This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Queensbury Tunnel'.


   
Sam Buckmaster 
GROUP PROPERTY 
CORPORATE FINANCE 
 
DEPARTMENT FOR TRANSPORT 
G
 
REAT MINSTER HOUSE 
33 HORSEFERRY ROAD 
 
LONDON SW1P 4DR 
 
 
Web Site: www.dft.gov.uk 
 
 
 
03 July 2019 
 
Graeme Bickerdike  
 
D
  ear Mr Bickerdike, 
 
Freedom of Information Act Request - F0017102 
 
Thank you for your information request of 11 February 2019. You requested the fol owing 
information: 
 
  copies of all emails (inc attachments), letters, reports and other 
documentation etc sent to/from/within the DfT since 1st July 2018 relating to 
Queensbury Tunnel 
 
  all available information/documentation regarding the lease (now forfeited) of 
land at the south-west end of Queensbury Tunnel on which a pumping 
station is sited, including arrangements/responsibilities for the annual 
payment of rent. 
 
As we advised in the letters of 22 May and 31 May, we were assessing the extent to 
which disclosure of the information requested would prejudice the commercial interests of 
a third party. The volume of the emails to be considered resulted in our review taking 
longer than expected. We have now concluded that consideration and we are now in a 
position to respond.  
 
Your request has been considered under the Freedom of Information Act 2000. 
 
Copies of all emails (inc attachments), letters, reports and other documentation etc 
sent to/from/within the DfT since 1st July 2018 relating to Queensbury Tunnel 
 
Copies of emails (including attachments), letters and reports etc sent to or from the DfT 
since 1 July 2018 to 10 February 2019 relating to the Queensbury Tunnel that are being 
disclosed are attached at Annex A to this letter.  
 
The emails attached at Annex A (including attachments) do not include the names and 
direct contact details of individuals who are at grades below the Senior Civil Service. They 
have been removed in reliance on the third party personal information exemption at 
sections 40(2) and 40(3A) of the FOIA. They are not in public facing roles and therefore 
have a reasonable expectation that their names and direct contact details wil  not be put 
into the public domain. It would be unfair for us to disclose their details and would 
contravene current data protection legislation. This is an absolute exemption and is not 
subject to a public interest test. The relevant extract of the section 40 exemption is 
included at Annex B to this letter.  
  

   
 
In addition, we have decided that some of the information held by the Department (within 
this part of the request) should not be disclosed in reliance on the exemptions under 
section 35(1)(a) (formulation of Government policy), section 43(2) (commercial interests) 
and section 42(1) (legal professional privilege) of the Freedom of Information Act.  
 
In applying these qualified exemptions, we have had to balance the public interest in 
withholding the information against the public interest in disclosure. Annexes C to E to 
this letter set out the exemptions in full and details why on balance the public interest test 
favours withholding the information.  
 
All available information/documentation regarding the lease (now forfeited) of land 
at the south-west end of Queensbury Tunnel on which a pumping station is sited, 
including arrangements/responsibilities for the annual payment of rent. 
 
In terms of this part of your request relating to lease of land at the south-west end of 
Queensbury Tunnel, the Department for Transport does not hold any information in 
addition to the information that has been withheld or has already been disclosed to you 
either in this letter or in previous letters. As we have previously advised, the Department 
for Transport is a federated organisation and it has delegated responsibility to Highways 
England for the management of the Historic Railways Estate, comprising 3,400 tunnels 
(including the Queensbury Tunnel), viaducts, bridges and similar properties associated 
with closed railway lines throughout England, Scotland and Wales. In accordance with 
that delegation and the agreed protocol for the management of the Historic Railways 
Estate the Department relies on the professional expertise of Highways England.  
 
The Department has considered a number of similar requests from you on the matter of 
the Queensbury Tunnel.  You should therefore note that in the future, if similar requests 
are received the Department wil  consider whether it is appropriate to refuse them as 
vexatious under section 14 of the FoI Act. Please note that if you were to submit similar 
requests in the future the Department would refuse them under section 14 of the FoI Act if 
we consider the request to be vexatious.  
 
Section 14(1) of the FoI Act states that the Department is not obliged to comply with a 
request that is vexatious. In considering the request for information we will review the 
Information Commissioner’s Office guidance in respect of determining vexatious requests 
which is set out on pages 7 to 9 of the following link:  
 
https://ico.org.uk/media/1198/dealing-with-vexatious-requests.pdf   
 
The request does not have to meet al  of the outlined indicators in order to be determined 
as vexatious.  
 
Please be aware that under section 17(6) of the FOI Act, the Department is not obliged to 
issue a refusal notice to future requests you may make if we consider those further 
requests to be vexatious. 
 
If you are unhappy with the way the Department has handled your request or with the 
decisions made in relation to your request you may complain within two calendar months 
of the date of this letter by writing to the Department’s FOI Advice Team at: 
  

   
 
Zone D/04 
Ashdown House 
Sedlescombe Road North 
Hastings 
East Sussex TN37 7GA 
E-mail: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx     
 
Please send or copy any fol ow-up correspondence relating to this request to the FOI 
Advice Team to help ensure that it receives prompt attention. Please remember to quote 
the reference number above in any future communications. 
 
