This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Funding reports'.


Statement of Accounts
 
2017/18
Swansea Council l Cyngor Abertawe

CONTENTS
Introduction
3
Narrative Report
4
Expenditure and Funding Analysis
12
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement 
14
Group Income and Expenditure Statement
16
Movement in Reserves Statement
18
Group Movement in Reserves Statement
21
Balance Sheet
23
Group Balance Sheet 
25
Cash Flow Statement
27
Group Cash Flow Statement 
28
Notes to the Accounts & Significant Accounting Policies (including 
29
notes to the Group Financial Statements)
Housing Revenue Account Income and Expenditure Statement
147
Movement on the HRA Balance
149
Notes to the Housing Revenue Account
150
Chief Finance Officer's Certificate and Statement of Responsibilities 
154
for the Statement of Accounts
Auditor's Report to the City and County of Swansea
155
Draft Annual Governance Statement
158
Glossary of Terms
195
2




INTRODUCTION
Swansea Council is located on the South 
Wales Coast and is one of twenty two current 
unitary local authorities providing local 
government services in Wales.
The area of the Council includes the Gower 
peninsula, designated as Britain’s first area 
of outstanding natural beauty.
Approximately 244,500 people live within 
the boundaries of the Council of which:
- 42,000 are aged under 16
- 54,300 are of pensionable age
- 21,700 are aged 75 years and over
The County has a mixed agricultural and 
industrial economy. The City sits at the 
mouth of the River Tawe, from which its 
Welsh name, Abertawe, derives.
This Statement of Accounts is one of a 
number of publications, which include the 
revenue and capital budgets, produced to 
comply with the law and designed to 
provide information about the Council's
financial affairs.
Copies of these accounts can be obtained 
from:
Chief Finance Officer
Swansea Council
Guildhall
Swansea
SA1 4PE
3

NARRATIVE REPORT
The main elements of this Statement of Accounts comprise:-
∗     The Expenditure and Funding Analysis which shows how annual expenditure is 
used and funded from resources by the  Authority in comparison with those 
resources consumed or earned by the Authority in accordance with generally 
accepted accounting practices. It also shows how this expenditure is allocated for 
decision making purposes between the Council's directorates.
∗     The Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement, which shows the income
from, and spending on, Authority services for the year. It also shows how much
money we get from the Welsh Government, business ratepayers and Council
taxpayers together with the net deficit / surplus for the year.
∗     The Movement in Reserves Statement which shows the movement in the year on
the different reserves held by the Authority, analysed into ‘usable reserves’ (i.e.
those that can be applied to fund expenditure or reduce local taxation) and other
reserves. 
∗     The Balance Sheet, showing a snapshot of the Authority’s financial position at the
31st March 2018.
∗     The Cash Flow Statement, which shows transactions for the year on a cash basis
rather than on an accruals basis.
∗     The notes to the accounts, incorporating the main accounting policies which show
the basis on which we have prepared the accounts and the accounting principles
the Authority has adopted. The notes also offer further analysis of items appearing
in the main financial statements.
∗     The Housing Revenue Account (HRA) Income and Expenditure Statement, which
shows income from, and spending on, Council housing for the year. This account is
stated separately as required by statute although the overall results are
incorporated into the Authority’s Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement.
∗     The Group Accounts, which show the consolidated accounts of the Authority and its
group companies.
∗     The Certificate and Statement of Responsibilities of the Chief Finance Officer who
is the responsible officer for the production of the statement.
∗     The Annual Governance Statement, which gives an indication of the arrangements
for and effectiveness of internal control procedures within the Authority.
∗     The auditor’s opinion and certificate relating to the Statement of Accounts.
4

NARRATIVE REPORT
We incur two main types of expenditure – revenue expenditure and capital
expenditure
.
Revenue expenditure covers spending on the day to day costs of our services such as
staff salaries and wages, maintenance of buildings and general supplies and equipment.
This expenditure is paid for by the income we receive from Council taxpayers, business
ratepayers, the fees and charges made for certain services, and by the grants we receive
from Government.
Capital expenditure covers spending on assets such as roads, redevelopment and the
major renovation of buildings. These assets will provide benefits to the community for
several years and the expenditure is largely financed by borrowing, capital grants and the
sale of fixed assets. Amounts borrowed for capital purposes are repaid in part each year
as part of our revenue expenditure.
Sources of borrowing utilised include the Public Works Loan Board (PWLB) and capital
markets. The PWLB is a Government agency which provides longer-term loans to local
authorities.
5

NARRATIVE REPORT
Revenue spending in 2017/2018
£'m
%
Revenue support grant
231.2
29
Non domestic rates
79.5
9
Where our 
money 

Council tax (including 
109.2
14
comes from
Reduction Scheme)
Other income (rents, fees 
368.9
48
and charges, specific 
grants)
788.8
100
£'m
%
Employees
351.1
44 
Capital charges
37.8
5
What we spend it 
Running costs
373.0
47 
on
Precepts/Levies
32.8

Reserve 
-5.9
0
transfers
788.8
100 
£'m
%
Resources
135.6
17 
People - Poverty & 
19.3

Prevention
People - Social Services
159.3
20 
People - Education
227.4
29 
Place
188.6
24 
And the 
Housing Revenue Account 
36.8

services it 
(HRA)
provides
Reserve transfers
-5.9
0
Other
27.7

788.8
100 
6

NARRATIVE REPORT
Authority services
The revenue outturn position of the Authority for 2017/18 resulted in an increase in
expenditure on services of £3.567m compared to adjusted budget. In addition, the
revenue outturn position reflects a further £7.399m of one off expenditure on an
invest to save basis, that was partly met from the Authority's contingency and
restucturing funds primarily to fund early retirement and voluntary redundancy costs
as the Authority seeks to reduce its operating costs and adjust to reducing grant
levels. Consequently there was a need to draw £3m from the General Fund reserve.
The net overall overspend on Services reflects forecast and known pressures within
both Social Services and Resources budgets which have been partly reflected in
2018/19 budget proposals. 
Neither of these are sustainable in the longer term and ongoing review and action will 
follow.
Other budget variations
Other budget savings during the year arose from reductions in capital repayments
and interest charges (£3.071m) and increased income from Council Tax (£0.503m).
In line with the Council's agreed reserve policy, the whole capital financing
underspend has been transferred to a Capital equalisation reserve.
Housing Revenue Account
The Housing Revenue Account of the Authority is a ring fenced account dealing
exclusively with income and expenditure arising from the Authority's housing stock.
For 2017/18 there was a net decrease in HRA reserves at year end of £3.040m
(2016/17 net decrease £5.412m).
Details of the annual Revenue, Capital and HRA outturn reports can be found on the
agenda of the Council's Cabinet for the meeting on 19th July 2018.
7

NARRATIVE REPORT
Capital spending in 2017/2018
£'000
External borrowing
27,967
Government grants
20,167
Where our money comes 
Other grants/contributions
2,936
Capital receipts
5,459
Revenue and reserves
29,742
Financing of previous years
-57
86,214
£'000
What services we 
Resources
1,742
spend it on
Place Services
73,938
People Services
10,534
86,214
Some of the assets it 
provided

People Services
£'000
Place Services
£'000
Education
Housing (GF)
Housing Disabled Facilities 
Pentrehafod Comp remodelling
6,951
4,412
Grants
School capital maintenance
4,436
Sandfields Renewal Area
675
Place Services
Housing other grants/loans
1,371
Housing (HRA)
HRA British Iron & Steel 
789
Highways and Transportation
Federation Properties
HRA refurbishment (includes 
23,877
Carriageways & Footways
3,069
kitchens and bathrooms)
Local Transport Network fund 
HRA Adaptation works
2,912
1,010
schemes
Local Transport fund (Baldwins 
HRA Energy Efficiency
1,495
515
Bridge)
HRA Wind & Weatherproofing 
8,805
(includes Hi-rise flats)
HRA Regeneration
2,853
Other Services
HRA landscaping and 
2,512
3G pitch Penyrheol
646
enhancement
Other Buildings Capital 
HRA new build
1,718
997
Maintenance
Economic Development
Waste generating station
1,135
The Kingsway Urban Park
771
City Centre Redevelopment - 
2,304
Swansea Central Phase 1
8

NARRATIVE REPORT
The Authority maintains a number of provisions and reserves. Provisions are disclosed in
Note 23 on pages 101 and 102. The information regarding reserves are disclosed in the
Movement in Reserves Statement on pages 19 to 22 and Note 10 on page 65.
Provisions are amounts included in the accounts as liabilities where there has been a
past event which is likely to result in a financial liability but where there is uncertainty over
timing and the precise value of the liability that has been incurred. It is therefore the
Authority’s best estimate of the financial liability as at 31st March 2018.
The Council holds Earmarked Reserves for specific purposes, together with a level of
General Reserves which are available to support overall Council expenditure. However,
due to the nature, size and complexity of the Council's operations, and in particular the
potential for short term volatility in terms of elements of income and expenditure, it is
prudent to maintain a level of General Reserves sufficient to meet anticipated and known
financial risks.
At the end of the year, the Authority's revenue reserve balances amounted to £75.215m
(2016/17 £77.922m).
International Accounting Standard 19 Employee Benefits (IAS 19)
The Accounts comply with the requirements of the above standard in that they reflect in
the revenue accounts the current year cost of pension provision to employees as advised
by the Authority’s actuary. The Statements also contain, within the Balance Sheet, the
actuary’s assessment of the Authority’s share of the Pension Fund liability as at 31st
March 2018 and the reserve needed to fund that liability.
The pension fund liability that is disclosed within the Balance Sheet is the total projected
deficit that exists over the expected life of the fund. This deficit will change on an annual
basis dependent on the performance of investments and the actuarial assumptions that
are made in terms of current pensioners, deferred pensioners and current employees.
The fund is subject to a 3 yearly actuarial valuation which assesses the then state of the
pension fund and advises the various admitted bodies on the appropriate rate of
employers contributions that needs to be made in order to restore the fund to a balanced
position over a period of time. The contribution rate used in 2017/18 relates to the
valuation undertaken on 31st March 2016. 
The Local Government Pension Scheme is a statutory scheme and, as such, benefits
accruing under the scheme can only be changed by legislation. The Department for
Communities and Local Government legislated for a new scheme which commenced in
April 2014 which was designed to have a material and beneficial effect on the projected
cost of the scheme over future years.
9

NARRATIVE REPORT
Group Accounts
Group Accounts are prepared where Local Authorities have material interests in
subsidiaries, associated companies and joint ventures. Group Accounts have been
prepared to include the Swansea City Waste Disposal Company Limited, the National
Waterfront Museum and the Wales National Pool. The Group Accounts comprise the
Movement in Reserves Statement, the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement, the Balance Sheet, the Cash Flow Statement and associated disclosure
notes.
Changes in the form and content of the Statement
The Statement has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Practice on Local
Authority Accounting in the United Kingdom 2017/18. The code is published by the
Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA).
The Statement also complies with the requirements of the Accounts and Audit (Wales) 
(Amendment) Regulations 2018.
The Accounts and Audit (Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2018 that came into force 
on the 14th March 2018 removed the requirement to include a statement relating to 
pension funds administered by a local authority in the statement of accounts. The 
Swansea Council Pension Fund Accounts has therefore been removed from the 
Swansea Council Statement of Accounts. The Swansea Council Pension Fund 
Accounts are prepared and published in the Pension Fund Annual Report and 
Statement of Accounts.
Financial outlook for the Authority.
On 6th March 2018 the Authority approved a medium term financial plan which
highlighted potential revenue shortfalls rising from £24.1m in 2019/20 to £68.7m in
2021/22.
That report also contained a range of potential future savings options including
continued focus on a range of cross cutting reviews as the pace and scale of
transformative change needed to fit to forecast reducing real terms resources levels
intensifies. These include reviews of asset utilisation, increased commercialism and
continued transformative business support.
Notwithstanding the information contained within the medium term financial plan, it is
clear that the financial outlook for the Authority in terms of Central Government funding
and support for both Revenue and Capital expenditure is likely to significantly reduce in
real terms in the short/medium term in line with the UK Government austerity
measures. Equally the Authority has ambitious plans to invest substantially in its capital
infrastructure, a significant part of which will need to be financed from its own revenue
resources, as well as from wider stakeholders including, but not limited to the Swansea
Bay City Region Deal.
10

NARRATIVE REPORT
Whilst the precise details of funding available for 2019/20 and beyond have not been
announced current indications are that an overall reduction in real terms support of
circa 10-15% is quite feasible. The Authority is already undertaking work to plan for
such reductions.
The Authority continues to face a challenging agenda following the introduction of an
equal pay compliant pay and grading structure from 1st April 2014, development of
regional partnership arrangements in line with Welsh Government policy, and
compliance with any legislative and other changes.
Local Government reorganisation proposals from the Welsh Government set out in
their Green Paper (Strengthening Local Government: Delivering for People) means that
the Local Government landscape will continue to evolve and change. Whilst a range of
reorganisation options feature, options remain varied (voluntary through to compulsory)
and there is meanwhile continued certainty of a degree of mandatory regional working
on a range of services. It is anticipated that the final proposals from Welsh Government
will be issued after the current period of public consultation.
At this stage, it is still too early to form a view as to the overall impact of these
proposals, nor what any final outcome may eventually be, but is clearly of significance
for the Authority as a whole.
Intrinsically linked to part of this regionalisation agenda is the shared vision between
four councils (including Swansea), the Welsh Government, the UK Government and
other public sector partners (NHS, University sectors) as well as the private sector in
delivering the £1.3bn Swansea Bay City Region deal. Overall funding obligations for
the Council and delivery expectations will become clearer as the City Deal project
develops.
Furthermore there may be impact as a result of ongoing consideration by UK
Government around the proposed Swansea Bay Tidal Lagoon project. Predominantly
this is a UK infrastructure project decision for UK Government and the private sector
and does not manifestly directly involve the Local Authority in the same way as the city
region deal but nonetheless it offers a scale and significance to the local area and
economy whose potential impact ought to be initially recognised.
Further information
You can get more information about the accounts from the Chief Finance Officer,
Swansea Council, Guildhall, Swansea, SA1 4PE.
11

EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING ANALYSIS
The Expenditure and Funding Analysis shows how annual expenditure is used and funded from resources (government grants,
rents, council tax and business rates) by local authorities in comparison with those resources consumed or earned by authorities
in accordance with generally accepted accounting practices. It also shows how this expenditure is allocated for decision making
purposes between the Authority's Directorates. Income and expenditure accounted for under generally accounting practices is
presented more fully in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement.
2016/17
2017/18
Net 
Adjustments 
Net Expenditure 
Net 
Adjustments Net Expenditure in 
Expenditure 
(Note 6a)
in the 
Expenditure 
(Note 6a)
the 
Chargeable to 
Comprehensive 
Chargeable to 
Comprehensive 
the General 
Income and 
the General 
Income and 
Fund and HRA 
Expenditure 
Fund and HRA 
Expenditure 
Balances
Statement
Balances
Statement
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
49,706
-12,835
36,871 Resources
50,023
-13,349
36,674
5,457
1,279
6,736 People - Poverty 
5,808
1,222
7,030
& Prevention
105,534
2,769
108,303 People - Social 
106,791
4,948
111,739
Services
163,719
14,058
177,777 People - 
163,517
16,701
180,218
Education
48,691
31,680
80,371 Place
50,119
38,738
88,857
-32,247
6,220
-26,027 Housing Revenue 
-33,426
8,944
-24,482
Account (HRA)
340,860
43,171
384,031 Net Cost of 
342,832
57,204
400,036
Services
12

EXPENDITURE AND FUNDING ANALYSIS
2016/17
2017/18
Net 
Adjustments 
Net Expenditure 
Net 
Adjustments Net Expenditure in 
Expenditure 
(Note 6a)
in the 
Expenditure 
(Note 6a)
the 
Chargeable to 
Comprehensive 
Chargeable to 
Comprehensive 
the General 
Income and 
the General 
Income and 
Fund and HRA 
Expenditure 
Fund and HRA 
Expenditure 
Balances
Statement
Balances
Statement
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
-335,168
-34,926
-370,094 Other Income and 
-340,125
-37,346
-377,471
Expenditure
5,692
8,245
13,937 (Surplus) or 
2,707
19,858
22,565
Deficit
Opening General 
Fund and HRA 

-83,614
Balance
-77,922
Less/Plus 
Surplus or 
Deficit on 
General Fund 
and HRA 

5,692
Balances in Year
2,707
Closing General 
Fund and HRA 
Balance at 31st 

-77,922
March *
-75,215
* For a split of this balance between the General Fund and the HRA - see the Movement in Reserves Statement.
13

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 
STATEMENT
The Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement shows the accounting cost in the
year of providing services in accordance with generally accepted accounting practices, rather
than the amount to be funded from taxation (or rents). Authorities raise taxation (and rents) to
cover expenditure in accordance with statutory requirements; this may be different from the
accounting cost. The taxation position is shown in both the Expenditure and Funding Analysis
and the Movement in Reserves Statement.
2016/17
2017/18
Gross 
Gross 
Net 
Gross 
Gross 
Net 
Expenditure Income Expenditure
Expenditure
Income Expenditure
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
130,151
-93,280
36,871 Resources
135,629
-98,955
36,674
18,548
-11,812
6,736 People - Poverty 
19,298
-12,268
7,030
& Prevention
153,382
-45,079
108,303 People - Social 
159,320
-47,581
111,739
Services
223,184
-45,407
177,777 People - 
227,388
-47,170
180,218
Education
179,745
-99,374
80,371 Place
188,564
-99,707
88,857
32,699
-58,726
-26,027 Housing 
36,806
-61,288
-24,482
Revenue 
Account (HRA)
737,709 -353,678
384,031 Cost of 
767,005 -366,969
400,036
Services
31,061
0
31,061 Other operating 
31,578
0
31,578
expenditure 
(Note 11)
71,943
-35,999
35,944 Financing and 
64,472
-33,562
30,910
investment 
income and 
expenditure 
(Note 12)
0 -437,099
-437,099 Taxation and 
0 -439,959
-439,959
non-specific 
grant income 
(Note 13)
13,937 (Surplus) or 
22,565
Deficit on 
Provision of 
Services

14

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 
STATEMENT
2016/17
2017/18
Gross 
Gross  Net 
Gross 
Gross 
Net 
Expenditure Income Expenditure
Expenditure Income Expenditure
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
4,694 (Surplus) or deficit 
7,281
on revaluation of 
Property, Plant 
and Equipment 
assets (Note 24)
89,390 Remeasurement 
4,320
of the net defined 
benefit liability / 
(asset) (Note 24)
94,084 Other Comprehensive Income 
11,601
and Expenditure
108,021 Total Comprehensive Income 
34,166
and Expenditure
15

GROUP INCOME AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT FOR 
THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH 2018
 
2016/17
2017/18
Gross
Gross
Net
Gross
Gross
Net
Expenditure Income Expenditure
Expenditure Income Expenditure
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
130,151
-93,280
36,871 Resources
135,629
-98,955
36,674
18,548
-11,812
6,736 People - Poverty 
19,298
-12,268
7,030
& Prevention
153,382
-45,079
108,303 People - Social 
159,320
-47,581
111,739
Services
223,184
-45,407
177,777 People - 
227,388
-47,170
180,218
Education
179,750
-99,399
80,351 Place
188,564
-99,707
88,857
32,699
-58,726
-26,027 Housing 
36,806
-61,288
-24,482
Revenue 
Account (HRA)
737,714 -353,703
384,011 Cost of 
767,005 -366,969
400,036
Services
31,061
0
31,061 Other operating 
31,578
0
31,578
expenditure
71,943
-35,999
35,944 Financing and 
64,472
-33,562
30,910
investment 
income and 
expenditure
0 -437,099
-437,099 Taxation and 
0 -439,959
-439,959
non-specific 
grant income
13,917 (Surplus) or 
22,565
Deficit on 
Provision of 
Services

-2,665 Share of the 
284
surplus or deficit 
on the provision 
of services by 
associates and 
joint ventures
11,252 Group 
22,849
(Surplus)/ 
Deficit

16

GROUP INCOME AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT FOR 
THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH 2018
 
2016/17
2017/18
Gross
Gross
Net
Gross
Gross
Net
Expenditure Income Expenditure
Expenditure Income Expenditure
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
4,694 (Surplus) or deficit 
-2,206
on revaluation of 
Property, Plant 
and Equipment 
assets
89,390 Actuarial losses / 
4,320
gains on pension 
assets / liabilities
94,084 Other 
2,114
Comprehensive 
Income and 
Expenditure

105,336 Total 
24,963
Comprehensive 
Income and 
Expenditure

17

MOVEMENT IN RESERVES STATEMENT
The Movement in Reserves Statement shows the movement in the year on the
different reserves held by the Authority, analysed into ‘usable reserves’ (i.e. those
that can be applied to fund expenditure or reduce local taxation) and unusable
reserves.  
The Statement shows how the movements in year of the Authority's reserves are
broken down between gains and losses incurred in accordance with generally
accepted accounting practices and the statutory adjustments required to return to
the amounts chargeable to council tax (or rents) for the year.
The Net Increase / Decrease line shows the statutory General Fund Balance and
Housing Revenue Account Balance movements in the year following those
adjustments.
18

