 
such as Border Force, the Home Office and HMRC. 
 
Legal Action 
 
Human rights cases can be heard in the Scottish courts.  
 
Individuals who are unable to obtain an effective remedy at a domestic level might 
be able to approach the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) in Strasbourg.  
The ECtHR applies and protects the rights and guarantees set out in the European 
Convention on Human Rights. The ECtHR will only consider an application if all 
other mechanisms, such as action in the Scottish courts, have been exhausted. 
 
If you are considering legal action you should seek professional advice from a 
solicitor as advised above.