Please see attached details of DfT’s complaints procedure and your right to complain to 
the Information Commissioner. 
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
Sam Buckmaster 
 
  

   
Your right to complain to DfT and the Information 
Commissioner 
 
You have the right to complain within two calendar months of the date of this letter about 
the way in which your request for information was handled and/or about the decision not 
to disclose al  or part of the information requested. In addition a complaint can be made 
that DfT has not complied with its FOI publication scheme. 
 
Your complaint wil  be acknowledged and you will be advised of a target date by which to 
expect a response. Initial y your complaint wil  be re-considered by the official who dealt 
with your request for information. If, after careful consideration, that official decides that 
his/her decision was correct, your complaint wil  automatical y be referred to a senior 
independent official who wil  conduct a further review. You wil  be advised of the outcome 
of your complaint and if a decision is taken to disclose information original y withheld this 
wil  be done as soon as possible.  
 
If you are not content with the outcome of the internal review, you have the right to apply 
directly to the Information Commissioner for a decision. The Information Commissioner 
can be contacted at: 
  
Information Commissioner’s Office  
Wycliffe House  
Water Lane 
Wilmslow 
Cheshire 
SK9 5AF 
 
 
 
  

   
Annex A 
See pdf file of correspondence. 
 
 
 
 
  

   
 
Annex B – Extract – Section 40 Personal Information Exemption. 
 
(2) Any information to which a request for information relates is also exempt 
information if— 
 
(a) it constitutes personal data which does not fall within subsection (1), and 
 
(b) the first, second or third condition below is satisfied. 
 
(3A) The first condition is that the disclosure of the information to a member 
of the public otherwise than under this Act— 
 
(a) would contravene any of the data protection principles, or 
 
(b) would do so if the exemptions in section 24(1) of the Data Protection Act 
2018 (manual unstructured data held by public authorities) were 
disregarded. 
 
(3B) The second condition is that the disclosure of the information to a 
member of the public otherwise than under this Act would contravene 
Article 21 of the GDPR (general processing: right to object to processing). 
 
(4A) The third condition is that— 
 
(a) on a request under Article 15(1) of the GDPR (general processing: right 
of access by the data subject) for access to personal data, the information 
would be withheld in reliance on provision made by or under section 15, 16 
or 26 of, or Schedule 2, 3 or 4 to, the Data Protection Act 2018, or 
 
(b) on a request under section 45(1)(b) of that Act (law enforcement 
processing: right of access by the data subject), the information would be 
withheld in reliance on subsection (4) of that section. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  

   
 
Annex C  
 
Exemption in full 
Section 43(2) exempts information whose disclosure would, or would be likely to 
prejudice the commercial interests of any person 
 (including DfT). 
 
Public interest test factors for 
Public interest test factors against 
disclosure 
disclosure 
There is a strong presumption in the 
Disclosing commercial y sensitive 
openness in the disclosure of information 
information would affect the competitive 
being in the general public interest. 
position of the Department for Transport. It 
 
would place the Department at a 
Disclosure of information al ows the public  commercial disadvantage as disclosure of 
to be informed of the activities being 
information fal ing within the request would 
carried and provides more opportunity for 
reduce its ability to negotiate effectively 
public involvement in that decision making  future legal rates and thus affect its 
process. 
competitiveness to operate in a 
 
commercial environment if it is publicly 
It enables the public to be better informed 
known how much the Department was 
and thus able to scrutinise the expenditure  prepared to pay. 
of public monies. 
 
 
Disclosure of the commercial y sensitive 
Transparency of information held by the 
information would prejudice the 
Department for Transport. Greater 
commercial interest of the Department in 
transparency makes government more 
that it would give potential bidders an 
accountable to the electorate and 
unfair advantage in terms of the level at 
increases trust. 
which to pitch their bid. The Department 
 
would therefore lose its ability to fully test 
 
and challenge the bids being tendered so 
as to obtain value for money which would 
mean the public purse was not protected 
and would result in a loss to the taxpayer. 
 
Disclosure of the commercial y sensitive  
information would also prejudice the 
commercial interests of third party 
suppliers as it would give competitors an 
unfair advantage in future retendering and 
in the placement of bids. This would have 
an adverse impact on that party and affect 
its ability to compete effectively. 
 
Disclosure of the commercial y sensitive 
information would further threaten the 
commercial interests of a third party as it 
wil  effectively place their rates in the 
  

   
public domain. It would therefore affect 
that party’s wider commercial position in 
that its ability to negotiate effective rates 
would be reduced. 
Decision 
 
In the circumstances of this case, to disclose the requested information would prejudice 
the commercial interests of both the Department for Transport, the incumbent supplier 
and also of third party suppliers. Disclosure would reduce the Department’s ability to 
test and challenge bids in a future tendering exercise.  It would therefore mean that the 
Department would be hampered in securing value for money from such future 
procurement exercises. The Department would be prevented from ensuring the public 
purse was appropriately protected which would not be in the public interest of the 
taxpayers. The balance of the public interest test is therefore in favour of withholding 
the requested information under Section 43(2) of the Freedom of Information Act. 
 