MOVEMENT IN RESERVES STATEMENT
         
s
e
rv
e
s
e
 R
t            
                
d
n
e
              
d
                        
                  
n
u
                     
s
e
u
o
rv
lie
s
e
c
c
c
e
p
e
rv
n
l F
s
e
p
                             
rv
s
e
la
ra
 A
a
e
e
s
a
e
e
n
e
u
 R
s
e
rv
 B
n
n
ts
 U
e
 R
d
e
e
ip
ts
 R
s
n
v
e
n
e
rity
u
 G
le
d
e
c
e
ra
b
 R
o
l F
e
 R
a
le
th
rk
g
s
u
ra
l R
l G
b
a
e
0
0
in
a
s
0
ita
0
ita
0
l U
0
s
0
l A
0
n
0
0
u
0
p
0
p
0
0
u
0
0
e
rm
o
a
a
ta
n
ta
2016/17
'0
a
'0
'0
'0
'0
o
'0
'0
o
'0
G
£
E
£
H
£
C
£
C
£
T
£
U
£
T
£
Balance at 31 March 2016
12,360
56,021
15,233
7,898
18,750 110,262
382,246
492,508
Movement in reserves during 2016/17
(Deficit) on the provision of services
-41,199
0
27,262
0
0
-13,937
0
-13,937
Other Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
0
0
0
0
0
0
-94,084
-94,084
Total Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
-41,199
0
27,262
0
0
-13,937
-94,084 -108,021
Adjustments between accounting basis & funding 
basis under regulations (Note 8) 
40,919
0
-32,674
-1,806
-3,823
2,616
-2,616
0
Net Decrease/Increase before
Transfers to Earmarked Reserves 

-280
0
-5,412
-1,806
-3,823
-11,321
-96,700 -108,021
Transfers from/to Earmarked Reserves (Note 10)
280
-280
0
0
0
0
0
0
Increase/Decrease in 2016/17
0
-280
-5,412
-1,806
-3,823
-11,321
-96,700 -108,021
Balance at 31 March 2017 carried forward
12,360
55,741
9,821
6,092
14,927
98,941
285,546
384,487
19

MOVEMENT IN RESERVES STATEMENT
         
s
e
rv
e
s
e
 R
t            
                
d
n
e
              
d
                        
                  
n
u
                     
s
e
u
o
rv
lie
s
e
c
c
c
e
p
e
rv
n
l F
s
e
p
                             
rv
s
e
la
ra
 A
a
e
e
s
a
e
e
n
e
u
 R
s
e
rv
 B
n
n
ts
 U
e
 R
d
e
e
ip
ts
 R
s
n
v
e
n
e
rity
u
 G
le
d
e
c
e
ra
b
 R
o
l F
e
 R
a
le
th
rk
g
s
u
ra
l R
l G
b
a
e
0
0
in
a
s
0
ita
0
ita
0
l U
0
s
0
l A
0
n
0
0
u
0
p
0
p
0
0
u
0
0
e
rm
o
a
a
ta
n
ta
2017/18
'0
a
'0
'0
'0
'0
o
'0
'0
o
'0
G
£
E
£
H
£
C
£
C
£
T
£
U
£
T
£
Balance at 31 March 2017 brought forward 
12,360
55,741
9,821
6,092 14,927
98,941 285,546 384,487
Movement in reserves during 2017/18
Surplus or (deficit) on the provision of services
-48,264
0 25,699
0
0
-22,565
0
-22,565
Other Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
0
0
0
0
0
0
-11,601
-11,601
Total Comprehensive Income and
Expenditure 

-48,264
0 25,699
0
0
-22,565
-11,601
-34,166
Adjustments between accounting
basis & funding basis under
regulations (Note 8) 
48,597
0 -28,739
362
-1,453
18,767
-18,767
0
Net Decrease/Increase before
Transfers to Earmarked Reserves 

333
0
-3,040
362
-1,453
-3,798
-30,368
-34,166
Transfers from/to Earmarked Reserves (Note 10)
-3,341
3,341
0
0
0
0
0
0
Decrease/Increase in Year
-3,008
3,341
-3,040
362
-1,453
-3,798
-30,368
-34,166
 
9,352
59,082
6,781
6,454 13,474
95,143 255,178 350,321
20

GROUP MOVEMENT IN RESERVES STATEMENT
         
s
e

rv
s
e
                                        
s
rie
s
e
ia
re
 R
t         
             
id
tu
d
n
e
            
d
                        
s
n
                  
n
u
                     
s
b
e
e
u
o
rv
lie
s
e
u
                              
c
c
c
e
p
e
rv
t V
s
n
l F
s
e
p
                             
e
rv
s
e
f S
in
la
ra
 A
a
e
e
s
 o
o
rv
a
e
e
n
e
e
u
 R
s
e
rv
re
 J
s
 B
n
n
ts
 U
e
 R
a
d
e
d
e
e
ip
ts
 R
s
h
n
n
v
e
n
e
rity
 R
u
 G
le
 a
d
e
c
 S
p
e
ra
b
 R
o
's
s
u
l F
e
 R
a
le
th
te
rk
g
s
u
ro
ra
l R
l G
b
a
rity
ia
e
0
0
in
a
s
0
ita
0
ita
0
l U
0
s
0
l A
0
o
c
0
l G
0
n
0
0
u
0
p
0
p
0
0
u
0
0
o
0
0
e
rm
th
o
a
a
ta
n
ta
s
ta
2016/17
'0
a
'0
'0
'0
'0
o
'0
'0
o
'0
u
s
'0
o
'0
G
£
E
£
H
£
C
£
C
£
T
£
U
£
T
£
A
A
£
T
£
Balance at 31 March 2016 carried forward
12,360 56,021
15,233
7,898 18,750
110,262 382,246
492,508
9,523
502,031
Movement in reserves during 2016/17
(Deficit) on the provision of services
-41,199
0
27,262
0
0
-13,937
0
-13,937
2,685
-11,252
Other Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
0
0
0
0
0
0 -94,084
-94,084
0
-94,084
Total Comprehensive Income and
-41,199
0
27,262
0
0
-13,937 -94,084 -108,021
2,685 -105,336
Expenditure
Adjustments between group accounts & 
authority accounts
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
-9
-9
Adjustments between accounting basis & 
funding basis under regulations
40,919
0 -32,674
-1,806 -3,823
2,616
-2,616
0
0
0
Net Increase/Decrease before
Transfers to Earmarked Reserves 

-280
0
-5,412
-1,806 -3,823
-11,321 -96,700 -108,021
2,676 -105,345
Transfers from/to Earmarked Reserves
280
-280
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Decrease/Increase in 2016/17
0
-280
-5,412
-1,806 -3,823
-11,321 -96,700 -108,021
2,676 -105,345
Balance at 31 March 2017 carried forward
12,360 55,741
9,821
6,092 14,927
98,941 285,546
384,487
12,199
396,686
21

GROUP MOVEMENT IN RESERVES STATEMENT
         
s
e

rv
s
e
                                        
s
rie
s
e
ia
re
 R
t         
             
id
tu
d
n
e
            
d
                        
s
n
                  
n
u
                     
s
b
e
e
u
o
rv
lie
s
e
u
                              
c
c
c
e
p
e
rv
t V
s
n
l F
s
e
p
                             
e
rv
s
e
f S
in
la
ra
 A
a
e
e
s
 o
o
rv
a
e
e
n
e
e
u
 R
s
e
rv
re
 J
s
 B
n
n
ts
 U
e
 R
a
d
e
d
e
e
ip
ts
 R
s
h
n
n
v
e
n
e
rity
 R
u
 G
le
 a
d
e
c
 S
p
e
ra
b
 R
o
's
s
u
l F
e
 R
a
le
th
te
rk
g
s
u
ro
ra
l R
l G
b
a
rity
ia
e
0
0
in
a
s
0
ita
0
ita
0
l U
0
s
0
l A
0
o
c
0
l G
0
n
0
0
u
0
p
0
p
0
0
u
0
0
o
0
0
e
rm
th
o
a
a
ta
n
ta
s
ta
2017/18
'0
a
'0
'0
'0
'0
o
'0
'0
o
'0
u
s
'0
o
'0
G
£
E
£
H
£
C
£
C
£
T
£
U
£
T
£
A
A
£
T
£
Balance at 31 March 2017 brought forward 
12,360 55,741
9,821
6,092 14,927
98,941 285,546 384,487 12,199 396,686
Movement in reserves during 2017/18
Surplus or (deficit) on the provision of services -48,264
0 25,699
0
0
-22,565
0
-22,565
-284
-22,849
Other Comprehensive Income and 
Expenditure
0
0
0
0
0
0
-11,601
-11,601
9,487
-2,114
Total Comprehensive Income and
-48,264
0 25,699
0
0
-22,565
-11,601
-34,166
9,203
-24,963
Expenditure 
Adjustments between group accounts & 
authority accounts
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Adjustments between accounting basis & 
funding basis under regulations
48,597
0 -28,739
362 -1,453
18,767
-18,767
0
0
0
Net Decrease/Increase before
Transfers to Earmarked Reserves 

333
0
-3,040
362 -1,453
-3,798
-30,368
-34,166
9,203
-24,963
Transfers from/to Earmarked Reserves
-3,341
3,341
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Decrease/Increase in Year
-3,008
3,341
-3,040
362 -1,453
-3,798
-30,368
-34,166
9,203
-24,963
Balance at 31 March 2018 carried forward
9,352 59,082
6,781
6,454 13,474
95,143 255,178 350,321 21,402 371,723
22

BALANCE SHEET
The Balance Sheet shows the value as at the Balance Sheet date of the assets and
liabilities recognised by the Authority. The net assets of the Authority (assets less
liabilities) are matched by the reserves held by the Authority. Reserves are reported in two
categories. The first category of reserves are usable reserves, i.e. those reserves that the
Authority may use to provide services, subject to the need to maintain a prudent level of
reserves and any statutory limitations on their use (for example the Capital Receipts
Reserve that may only be used to fund capital expenditure or repay debt). The second
category of reserves are those that the Authority is not able to use to provide services.
This category of reserves includes reserves that hold unrealised gains and losses (for
example the Revaluation Reserve), where amounts would only become available to
provide services if the assets are sold; and reserves that hold timing differences shown in
the Movement in Reserves Statement line 'Adjustments between accounting basis and
funding basis under regulations'.
31 March
31 March
2017
Notes
2018
£’000
£’000
Property, Plant & Equipment
14
383,315 Council Dwellings
378,177
615,659 Other Land and Buildings
631,283
7,122 Vehicles, Plant, Furniture and Equipment
7,905
241,611 Infrastructure Assets
239,519
10,159 Community Assets
9,771
88,936 Surplus Assets
87,092
30,919 Assets under Construction
29,905
1,377,721
1,383,652
29,794 Heritage Assets
15
29,876
40,375 Investment Properties
16
47,958
400 Intangible Assets
17
458
74 Long Term Investments
18
124
2,615 Long Term Debtors
18
3,072
1,450,979 Long Term Assets
1,465,140
52,548 Short Term Investments
18
25,500
2,979 Assets Held for Sale
21
2,030
2,129 Inventories
1,978
46,446 Short Term Debtors
19
45,045
30,138 Cash and Cash Equivalents
20
53,953
134,240 Current Assets
128,506
-37,831 Short Term Borrowing
18
-5,822
-52,108 Short Term Creditors
22
-49,182
-3,222 Provisions
23
-2,854
-93,161 Current Liabilities
-57,858
23

BALANCE SHEET
31 March
31 March
2017
Notes
2018
£’000
£’000
-2,359 Long Term Creditors
18
-2,268
-10,839 Provisions
23
-10,189
-415,281 Long Term Borrowing
18
-460,982
-679,092 Other Long Term Liabilities
40
-712,028
-1,107,571 Long Term Liabilities
-1,185,467
384,487 Net Assets 
350,321
Usable Reserves
12,360 Balances - General Fund
9,352
9,821 Balances - Housing Revenue Account
10
6,781
6,092 Capital Receipts Reserve
6,454
14,927 Capital Grants Unapplied Account
13,474
55,741 Earmarked Reserves
10
59,082
98,941
95,143
Unusable Reserves
24
454,146 Revaluation Reserve
429,264
-679,092 Pensions Reserve
-712,028
521,269 Capital Adjustment Account
548,857
-2,215 Financial Instrument Adjustment Account
-2,221
-8,562 Accumulated Absences Account
-8,694
285,546
255,178
384,487 Total Reserves
350,321
24

GROUP BALANCE SHEET
31 March
31 March
2017
Notes
2018
£’000
£’000
Property, Plant & Equipment
383,315 Council dwellings
14
378,177
615,659 Other land and buildings
631,283
7,122 Vehicles, plant, furniture and equipment
7,905
241,611 Infrastructure assets
239,519
10,159 Community assets
9,771
88,936 Surplus assets
87,092
30,919 Assets under construction
29,905
1,377,721
1,383,652
29,794 Heritage Assets
15
29,876
40,375 Investment Property
16
47,958
400 Intangible Assets
17
458
74 Long Term Investments
18
124
12,167 Investments in Associates and Joint Ventures
21,370
2,615 Long Term Debtors
18
3,072
1,463,146 Long Term Assets
1,486,510
52,548 Short Term Investments
18
25,500
2,979 Assets Held for Sale
21
2,030
2,129 Inventories
1,978
46,447 Short Term Debtors
19
45,046
30,169 Cash and Cash Equivalents 
20
53,984
134,272 Current Assets
128,538
-37,831 Short Term Borrowing
18
-5,822
-52,108 Short Term Creditors
22
-49,182
-3,222 Provisions
23
-2,854
-93,161 Current Liabilities
-57,858
-2,359 Long Term Creditors
18
-2,268
-10,839 Provisions
23
-10,189
-415,281 Long Term Borrowing
18
-460,982
-679,092 Other Long Term Liabilities
40
-712,028
-1,107,571 Long Term Liabilities
-1,185,467
396,686 Net Assets 
371,723
25

GROUP BALANCE SHEET
31 March
31 March
2017
Notes
2018
£’000
£’000
Usable Reserves
24,559 Balances - General Fund
21,267
9,821 Balances - Housing Revenue Account
10
6,781
6,092 Capital Receipts Reserve
6,454
14,927 Capital Grants Unapplied Account
13,474
55,741 Earmarked Reserves
10
59,082
111,140
107,058
Unusable Reserves
24
454,146 Revaluation Reserve
438,751
-679,092 Pensions Reserve
-712,028
521,269 Capital Adjustment Account
548,857
-2,215 Financial Instrument Adjustment Account
-2,221
-8,562 Accumulated Absences Account
-8,694
285,546
264,665
396,686 Total Reserves
371,723
26

CASH FLOW STATEMENT
The Cash Flow Statement shows the changes in cash and cash equivalents of the
Authority during the reporting period. The Statement shows how the Authority
generates and uses cash and cash equivalents by classifying cash flows as operating,
investing and financing activities. The amount of net cash flows arising from operating
activities is a key indicator of the extent to which the operations of the Authority are
funded by way of taxation and grant income or from the recipients of services provided
by the Authority. Investing activities represent the extent to which cash outflows have
been made for resources which are intended to contribute to the Authority's future
service delivery. Cash flows arising from financing activities are useful in predicting
claims on future cash flows by providers of capital (i.e. borrowing) to the Authority.
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
-13,937 Net (deficit) on the provision of services
-22,565
72,232 Adjustments to net surplus or (deficit) on the provision 
78,552
of services for non-cash movements (note 25)
-29,118 Adjustments for items included in the net surplus or 
-21,650
(deficit) on the provision of services that are investing 
and financing activities (note 25)
29,177 Net cash flows from operating activities 
34,337
-78,426 Investing activities (note 26)
-24,214
42,334 Financing activities (note 27)
13,692
-6,915 Net (decrease) or increase in cash and cash 
23,815
equivalents
37,053 Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the 
30,138
reporting period
30,138 Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the 
53,953
reporting period (note 20)
27

GROUP CASH FLOW STATEMENT
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£'000
-13,917 Net surplus / (deficit) on the provision of services
-22,565
72,232 Adjustments to net surplus or (deficit) on the provision of services 
78,552
for non-cash movements (note 25)
-29,118 Adjustments for items included in the net surplus or deficit on the 
-21,650
provision of services that are investing and finance activities (note 
25)
29,197 Net cash flows from operating activities
34,337
-78,426 Investing activities (note 26)
-24,214
42,334 Financing activities (note 27)
13,692
-6,895 Net increase or decrease in cash and cash equivalents
23,815
37,064 Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the reporting period
30,169
30,169 Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the reporting period 
53,984
(note 20)
28

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
1. Accounting Policies
i. General Principles
The Statement of Accounts summarises the Authority's transactions for the 2017/18
financial year and its position at the year-end of 31st March 2018.
The Authority is required to prepare an annual Statement of Accounts by virtue of the
Accounts and Audit (Wales) (Amendment) Regulations 2018. These regulations require
the Accounts to be prepared in accordance with proper accounting practices.
These practices are set out in the Code of Practice on Local Authority Accounting in the
United Kingdom 2017/18 (the Code), supported by International Financial Reporting
Standards (IFRS).
The Accounts have been prepared on a historical cost basis, with the exception of certain
categories of non-current assets that are measured at current value, and financial
instruments which are now carried within the balance sheet at fair value as defined by the
Code.
The Group Accounts consolidate Swansea Council’s accounts with the accounts of
companies in which the Authority has an interest and are considered to be part of our
group.
The CIPFA Code of Practice on Local Authority Accounting 2017/18 requires that Group
Accounting Statements have to be prepared, consolidating the accounts of the parent and
any subsidiary, associate or joint undertakings. An assessment of the activities and
interests of Swansea Council has been undertaken, which has determined that the
Swansea Council Group consists of the Local Authority as the parent, and the following
companies:
Swansea City Waste Disposal Limited (SCWDC)
Subsidiary
Wales National Pool Swansea (WNPS)
Joint Venture
National Waterfront Museum Swansea (NWMS)
Joint Venture
Swansea Stadium Management Company Limited (SSMC)
Associate
Bay Leisure Limited
Associate
Swansea Community Energy & Enterprise Scheme (SCEES)
Associate
Notes have been provided to the Group Accounting Statements only where the disclosure
for the Group differs from that required for the Local Authority due to the combination of
the accounts of the various entities.
IAS 19 requires that entries are included in the Group Balance Sheet for the Group's
share of assets and liabilities of the Local Authority Pension Scheme.
The Accounts are prepared on a going concern basis.
29

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
ii. Accruals of Income and Expenditure
The Accounts are maintained on an accruals basis in accordance with the Code. This
means that sums due to or from the Authority, where the supply or service was provided or
received during the year, are included in the Accounts whether or not the cash has
actually been received or paid in the year.
Accruals are made in respect of grants claimed or claimable for Revenue and Capital
purposes. Some grant claims are finalised after the Accounts have been completed and in
this case the grant is accrued on the basis of the best estimate available, and any
differences are accounted for in the following year.
Revenue from the provision of services is recognised when the Authority can measure
reliably the percentage of completion of the transaction and it is probable that economic
benefits or service potential associated with the transaction will flow to the Authority.
Supplies are recorded as expenditure when they are consumed - where there is a gap
between the date supplies are received and their consumption, they are carried as
inventories on the Balance Sheet.
Expenses in relation to services received (including services provided by employees) are
recorded as expenditure when the services are received rather than when payments are
made.
Interest receivable on investments and payable on borrowings is accounted for
respectively as income and expenditure in the main on the basis of the effective interest
rate for the relevant financial instrument.
Where revenue and expenditure have been recognised but cash has not been received or
paid, a debtor or creditor for the relevant amount is recorded in the Balance Sheet. Where
debts may not be settled, the balance of debtors is written down and a charge made to
revenue for the income that might not be collected.
iii. Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash or cash equivalents will be any cash investment which is held for short-term cash
flow purposes which can be readily realised without a significant change in value.
In the Cash Flow Statement, cash and cash equivalents are shown net of bank overdrafts
that are repayable on demand and form an integral part of the Authority's cash
management.
30

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
iv. Exceptional Items
When items of income and expense are material, their nature and amount is disclosed
separately, either on the face of the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement
or in the notes to the accounts, depending on how significant the items are to an
understanding of the Authority's financial performance.
v. Prior Period Adjustments, Changes in Accounting Policies and Estimates and
Errors

Prior period adjustments may arise as a result of a change in accounting policies or to
correct a material error. Changes in accounting estimates are accounted for
prospectively, i.e in the current and future years affected by the change and do not give
rise to a prior period adjustment.
Changes in accounting policies are only made when required by proper accounting
practices or the change provides more reliable or relevant information about the effect of
transactions, other events or conditions on the Authority's financial position or financial
performance. Where a change is made, it is applied retrospectively (unless stated
otherwise) by adjusting opening balances and comparative amounts for the prior period
as if the new policy had always been applied.
Material errors discovered in prior period figures are corrected retrospectively by
amending opening balances and comparative amounts for the prior period. There were
no material errors to report in 2017/18.
As part of a review of Property, Plant and Equipment changes in assumptions have been
made regarding the remaining useful lives of some surplus assets during 2017/18. 
Where appropriate, consideration has been given to the estimated useful life of individual
asset components (primarily electrical, mechanical, and fabric); revenue charges for
depreciation reflect the differing useful lives of asset components for other land and
building assets revalued as per the Authority's rolling programme between 1st April 2010
and 31st March 2016. Revenue charges for depreciation on assets, revalued as per the
rolling programme from 1st April 2016, will be charged on the building component of
Other Land and Buildings assets. Annual depreciation has been charged on opening
balances from 1st April 2017.
vi. Charges to Revenue for Non-Current Assets
Services, support services and trading accounts are debited with the following amounts to
record the cost of holding non-current assets during the year:

depreciation attributable to the assets used by the relevant service.

revaluation and impairment losses on assets used by the service where there are no
accumulated gains in the Revaluation Reserve against which the losses can be
written off.

amortisation of intangible assets attributable to the service.
31

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Authority is not required to raise council tax to fund depreciation, revaluation and
impairment losses or amortisation. However, it is required to make an annual
contribution from revenue towards the reduction in its overall borrowing requirement
(equal to an amount calculated on a prudent basis determined by the Authority in
accordance with statutory guidance). Depreciation, revaluation and impairment losses
and amortisation are therefore replaced by the contribution in the General Fund Balance
(Minimum Revenue Provision), by way of an adjusting transaction with the Capital
Adjustment Account in the Movement in Reserves Statement for the difference between
the two.
vii. Employee Benefits
Benefits Payable During Employment
Short-term employee benefits are those due to be settled within 12 months of the year-
end. They include such benefits as wages and salaries, paid annual leave, paid sick
leave and bonuses. Any non-monetary benefits for current employees are recognised
as an expense for services in the year in which employees render service to the
Authority. An accrual is made for the cost of holiday entitlements (or any form of leave,
e.g. flexi leave) earned by employees but not taken before the year-end, which
employees can carry forward into the next financial year. The accrual is made at the
wage and salary rates applicable in the following accounting year, being the period in
which the employee takes the benefit. The accrual is charged to Surplus or Deficit on
the Provision of Services, but then reversed out through the Movement in Reserves
Statement so that holiday benefits are charged to revenue in the financial year in which
the holiday absence occurs.
Termination Benefits
Termination benefits are amounts payable as a result of a decision by the Authority to
terminate an officer's employment before the normal retirement date, or an officer's
decision to accept voluntary redundancy. Costs relating to termination benefits are
charged on an accruals basis to the relevant Cost of Service lines in the Comprehensive
Income and Expenditure Statement only when the Authority is demonstrably committed
to the termination of the employment of an officer, or group of officers, or making an
offer to encourage voluntary redundancy. 
Post Employment Benefits
Employees of the Authority are members of two separate pension schemes:

The Teachers' Pension Scheme, administered by CAPITA on behalf of the
Department for Education.

