This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Brookvale park Birmingham bird deaths'.



 
26 B0002 01 19
Animal and Plant Health Agency Shrewsbury 
Kendal Road, Harlescott, Shrewsbury. SY1 4HD 
Telephone: 03000 600023 
Email: xxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
 
Please click on the following link to access our online  
Submission service:  
https://www.animal-disease-testing.service.gov.uk 
 
26/EC 
APHA Ref. No.  26-B0002-01-19 
 
Sender's Ref. 
Not Given 
 
Previous Ref 
Not Given 
RSPCA (Birmingham) 
Owner 
N/A 
CPHH 
N/A 
Date Received 
02/01/2019 
 
Date of Sampling 
02/01/2019 
Case Vet 
Not Given 
 
Species / Breed 
Mixed Avian Species / Mixed Avian 
@rspca.org.uk 
Sex / Age 
Mixed / Adult 
cc:  
@apha.gov.uk 
Samples 
Animal Presented Dead x 5 
@apha.gov.uk 
Sub. Reason 
Diagnostic Casework 
 
 
 
 
REPORT 1 (PRELIMINARY) 
 
HISTORY 
 
Deaths of water birds were reported at Brookvale Park, Erdington, West Midlands, B23 7AG approximate grid 
reference SP09333 90993.  Approximately 20 to 30 birds were reported to have died over two weeks including 
three coots, one tufted duck, two Canada geese, one domestic type goose and the remainder Mute  swans.  
Birds have been found dead or been found weak with droopy wings leading to inability to fly and walk.  Some 
have been taken to RSPCA Wildlife Hospital and Vale Wildlife Hospital for treatment and some have died or 
been euthanased at the lake.  Botulism was suspected from the clinical signs.  The water level on the lake has 
been decreasing and the reason for this is being investigated.  Bird 1 was euthanased at Brookvale Park.  Bird 
4 had been hospitalised at the RSPCA on 27th  December and was euthanased on 30th  December.  An x-ray 
revealed several metallic particles in the gizzard and it was described as very ataxic.  Bird 5 was hospitalised at 
the RSPCA on 27th December and had a lead level of ‘>600’.  It died on 28th December. 
 
GENERAL OBSERVATIONS 
 

Identification 
Sex 
Age  
Weight 
Body 
Degree of 
Submitted 
(RSPCA ref) 
(kgs) 
Condition 
Autolysis 
Live/Dead/Frozen 
Bird 1: Mute swan 
Male 
Adult 
~8.5kg 
Fair to good 
Moderate 
Dead 
Bird 2: Canada goose 
Female 
Adult 
~4.5kg 
Good 
Moderate 
Dead 
Bird 3:  Coot 
Male 
Adult  
~0.5kg 
Good to fat 
Moderate 
Dead 
Bird 4: Mute swan 
Female 
Adult 
~7kg 
Good 
Moderate 
Dead 
Metal ring: ZY 8384 
(331276) 
Bird 5: Mute swan  
Male 
Adult 
~10kg 
Good 
Moderate to 
Dead 
(331278) 
severe 
 
 
NECROPSY FINDINGS 
 
Skin and subcutis and musculoskeletal system: 
 
Bird 1:  Well feathered with brown faecal staining around the tail and vent.  Pododermatitis with swelling and 
ulceration of the foot pads.   
No charges applied 
‡ - Test subcontracted; opinions given and interpretations of the result are outside the scope of UKAS accreditation. 
† - Not UKAS accredited; opinions given and interpretations of the result are outside the scope of UKAS accreditation. 
§ - Accredited under Flexible Scope. 
For further details of the test methods used, and other terms and conditions, please refer to the APHA Website. 

  
Page 1 of 3 
 

APHA Ref. No.  26-B0002-01-19 continued...  
Date Received : 02/01/2019 
REPORT 1 (PRELIMINARY) 
 
 
 
Bird 2:  Clean and well feathered carcase with a large amount of subcutaneous fat and well developed pectoral 
muscles. 
Bird 3:  Clean and well feathered carcase with a large amount of subcutaneous fat. 
Bird 4:  Pink material around the head and staining the feathers of the neck, drip set in left hind leg, brown 
faecal staining around the vent, metal ring present on left leg, a good amount of subcutaneous fat. 
Bird 5:  Well feathered with brown faecal staining around the vent.  A large amount of subcutaneous fat 
present. 
 
Peritoneal cavity: 
 
The gall bladder was full of bile in all birds with extensive enlargement in Bird 3, the coot. 
 
Alimentary system: 
 
Bird 1:  Corn/grain in the oropharynx and a small amount in the proventriculus.  Gritty material in the gizzard 
and soft brown intestinal contents. 
Bird 2:  The proventriculus was empty and there was gritty material in the gizzard.  Minimal lower intestinal 
contents, large amount of fat surrounding the lower intestines. 
Bird 3:  A small amount of gritty material in the gizzard, a large amount of fat surrounding the intestinal tract 
and minimal brown contents in the lower intestine. 
Bird 4:  Pink material in the oropharynx and oesophagus and pale fine sandy material in the gizzard with at 
least three small bits of metallic material approximately 4-5mm long, probably wiring.  Brown fluid and mucus in 
the gut with a few cestodes adherent to the lower intestinal tract mucosa. 
Bird 5:  Clear fluid in the upper oesophagus and accumulation of green plant material partially impacted in the 
lower two-thirds of the oesophagus and proventriculus.  The gizzard contained gritty material and there was 
pale brown fluid in the remainder of the intestinal tract which was relatively autolysed.   
 
Respiratory system: 
 
Bird 1:  A small amount of mucus was present in the trachea. 
Bird 5:  Marked autolysis with greying of the lung tissue. 
 
Cardiovascular system: 
 
Bird 5:  There was a slight increase in pericardial fluid. 
 
Lymphoreticular system: 
 
Bird 4:  Moderately enlarged spleen. 
 
Examination of the remaining systems was unremarkable apart from changes associated with autolysis. 
 
WORK IN PROGRESS 
 
Matrix (M) gene RRT-PCR - screening test for M gene of all influenza A viruses x 10 
 
COMMENTS 
 
Overall the birds were in relatively good bodily condition with good reserves of body fat but, apart from Bird 5, 
there was minimal food material in the intestinal tracts.  Bird 5 was recorded as having a lead level >600 
although I am not sure what the units are, I assume this was suspected to  be a case of lead poisoning.  
Impaction of the oesophagus with food material is often associated with lead poisoning. 
 
The clinical history of lack of obvious gross lesions in the others is suggestive of avian botulism.  We will initially 
screen for avian influenza and consider further testing when that is complete.   
 
I understand that there are concerns about the low water level in Brookvale Park and also there may still be 
carcase remains around the edge of the lake particularly on the island which would be a good source of toxin.  I 
enclose a link to information about avian botulism, one of the key principles in the early stages is to remove all 
carcase material and rotting organic material and improve the water quality.  I would be interested to receive 
 
Page 2 of 3 
 

APHA Ref. No.  26-B0002-01-19 continued...  
Date Received : 02/01/2019 
REPORT 1 (PRELIMINARY) 
 
 
 
further information about how this is progressing and discuss clinical findings in the live birds at the RSPCA 
Hospital.   
 
http://apha.defra.gov.uk/documents/surveillance/diseases/avian-botulism.pdf 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 BVSc MSc MRCVS 
Veterinary Investigation Officer 
04/01/2019 
 
Page 3 of 3