 
 
 
  

   
 
Annex D 
 
Exemption in full 
 
 
 
Section 35: Formulation of government policy   
  
(1) Information held by a government department or by the national assembly for 
Wales is exempt info if it relates to-   
  
(a) The formulation or development of government policy   
 
Public interest test factors for 
Public interest test factors against 
disclosure 
disclosure 
 
 
 
 
Disclosure of the correspondence would 
The policy consideration of the action to 
al ow the individual, and the public at 
be taken in relation to the Queensbury 
large to see what is being considered 
tunnel is being explored and developed 
and al ow them to contribute to the policy  and is subject to on-going Ministerial 
making process. 
consideration.  
 
 
As public knowledge of the way in which  The disclosure of correspondence 
the government works increases, the 
relating to the formulation and 
public contribution to the policy making 
development of policy concerning the 
process could become more effective.  
Queensbury tunnel wil  inhibit 
 
discussions, as officials will be reluctant 
Disclosure of the correspondence which 
to provide views and opinions if they 
has only been sent to a limited number 
were routinely disclosed. The 
of recipients would contribute to the 
Queensbury tunnel is subject to local 
government’s wider transparency 
concern and debate regarding its 
agenda. 
potential use at a local level. Officials 
  
need to have a safe space to discuss all 
  
options freely and candidly without 
  
interference.  
 
It is in the public interest that Ministers 
and officials have a safe space in which 
to formulate and develop policy on the 
Queensbury tunnel so that the 
Department’s decision making is based 
on the best advice available and a full 
consideration of al  the options 
associated with the future of this 
structure. 
 
There is a risk that Ministers will require 
further consideration of matters 
  

   
associated with future management and 
use of Queensbury tunnel and this may 
need input from stakeholders and other 
representatives. If such information and 
advice was routinely made public there is 
a risk that officials could come under 
political or public pressure not to 
challenge ideas in the formulation of 
policy, thus leading to poorer decision 
making. Clearly this would not be in the 
public interest. 
 
Ministers and officials need to be able to 
conduct rigorous assessments on any 
future policy including considerations of 
the pros and cons of any proposal 
associated with the future management 
and use of Queensbury Tunnel without 
there being premature disclosure which 
might close off better options. 
 
The quality of the formulation and 
development of future government policy 
should not be put at risk of it, or the 
information informing it, having to be 
presented in any particular way were it to 
be the subject of scrutiny. 
 
Decision  
 
Ministers and officials need to be able to conduct rigorous assessment on any future 
policy concerning the management and use of Queensbury Tunnel without the risk of 
the information being prematurely disclosed, which might close off better options. 
This information is being withheld as on balance the factors for withholding this 
information outweighs the factors for releasing it.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  

   
Annex E 
 
Exemption in full 
 
 
 
42. - (1) Information in respect of which a claim to legal professional privilege or, in 
Scotland, to confidentiality of communications could be maintained in legal 
proceedings is exempt information. 
 
(2)The duty to confirm or deny does not arise if, or to the extent that, compliance with 
section 1(1)(a) would involve the disclosure of any information (whether or not 
already recorded) in respect of which such a claim could be maintained in legal 
proceedings. 
Public interest test factors for 
Public interest test factors against 
disclosure 
disclosure 
 
 
 
 
Disclosure of the correspondence would 
Disclosure of the requested information 
al ow the individual, and the public at 
that is subject to privileged legal advice 
large to see what is being considered 
would have a significant potential to 
and al ow them to contribute to the 
prejudice the ability of the government to 
process. 
make sound policy decisions in relation 
 
to the Queensbury tunnel.  The 
As public knowledge of the way in which  government needs to ensure there is 
the government works increases, the 
frank and open discussion with its legal 
public contribution to the policy making 
advisers so that it can obtain and benefit 
process could become more effective.  
from the effective provision of legal 
 
advice.  
Disclosure of the correspondence which 
 
has only been sent to a limited number 
The information being requested relates 
of recipients would contribute to the 
to current litigationand disclosure of 
government’s wider transparency 
current legal y privileged communication 
agenda..  
would impede the Department in being 
  
able to progress the case.  
  
There is a strong public interest inherent 
  
in maintaining Legal Professional 
Privilege. Officials and lawyers have to 
be able to share all information that is 
available to them frankly and in 
confidence, to enable effective decision 
making based on the facts and an 
informed assessment of the legal risks.  It 
may be detrimental to future decision 
making and/or appropriate recording of 
legal advice if a precedent for disclosure 
is made.  Moreover, the Government’s 
position as compared with a private 
person who would be entitled to rely on 
  

   
legal professional privilege would be 
adversely affected. 
 
Decision  
 
The general public interest inherent in this exemption wil  always be strong due to 
the importance of the principle behind LPP: safeguarding openness in all 
communications between client and lawyer to ensure access to ful  and frank legal 
advice. This information is being withheld as on balance the factors for withholding 
this information outweighs the factors for releasing it.