The Local Government Pensions Scheme, administered by Swansea Council.
Both schemes provide defined benefits to members (retirement lump sums and
pensions), earned by employees during their period of employment with the Authority.
32

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
However, the arrangements for the teachers' scheme means that liabilities for these
benefits cannot ordinarily be identified specifically to the Authority. The scheme is
therefore accounted for as if it were a defined contribution scheme and no liability for
future payments of benefits is recognised in the Balance Sheet. The People - Education
line in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement is charged with the
employer's contributions payable to the Teachers' Pensions in the year.
The Local Government Pension Scheme
The Local Government Pension Scheme is accounted for as a defined benefits 
scheme:
• 
The liabilities of the Swansea Council pension fund attributable to the Authority are
included in the Balance Sheet on an actuarial basis using the projected unit method
- i.e. an assessment of the future payments that will be made in relation to
retirement benefits earned to date by employees, based on assumptions about
mortality rates, employee turnover rates, etc, and projected earnings for current
employees.
• 
Liabilities are discounted to their value at current prices, using a discount rate
based on the indicative rate of return on high quality corporate bonds as required by
IAS 19.

The assets of the Swansea Council pension fund attributable to the Authority are
included in the Balance Sheet at their fair value:
─ quoted securities - current bid price
─ unquoted securities - industry accepted techniques
─ unitised securities - current bid price
─ property - market value.
The change in the net pensions liability is analysed into the following components:

Service cost comprising:
─ current service cost - the increase in liabilities as a result of years of service
earned this year - allocated in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement to the services for which the employees worked.
─ past service cost - the increase in liabilities as a result of a scheme amendment
or curtailment whose effect relates to years of service earned in earlier years -
debited to the Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of Services in the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement.
─ net interest on the net defined benefit liability (asset), i.e. net interest expense for
the Authority - the change during the period in the net defined benefit liability
(asset) that arises from the passage of time charged to the Financing and
Investment Income and Expenditure line of the Comprehensive Income and
Expenditure Statement - this is calculated by applying the discount rate used to
measure the defined benefit obligation at the beginning of the period to the net
defined benefit liability (asset) at the beginning of the period - taking into account
any changes in the net defined benefit liability (asset) during the period as a
result of contribution and benefit payments.
33

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS

Remeasurements comprising:
─ the return on plan assets - excluding amounts included in net interest on the net
defined benefit liability (asset) - charged to the Pensions Reserve as Other
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure.
─ actuarial gains and losses - changes in the net pensions liability that arise because
events have not coincided with assumptions made at the last actuarial valuation or
because the actuaries have updated their assumptions - charged to the Pensions
Reserve as Other Comprehensive Income and Expenditure.

contributions paid to the Swansea Council pension fund - cash paid as employer's
contributions to the pension fund in settlement of liabilities; not accounted for as an
expense.
In relation to retirement benefits, statutory provisions require the General Fund balance to
be charged with the amount payable by the Authority to the pension fund or directly to
pensioners in the year, not the amount calculated according to the relevant accounting
standards. In the Movement in Reserves Statement, this means that there are transfers
to and from the Pensions Reserve to remove the notional debits and credits for
retirement benefits and replace them with debits for the cash paid to the Pension Fund
and pensioners and any such amounts payable but unpaid at the year-end. The negative
balance that arises on the Pensions Reserve thereby measures the beneficial impact to
the General Fund of being required to account for retirement benefits on the basis of
cash flows rather than as benefits are earned by employees.
Discretionary Benefits
The Authority also has restricted powers to make discretionary awards of retirement
benefits in the event of early retirements. Any liabilities estimated to arise as a result of
an award to any member of staff (including teachers) are accrued in the year of the
decision to make the award and accounted for using the same policies as are applied to
the Local Government Pension Scheme. No such discretionary powers were used during
the year.
viii. Events After the Balance Sheet Date
Events after the Balance Sheet date are those events, both favourable and unfavourable,
that occur between the end of the reporting period and the date when the Statement of
Accounts is authorised for issue. Two types of events can be identified:

those that provide evidence of conditions that existed at the end of the reporting
period - the Statement of Accounts is adjusted to reflect such events.

those that are indicative of conditions that arose after the reporting period - the
Statement of Accounts is not adjusted to reflect such events, but where a category of
events would have a material effect, disclosure is made in the notes of the nature of
the events and their estimated financial effect.
34

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Events taking place after the date of authorisation for issue are not reflected in the
Statement of Accounts.
ix. Financial Instruments
Financial Liabilities
Financial liabilities are recognised on the Balance Sheet when the Authority becomes
a party to the contractual provisions of a financial instrument and are initially
measured at fair value and are carried at their amortised cost. Annual charges to the
Financing and Investment Income and Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income
and Expenditure Statement for interest payable are based on the carrying amount of
the liability, multiplied by the effective rate of interest for the instrument. The effective
interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments over the
life of the instrument to the amount at which it was originally recognised. 
For most of the borrowings that the Authority has, this means that the amount
presented in the Balance Sheet is the outstanding principal repayable (plus accrued
interest); and interest charged to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement is the amount payable for the year according to the loan agreement.
Gains and losses on the repurchase or early settlement of borrowing are credited and
debited to the Financing and Investment Income and Expenditure line in the
Comprehensive
Income
and
Expenditure
Statement
in
the
year
of
repurchase/settlement. However, where repurchase has taken place as part of a
restructuring of the loan portfolio that involves the modification or exchange of existing
instruments, the premium or discount is respectively deducted from or added to the
amortised cost of the new or modified loan and the write-down to the Comprehensive
Income and Expenditure Statement is spread over the life of the loan by an
adjustment to the effective interest rate.  
Where premiums and discounts have been charged to the Comprehensive Income
and Expenditure Statement, regulations allow the impact on the General Fund
Balance to be spread over future years. The Authority has a policy of spreading the
gain or loss over the term that was remaining on the loan against which the premium
was payable or discount receivable when it was repaid. The reconciliation of amounts
charged to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement to the net charge
required against the General Fund Balance is managed by a transfer to or from the
Financial Instruments Adjustment Account in the Movement in Reserves Statement.
Financial Assets
Financial assets are classified into two types:

loans and receivables - assets that have fixed or determinable payments but are
not quoted in an active market,

available-for-sale assets - assets that have a quoted market price and/or do not
have fixed or determinable payments.
35

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Loan and Receivables
Loans and receivables are recognised on the Balance Sheet when the Authority
becomes a party to the contractual provisions of a financial instrument and are initially
measured at fair value. They are subsequently measured at their amortised cost. Annual
credits to the Financing and Investment Income and Expenditure line in the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement for interest receivable are based on
the carrying amount of the asset multiplied by the effective rate of interest for the
instrument. For most of the loans that the Authority has made, this means that the
amount presented in the Balance Sheet is the outstanding principal receivable (plus
accrued interest) and interest credited to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement is the amount receivable for the year in the loan agreement. 
However, the Authority has made loans to voluntary organisations and third parties at
less than market rates (soft loans). When soft loans are made, a loss is recorded in the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement (debited to the appropriate service)
for the present value of the interest that will be foregone over the life of the instrument,
resulting in a lower amortised cost than the outstanding principal. Interest is credited to
the Financing and Investment Income and Expenditure line in the Comprehensive
Income and Expenditure Statement at a marginally higher effective rate of interest than
the rate receivable from the voluntary organisations, with the difference serving to
increase the amortised cost of the loan in the Balance Sheet. 
Statutory provisions require that the impact of soft loans on the General Fund Balance is
the interest receivable for the financial year - the reconciliation of amounts debited and
credited to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement to the net gain
required against the General Fund Balance is managed by a transfer to or from the
Financial Instruments Adjustment Account in the Movement in Reserves Statement.
Where assets are identified as impaired because of a likelihood arising from a past event
that payments due under the contract will not be made, the asset is written down and a
charge made to the relevant service (for receivables specific to that service) or the
Financing and Investment Income and Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income
and Expenditure Statement. The impairment loss is measured as the difference between
the carrying amount and the present value of the revised future cash flows discounted at
the asset's original effective interest rate. 
Any gains and losses that arise on the derecognition of an asset are credited or debited
to the Financing and Investment Income Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income
and Expenditure Statement.
36

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
x. Government Grants and Contributions
Whether paid on account, by instalments or in arrears, government grants and third party
contributions and donations are recognised as due to the Authority when there is
reasonable assurance that:
 •  the Authority will comply with the conditions attached to the payments, and
 •  the grants or contributions will be received.
Amounts recognised as due to the Authority are not credited to the Comprehensive
Income and Expenditure Statement until conditions attached to the grant or contribution
have been satisfied. Conditions are stipulations that specify that the future economic
benefits or service potential embodied in the asset received in the form of the grant or
contribution are required to be consumed by the recipient as specified, or future economic
benefits or service potential must be returned to the transferor.
Monies advanced as grants and contributions for which conditions have not been satisfied
are carried in the Balance Sheet as creditors. When conditions are satisfied, the grant or
contribution is credited to the relevant service line (attributable revenue grants and
contributions) or Taxation and Non-Specific Grant Income (non-ring fenced revenue grants
and all capital grants) in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement.
Where capital grants are credited to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement, they are reversed out of the General Fund Balance in the Movement in
Reserves Statement. Where the grant has yet to be used to finance capital expenditure, it
is posted to the Capital Grants Unapplied Account. Where it has been applied, it is posted
to the Capital Adjustment Account. Amounts in the Capital Grants Unapplied Account are
transferred to the Capital Adjustment Account once they have been applied to fund capital
expenditure.
xi. Business Improvement Districts
A Business Improvement District (BID) scheme applies across the City Centre. The
scheme is funded by a BID levy paid by non-domestic ratepayers. The Authority acts as
principal under the scheme, and accounts for income received and expenditure incurred
(including contributions to the BID project) within the relevant services within the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement.
xii. Heritage Assets
Heritage assets are assets with historical, artistic, scientific, technological, geophysical or
environmental qualities that are held and maintained by the Authority, principally for their
contribution to knowledge and culture.
Subject to specific requirements, Heritage Assets are accounted for in accordance with the
Authority's policies of Property, Plant and Equipment (including the treatment of
revaluation gains and losses).
37

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Authority does not normally purchase fixed assets of a heritage nature; all assets
disclosed have been donated into the Authority's possession. All assets are open to
access by members of the public, with no restrictions other than those resulting from the
normal operational limitations of venues (opening and closing times, and public safety).
Management of these assets is undertaken by designated specialists and other personnel
employed by the Authority. These personnel are responsible for the maintenance of all
historical records relating to the assets the Authority is in possession of, access to which
can be granted through local arrangement. Any preservation works required, either
enhancing or non-enhancing in nature, will be undertaken through the Authority's main
capital program, with minor works undertaken ad-hoc per the standard Authority internal
systems for revenue expenditure.
No heritage assets disposals are actively undertaken by the Authority. Under such
circumstance that asset disposal is required, it shall be undertaken in accordance with the
Authority's standard asset disposal procedures. 
Valuation of heritage assets may be made by any method that is appropriate and relevant.
The Authority's assets are mostly valued at insurance valuation and replacement cost
(based on construction methods and materials used).
Depreciation is not required on heritage assets which have indefinite lives. Impairment
reviews will only be carried out where there is reported physical deterioration or new
doubts as to the authenticity of a heritage asset.
Where information on the cost or value is not available, and the cost of obtaining the
information outweighs the benefits to users of the financial statements, the asset is not
recognised on the balance sheet. Items such as Hafod Copperworks, memorials and
some museum and library collections have been considered but not recognised as value /
cost information is unavailable.
xiii. Intangible Assets
Expenditure on non-monetary assets that do not have physical substance but are
controlled by the Authority as a result of past events (e.g. software licences) is capitalised
when it is expected that future economic benefits or service potential will flow from the
intangible assets to the Authority.
38

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Intangible assets are measured initially at cost and subsequently carried at cost less
amortisation charged on a straight line basis. Amounts are only revalued where the fair
value of the assets held by the Authority can be determined by reference to an active
market. In practice, no intangible asset held by the Authority meets this criterion, and
they are therefore carried at cost less amortisation. The depreciable amount of an
intangible asset is amortised over its useful life to the relevant service line in the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement. An asset is tested for impairment
whenever there is an indication that the asset might be impaired - any losses recognised
are posted to the relevant service line(s) in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement. Any gain or loss arising on the disposal or abandonment of an intangible
asset is posted to the Other Operating Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income
and Expenditure Statement.
Where expenditure on intangible assets qualifies as capital expenditure for statutory
purposes, amortisation, impairment losses and disposal gains and losses are not
permitted to have an impact on the General Fund Balance. The gains and losses are
therefore reversed out of the General Fund Balance to the Capital Adjustment Account
and (for any sale proceeds greater than £10,000) the Capital Receipts Reserve in the
Movement in Reserves Statement.
xiv. Interests in Companies and Other Entities
The Authority has material interests in companies and other entities that have the nature
of subsidiaries, associates and jointly controlled entities and require it to prepare group
accounts. In the Authority's own single-entity accounts, the interests in companies and
other entities are recorded as financial assets at cost, less any provision for losses.
xv. Inventories and Long Term Contracts
Inventories are included in the Balance Sheet at current cost. The effect of this policy (as
opposed to recording values at the lower of actual cost or net realisable value) is not
considered material.
Long term contracts are accounted for on the basis of charging the Surplus or Deficit on
the Provision of Services with the value of works and services received under the
contract during the financial year.
xvi. Investment Property
Investment properties are those that are used solely to earn rentals and/or for capital
appreciation. The definition is not met if the property is used in any way to facilitate the
delivery of services or production of goods or is held for sale.
39

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Investment properties are measured initially at cost and subsequently at fair value, being
the price that would be received to sell such an asset in an orderly transaction between
market participants at the measurement date. As a non-financial asset, investment
properties are measured at highest and best use. Investment properties are not
depreciated but are revalued annually according to market conditions at the year-end.
Gains and losses on revaluation are posted to the Financing and Investment Income and
Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement. The same
treatment is applied to gains and losses on disposal.
Rentals received in relation to investment properties are credited to the Financing and
Investment Income line and result in a gain for the General Fund Balance. However,
revaluation and disposal gains and losses are not permitted by statutory arrangements to
have an impact on the General Fund Balance. The gains and losses are therefore
reversed out of the General Fund Balance in the Movement in Reserves Statement and
posted to the Capital Adjustment Account and (for any sale proceeds greater than
£10,000) the Capital Receipts Reserve.
xvii. Jointly Controlled Operations and Jointly Controlled Assets
Jointly controlled operations are activities undertaken by the Authority in conjunction with
other venturers that involve the use of assets and resources rather than the establishment
of a separate entity. The Authority recognises on its Balance Sheet the assets that it
controls and the liabilities that it incurs and debits and credits the Comprehensive Income
and Expenditure Statement with the expenditure it incurs and the share of income it earns
from the activity of the operation.
Jointly controlled assets are items of property, plant or equipment that are jointly controlled
by the Authority and other venturers, with the assets being used to obtain benefits for the
venturers. The joint venture does not involve the establishment of a separate entity. The
Authority accounts for only its share of the jointly controlled assets, the liabilities and
expenses that it incurs on its own behalf or jointly with others in respect of its interest in the
joint venture and income that it earns from the venture.
xviii. Leases
Leases are classified as finance leases where the terms of the lease transfer substantially
all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership of the property, plant or equipment from
the lessor to the lessee. All other leases are classified as operating leases.
Where a lease covers both land and buildings, the land and buildings elements are
considered separately for classification.
Arrangements that do not have the legal status of a lease but convey a right to use an
asset in return for payment are accounted for under this policy where fulfilment of the
arrangement is dependent on the use of specific assets.
40

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Authority as Lessee
Finance Leases
Property, plant and equipment held under finance leases is recognised on the Balance
Sheet at the commencement of the lease at its fair value measured at the lease's
inception (or the present value of the minimum lease payments, if lower). The asset
recognised is matched by a liability for the obligation to pay the lessor. Initial direct costs
of the Authority are added to the carrying amount of the asset. Premiums paid on entry
into a lease are applied to writing down the lease liability. Contingent rents are charged
as expenses in the periods in which they are incurred.
Lease payments are apportioned between:

a charge for the acquisition of the interest in the property, plant or equipment -
applied to write down the lease liability, and

a finance charge (debited to the Financing and Investment Income and Expenditure
line in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement).
Property, Plant and Equipment recognised under finance leases is accounted for using
the policies applied generally to such assets, subject to depreciation being charged over
the lease term if this is shorter than the asset's estimated useful life (where ownership of
the asset does not transfer to the Authority at the end of the lease period).
The Authority is not required to raise council tax to cover depreciation or revaluation and
impairment losses arising on leased assets. Instead, a prudent annual contribution is
made from revenue funds towards the deemed capital investment in accordance with
statutory requirements. Depreciation and revaluation and impairment losses are
therefore substituted by a revenue contribution in the General Fund Balance, by way of
an adjusting transaction with the Capital Adjustment Account in the Movement in
Reserves Statement for the difference between the two.
Operating Leases
Rentals paid under operating leases are charged to the Comprehensive Income and
Expenditure Statement as an expense of the services benefiting from use of the leased
property, plant or equipment. Charges are made on a straight-line basis over the life of
the lease, even if this does not match the pattern of payments (e.g. there is a rent-free
period at the commencement of the lease).
41

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Authority as Lessor
Finance Leases
Where the Authority grants a finance lease over a property or an item of plant or
equipment, the relevant asset is written out of the Balance Sheet as a disposal. At the
commencement of the lease, the carrying amount of the asset in the Balance Sheet
(whether Property, Plant and Equipment or Assets Held for Sale) is written off to the
Other Operating Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement as part of the gain or loss on disposal. A gain, representing the Authority's net
investment in the lease, is credited to the same line in the Comprehensive Income and
Expenditure Statement also as part of the gain or loss on disposal (i.e. netted off against
the carrying value of the asset at the time of disposal), matched by a lease (long-term
debtor) asset in the Balance Sheet.
Lease rentals receivable are apportioned between:

a charge for the acquisition of the interest in the property - applied to write down the
lease debtor (together with any premiums received), and

finance income (credited to the Financing and Investment Income and Expenditure
line in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement).
The gain credited to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement on disposal
is not permitted by statute to increase the General Fund Balance and is required to be
treated as a capital receipt. Where a premium has been received, this is posted out of
the General Fund Balance to the Capital Receipts Reserve in the Movement in Reserves
Statement. Where the amount due in relation to the lease asset is to be settled by the
payment of rentals in future financial years, this is posted out of the General Fund
Balance to the Deferred Capital Receipts Reserve in the Movement in Reserves
Statement. 
When the future rentals are received, the element for the capital receipt for the disposal
of the asset is used to write down the lease debtor. At this point, the deferred capital
receipts are transferred to the Capital Receipts Reserve.
The written-off value of disposals is not a charge against council tax, as the cost of non-
current assets is fully provided for under separate arrangements for capital financing.
Amounts are therefore appropriated to the Capital Adjustment Account from the General
Fund Balance in the Movement in Reserves Statement.
42

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Operating Leases
Where the Authority grants an operating lease over a property or an item of plant or
equipment, the asset is retained in the Balance Sheet. Rental income is credited to the
Other Operating Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement. Credits are made on a straight-line basis over the life of the lease, even if this
does not match the pattern of payments (e.g. there is a premium paid at the
commencement of the lease). Initial direct costs incurred in negotiating and arranging the
lease are added to the carrying amount of the relevant asset and charged as an expense
over the lease term on the same basis as rental income.
Most leases granted by the Authority as lessor relate to commercial properties. 
xix. Overheads and Support Services
The costs of overheads and support services are charged to service segments in
accordance
with
the
Authority's
arrangements
for
accountability
and
financial
performance.
xx. Property, Plant and Equipment
Assets that have physical substance and are held for use in the production or supply of
goods or services, for rental to others, or for administrative purposes and that are
expected to be used during more than one financial year are classified as Property, Plant
and Equipment. 
Recognition
Expenditure on the acquisition, creation or enhancement of Property, Plant and
Equipment is capitalised on an accruals basis, provided that it is probable that the future
economic benefits or service potential associated with the item will flow to the Authority
and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. Expenditure that maintains but does
not add to an asset's potential to deliver future economic benefits or service potential (i.e.
repairs and maintenance) is charged as an expense when it is incurred.
Measurement
Assets are initially measured at cost, comprising:

the purchase price,

any costs attributable to bringing the asset to the location and condition necessary for
it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management.
The Authority does not capitalise borrowing costs incurred whilst assets are under
construction.
43

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The cost of assets acquired other than by purchase is deemed to be its fair value, unless
the acquisition does not have commercial substance (i.e. it will not lead to a variation in
the cash flows of the Authority). In the latter case, where an asset is acquired via an
exchange, the cost of the acquisition is the carrying amount of the asset given up by the
Authority.
Assets are then carried in the Balance Sheet using the following measurement bases:

infrastructure and community assets - depreciated historical cost,

council dwellings - current value, determined using the basis of existing use value for
social housing (EUV-SH),

school buildings - current value, but because of their specialist nature, are measured
at depreciated replacement cost which is used as an estimate of current value,

surplus assets - the current value measurement base is fair value, estimated at
highest and best use from a market participant's perspective,

all other assets - current value, determined as the amount that would be paid for the
asset in its existing use (existing use value - EUV).
Where there is no market-based evidence of current value because of the specialist
nature of an asset, depreciated replacement cost (DRC) is used as an estimate of current
value.
Where non-property assets that have short useful lives or low values (or both),
depreciated historical cost basis is used as a proxy for current value.
Assets included in the Balance Sheet at current value are revalued sufficiently regularly to
ensure that their carrying amount is not materially different from their current value at the
year-end, but as a minimum every five years. Increases in valuations are matched by
credits to the Revaluation Reserve to recognise unrealised gains. Exceptionally, gains
might be credited to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement where they
arise from the reversal of a loss previously charged to a service.
Where decreases in value are identified, they are accounted for as follows:

for a balance of revaluation gains for the asset in the Revaluation Reserve, the
carrying amount of the asset is written down against that balance (up to the amount of
the accumulated gains).

where there is no balance in the Revaluation Reserve or an insufficient balance, the
carrying amount of the asset is written down against the relevant service line(s) in the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement.
44

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Revaluation Reserve contains revaluation gains recognised since 1 April 2007 only,
the date of its formal implementation. Gains arising before that date have been
consolidated into the Capital Adjustment Account.
Impairment
Assets are assessed at each year-end as to whether there is any indication that an asset
may be impaired. Where indications exist and any possible differences are estimated to
be material, the recoverable amount of the asset is estimated and, where this is less than
the carrying amount of the asset, an impairment loss is recognised for the shortfall.
Where impairment losses are identified, they are accounted for as follows:
• 
for a balance of revaluation gains for the asset in the Revaluation Reserve, the
carrying amount of the asset is written down against that balance (up to the amount
of the accumulated gains).

where there is no balance in the Revaluation Reserve or an insufficient balance, the
carrying amount of the asset is written down against the relevant service line(s) in the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement.
Where an impairment loss is reversed subsequently, the reversal is credited to the
relevant service line(s) in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement, up to
the amount of the original loss, adjusted for depreciation that would have been charged if
the loss had not been recognised.
Depreciation
Depreciation is provided for on all Property, Plant and Equipment assets by the
systematic allocation of their depreciable amounts over their estimated useful lives. No
charge is made for assets without a determinable finite useful life (i.e. freehold land and
certain Community Assets) and assets that are not yet available for use (i.e. assets
under construction). From 1st April 2017 the Authority charges depreciation based on
opening balances.
Depreciation is calculated on the following bases:

traditional dwellings - straight-line allocation over the estimated useful life of the
property (80 years),

non traditional dwellings - straight-line allocation over the estimated useful life of the
property (30 years),

other buildings - straight-line allocation over the estimated useful life of the property
and, where applicable, its significant components (1 to 60 years),

vehicles, plant, furniture and equipment - straight line allocation over the estimated
useful life of the asset (2 to 10 years),
45

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS

infrastructure / community assets - straight-line allocation over the estimated useful
life of the asset (20 to 40 years),

surplus assets - per original allocated estimated useful life from original categorisation
unless indication of amendments required to this assessment is apparent.
Each accounting period the estimated useful life assigned to individual assets is
assessed. Where there is evidence to indicate the departure from a standard useful life
the asset's estimated useful life will be amended.
Component Accounting
In recognition that single assets may have a number of different components each having
a different estimated useful life, two factors are taken into account to determine whether a
separate valuation of components is to be recognised in the accounts in order to provide
an accurate figure for depreciation of the Authority's other land and building assets
revalued since 1st April 2010. 
1. Suitability of assets.
To 31st March 2016, the Authority deemed assets revalued during the year to be of a
suitable significant nature. Asset valuation therefore reflected assessment of component
apportionment of Building Fabric 79%, Mechanical 13%, Electrical 8% and respective
remaining estimated useful economic life. From 1st April 2016, the Authority has deemed
assets revalued under the 5 year rolling programme to be apportioned between land and
buildings.
2. Difference in rate of depreciation compared to the overall asset.
Only those elements that normally depreciate at a significantly different rate from the non
land element as a whole, had been identified for componentisation. From 1st April 2016,
the whole building element will be depreciated using the building fabric's useful life
(unless evidence suggests this is to be amended).
Assets that fall below the de-minimis levels and tests above are disregarded for
componentisation on the basis that any adjustment to depreciation charges would not
result in a material mis-statement in the accounts.
Professional judgement will be used in establishing materiality levels: the significance of
components and apportionment applied, useful lives, depreciation methods and
apportioning asset values over recognised components.
Where there is a major refurbishment of an asset, a new valuation will be sought in the 
year of completion and a reassessment of the useful life.
46

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Disposals and Non-Current Assets Held for Sale
When it becomes probable that the carrying amount of an asset will be recovered
principally through a sale transaction rather than through its continuing use, it is
reclassified as an Asset Held for Sale. The asset is revalued immediately before
reclassification and then carried at the lower of this amount and fair value less costs to
sell. Where there is a subsequent decrease to fair value less costs to sell, the loss is
posted to the Other Operating Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income and
Expenditure Statement. Gains in fair value are recognised only up to the amount of any
previous losses recognised in the Surplus or Deficit on Provision of Services. Depreciation
is not charged on Assets Held for Sale.
If assets no longer meet the criteria to be classified as Assets Held for Sale, they are
reclassified back to non-current assets and valued at the lower of their carrying amount
before they were classified as held for sale; adjusted for depreciation, amortisation or
revaluations that would have been recognised had they not been classified as Held for
Sale, and their recoverable amount at the date of the decision not to sell.
When an asset is disposed of or decommissioned, the carrying amount of the asset in the
Balance Sheet (whether Property, Plant and Equipment or Assets Held for Sale) is written
off to the Other Operating Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement as part of the gain or loss on disposal. Receipts from disposals (if any) are
credited to the same line in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement also
as part of the gain or loss on disposal (i.e. netted off against the carrying value of the asset
at the time of disposal). Any revaluation gains accumulated for the asset in the
Revaluation Reserve are transferred to the Capital Adjustment Account.
Amounts received for a disposal in excess of £10,000 are categorised as capital receipts.
Such receipts are required to be credited to the Capital Receipts Reserve, and can then
only be used for new capital investment or set aside to reduce the Authority's underlying
need to borrow (the capital financing requirement). Receipts are appropriated to the
Reserve from the General Fund Balance in the Movement in Reserves Statement.
The written-off value of disposals is not a charge against council tax, as the cost of non
current assets is fully provided for under separate arrangements for capital financing.
Amounts are appropriated to the Capital Adjustment Account from the General Fund
Balance in the Movement in Reserves Statement.
47

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
xxi. Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets
Provisions
Provisions are made where an event has taken place that gives the Authority a legal or
constructive obligation that probably requires settlement by a transfer of economic benefits
or service potential, and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.
For instance, the Authority may be involved in a court case that could eventually result in
the making of a settlement or the payment of compensation.
Provisions are charged as an expense to the appropriate service line in the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement in the year that the obligation arises,
and are measured at the best estimate at the Balance Sheet date of the expenditure
required to settle the obligation, taking into account relevant risks and uncertainties.
When payments are eventually made, they are charged to the provisions carried in the
Balance Sheet. Estimated settlements are reviewed at the end of each financial year -
where it becomes less than probable that a transfer of economic benefits will now be
required (or a lower settlement than anticipated is made), the provision is reversed and
credited back to the relevant service.
Where some or all of the payment required to settle a provision is expected to be
recovered from another party (e.g. from an insurance claim), this is only recognised as
income for the relevant service if it is virtually certain that reimbursement will be received if
the Authority settles the obligation.
Provision for Back Pay Arising from Unequal Pay Claims
The Authority implemented an equal pay compliant pay and grading structure from 1st
April 2014.
In 2017/18 the Council settled £257k of unequal pay claims. These payments were funded
by earmarked reserves. During 2016/17 the Council settled further unequal pay claims
totalling £5.401m (including composite payments to HMRC). This was funded from
existing provisions.
Contingent Liabilities
A contingent liability arises where an event has taken place that gives the Authority a
possible obligation whose existence will only be confirmed by the occurrence or otherwise
of uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Authority. Contingent
liabilities also arise in circumstances where a provision would otherwise be made but
either it is not probable that an outflow of resources will be required or the amount of the
obligation cannot be measured reliably.
48

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Contingent liabilities are not recognised in the Balance Sheet but disclosed in a note to
the accounts.
Contingent Assets
A contingent asset arises where an event has taken place that gives the Authority a
possible asset whose existence will only be confirmed by the occurrence or otherwise of
uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Authority. 
Contingent assets are not recognised in the Balance Sheet but disclosed in a note to the
accounts where it is probable that there will be an inflow of economic benefits or service
potential.
xxii. Reserves
The Authority sets aside specific amounts as reserves for future policy purposes or to
cover contingencies. Reserves are created by appropriating amounts out of the General
Fund Balance. When expenditure to be financed from a reserve is incurred, it is charged
to the appropriate service in that year to score against the Surplus or Deficit on the
Provision of Services in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement. The
reserve is then appropriated back into the General Fund Balance so that there is no net
charge against council tax for the expenditure.
Certain reserves are kept to manage the accounting processes for non-current assets,
financial instruments, retirement and employee benefits and do not represent usable
resources for the Authority - these reserves are explained in the relevant policies.
xxiii. Revenue Expenditure Funded from Capital under Statute
Expenditure incurred during the year that may be capitalised under statutory provisions
but that does not result in the creation of a non-current asset has been charged as
expenditure to the relevant service in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement in the year. Where the Authority has determined to meet the cost of this
expenditure from existing capital resources or by borrowing, a transfer in the Movement in
Reserves Statement from the General Fund Balance to the Capital Adjustment Account
then reverses out the amounts charged so that there is no impact on the level of council
tax.
xxiv. VAT
VAT payable is included as an expense only to the extent that it is not recoverable from
Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs (HMRC). VAT receivable is excluded from income.
49

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Authority undertakes an annual review of its de-minimus VAT position under s33 of
the VAT Act 1993 as required by HMRC. For the year ended 31st March 2018 the
Authority believes that it will be below the de-minimus level in respect of exempt related
input tax and hence will be entitled to recovery of input tax in full.
xxv. Carbon Reduction Commitment Allowances
The Authority is required to participate in the Carbon Reduction Commitment Energy
Efficiency Scheme. This scheme is currently in the third year of its second phase, which
ends on 31st March 2019. The Authority is required to purchase allowances, either
prospectively or retrospectively, and surrender them on the basis of emissions, i.e. carbon
dioxide produced as energy is used. As carbon dioxide is emitted (i.e. as energy is used),
a liability and an expense are recognised. The liability will be discharged by surrendering
allowances. Ths liability is measured at the best estimate of the expenditure required to
meet the obligation, normally at the current market price of the number of allowances
required to meet the liability at the reporting date. The cost to the Authority is recognised
and reported in the costs of the Authority's services and is apportioned to services on the
basis of energy consumption.
xxvi. Fair Value Measurement
The Authority measures some of its non-financial assets such as surplus assets and
investment properties and some of its financial instruments such as equity shareholdings
at fair value at each reporting date. Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an
asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at
the measurement date. The fair value measurement assumes that the transaction to sell
the asset or transfer the liability takes place either :
a)    in the principal market for the asset or liability, or
b)
in the absence of a principal market, in the most advantageous market for the asset or
liability.
The Authority measures the fair value of an asset or liability using the assumptions that
market participants would use when pricing the asset or liability, assuming that market
participants act in their economic best interest.
When measuring the fair value of a non-financial asset, the authority takes into account a
market participant's ability to generate economic benefits by using the asset in its highest
and best use or by selling it to another market participant that would use the asset in its
highest and best use.
The Authority uses valuation techniques that are appropriate in the circumstances and for
which sufficient data is available, maximising the use of relevant observable inputs and
minimising the use of unobservable inputs.
50

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Inputs to the valuation techniques in respect of assets and liabilities for which fair value is
measured or disclosed in the authority's financial statements are categorised within the fair
value hierarchy, as follows:
Level 1  -  quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities 
that the authority can access at the measurement date,
Level 2 - inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for 
the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly,
Level 3 - unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.
xxvii. Group Accounting Policies
The accounting policies for both City and County of Swansea and City and County of 
Swansea Group are materially aligned except for the valuation of assets in respect of the 
Wales National Pool Swansea. The assets of the Wales National Pool Swansea have 
been valued on a different basis within the company's accounts to that used by the Council 
for assets of this nature. For the purposes of the Group accounts, the National Pool has 
been separately valued by the Council in accordance with its own accounting policies. Full 
disclosure of the different valuations have been included on page 127 to the financial 
statements.
2. Accounting standards that have been issued but have not yet been adopted
The Code of Practice on Local Authority Accounting in the United Kingdom 2017/18 (the
Code) has introduced accounting policy changes in relation to the following:
a) IFRS 9 Financial Instruments
b) IFRS 15 Revenue from Contracts with Customers including amendments to IFRS 15 
and Clarifications to IFRS 15 Revenue from contracts with Customers
c) Amendments to IAS 12  Income Taxes: Recognition of Deferred Tax Assets for 
Unrealised Losses
d) Amendments to IAS 7 Statement of Cash Flows: Disclosure Initiative
The adoption of 2a) and 2b) follow transitional reporting requirements that do not require
the Authority to publish a third Balance Sheet.
The adoption of 2d) will not require the publication of a third Balance Sheet.
The implementation of 2c) represents a change in accounting policy so the Authority will
be required to publish a third Balance Sheet for the beginning of the earliest comparative
period where the changes adopted in the Authority and Group Accounts are material.
51

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
3. Critical judgements in applying accounting policies
In applying the accounting policies set out in note 1, the Authority has had to make
certain judgements about complex transactions or those involving uncertainty about
future events.
The critical judgements made in the Statement of Accounts are:-
─ The medium term financial plan approved by the Authority on 6th March 2018
detailed significant ongoing forecast revenue funding shortfalls over the medium
term. Current indications are that there will be significant real terms reductions in
Revenue and Capital support from Central Government from 2019/20 onwards.
Whilst the Authority will consider future spending plans in line with projected
funding announcements there is no indication at present that any of the assets of
the Authority may be impaired as a result of a need to close facilities and reduce
the level of service provision.
─ The Authority implemented an equality compliant pay and grading structure for its
employees from 1st April 2014. At the same time, the Authority continues to face a
residual number of claims from past and existing employees based on equal pay
grounds. In determining the extent of the resources to be set aside the Authority
has made assumptions regarding the number of potential claimants and the
potential value of their respective claims. The Authority is confident that it has
sufficient resource to meet the remaining liabilities arising from equal pay issues.
─ The Government has made fundamental changes in respect of the provision of
public sector pensions. On 9th March 2012, the Government confirmed details for
the new Teachers Pension Scheme which were introduced in 2015, with changes
to employee contribution rates from April 2012. Changes to employer contribution
rates in the Teachers' Pension Scheme took effect from September 2015.
Employer rates increased from 14.1% to 16.48%.
A re-modelled Local
Government Pension scheme was introduced from 1st April 2014 but there is no
indication that the finances of the Authority will be adversely affected by any of the
changes. The LGPS triennial valuation in 2016 has confirmed the affordability of
future contribution rates.
─ In line with accounting standards the Authority has made a significant provision in
respect of final remedial work and future maintenance/monitoring of its major
waste disposal site at Tir John. Assumptions regarding remediation and aftercare
costs have been based on legal requirements to monitor the site for a period of 60
years following closure and have been calculated taking into account commitments
currently within the Council's Capital Programme.
52

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS

The Authority has undertaken a fundamental review in 2012/13 of its Schools
portfolio with a view to both rationalising and significantly improving the quality
of school premises available across the City and County (21st Century Schools
Programme). In the light of this scheme and the outline timescale for
implementation, the useful lives of some school buildings have been re-
evaluated and considerably reduced from that previously used. The effect of
this is to accelerate residual depreciation affecting both the Comprehensive
Income and Expenditure Statement and the net book value as shown on the
Balance Sheet. As the Schools Programme has progressed there has been
further re-evaluations however there are no adjustments in 2017/18.
4. Assumptions made about the future and other sources of estimation 
uncertainty

The Statement of Accounts contains estimated figures that are based on
assumptions made by the Authority about the future or that are otherwise uncertain.
Estimates are made taking into account historical experience, current trends and
other relevant factors. However, because balances cannot be determined with
certainty, actual results could be materially different from the assumptions and
estimates.
The items in the Authority's Balance Sheet as at 31st March 2018 for which there is a
significant risk of material adjustment in the forthcoming year are as follows:-
Effect if actual results differ from 
Item
Uncertainties
assumptions
Property, Plant and  Assets are depreciated over  To the extent that useful lives have
Equipment
useful lives that are 
been
determined
inappropriately
dependant upon 
the result could be:-                                                           
assumptions over the 
a)
In
the
event
of
a
further
specific life expectancy of 
reduction in useful lives there would
those assets. As stated in 
be an additional charge to revenue
note 3 a review has been 
and a reduction in the carrying
undertaken of a significant 
value of the asset.      
number of school buildings 
and in particular the impact  b) In the event that useful lives
of the Councils strategic 
have
been
underestimated
this
21st Century Schools 
would
result
in
a
substantially
Programme plan for asset 
reduced revenue charge and an
replacement.                          i n
   c  r e
   ase in the carrying value of
In addition revised useful 
such assets as and when the useful
lives have been applied to a  life is deemed to be extended.
number of assets during 
2017/18 in line with 
In
any
event
the
effect
of
professional judgement.
depreciation is reversed out of the
Comprehensive
Income
and
Expenditure Statement to have nil
effect on the Council taxpayer.
53

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Effect if actual results differ 
Item
Uncertainties
from assumptions
Provisions
The Authority has made a 
Any shortfall in future years will 
significant capital provision for  have to be funded via the capital 
the future remediation and 
programme.
maintenance of major land 
refuse disposal sites. 
Uncertainty arises because of 
the 60 year timescale for 
liability on this issue.
Pension liabilities
The Authority's share of the 
The Pension Fund is designed to 
Local Government pension 
be sustainable over the long term 
fund liability as at 31st March 
and it is unlikely that there will be 
2018 is £712.028m. However,  any significant short term impact 
the fund is subject to a triennial  on the Authority's finances arising 
valuation which at present 
from any assumptions currently 
reviews the level of employers  made or decisions that are likely 
contributions in order to ensure  in the coming financial year.
the long term sustainability of 
the fund. Changes to the Local 
Government Pension Scheme 
introduced on 1st April 2014 
were designed to ensure the 
long term affordability of the 
scheme.
Insurance Provisions The Authority has set aside 
Should the sums set aside prove 
and Reserves
provisions to meet contractual  insufficient to meet these 
excess amounts from known 
payments there would be an 
and existing insurance claims.  immediate revenue effect in the 
In deciding the level of 
year that the available sums were 
provision to make in respect of  exhausted. Equally, the Authority 
ongoing claims, the Authority 
regularly reviews the level of both 
has taken advice from its  legal  provisions and reserves with a 
advisers and/or  its contracted   view to releasing funds back to 
loss adjusters. The Authority 
revenue if appropriate.
also maintains an insurance 
reserve which is used to meet 
the cost of future unforeseen 
events based on previous 
experience.
54

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Effect if actual results differ 
Item
Uncertainties
from Assumptions
Fair value 
When the fair values of financial  The authority uses the 
measurements
assets and financial liabilities 
discounted cash flow (DCF) 
cannot be measured based on 
model to measure the fair value 
quoted prices in active markets 
of some of its financial assets / 
(i.e. Level 1 inputs), their fair 
liabilities.
value is measured using 
valuation techniques (e.g. quoted 
prices for similar assets or 
liabilities in active markets or the 
discounted cash flow (DCF) 
model).
Where possible, the inputs to 
The significant unobservable 
these valuation techniques are 
inputs used in the fair value 
based on observable data, but 
measurement include 
where this is not possible 
assumptions regarding rent 
judgement is required in 
levels, vacancy levels (for 
establishing fair values.  These 
investment properties), 
judgements typically include 
investment yields and discount 
considerations such as 
rates - for some financial 
uncertainty and risk.  However, 
assets.
changes in the assumptions used 
could affect the fair value of the 
Authority's assets and liabilities.
Where Level 1 inputs are not 
Significant changes in any of 
available, the Authority employs  the unobservable inputs would 
experts to identify the most 
result in a significantly lower or 
appropriate valuation techniques  higher fair value measurement 
to determine fair value (for 
for the surplus assets, 
example for surplus assets and 
investment properties and 
investment properties, the 
financial assets.
Authority's internal property 
valuation team).
Information about the valuation 
techniques and inputs used in 
determining the fair value of the 
Authority's assets and liabilities is 
disclosed in notes: 
14. Non-operational PPE 
(Surplus Assets)
16. Investment Properties
18. Financial Instruments
55

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
5. Material items of income and expense
There are no material items of income and expenditure in 2016/17 and 2017/18.
6a) Note to the Expenditure and Funding Analysis
Adjustments between Funding and Accounting Basis
2017/18
Adjustments  Net Change 
Other 
Other (Non-
Adjustments from General Fund to 
for Capital 
for Pension 
Statutory 
Total 
statutory) 
arrive at the Comprehensive Income 
Purposes 
Adjustments  Adjustments Statutory 
Adjustments  Total 
and Expenditure Statement amounts
(Note 1)
(Note 2)
(Note 3)
Adjustments (Note 4)
Adjustments
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Resources
4,335
2,021
122
6,478
-19,827
-13,349
People - Poverty & Prevention
479
729
14
1,222
0
1,222
People - Social Services
1,484
3,584
-120
4,948
0
4,948
People - Education
16,824
-233
56
16,647
54
16,701
Place
30,173
5,316
-153
35,336
3,402
38,738
Housing Revenue Account (HRA)
7,993
843
0
8,836
108
8,944
Net Cost of Services
61,288
12,260
-81
73,467
-16,263
57,204
Other income and expenditure from the 
Expenditure and Funding Analysis

-70,067
16,430
28
-53,609
16,263
-37,346
Difference between General Fund 
surplus or deficit and Comprehensive 
Income and Expenditure Statement 
Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of 
Services

-8,779
28,690
-53
19,858
0
19,858
56

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Adjustments between Funding and Accounting Basis
2016/17
Adjustments  Net Change  Other 
Other (Non-
Adjustments from General Fund to 
for Capital 
for Pension  Statutory 
Total 
statutory) 
arrive at the Comprehensive Income 
Purposes 
Adjustments  Adjustments  Statutory 
Adjustments  Total 
and Expenditure Statement amounts
(Note 1)
(Note 2)
(Note 3)
Adjustments (Note 4)
Adjustments
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Resources
6,630
632
-240
7,022
-19,857
-12,835
People - Poverty & Prevention
1,066
230
-17
1,279
0
1,279
People - Social Services
1,558
1,297
-86
2,769
0
2,769
People - Education
17,552
-2,835
-713
14,004
54
14,058
Place
25,586
1,784
1,136
28,506
3,174
31,680
Housing Revenue Account (HRA)
5,984
130
0
6,114
106
6,220
Net Cost of Services
58,376
1,238
80
59,694
-16,523
43,171
Other income and expenditure from the 
Expenditure and Funding Analysis

-70,189
18,691
49
-51,449
16,523
-34,926
Difference between General Fund 
surplus or deficit and Comprehensive 
Income and Expenditure Statement 
Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of 
Services

-11,813
19,929
129
8,245
0
8,245
57

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Adjustments for Capital Purposes
1) Adjustments for capital purposes - this column adds in depreciation and impairment and 
revaluation gains and losses in the service line, and for:
Other operating expenditure - adjusts for capital disposals with a transfer of income 
on disposal of assets and the amounts written off for those assets.
Financing and investment income and expenditure - the statutory charges for 
capital financing i.e. Minimum Revenue Provision (MRP) and other revenue 
contributions are deducted from other income and expenditure as these are not 
chargeable under generally accepted accounting practices.
Taxation and non-specific grant income and expenditure - capital grants are 
adjusted for income not chargeable under generally accepted accounting practices. 
Revenue grants are adjusted from those receivable in the year to those receivable 
without conditions or for which conditions were satisfied throughout the year. The 
Taxation and Non Specific Grant Income and Expenditure line is credited with capital 
grants receivable in the year without conditions or for which conditions were satisfied in 
the year.
Net Change for Pension Adjustments
2) Net change for the removal of pension contributions and the addition of IAS19 
Employee Benefits pension related expenditure and income:
For services this represents the removal of the employer pension contributions made 
by the Authority as allowed by statute and the replacement with current service costs 
and past service costs.
For Financing and investment income and expenditure - the net interest on the 
defined benefit liability is charged to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure 
Statement.
Other Statutory Adjustments
3)  Other statutory adjustments between amounts debited/credited to the Comprehensive 
Income and Expenditure Statement and amounts payable/receivable to be recognised 
under statute:
For Financing and investment income and expenditure the other statutory 
adjustments column recognises adjustments to the General Fund for the timing 
differences for premiums and discounts.
The charge under Taxation and non-specific grant income and expenditure 
represents the difference between what is chargeable under statutory regulations for 
council tax and NDR that was projected to be received at the start of the year and the 
income recognised under generally accepted accounting practices in the Code. This is a 
timing difference as any difference will be brought forward in future Surpluses or Deficits 
on the Collection Fund.
58

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Other Non-statutory Adjustments
4) Other non-statutory adjustments represent amounts debited/credited to service 
segments which need to be adjusted against the 'Other income and expenditure from 
the Expenditure and Funding Analysis' line to comply with the presentational 
requirements in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement:
For Financing and investment income and expenditure the other non-statutory 
adjustments column recognises adjustments to service segments e.g. for interest 
income and expenditure and changes in the fair values of investment properties.
For Taxation and non-specific grant income and expenditure the other non-statutory 
adjustments column recognises adjustments to service segments e.g. for unringfenced 
government grants.
6b) Segmental Income
Income received on a segmental basis is analysed below:
2017/18
2016/17
Services
Income from Services
Income from Services
£'000
£'000
Resources
-95,004
-93,221
People - Poverty & Prevention
-12,268
-11,245
People - Social Services
-46,946
-44,653
People - Education
-46,698
-44,917
Place
-107,134
-106,157
Housing Revenue Account 
(HRA)
-61,249
-60,689
Total income analysed on a 
segmental basis

-369,299
-360,882
59

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
7. Expenditure and Income Analysed by Nature
The Authority's expenditure and income is analysed as follows:
2016/17
2017/18
Expenditure/Income
£'000
£'000
Expenditure
Employee expenses
333,928
351,063
Premises
45,386
45,518
Transport
27,602
27,608
Supplies & Services
156,486
106,551
Other Costs
172,837
223,885
Depreciation, amortisation and impairment
52,994
56,467
Interest payments
20,420
20,385
Precepts and levies
31,502
32,849
Gain or loss on the disposal of assets
-442
-1,271
Total expenditure
840,713
863,055
Income
Fees, charges and other service income
-221,754
-230,734
Interest and investment income
-359
-203
Income from council tax
-105,152
-109,236
Government grants and contributions
-499,511
-500,317
Total income
-826,776
-840,490
Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of Services
13,937
22,565
8. Adjustments Between Accounting Basis and Funding Basis Under Regulations
This note details the adjustments that are made to the total Comprehensive Income and
Expenditure recognised by the Authority in the year in accordance with proper accounting
practice to arrive at the resources that are specified by statutory provisions as being
available to the Authority to meet future capital and revenue expenditure.
The following sets out a description of the reserves that the adjustments are made against.
General Fund Balance
The General Fund is the statutory fund into which all the receipts of an Authority are
required to be paid and out of which all liabilities of the Authority are to be met, except to
the extent that statutory rules might provide otherwise. These rules can also specify the
financial year in which liabilities and payments should impact on the General Fund
Balance, which is not necessarily in accordance with proper accounting practice. The
General Fund Balance therefore summarises the resources that the Council is statutorily
empowered to spend on its services or on capital investment (or the deficit of resources
that the Council is required to recover) at the end of the financial year.
60

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Housing Revenue Account Balance
The Housing Revenue Account Balance reflects the statutory obligation to maintain a revenue
account for local authority council housing provision in accordance with Part VI of the Local
Government and Housing Act 1989. It contains the balance of income and expenditure as defined
by the 1989 Act that is available to fund future expenditure in connection with the Council's landlord
function or (where in deficit) that is required to be recovered from tenants in future years.
Capital Receipts Reserve
The Capital Receipts Reserve holds the proceeds from the disposal of land or other assets, which
are restricted by statute from being used other than to fund new capital expenditure or to be set
aside to finance historical capital expenditure. The balance on the reserve shows the resources that
have yet to be applied for these purposes at the year-end.
Capital Grants Unapplied
The Capital Grants Unapplied Account (Reserve) holds the grants and contributions received
towards capital projects for which the Council has met the conditions that would otherwise require
repayment of the monies but which have yet to be applied to meet expenditure. The balance is
restricted by grant terms as to the capital expenditure against which it can be applied and / or the
financial year in which this can take place.
2017/18
Usable Reserves
 
e
u

 
 
n
ts
 
d
e
ip
ts
n
v
e
n
u
e
c
 R
e
ra
d
l F
e
g
t
n

l R
e
l G
lie
ra
c
in
u
p
e
n
s
rv
o
ita
e
ita
p
n
la
u
c
p
s
p
a
e
a
o
c
a
e
a
n
G
B
H
A
C
R
C
U
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Adjustments to the Revenue Resources
Amounts by which income and expenditure included in the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement are
different from revenue for the year calculated in accordance
with statutory requirements:
- Pensions costs (transferred to (or from) the Pensions
Reserve)
27,026
1,590
0
0
- Financial instruments (transferred to the Financial Instruments 
Adjustments Account)
17
-6
0
0
- Holiday pay (transferred to the Accumulated Absences
Reserve)
57
74
0
0
Reversal of entries included in the Surplus or Deficit on the
Provision of Services in relation to capital expenditure (these
items are charged to the Capital Adjustment Account):
40,710
-1,165
0
-1,453
Total Adjustments to Revenue Resources
67,810
493
0
-1,453
61

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
2017/18
Usable Reserves
 
e
u

 
 
n
ts
 
d
e
ip
ts
n
v
e
n
u
e
c
 R
e
ra
d
l F
e
g
t
n

l R
e
l G
lie
ra
c
in
u
p
e
n
s
rv
o
ita
e
ita
p
n
la
u
c
p
s
p
a
e
a
o
c
a
e
a
n
G
B
H
A
C
R
C
U
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Adjustments between Revenue and Capital 
Resources

Transfer of non-current asset sale proceeds from 
revenue to the Capital Receipts Reserve
-1,271
0
5,492
0
Statutory provision for the repayment of debt (transfer 
from the Capital Adjustment Account)
-14,558
-2,882
0
0
Capital expenditure financed from revenue balances 
(transfer to the Capital Adjustment Account)
-3,392 -26,350
0
0
Total Adjustments between Revenue and Capital 
Resources

-19,221 -29,232
5,492
0
Adjustments to Capital Resources
Use of Capital Receipts Reserve to finance capital 
expenditure
0
0
-14
0
Cash payments in relation to deferred capital receipts
0
0
-5,117
0
Total Adjustments to Capital Resources
0
0
-5,131
0
Total Adjustments
48,589 -28,739
361
-1,453
62

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
2016/17 Comparative Figures
Usable Reserves
 
e
u

 
 
n
ts
 
d
e
ip
ts
n
v
e
n
u
e
c
 R
e
ra
d
l F
e
g
t
n

l R
e
l G
lie
ra
c
in
u
p
e
n
s
rv
o
ita
e
ita
p
n
la
u
c
p
s
p
a
e
a
o
c
a
e
a
n
G
B
H
A
C
R
C
U
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Adjustments to the Revenue Resources
Amounts by which income and expenditure included in 
the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement 
are different from revenue for the year calculated in 
accordance with statutory requirements:
- Pensions costs (transferred to (or from) the Pensions 
Reserve)
18,864
1,198
0
0
- Financial instruments (transferred to the Financial 
Instruments Adjustments Account)
55
-3
0
0
- Holiday pay (transferred to the Accumulated Absences 
Reserve)
-1,211
-133
0
0
Reversal of entries included in the Surplus or Deficit on 
the Provision of Services in relation to capital 
expenditure (these items are charged to the Capital 
Adjustment Account):
39,183
-3,033
0
-3,822
Total Adjustments to Revenue Resources
56,891
-1,971
0
-3,822
Adjustments between Revenue and Capital 
Resources

Transfer of non-current asset sale proceeds from 
revenue to the Capital Receipts Reserve
-442
0
3,988
0
Statutory provision for the repayment of debt (transfer 
from the Capital Adjustment Account)
-11,156
-2,703
0
0
Capital expenditure financed from revenue balances 
(transfer to the Capital Adjustment Account)
-4,380 -28,000
0
0
Total Adjustments between Revenue and Capital 
Resources

-15,978 -30,703
3,988
0
63

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
2016/17 Comparative Figures
Usable Reserves
 
e
u

 
 
n
ts
 
d
e
ip
ts
n
v
e
n
u
e
c
 R
e
ra
d
l F
e
g
t
n

l R
e
l G
lie
ra
c
in
u
p
e
n
s
rv
o
ita
e
ita
p
n
la
u
c
p
s
p
a
e
a
o
c
a
e
a
n
G
B
H
A
C
R
C
U
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Adjustments to Capital Resources
Use of Capital Receipts Reserve to finance capital 
expenditure
0
0
-77
0
Cash payments in relation to deferred capital receipts
0
0
-5,716
0
Total Adjustments to Capital Resources
0
0
-5,793
0
Total Adjustments
40,913 -32,674
-1,805
-3,822
9. Events After the Balance Sheet Date
Events after the Balance Sheet date are those events, both favourable and unfavourable, that
occur between the end of the reporting period and the date when the Statement of Accounts is
authorised for issue. Two types of events can be identified:
- those that provide evidence of conditions that existed at the end of the reporting period - the
Statement of Accounts is adjusted to reflect such events.
- those that are indicative of conditions that arose after the reporting period - the Statement of
Accounts is not adjusted to reflect such events, but where a category of events would have a
material effect, disclosure is made in the notes of the nature of the events and their estimated
financial effect.
There are no known events that would have a material impact on these accounts.
64

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
10. Movements In  Earmarked Reserves
This note sets out the amounts set aside from the General Fund and HRA balances in
earmarked reserves to provide financing for future expenditure plans and the amounts
posted back from earmarked reserves to meet General Fund and HRA expenditure in
2017/18.

s



u
 
 
 
u
 
t 1
 O
 In

h
 O
 In

h
 a
6
 a
 a
e
1
rs
rs
e
rc
rs
rs
e
rc
c
0
fe
7
fe
7
c
a
fe
8
fe
8
c
a
n
s
/1
s
/1
n
s
/1
s
/1
n
la
ril 2
n
6
n
6
la
t M
7
n
7
n
7
la
t M
8
a
p
1
1
s
1
1
1
s
1
ra
0
ra
0
a
1
0
ra
0
ra
0
a
1
0
B
A
T
2
T
2
B
3
2
T
2
T
2
B
3
2
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
General Fund:
Balances held by schools 
under the scheme of 
delegation
9,547
-2,095
123
7,575
-474
0
7,101
Primary School Sickness 
Scheme Reserve
145
-145
13
13
-13
158
158
Information technology 
reserves
462
-52
5
415
-24
1,092
1,483
Development reserves
4,426
-69
227
4,584
-73
159
4,670
Insurance reserves
14,092
-2,951
4,554
15,695
-10
1,116
16,801
Restructuring Costs reserve
9,497
-1,018
0
8,479
-801
0
7,678
Other earmarked revenue 
reserves
12,356
-2,157
3,201
13,400
-4,364
3,335
12,371
Revenue reserve 
earmarked to fund future 
capital expenditure
5,496
0
84
5,580
169
3,071
8,820
Total
56,021
-8,487
8,207
55,741
-5,590
8,931
59,082
HRA:
Housing Revenue Account
15,233
-5,412
0
9,821
-3,040
0
6,781
65

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
11. Other Operating Expenditure
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
967 Community Council precepts
965
18,530 South Wales Police Authority precept
19,525
12,005 Levies and Contributions
12,359
-441 Gains/losses on the disposals of non-current assets
-1,271
31,061
31,578
12. Financing and Investment Income and Expenditure
2016/17
2017/18
Gross 
Gross  Net Exp
Gross  Gross  Net Exp
Exp Income
Exp Income
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Interest payable and similar 
20,419
0
20,419 charges
20,384
0
20,384
Net interest on the net 
48,440 -29,750
18,690 defined benefit liability (asset)
42,750 -26,320
16,430
Interest receivable and 
0
-358
-358 similar income
0
-203
-203
Income and expenditure in 
relation to investment 
properties and changes in 
3,084
-5,891
-2,807 their fair value
1,338
-7,039
-5,701
71,943 -35,999
35,944
64,472 -33,562
30,910
The income generated from investment properties during the year amounted to £4.226m
(2016/17 £4.106m) and changes to the fair value of investment properties amounted to
£2.154m (2016/17 -£0.510m).
13. Taxation and Non Specific Grant Income
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
-105,152 Council tax income (note 42)
-109,236
-73,224 Non domestic rates (note 43)
-79,531
-234,543 Non-ringfenced government grants
-231,169
-24,157 Capital grants and contributions
-19,518
-23 Other grants
-505
-437,099
-439,959
66

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
14. Property, Plant and Equipment
Movement on Balances
Movements in 2017/18:
 
                   
     
s
re
 
ts

 
t               
g
itu
n
re
 
e
s
e
n
t                          
 
d
e
s
d
 
s
n
in

rn
tu
ity
n
tio

n
u
m
c
n
d
 A
c
e
il 
g
a
ild
s
        
u
            
s
 U
n
c
u
le
ip
tru
rty
tru
m
n
llin
r L
e
ic
t, F
u
s
ts
m
ts
lu
ts
s

t a
ip
u
e
e
 B
h
n
q
e
m
e
rp
e
n
ta
p
n
u
o
w
th
d
s
s
s
n
e
la
 E
fra
s
o
s
u
s
o
o
ro
la
q
C
D
O
a
V
P
&
In
A
C
A
S
A
C
T
P
P
E
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Cost or 
valuation
At 1 April 2017
389,108 658,247 35,702 380,961 15,989 88,966 30,919 1,599,892
additions (Cap 
Exp)
43,174
8,401
3,625
8,692
79
581 13,205
77,757
additions (Other)
0
340
159
0
0
1,645
0
2,144
revaluation 
increases  /      
(decreases) 
recognised in the 
Revaluation 
Reserve
-41,570 -17,008
0
0
0
5,970
0
-52,608
revaluation 
increases / 
(decreases) 
recognised in the 
Surplus/Deficit 
on the Provision 
of Services
-2,208
133
0
0
-79 -5,085
0
-7,239
impairment 
losses 
recognised in the 
Surplus/Deficit 
on the Provision 
of Services
0
-1,234
-592
0
0
0
0
-1,826
derecognition - 
disposals
0
0
-932
0
0 -2,904
0
-3,836
assets 
reclassified 
to/from Held for 
Sale
0
0
0
0
0
-299
0
-299
67

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Movements in 2017/18 (continued):
 
            
s
ts
g
 
e
d
t, 
s
                   

llin
n
n
 
s
ts

e
rty
 a
la
 
re
 A
e
s
e
n
e
t                          
w
d
t               
d
 
n
     
tu
ity
s
p
n
s
, P
 &
n
n
tio
d
e
c
n
 A
c
e
il D
a
g
s
re
        
u
s
 U
ro
n
c
le
m
tru
tru
m
n
r L
in
ic
itu
ip
s
ts
m
lu
ts
s
l P
t a
ip
u
e
ild
h
u
e
m
rp
e
n
ta
n
u
o
th
rn
s
s
u
e
u
q
fra
s
o
u
s
o
o
la
q
C
O
B
V
F
E
In
A
C
S
A
C
T
P
E
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
reclassifications 
Cap Ex WIP
1,190
9,407
0
11
0
3,611 -14,219
0
other 
reclassifications
24
-344
0
0
0 -4,893
0
-5,213
At 31 March 2018 389,718 657,942 37,962 389,664 15,989 87,592 29,905 1,608,772
Accumulated 
Depreciation 
and Impairment
At 1 April 2017
-5,793 -42,588 -28,580 -139,350 -5,830
-30
0
-222,171
depreciation 
charge
-5,748 -25,464
-2,319
-10,795
-388 -1,027
0
-45,741
depreciation 
written out to the 
Revaluation 
Reserve
0
40,102
0
0
0
216
0
40,318
depreciation 
written out to the 
Surplus / Deficit 
on the provision 
of services
0
1,280
0
0
0
332
0
1,612
derecognition - 
disposals
0
0
842
0
0
20
0
862
other movements 
in depreciation 
and impairment
0
11
0
0
0
-11
0
0
At 31 March 
2018

-11,541 -26,659 -30,057 -150,145 -6,218
-500
0
-225,120
Net Book Value
At 1 April 2017
383,315 615,659
7,122 241,611 10,159 88,936 30,919 1,377,721
At 31 March 
2018

378,177 631,283
7,905 239,519 9,771 87,092 29,905 1,383,652
68

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Comparative Movements in 2016/17:
 
d
t, 
                   

n
n
 
ts

rty
 a
la
 
re
 
e
s
e
n
e
t                          
 
d
t               
s
d
p
 
s
n
     
tu
ity
n
s
, P
 &
n
n
tio
d
e
c
n
 A
c
e
il 
g
a
g
s
re
        
u
            
s
 U
ro
n
c
le
m
tru
tru
m
n
llin
r L
in
ic
itu
ip
s
ts
m
ts
lu
ts
s
l P
t a
ip
u
e
e
ild
h
u
e
m
e
rp
e
n
ta
n
u
o
w
th
rn
s
s
s
u
e
u
q
fra
s
o
s
u
s
o
o
la
q
C
D
O
B
V
F
E
In
A
C
A
S
A
C
T
P
E
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Cost or valuation
At 1 April 2016
388,001 639,864
36,921 370,450
15,989 53,910 17,676 1,522,811
additions(Cap 
Exp)
40,065
8,784
2,315
9,965
116
2,737 26,461
90,443
additions(Other)
0
0
0
0
0
1,544
0
1,544
revaluation 
increases / 
(decreases)  
recognised in the 
Revaluation 
Reserve
-39,325
1,034
0
0
0
2,735
0
-35,556
revaluation 
increases / 
(decreases) 
recognised in the 
Surplus/Deficit on 
the Provision of 
Services
-231
1,319
-142
0
-116 -4,938
-1,490
-5,598
impairment losses 
recognised in the 
Surplus/Deficit on 
the Provision of 
Services
0
-1,470
-139
-741
0
0
0
-2,350
derecognition  -
Disposals
-80
0
-215
0
0 -1,231
0
-1,526
assets reclassified 
to/from  Held for 
Sale
0
-1,525
0
0
0
-170
0
-1,695
reclassifications 
Cap Ex WIP
370
9,982
27
856
0
481 -11,728
-12
other 
reclassifications
308
259
-3,065
431
0 33,898
0
31,831
At 31 March 2017 389,108 658,247
35,702 380,961
15,989 88,966 30,919 1,599,892
69

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Comparative Movements in 2016/17 (continued):
        
 
ts
            
s
e
ts
g
 
s
e
d
t, 
s
s
                   

llin
n
n
 A
s
ts

e
rty
 a
la
 
re
 A
e
s
e
n
e
t                          
w
d
t               
d
 
n
     
tu
ity
s
p
n
s
, P
 &
n
n
tio
d
e
c
n
 A
c
e
il D
a
g
s
re
u
s
 U
ro
n
c
le
m
tru
tru
m
n
r L
in
ic
itu
ip
s
m
lu
ts
s
l P
t a
ip
u
e
ild
h
u
m
rp
e
n
ta
n
u
o
th
rn
s
u
e
u
q
fra
o
u
s
o
o
la
q
C
O
B
V
F
E
In
C
S
A
C
T
P
E
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Accumulated 
Depreciation and 
Impairment
At 1 April 2016
-119 -41,692 -27,483 -128,886 -5,442
0
0
-203,622
depreciation 
charge
-5,720 -26,034 -1,555
-10,332
-388
-38
0
-44,067
depreciation 
written out to the 
Revaluation 
Reserve
45
25,138
0
0
0
0
0
25,183
depreciation 
written out to the 
Surplus/Deficit on 
the provision of 
services
0
0
140
0
0
8
0
148
derecognition - 
disposals
1
0
186
0
0
0
0
187
other movements 
in depreciation 
and impairment
0
0
132
-132
0
0
0
0
At 31 March 2017
-5,793 -42,588 -28,580 -139,350 -5,830
-30
0
-222,171
Net Book Value
At 31 March 2017 383,315 615,659
7,122 241,611 10,159 88,936 30,919 1,377,721
At 1 April 2016
387,882 598,172
9,438 241,564 10,547 53,910 17,676 1,319,189
70

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
               
Capital Commitments
As at 31st March 2018 the Authority has entered into a number of contracts for the construction
or enhancement of Property, Plant and Equipment in 2018/19 and future years budgeted to cost
£10.544m.  Similar commitments at 31st March 2017 were £17.631m. 
The major commitments are:
 •  Pentrehafod Comprehensive Refurbishment £3,728k
 •  Feasibility study/planning for Swansea Central development and Civic Site £3,103k
 •  HRA Environmental Facilities Schemes £698k
 •  HRA Enveloping Properties schemes £1,484k
 •  HRA Highrise flats, Clyne & Jeffreys Court £1,531k
Revaluations
The Authority carries out a rolling programme that ensures that all property, plant and equipment
required to be measured at current value is revalued at least every five years. All valuations were
carried out internally. Valuations of land and buildings were carried out in accordance with the
methodologies and bases for estimation set out in the professional standards of the Royal
Institution of Chartered Surveyors. The valuation dates for 2017/18 were 30th June 2017, 30th
September 2017, 31st December 2017 and 31st March 2018.
The Authority has been following a 4 year rolling programme since 2016/17 and has not deviated 
from this which will ensure that all assets have been revalued in that time.
The main asset groups revalued during 2017/18 and the remaining groups to be revalued under 
the current rolling programme are as follows:
Asset Category
2017/18
2018/19
2019/20
Schools, Community 
Offices, Libraries, 
Centres, Changing 
Other Land and 
Industrial (e.g. Depots), 
Rooms, Pavilions, 
-
Buildings
Civic Amenity Sites and 
Homes for Older 
Leisure Facilities
Persons and Car Parks
City Centre, Residential  Industrial Estates and 
Surplus Assets
shared % and 
-
Residential Freehold
Agricultural
Council Houses / Flats 
Council Dwellings
-
-
and Sheltered Housing  
Complexes
Assets transferred from Assets Under Construction are also revalued each year.
In 2020/21, the rolling programme will be revised.
71

ASSET STRUCTURE
Asset Structure
The major non-current assets held by the Authority at 31st March 2018 are:
Number
Number
31/03/2017
31/03/2018
Corporate Building & Property Services
1
•        Enterprise Park
1
1
•        Civic Centre  (Swansea)
1
1
•        Guildhall 
1
1
•        St David's Shopping Centre (Part Demolished)
1
1
•        The Quadrant Shopping Centre
1
Culture & Tourism
4
•        Leisure Centres
4
1
•        LC
1
2
•        Sports Centres
2
1
•        St Helens Ground
1
1
•        Tennis Centre
1
1
•        Plantasia
1
1
•        Grand Theatre
1
1
•        Brangwyn Hall
1
1
•        Dylan Thomas Centre
1
78
•        Parks & Open Spaces (497 Hectares)
78
970
•        Foreshore (hectares)
970
1
•        Stadium
1
1
•        Bowls Hall
1
4
•        Museums
4
1
•        Art Gallery
1
1
•        Country Park - Clyne
1
1
•        Oystermouth Castle
1
17
•        Libraries
17
Education
74
•        Primary/Junior/Infants/Nursery School (excluding                  7  4
Church Schools)
13
•        Secondary Schools (excluding Church Schools)
13
5
•        Special Schools/Referral Units
5
Housing and Community Regeneration
13,500
•        Council Dwellings
13,528
9
•        Area Housing Offices
9
Marketing Communications & Scrutiny
1
•        Mansion House
1
72

ASSET STRUCTURE
Number
Number
31/03/2017
31/03/2018
Public Protection
7
•        Cemeteries
7
1
•        Crematorium
1
Regeneration & Planning 
1
•        Market
1
Social Services
11
•        Residential & Respite Facilities
12
1
•        Residential & Respite Facilities (Vacant)
0
16
•        Day & Social Centres/Activities
15
3
•        Residential & Day Centres/Activities (combined on                3
same site)      
Highways
102
•        Principal Roads - A Roads (Kilometres)
102
230
•        Non Principal Roads - B & C Roads (Kilometres)
231
773
•        Non Classified Roads (Kilometres)
774
Transportation
59
•        Car Parks
55
1
•       Swansea Bus Station (Quadrant)
1
1
•        Marina
1
1
•        Barrage
1
36,145
•        Highway Bridges (Square metres of deck area)
36,145
Waste Management
5
•        Amenity Sites
5
1
•        Landfill Sites
1
1
•        MRF (Baling Plant Llansamlet)
1
73

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Non-operational Property, Plant and Equipment (Surplus Assets)
Fair Value Hierarchy
Details of the Authority's surplus assets and information about fair value hierarchy as at 31 March 2018  and 31 March 2017 are as follows:
 
 
 
 
 
ts
le
8
8
S
ts

S
e
b
a

 
1
1
R
e
 a
R
 
s
le
0
0
s
s
e
s
rv
 2
s
e
b
 
 IF
 a
a
 2
h
 IF
 A
e
tiv
l a
s
h
m
s
c
a
b
rv
rc
 - 
lu
e
rc
a
r to
8
r to
8
lu
8
a
 a
tic
a
t o
s
 fro
Fair Value reclassified to 
1
1
1
b
d
rio
0
rio
0
rp
0
 V
 in
n
n
t M
t M
 2
 2
u
s
e
a
o
s
Surplus Assets prior to 
s
 p
 p
 2
ts
e
n
1
ifie
1
d
h
d
h
 S
h
e
r id
ific
s
31st March 2018
 3
te
rc
s
te
rc
m
rc
s
ric
n
t u
s
s
a
8
n
t 3
s
a
a
1
 p
 fo
ig
a
 a
la
 A
c
r to
ju
ju
0
d
ts
s
d
t M
 fro
s
t M
s
d
s
d
t M
 2
te
e
r s
ts
ific
ts
 a
 re
rio
 a
1
s
lu
 a
1
h
o
rk
e
u
n
u
e
e
e
e
1
ifie
rp
u
a
th
p
 p
 3
rc
ig
p
lu
lu
s
lu
t 3
lu
t 3
s
u
a
Q
m
O
in
S
in
a
a
lu
a
 a
a
 a
s
s
s
l S
la
r to
rp
ir v
 a
c
ta
t M
(Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
ir V
ir v
ir v
 a
s
a
a
u
(Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
a
3
a
3
e
rio
o
1
F
F
S
F
1
F
1
R
p
T
3
Recurring fair value measurements 
using:

£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Long Leases @ Peppercorn Rent
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Agricultural
0
0
537
537
0
0
0
0
0
0
537
City Centre
0
5,728
12,555 18,283
0
0
0
0
0
0
18,283
Industrial Units
0
0
2,152
2,152
0
0
0
0
154
0
2,306
Land only
0
1,236
44,673 45,909
0
0
0
553
0
0
46,462
High Value
0
0
260
260
0
0
0
0
0
0
260
Residential Freeholds (LRA)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
297
0
297
Residential shared %
0
0
1,021
1,021
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,021
Miscellaneous
0
4,700
19,018 23,718
-5,361
0
0
55
14
0
18,426
Total
0
11,664
80,216 91,880
-5,361
0
0
608
465
0
87,592
74

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
2016/17 Comparative Figures
7
 
 

 
7
S
S
1
1
7
 a
R
R
1
 
le
0
0
s
0
e
b
 2
 
 2
 IF
 IF
 a
a
h
h
 
 2
e
tiv

m
 - 
s
h
c
a
rv
rc
rc
lu
e
r to
r to
a
a
7
7
lu
rc
a
 a
tic
1
1

ts
s
 fro
a
b
d
Fair Value reclassified to 
rio
0
rio
0
rp
 V
 in
n
n
u
t M
t M
 2
 2
u
s
e
a
p
o
s
 p
 p
t M
ts
s
Surplus Assets prior to 
h
h
e
n
ifie
1
d
d
 S
s
e
1
r id
ific
 in
s
1
s
s
 3
31st March 2017
te
rc
te
rc
m
s
ric
n
le
t u
t 3
s
a
s
a
 3
7
n
la
1
 p
 fo
ig
b
a
 A
 a
c
r to
ju
ju
0
 fro
d
ts
 
a
s
s
d
t M
t M
s
d
s
d
r to
 2
te
e
ts
r s
rv
ific
ts
 a
lu
 re
rio
 a
1
 a
1
h
o
rk
e
e
e
n
u
e
e
e
e
ifie
rio
rp
u
a
s
s
 p
rc
s
th
b
ig
p
lu
lu
s
lu
t 3
lu
t 3
s
 p
u
a
Q
m
a
O
o
S
in
a
a
lu
a
 a
a
 a
s
s
s
ts
l S
la
e
ir V
ir v
rp
ir v
 a
ir v
 a
c
s
ta
t M
(Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
a
a
u
(Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
s
a
3
a
3
e
s
o
1
F
F
S
F
1
F
1
R
A
T
3
Recurring fair value 
measurements using:

£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Long Leases @ Peppercorn 
Rent
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
Agricultural
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
189
0
189
City Centre
0
0
2,538
2,538
0
0
5,894
7,389
3,400
0
19,221
Industrial Units
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2,207
264
0
2,471
Land only
0
1,236
44,582 45,818
0
0
0
0
0
0
45,818
High Value
0
0
260
260
0
0
0
0
0
0
260
Residential Freeholds (LRA)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
432
432
Residential shared %
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,046
0
1,046
Miscellaneous
0
792
5,195
5,987
0
0
4,458
9,009
55
19
19,528
Total
0
2,028
52,576 54,604
0
0
10,352
18,605
4,954
451
88,966
75

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Fair Value of 4 assets categorised as a level 2 in the Fair Value hierarchy in 2016/17 has
been determined using the income approach to valuation. However the tenant situation of
each asset has changed and the significant inputs used to arrive at Fair Value are less
observable than previously. This has resulted in the properties being categorised as a level 3
in 2017/18.
Valuation Techniques used to Determine Level 2 and 3 Fair Values for Surplus Assets
Significant Observable Inputs - Level 2
The fair value for some properties has been based on the market approach using current
market conditions and recent sales prices and other relevant information for similar assets in
the local Authority area. Market conditions are such that similar properties are actively
purchased and sold and the level of observable inputs are significant, leading to the properties
being categorised at Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy.
Significant Unobservable Inputs - Level 3
The surplus land located in the local authority are measured using a value per acre of land
derived from sale transactions of comparable parcels of land in similar locations. The
approach has been developed using the Authority's own data requiring it to factor in
assumptions such as the location, date of sale and size of land sold.
The Authority's surplus land is therefore categorised as Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy as
the measurement technique uses significant unobservable inputs to determine the fair value
measurements (and there is no reasonably available information that indicates that market
participants would use different assumptions).
Highest and Best Use of Surplus Assets
In estimating the fair value of the Authority's surplus assets, the highest and best use of the
properties is sometimes their current use and sometimes, as in the case of vacant land and
buildings, is the value assuming planning permission would be granted for development / or
refurbishment.
Recognition of Fair Value Measurements (using Significant Unobservable Inputs)
Categorised within Level 3 of the Fair Value Hierarchy

Long Lease @ Peppercorn Rent categorised with             31 March 2018 31 March 2017
Level 3

£'000
£'000
Opening balance
1
0
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
0
-79
Revaluation Reserves resulting from changes in the fair 
value
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in Surplus or 
0
0
Deficit on the Provision of Services resulting from changes 
in the fair value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
-1
80
Closing Balance
0
1
76

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
Agricultural categorised with Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
0
0
Transfers In - Fair Value adjustment prior to IFRS13
128
0
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
409
0
Revaluation Reserves resulting from changes in the fair 
value
Closing Balance
537
0
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
City Centre categorised with Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
9,927
0
Transfers In - Fair Value adjustment prior to IFRS13
2,356
100
Transfers into Level 3
631
0
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
793
0
Revaluation Reserves resulting from changes in the fair 
value
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in Surplus or 
-1,152
-763
Deficit on the Provision of Services resulting from changes 
in the fair value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
0
7,389
Additions
0
3,201
Closing Balance
12,555
9,927
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
Industrial Units categorised with Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
2,207
0
Transfers In - Fair Value adjustment prior to IFRS13
0
2,207
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in Surplus or 
-5
0
Deficit on the Provision of Services resulting from changes 
in the fair value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
-50
0
Closing Balance
2,152
2,207
77

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
Land Only categorised with Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
44,582
41,985
Transfers In - Fair Value adjustment prior to IFRS13
0
2,496
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
220
3,048
Revaluation Reserves resulting from changes in the fair 
value
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in Surplus or 
1
-2,690
Deficit on the Provision of Services resulting from changes 
in the fair value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
553
-275
Additions
1,400
678
Disposals
-1,530
-660
Closing Balance
45,226
44,582
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
High Value categorised with Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
260
0
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
0
46
Revaluation Reserves resulting from changes in the fair 
value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
0
214
Closing Balance
260
260
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
Residential shared % categorised with Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
0
13
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
0
-13
Closing Balance
0
0
78

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
Residential shared % categorised with Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
0
0
Transfers In - Fair Value adjustment prior to IFRS13
908
0
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
120
0
Revaluation Reserves resulting from changes in the 
fair value
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
-7
0
Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of Services 
resulting from changes in the fair value
Closing Balance
1,021
0
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
Miscellaneous categorised with Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
14,204
5,275
Transfers In - Fair Value adjustment prior to IFRS13
10
222
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
4,124
239
Revaluation Reserves resulting from changes in the 
fair value
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in 
1,577
-144
Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of Services 
resulting from changes in the fair value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
-5,558
8,849
Additions
0
763
Disposals
-645
-1,000
Closing Balance
13,712
14,204
Any gains or losses arising from changes in the fair value of Surplus assets included in
the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement are recognised in Surplus or
Deficit on the Provision of Services.
79

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Quantitative Information about Fair Value Measurement of Surplus Assets using Significant Unobservable Inputs - Level 3
As at 
Valuation technique 
Unobservable  Range (weighted 
31/03/2018 
used to measure fair 
Sensitivity
inputs
average used)
£'000
value
Long Lease @ 
Nominal amount adopted 
Peppercorn 
0
to reflect Council's 
N/A
N/A
N/A - all £1,000
Rent
reversionary value
Significant changes in land value and yield
Land Value       
£2000 - £5000 per 
Agricultural
537
Market Approach
will result in significantly lower or higher fair
per acre
acre
value
Zone A £150 to  Significant changes in rent and yields will 
Rents
City Centre
12,555
Market Approach
£1,000 per sq m result in significantly lower or higher fair 
Yield
4-8%
value
Yield
7-12%
Significant changes in rent and yields will 
Industrial Units
2,152
Market Approach
result in significantly lower or higher fair 
Rents
Various
value
Significant changes in rent and yields will 
Land Value        £100,000 to 
Land Only
45,226
Market Approach
result in significantly lower or higher fair 
per acre
£600,000 per acre value
Yield
Various
Significant changes in rent and yields will 
High Value
260
Market Approach
result in significantly lower or higher fair 
Rents
Various
value
Residential 
£115,000 - 
Significant changes in capital value will 
1,021
Market Approach
Capital Value
shared %
£135,000
result in a change to the Fair Value
Yield
5-12%
Significant changes in rent and yields will 
Miscellaneous
13,712
Market Approach
result in significantly lower or higher fair 
Rents
Various
value
TOTAL
75,463
80

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Valuation Process for Surplus Assets
The fair value of the Authority's surplus assets is measured under a rolling programme. All
valuations are carried out internally, in accordance with the methodologies and bases for
estimation set out in the professional standards of the Royal Institution of Chartered
Surveyors (RICS).
The Authority's valuation experts works closely with finance officers
reporting directly to the Chief Finance Officer on a regular basis regarding all valuation
matters.
15. Heritage Assets
Reconciliation of the Carrying Value of Heritage Assets Held by the Authority.
 
s

s
re
d
tu
n
m
 
re
u
ix
ts
a
e
e
 L
 &
tu
s
, F
s
e
s
c
u
s
s
g
g
re
g
in
tru
s
 M
itu
r
l A
rita
ild
rn
ittin
e
ta
e
u
fra
rt &
u
 F
th
o
H
B
In
A
F
&
O
T
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Cost or Valuation
At 1st April 2016
4,137
19,087
3,179
1,578
27,981
Additions (Cap Exp)
4
0
0
4
8
Revaluations
0
2,037
0
0
2,037
Recognised in the 
Surplus/Deficit on the 
provision of services
-4
0
-224
-4
-232
At 31st March 2017
4,137
21,124
2,955
1,578
29,794
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Cost or Valuation
At 1st April 2017
4,137
21,124
2,955
1,578
29,794
Additions (Cap Exp)
6
4
0
0
10
Additions (Other)
0
75
0
0
75
Revaluations
0
3
0
0
3
Recognised in the 
Surplus/ Deficit on the 
provision of services
-6
0
0
0
-6
At 31st March 2018
4,137
21,206
2,955
1,578
29,876
81

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Heritage Land, Buildings and Infrastructure
The Authority's heritage land, buildings and infrastructure assets included on the
previous page are reported in the Balance Sheet at historic cost (e.g. Oystermouth
Castle) and at valuation (e.g. Mushgrove Engine House and adj. Chimney stack, Neath
Road or Morfa Bridge - off Normandy Road, Landore). Valuations have been carried out
internally by the Authority's internal RICS valuer and internal highways engineer.
Art & Museums
The Authority's art and museums assets are mainly included at insurance valuation by
external valuers. This category includes the Brangwyn Hall panels and other sculptures,
busts, paintings and various exhibitions held by the Authority.
Other
Most of the remaining assets included above are reported in the Balance Sheet at
insurance valuation (e.g. Brangwyn Hall Organ). However, there are some held at
historic cost (e.g. Cenotaph) and others valued internally by the Authority's internal
Museums Valuer (e.g. Helwick Light Ship) and internal County Archivist (e.g. West
Glamorgan owned collections).
16. Investment Properties
The following items of income and expenses have been accounted for in the Financing
and Investment Income and Expenditure line in the Comprehensive Income and
Expenditure Statement.
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
4,106 Rental income from investment property
4,226
-790 Direct operating expenses arising from investment property
-679
3,316 Net gain
3,547
There are no restrictions on the Authority's ability to realise the value inherent in its
investment property or on the Authority's right to the remittance of income and the
proceeds of disposal. The Authority has no contractual obligations to purchase, construct
or develop investment property or repairs, maintenance or enhancement.
82

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The following table summarises the movement in the fair value of investment
properties over the year:
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
75,253 Balance at start of the year
40,375
Additions:
189 - Construction (Current)
215
-104 Disposals
0
-510 Net gains/losses from fair value adjustments
2,154
-34,453 Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
5,214
40,375 Balance at end of the year
47,958
83

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Fair Value measurement of investment property - Fair Value Hierarchy
Details of the Authority's investment properties and information about fair value hierarchy as at 31 March 2018 and 31 March 2017 are as follows:
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
le
h
8
 
e
b
 

 to
 
1
 
m
a
rc
d
s
d
s
0
r to
h
r to
rio
rty
1
 
tiv

a
rc
 fro
 p
e
h
c
a
rv
 2
e
ifie
 3
ifie
rtie
h
rio
a
rio
d
s
p
 a
tic
rc

ts
s
t M
s
s
e
 p

 p
a
b
s
s
r to
s
p
rc
d
t M
ro
d
 in
n
n
u
1
n
a
ifie
rtie
8
la
s
s
e
a
p
o
e
la
ro
te
s
e
1
c
1
te
t P
0
t M
e
n
t 3
rio
c
s
s
s
p
n
s
r id
t M
ific
 in
 a
tm
 p
8
t P
s
 2
 re
ju
la
e
ro
1
ju
ric
n
le
t u
s
 re
c
n
s
e
h
e
s
1
e
n
1
d
t   3
0
d
e
tm
 p
 fo
ig
b
a
 a
e
v
 3
lu
 a
 a
 a
t P
rc
s
t  3
d
ts
a
 
e
lu
a
rtie
 2
a
n
a
tm
e
s
e
e
 a
e
te
e
ts
r s
rv
ific
ts
lu
 In
e
h
s
r to
lu
 a
  - R
v
s
lu
o
rk
e
e
e
n
u
a
m
p
rc
e
a
3
a
3
tm
t M
 a
u
a
s
s
ir v
ir v
a
1
1
s
s
th
b
ig
p
a
ro
a
v
rio
s
l In
e
1
Q
m
a
O
o
S
in
8
8
S
8
ir v
S
1
F
fro
P
M
F
In
p
ir v
e
R
1
ir v
ta
lu
a
R
v
 3
a
1
Recurring fair value 
(Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
a
0
a
0
o
0
F
2 (Level 2) (Level 3) (Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
F
IF
2
F
IF
In
to
T
V
2
measurements using:
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Other 
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Enterprise Park
0
9,630
8,528 18,158
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
18,158
High Value
0
4,099
20,340 24,439
0
0
0
0
5,361
0
0
29,800
Right to Buy
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Long Leases @ Peppercorn 
Rent
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Residential Freeholds (LRA)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Industrial Units
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Agricultural
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Residential Shared %
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
0
13,729
28,868 42,597
0
0
0
0
5,361
0
0
47,958
84

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
2016/17 Comparative Figures
 
 
 
 
 
7
 
 
le

h
7
 
1
e
b
 

 to
 
1
 
m
0
a
rc
d
s
d
s
0
r to
h
r to
rio
rty
1
 2
tiv

a
rc
 fro
 p
e
 2
h
c
a
rv
e

ifie
 3
ifie
rio
a
rio
d
s
p
rtie
h
 a
rc
tic

ts
s
t M
s

s
e
rc
 p
 p
a
b
ro
s
s
s
p
d
t M
d
 in
n
n
u
1
n
r to
a
rtie
7
s
ifie
s
e
a
p
o
la
e
la
ro
te
te
s
e
1
t P
1
0
t M
e
n
t 3
c
rio
c
s
s
s
p
n
t M
s
r id
ific
 in
tm
la
 2
e
 p
7
t P
s
ro
1
 a
ju
ju
ric
n
le
t u
 re
 re
n
s
e
s
c
h
e
s
1
n
1
t   3
0
e
e
d
d
e
tm
 p
 fo
ig
b
a
 a
lu
v
lu
 3
 a
 a
 a
t P
rc
s
t  3
d
ts
a
 
e
a
rtie
 2
a
e
s
e
n
a
e
 a
tm
e
te
e
ts
r s
rv
ific
ts
 In
e
h
 a
  - R
v
s
lu
s
r to
lu
lu
o
rk
e
e
e
n
u
a
m
p
rc
e
a
3
a
3
tm
t M
 a
u
a
s
s
ir v
ir v
1
1
s
s
th
b
ig
p
ro
a
v
s
l In
e
a
a
rio
1
Q
m
a
O
o
S
in
7
7
ir v
S
S
1
F
fro
P
M
F
In
p
ir v
1
ir v
e
ta
lu
a
0
a
R
0
a
R
v
 3
a
Recurring fair  (Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
F
2 (Level 2) (Level 3) (Level 1) (Level 2) (Level 3)
o
F
IF
2
F
IF
In
to
T
V
value 
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Other 
0
10,352
16,398 26,750
-10,352
-16,398
0
0
0
3,539
-3,539
0
Enterprise Park
0
9,496
8,271 17,767
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
17,767
High Value
0
4,145
18,677 22,822
0
-214
0
0
0
0
0
22,608
Right to Buy
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Long Leases @ 
Peppercorn 
Rent
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Residential 
Freeholds (LRA)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Industrial Units
0
0
2,207
2,207
0
-2,207
0
0
0
264
-264
0
Agricultural
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
189
-189
0
Residential 
Shared %
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1,046
-1,046
0
Total
0
23,993
45,553 69,546
-10,352
-18,819
0
0
0
5,038
-5,038
40,375
85

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Valuation Techniques used to Determine Level 2 and 3 Fair Values for Investment
Properties

Significant Observable Inputs - Level 2
The fair value of some of the commercial portfolio has been based on the market
approach using current market conditions and recent sales prices and other relevant
information for similar assets in the local Authority area. Market conditions are such that
similar properties are actively purchased and sold and the level of observable inputs are
significant, leading to the properties being categorised at Level 2 in the fair value
hierarchy.
Significant Unobservable Inputs - Level 3
Some of the Authority's commercial portfolio is categorised as Level 3 in the fair value
hierarchy as the measurement technique uses significant unobservable inputs to
determine the fair value measurements (and there is no reasonably available information
that indicates that market participants would use different assumptions).
Highest and Best Use of Surplus Assets
In estimating the fair value of some of the Authority's investment properties, the highest
and best use of the properties is their current use. In some cases, alternative uses have
been assumed (subject to planning permission being granted).
31 March 2018 31 March 2017
Other categorised within Level 3
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
0
11,217
Transfers In - Fair Value adjustment prior to IFRS13
0
4,549
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in Surplus 
0
632
or Deficit on the Provision of Services resulting from 
changes in the fair value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
0
-16,398
Closing Balance
0
0
86

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
31 March  31 March 
Enterprise Park categorised within Level 3
2018
2017
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
8,271
642
Transfer into Level 3
0
1,444
Transfers In - Fair Value Adjusted prior to IFRS13
0
5,976
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in Surplus or Deficit 
317
209
on the Provision of Services resulting from changes in the fair 
value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
-60
0
Closing Balance
8,528
8,271
31 March  31 March 
High Value categorised within Level 3
2018
2017
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
18,463
1,218
Transfer into Level 3
0
17,382
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in Surplus or Deficit 
1,877
77
on the Provision of Services resulting from changes in the fair 
value
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
5,361
-214
Closing Balance
25,701
18,463
31 March  31 March 
Industrial Units categorised within Level 3
2018
2017
£'000
£'000
Opening balance
0
2,152
Transfers In - Fair Value Adjusted prior to IFRS13
0
35
Total gains [or losses] for the period included in Surplus or Deficit 
on the Provision of Services resulting from changes in the fair 
value
0
9
Transfers to/from Property, Plant and Equipment
0
-2,207
Addition
0
11
Closing Balance
0
0
Gains or losses arising from changes in the fair value of the investment property are
recognised in Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of Services - Financing and Investment
Income and Expenditure line.
87

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Quantitative Information about Fair Value Measurement of Investment Properties using
Significant Unobservable Inputs - Level 3

Valuation 
Range 
As at 
technique  Unobservable  (weighted 
31/03/2018 
used to 
Sensitivity
inputs
average 
£'000
measure 
used)
fair value
Significant changes in 
Enterprise 
Market 
Yield
8-12%
rents and yields will 
8,528
Park
Approach
result in significantly 
lower or higher fair value
Rent
Various
Significant changes in 
Market 
Yield
Various
rents and yields will 
High Value
25,701 Approach
result in significantly 
Rent
Various
lower or higher fair value
TOTAL
34,229
Valuation Process for Investment Properties
Valuations are carried out internally, in accordance with the methodologies and bases for
estimation set out in the professional standards of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors
(RICS). Occasionally external valuers will be employed when it is considered that the
Council's internal valuers do not have the necessary experience and knowledge. The
Authority's valuation experts work closely with finance officers reporting directly to the Chief
Finance Officer on a regular basis regarding all valuation matters.
17. Intangible Assets
The Authority accounts for its software as intangible assets, to the extent that the software is
not an integral part of a particular IT system and accounted for as part of the hardware item of
Property, Plant and Equipment. 
All software is given a finite useful life, based on assessments of the period that the software
is expected to be of use to the Authority. The useful lives assigned to the major software
suites used by the Authority are:
Purchased Licences
Other IT software
Windows Licences
3  years
Payroll Development
5 years
Paris Software
5  years
Oracle Licences
6 years
88

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The carrying amount of intangible assets is amortised on a straight-line basis. The
amortisation of £192K was charged to revenue in 2017/18.
The movement on Intangible Asset balances during the year is as follows:
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
Balance at start of year:
4,975  - Gross carrying amounts
5,108
-4,475  - Accumulated amortisation
-4,708
500 Net carrying amount at start of year
400
Additions:
154  - Purchases during year
371
-21 Revaluations increases or decreases
-101
Impairment losses recognised in the 
Suplus/Deficit on the Provision of 
0 Services
-74
-244 Amortisation for the period
-192
Amortisation written out to the 
11 Surplus/Deficit on the provision of 
98
services
0 Other changes
-44
400 Net carrying amount at end of year
458
Comprising:
5,108  - Gross carrying amounts
5,260
-4,708  - Accumulated amortisation
-4,802
400
458
18. Financial Instruments
The notes on financial instruments on the following pages are the requirement of the
code. IFRS requires for the restatement of nominal amounts for loans and investments
to include for example the spread cost of premium / discounts and using equivalent
interest rates instead of actual stepped interest rates in the case of ‘amortised cost’ and
also the restatement of the nominal values of the loans and investments if they were to
be refinanced in the market at 31st March 2018 in the ‘fair value’ disclosure.
89

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
TYPES OF FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
 
TABLE 1 – FINANCIAL INSTRUMENT BALANCES
Long-Term
Short-Term
Total
31st March  31st March  31st March  31st March  31st March 
31st March 
2018
2017
2018
2017
2018
2017
Borrowings
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Financial liabilities at 
amortised cost
460,982
415,281
5,822
37,831
466,804
453,112
Total included in 
Borrowings

460,982
415,281
5,822
37,831
466,804
453,112
Creditors
Financial liabilities 
carried at contract 
amount
2,268
2,359
42,721
45,500
44,989
47,859
Total included in 
Creditors

2,268
2,359
42,721
45,500
44,989
47,859
Investments
Loans and 
receivables
24
24
25,500
52,548
25,524
52,572
Financial Assets at 
Fair Value through 
Profit or Loss
0
0
0
0
0
0
Unquoted equity 
investment at cost
100
50
0
0
100
50
Total Investments
124
74
25,500
52,548
25,624
52,622
Debtors
Loans and 
receivables
0
0
0
0
0
0
Financial assets 
carried at contract 
amount
3,072
2,615
44,154
45,774
47,226
48,389
Total Debtors
3,072
2,615
44,154
45,774
47,226
48,389
Note - Lender Option / Borrower Option Loans (LOBO’s) of £40m (2016/17 £58m)
have been included in long term borrowing but have an option date in the next 12
months.
90

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Authority disposed of its one third shareholding (£50,000 'A' shares) in the Swansea
Stadium Management Company Limited during the year, a joint venture between the
Authority, Swansea City Association Football Club Limited (The) and Ospreys Rugby
Limited. The purpose of the company is to run the Liberty Stadium, a purpose built
stadium for major sporting events in Swansea. 
The Authority owns £5,030,000 of ordinary shares in Swansea City Waste Disposal
Company Limited. These are not reflected in the Authority's assets as they are
considered to be of zero value.
INCOME, EXPENSE, GAINS AND LOSSES
The gains and losses recognised in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement in relation to financial instruments are made up as follows:
TABLE 2 – FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS GAINS/LOSSES
Financial 
2017/18
Liabilities
Financial Assets
Liabilities 
measured 
Fair value 
at 
through 
amortised  Loans and 
profit or 
cost receivables
loss
Total
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Interest expense
-20,321
0
0
-20,321
Losses on Derecognition
0
0
0
0
Reductions in Fair Value
0
0
0
0
Fee Expense
0
0
0
0
Total Expense in Surplus or Deficit
on the Provision of Services

-20,321
0
0
-20,321
91

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Financial 
2017/18
Liabilities
Financial Assets
Liabilities 
measured 
Fair value 
at 
through 
amortised 
Loans and 
profit or 
cost
receivables
loss
Total
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Interest income
0
264
0
264
Gains on Derecognition
0
0
0
0
Total Income in Surplus or 
Deficit on the Provision of 
Services

0
264
0
264
Net (gain)/loss for the year
-20,321
264
0
-20,057
Financial 
2016/17 Comparative Table
Liabilities
Financial Assets
Liabilities 
measured 
Fair value 
at 
through 
amortised 
Loans and 
profit or 
cost
receivables
loss
Total
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Interest expense
-20,443
0
0
-20,443
Losses on Derecognition
0
0
0
0
Reductions in Fair Value
0
0
0
0
Fee Expense
0
0
0
0
Total Expense in Surplus or 
Deficit on the Provision of 
Services

-20,443
0
0
-20,443
Interest income
0
420
0
420
Gains on Derecognition
0
0
0
0
Total Income in Surplus or 
Deficit on the Provision of 
Services

0
420
0
420
Net (gain)/loss for the year
-20,443
420
0
-20,023
92

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
FAIR VALUES OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES CARRIED AT AMORTISED COST
Financial liabilities, financial assets represented by loans and receivables and long-
term debtors and creditors are carried in the Balance Sheet at amortised cost. Their
fair value can be assessed by calculating the present value of the cash flows that will
take place over the remaining term of the instruments, using the following
assumptions:
Methods and Assumptions in valuation technique
The fair value of an instrument is determined by calculating the net present value of
future cash flows, which provides an estimate of the value of payments in the future in
today’s terms.
The discount rate used in the Net Present Value calculation is the rate applicable in
the market on the date of valuation for an instrument with the same structure, terms
and remaining duration. For debt, this will be the new borrowing rate since premature
repayment rates include a margin which represents the lender's profit as a result of
rescheduling the loan; this is not included in the fair value calculation since any
motivation other than securing a fair price should be ignored.
The rates quoted in this valuation were obtained by our treasury management
consultants from the market on 31st March 2018, using bid prices where applicable.
The calculations are made with the following assumptions:
• Estimated ranges of interest rates at 31 March 2018 of 1.67% to 2.77% for loans
from the PWLB and 0.20% to 2.77% for other loans receivable and payable, based
on new lending rates for equivalent loans at that date.
• We have used interpolation techniques between available rates where the exact
maturity period was not available.
• No early repayment or impairment is recognised.
• We have calculated fair values for all instruments in the portfolio, but only disclose
those which are materially different from the carrying value.
• The fair value of trade and other receivables is taken to be the invoiced or billed.
• The fair values are calculated as follows:
TABLE 3 – FAIR VALUE OF LIABILITIES CARRIED AT AMORTISED COST
31st March 2018
31st March 2017
Carrying amount
Fair value
Carrying amount
Fair value
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Financial liabilities
452,084
667,921
448,580
663,996
Creditors
44,989
44,989
47,859
47,859
93

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Fair value is sometimes more than the carrying amount because the Authority’s portfolio
of loans includes a number of fixed rate loans where the interest rate payable is lower
than the rates available for similar loans at the Balance Sheet date. The commitment to
pay interest below current market rates reduces the amount that the Authority would have
to pay if the lender requested or agreed to early repayment of the loans. 
TABLE 4 – FAIR VALUE OF ASSETS CARRIED AT AMORTISED COST
31st March 2018
31st March 2017
Carrying 
Carrying 
amount
Fair value
amount
Fair value
£000s
£000s
£000s
£000s
Loans and receivables
25,500
25,500
47,500
52,637
Debtors
47,226
47,226
48,389
48,389
The fair value is higher than the carrying amount because the Authority's portfolio of
investments includes a number of fixed rate loans where the interest rate receivable is
higher than the rates available for similar loans at the Balance Sheet date. This shows a
notional future loss (based on economic conditions at 31 March 2018) attributable to the
commitment to receive interest below current market rates.
Short-term debtors and creditors are carried at cost as this is a fair approximation of their
fair value.
NATURE AND EXTENT OF RISKS ARISING FROM FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
The Authority's activities expose it to a variety of financial risks:
• credit risk - the possibility that other parties might fail to pay amounts due to the
Authority.
• liquidity risk - the possibility that the Authority might not have funds available to meet
its commitments to make payments.
• market risk - the possibility that financial loss might rise for the Authority as a result of
changes in such measures as interest rates and stock market movements.
The Authority's overall risk management programme focuses on the unpredictability of
financial markets and seeks to minimise potential adverse effects on the resources
available to fund services. Risk management is carried out by a central treasury team,
under policies approved by the Council in the Annual Treasury Management Strategy.
The Council provides written principles for overall risk management, as well as covering
specific areas, such as interest rate risk, credit risk and the investment of surplus cash.
1. Credit Risk 
Credit risk arises from deposits with banks, building societies and other local authorities
as well as credit exposures to the Authority's customers.   
94

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The risk is managed through the Annual Investment Strategy which outlines the minimum
credit criteria required for the Authority to make an investment which requires that deposits
are not made with financial institutions unless they meet identified minimum credit criteria. The
Annual Investment Strategy also imposes a maximum sum to be invested with a financial
institution within each category.
The full details of the credit criteria are outlined in the previously published Treasury
Management Strategy report available on the Council's website.
The Authority has no exposure to credit risk to financial institutions as its investments are with
other local authorities . The risk of irrecoverability applies to all investments, however there
was no evidence at 31/03/18 that this was likely to crystallise.
The following analysis summarises the Authority’s potential maximum exposure to credit risk,
based on past experience and current market conditions. The Authority considers for
impairment all of its financial instruments annually. No credit limits were exceeded during the
financial year and the Authority expects full repayment on the due date of deposits placed with
its counterparties.
TABLE 5 – CREDIT RISK (A) 
Historical 
Estimated 
Historical 
experience 
maximum 
experience 
adjusted for 
exposure to 
Estimated 
Amounts 
of default 
market 
default and 
maximum 
at 31 
31 March 
conditions as  uncollectability  exposure 31 
March
2018
at 31 March 31 March 2018 March 2017
2018
2018
£'000
%
%
£'000
Bonds and other 
securities
0
0.00
0.00
0
0
Customers
47,226
13.99%
14.73%
6,960
6,862
Total
47,226
0.00
0.00
6,960
6,862
The Authority does not generally allow credit for customers such that £16.2m of the £47.2m
balance is past its due date for payment. The amount can be analysed as follows -
31-Mar-18
31-Mar-17
less than 3 months
12,475
8,426
3 to 6 months
616
1,171
6 months to 1 year
968
1,200
more than 1 year
2,115
2,048
16,174
12,845
95

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
2. Liquidity Risk
The Authority has a cashflow management system to ensure cash is available when
needed. If unexpected movements happen, the Authority has ready access to the money
markets and the PWLB. There is no significant risk that it will be unable to raise finance to
meet its commitments under financial instruments. The risk may be bound to replenish a
proportion of its borrowings at times of unfavourable interest rates. The Authority sets limits 
on the proportion of its fixed borrowing during specific periods and seeks to ensure an
even maturity profile through a combination of planning when to take new loans and where
economic when to make early repayments.
The maturity structure of financial liabilities at nominal value is as follows (liability figure per
Table 1 includes accrued interest on PWLB and LOBOs of £5.301k (prior year £5,493k):
TABLE 6 – LIQUIDITY RISK
On 31 March 2017
Loans outstanding
On 31 March 2018
£'000
£'000
83,331 Less than 1 year
48,543
0 Between 1 and 2 years
0
3,003 Between 2 and 5 years
8,500
19,000 Between 5 and 10 years
28,000
393,279 More than 10 years
424,482
498,613 Total
509,525
In the more than 10 years category there are £40m (31 March 2017 £58m) of LOBOs
which have a call date in the next 12 months. 
3. Market Risk
Interest rate risk 
The Authority is exposed to risk in terms of its exposure to interest rate movements on its
borrowings and investments. Movements in interest rates have a complex impact on the
Authority.  A rise in interest rates would have the following effects:
• borrowings at variable rates - the interest expense charged to the surplus or deficit on 
the provision of services will rise
• borrowings at fixed rates - the fair value of the liabilities borrowings will fall
• investments at variable rates - the interest income credited to the surplus or deficit on 
the provision of services will rise
• investments at fixed rates - the fair value of the assets will fall
Borrowings are not carried at fair value, so nominal gains and losses on fixed rate
borrowings would not impact on the surplus or deficit on the Provision of Services or
other comprehensive income and expenditure. However changes in interest payable and
receivable on variable rate borrowings and investments will be posted to the surplus or
deficit on the provision of services and affect the general fund balance.
96

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Authority has a number of strategies for managing interest rate risk. The policy is to
have up to a maximum of 40% of its borrowings in variable rate loans. During periods of
falling interest rates, and where economic circumstances make it favourable, fixed rate
loans will be repaid early to limit exposure to losses. The risk of loss is ameliorated by the
fact that a proportion of government grant payable on financing costs will normally move
with prevailing interest rates or the Authority's cost of borrowing and provide
compensation for a proportion of any higher costs.
The treasury management team has an active strategy for assessing interest rate
exposure that feeds into the setting of the annual budget and which is used to inform
budget monitoring during the year. This allows any adverse changes to be
accommodated. The analysis will also advise whether new borrowing taken out is fixed or
variable.
According to this assessment strategy, at 31 March 2018, if interest rates had been 1%
higher than market rate with all other variables held constant, the financial effect would
be: 
TABLE 7 – INTEREST RATE RISK
2016/17 2017/18
£'000
£'000
Increase in interest payable on variable rate borrowings
580
400
Increase in interest receivable on variable rate investments
0
0
Increase in government grant receivable for financing costs
0
0
Impact on Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of Services
580
400
Share of overall impact debited to the Housing Revenue Account
180
128
Decrease in fair value of fixed rate investment assets
422
0
Impact on Other Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
422
0
Decrease in fair value of fixed rate borrowing liabilities (no impact on 
the Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of Services or other 
comprehensive I&E)
106,848 113,056
Foreign Exchange Risk
The Authority has no financial assets or liabilities denominated in foreign currencies and
thus has no exposure to loss arising from movements in exchange rates.
Price Risk
The Authority does not generally invest in equity shares.
97

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Financial Instruments Adjustment Account
31/03/2017
31/03/2018
£'000
£'000
-2,160 Balance brought forward
-2,215
120 PWLB Premia amortisation
1
-119 PWLB Discounts amortisation
-9
11 LOBO equivalent interest rate amortisation 
16
-67 Notional advances right to buy sales
-14
-2,215 Published Balance as at 31st March
-2,221
Analysis of Borrowing
31/03/2017 Sources of borrowing
31/03/2018
£’000
£’000
314,073 Public Works Loan Board
354,084
99,208 Money market
99,200
2,000 Other
7,698
415,281 Total borrowing greater than one 
460,982
year
1 Stock issues
1
14,101 Public Works Loans Board
4,898
405 Money market
401
4 Local bonds & internal mortgages
5
23,320 Temporary loans
517
37,831 Total borrowing less than one year
5,822
453,112
466,804
Maturity dates for the repayment of loans
31/03/2017
31/03/2018
£’000
£’000
28,826 Temporary loans up to 1 year
517
Long term debt maturing within:-
9,004 1 year
5,305
0 1 - 2 years
0
3,003 2 – 5 years
8,500
19,000 5 -10 years
28,000
393,279 Over 10 years
424,482
453,112
466,804
98

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Fair Value hierarchy for financial assets and financial liabilities that are not measured
at fair value

31 March 2018
Quoted prices 
Other 
in active 
significant 
Significant 
markets for 
observable  unobservable 
identical assets
inputs
inputs
Recurring fair value 
(Level 1)
(Level 2)
(Level 3)
Total
measurements using:
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Financial assets
Loans and receivables:
Other loans and 
receivables
0
1,770
0
1,770
Total
0
1,770
0
1,770
31 March 2017
Quoted prices 
Other 
in active 
significant 
Significant 
markets for 
observable  unobservable 
identical assets
inputs
inputs
Recurring fair value 
(Level 1)
(Level 2)
(Level 3)
Total
measurements using:
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Financial assets
Loans and receivables:
Other loans and 
receivables
0
1,770
0
1,770
Total
0
1,770
0
1,770
The fair value for financial liabilities and financial assets that are not measured at fair value
included in levels 2 and 3 in the table above have been arrived at using a discounted cash
flow analysis with the most significant inputs being the discount rate.
The fair value for financial liabilities and financial assets that are not measured at fair value
can be assessed by calculating the present value of the cash flows that will take place over
the remaining term of the instruments, using the following assumptions:
Financial Assets
Financial liabilities
- no early repayment or impairment is 
- no early repayment is recognised
recognised
- estimated ranges of interest rates at 31 
- estimated ranges of interest rates at 31 March 
March 2018 of 0.25% to 0.97% for loans 
2018 of 0.54% to 2.29% for loans payable 
receivable, based on new lending rates for  based on new lending rates for equivalent loans 
equivalent loans at that date
at that date
- the fair value of trade and other 
- the fair value of WG loans are taken at 
receivables is taken to be the invoiced or 
nominal value
billed amount
99

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
19. Short Term Debtors
Authority
Group
Authority
Group
31st March  31st March 
31st March 
31st March 
2017
2017
2018
2018
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
24,894
24,894 Central government bodies
24,327
24,327
3,195
3,195 Other local authorities
3,470
3,470
5,112
5,112 NHS bodies
3,537
3,537
2
2 Public corporations and trading funds
8
8
25,343
25,344 Other entities and individuals
24,256
24,257
1,259
1,259 Payments In Advance
2,488
2,488
-13,359
-13,359 Provision for doubtful debts
-13,041
-13,041
46,446
46,447 Total
45,045
45,046
20. Cash and Cash Equivalents
The balance of Cash and Cash Equivalents is made up of the following elements:
Authority
Group
Authority
Group
31st March  31st March 
31st March 
31st March 
2017
2017
2018
2018
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
-236
-236 Cash held by the Authority
-662
-662
30,374
30,405 Bank current accounts
54,615
54,646
30,138
30,169 Total Cash and Cash Equivalents
53,953
53,984
21. Assets Held for Sale
All of the assets held for sale have been classified as current assets.
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
3,422
Balance outstanding at start of year
2,979
-36
Revaluation gains/losses
0
1,695
Assets classified to/from held for sale:
299
-2,102
Assets sold
-1,248
2,979
Balance outstanding at year end
2,030
22. Short Term Creditors
Authority
Group
Authority
Group
31st March  31st March 
31st March 
31st March 
2017
2017
2018
2018
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
8,206
8,206 Central government bodies
7,406
7,406
2,068
2,068 Other local authorities
2,000
2,000
300
300 NHS bodies
578
578
20
20 Public corporations and trading funds
9
9
34,305
34,305 Other entities and individuals
32,728
32,728
7,209
7,209 Receipts In Advance
6,461
6,461
52,108
52,108 Total
49,182
49,182
100

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
23. Provisions
Short - term 
 
 
n
g
s
tio
in
e
 
a
 
s
d
s
d
 
s
e
n
n
a
n
e
n
e
e
y
io
ta
l C
 a
g
s
a
p
lo
fits
e


is
l
ts
a
ry
m
m
im
p
n
e
v
u
g
ta
e
ju
a
o
la
m
e
th
ro
o
O
L
In
D
C
C
E
B
O
P
T
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Balance at 1 April 2017
55
1,601
58
1,508
3,222
Additional provisions made in 2017/18
0
732
470
320
1,522
Amounts used in 2017/18
0
-1,295
-14
-539
-1,848
Unused amounts reversed in 2017/18
0
-843
-267
-383
-1,493
Transfer from long term to short term
0
1,377
14
60
1,451
Balance at 31 March 2018
55
1,572
261
966
2,854
Long - term
 
 
n
g
s
tio
in
e
 
a
 
s
d
s
d
 
s
e
n
n
a
n
e
n
e
e
y
io
ta
l C
 a
g
s
a
p
lo
fits
e


is
l
ts
a
ry
m
m
im
p
n
e
v
u
g
ta
e
ju
a
o
la
m
e
th
ro
o
O
L
In
D
C
C
E
B
O
P
T
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
Balance at 1 April 2017
0
3,636
14
7,189
10,839
Additional provisions made in 2017/18
0
1,206
0
35
1,241
Amounts used in 2017/18
0
0
0
-436
-436
Unused amounts reversed in 2017/18
0
0
0
-4
-4
Transfer from long term to short term
0
-1,377
-14
-60
-1,451
Balance at 31 March 2018
0
3,465
0
6,724
10,189
Outstanding Legal Cases
The Authority has incurred legal costs in defending its position across a number of
issues and will seek to defray those costs against third parties if appropriate. To the
extent that this is considered unlikely this provision is intended to quantify and provide
for the expected extent of irrecoverable costs.
101

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Injury and Damage Compensation Claims
This is in respect of excess charges and uninsured costs on all known outstanding
insurance claims made against the Authority in respect of all injury and compensation claims
outstanding at the Balance Sheet date.
Employee Benefits
This is in respect of the potential costs of settling all reasonably expected equal pay
compensation claims as they exist at the Balance Sheet date on the basis that following the
implementation of an equal pay compliant pay structure a significant element of the potential
liability will be settled by way of compensation payment rather than as backpay. It is
envisaged the majority of this will be settled within 1 year.
Other Provisions
These amounts are to cover a variety of potential liabilities including land compensation
claims following compulsory purchase, potential sums arising out of grant reclaims and
obsolete stock. Other provisions include a significant capital provision (£5.378m) for the
future remediation and maintenance of major land refuse disposal sites. Of the £5.378m,
£2.595m is likely to be settled within the next ten years and the remaining £2.783m over the
next forty years.
24. Unusable Reserves
Authority

Group
Authority
Group
31st March  31st March 
31st March  31st March 
2017
2017
2018
2018
£'000
£'000
454,146
454,146 Revaluation Reserve
429,264
438,751
521,269
521,269 Capital Adjustment Account
548,857
548,857
-2,215
-2,215 Financial Instruments Adjustment 
-2,221
-2,221
Account
-679,092
-679,092 Pensions Reserve
-712,028
-712,028
-8,562
-8,562 Accumulated Absences Account
-8,694
-8,694
285,546
285,546 Total Unusable Reserves
255,178
264,665
Revaluation Reserve
The Revaluation Reserve contains the gains made by the Authority arising from increases in
the value of its Property, Plant and Equipment. The balance is reduced when assets with
accumulated gains are:
- revalued downwards or impaired and the gains are lost,
- used in the provision of services and the gains are consumed through depreciation, or
- disposed of and the gains are realised.
The Reserve contains only revaluation gains accumulated since 1 April 2007, the date that
the Reserve was created. Accumulated gains arising before that date are consolidated into
the balance on the Capital Adjustment Account.
102

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Authority Group
Authority Group
2016/17 2016/17
2017/18 2017/18
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
475,796 475,796 Balance at 1st April
454,146 454,146
Upward revaluation of assets -
19,963
19,963 Cost
13,271
22,758
24,867
24,867 Depreciation
35,404
35,404
Downward revaluation of assets and 
impairment losses not charged to the 
Surplus/Deficit on the Provision of Services -
-51,936 -51,936 Cost
-63,881 -63,881
2,411
2,411 Depreciation
7,912
7,912
-4,695
-4,695 Surplus or deficit on revaluation of non-current 
-7,294
2,193
assets not posted to the Surplus or Deficit on 
the Provision of Services
-16,615 -16,615 Difference between fair value depreciation and 
-15,895 -15,895
historical cost depreciation
-329
-329 Accumulated gains on assets sold or scrapped
-1,693
-1,693
-11
-11 Transfer of Investment Property Revaluation 
0
0
Reserve
Amount written off to the Capital Adjustment 
-16,955 -16,955 Account
-17,588 -17,588
454,146 454,146 Balance at 31st March
429,264 438,751
Capital Adjustment Account
The Capital Adjustment Account absorbs the timing differences arising from the different
arrangements for accounting for the consumption of non-current assets and for financing
the acquisition, construction or subsequent costs of those assets under statutory
provisions. The Account is debited with the cost of acquisition, construction or
subsequent costs as depreciation, impairment losses and amortisation are charged to the 
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement (with reconciling postings from the
Revaluation Reserve to convert current and fair value figures to a historical cost basis).
The Account is credited with the amounts set aside by the Authority as finance for the
costs of acquisition, construction and subsequent costs.
The Account contains accumulated gains and losses on Investment Properties. The
Account also contains revaluation gains accumulated on Property, Plant and Equipment
before 1st April 2007, the date that the Revaluation Reserve was created to hold such
gains. Note 6 provides details of the source of all the transactions posted to the Account,
apart from those involving the Revaluation Reserve.
103

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
488,156 Balance at 1st April
521,269
Reversal of items relating to capital expenditure debited or 
credited to the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure 
Statement:
-46,420 Charges for depreciation and impairment of non-current 
-47,641
assets
-6,330 Revaluation losses on Property, Plant and Equipment
-8,634
-244 Amortisation of intangible assets
-192
-11,765 Revenue expenditure funded from capital under statute 
-6,946
(REFCUS)
-3,546 Amounts of non-current assets written off on disposal or sale 
-4,222
as part of the gain/loss on disposal to the Comprehensive 
Income and Expenditure Statement
-68,305
-67,635
16,955 Adjusting amounts written out of the Revaluation Reserve
17,588
-51,350 Net written out amount of the cost of non-current assets 
-50,047
consumed in the year
Capital financing applied in the year:
5,793 Use of the Capital Receipts Reserve to finance new capital 
5,131
expenditure
32,941 Capital grants and contributions credited to the 
23,167
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement that have 
been applied to capital financing
13,859 Statutory provision for the financing of the capital investment 
17,440
charged against the General Fund and HRA balances
32,380 Capital expenditure charged against the HRA and General 
29,743
Fund balances
84,973
75,481
-510 Movements in the market value of Investment Properties 
2,154
521,269 Balance at 31st March
548,857
104

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Financial Instruments Adjustment Account
The Financial Instruments Adjustment Account absorbs the timing differences
arising from the different arrangements for accounting for income and expenses
relating to certain financial instruments and for bearing losses or benefiting from
gains per statutory provisions.
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
-2,160 Balance at 1st April
-2,215
Premiums incurred in the year and charged to the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement
1 Proportion of premiums incurred in previous financial
-8
years to be charged against the General Fund Balance
in accordance with statutory requirements
-56 Amount
by
which
finance
costs
charged
to
the
2
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement are
different from finance costs chargeable in the year in
accordance with statutory requirements
-2,215 Balance at 31st March
-2,221
105

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Pensions Reserve
The Pensions Reserve absorbs the timing differences arising from the different
arrangements for accounting for post employment benefits and for funding benefits
in accordance with statutory provisions. The Authority accounts for post
employment benefits in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement as
the benefits are earned by employees accruing years of service, updating the
liabilities recognised to reflect inflation, changing assumptions and investment
returns on any resources set aside to meet the costs. However, statutory
arrangements require benefits earned to be financed as the Authority makes
employer's contributions to pension funds or eventually pays any pensions for which
it is directly responsible. The debit balance on the Pensions Reserve therefore
shows a substantial shortfall in the benefits earned by past and current employees
and the resources the Authority has set aside to meet them. The statutory
arrangements will ensure that funding will have been set aside by the time the
benefits come to be paid.
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
-569,640 Balance at 1st April
-679,092
-89,390 Remeasurements
of
the
net
defined
benefit
-4,320
liability/(asset)
-58,220 Reversal of items relating to retirement benefits debited
-69,760
or credited to the Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of
Services in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement
-2,670 Past service cost adjustment 
-4,730
40,828 Employer's pensions contributions and direct payments
45,874
to pensioners payable in the year
-679,092 Balance at 31st March
-712,028
106

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Accumulated Absences Account
The Accumulated Absences Account absorbs the differences that would otherwise arise
on the General Fund Balance from accruing for compensated absences earned but not
taken in the year, e.g. annual leave entitlement carried forward at 31st March. Statutory
arrangements require that the impact on the General Fund Balance is neutralised by
transfers to or from the Account.
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
-9,906 Balance at 1st April
-8,562
9,906 Settlement or cancellation of accrual made at the 
8,562
end of the preceding year
-8,562 Amounts accrued at the end of the current year
-8,694
1,344 Amount by which officer remuneration charged to 
-132
the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure 
Statement on an accruals basis is different from 
remuneration chargeable in the year in 
accordance with statutory requirements
-8,562 Balance at 31st March
-8,694
25. Cash Flow Statement - Operating Activities
The cash flows for operating activities include the following items:
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
358 Interest received
203
-20,419 Interest paid
-20,384
-20,061
-20,181
The surplus or deficit on the provision of services has been adjusted for the following non-
cash movements:
Authority
Group
Authority
Group
2016/17
2016/17
2017/18
2017/18
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
52,750
52,750 Depreciation
56,275
56,275
510
510 Impairment and downward revaluations
-2,154
-2,154
244
244 Amortisation
192
192
-5,561
-5,561 Increase/(decrease) in creditors
-2,576
-2,576
9,001
9,001 Increase in debtors
944
944
-137
-137 (Increase)/decrease in inventories
151
151
20,062
20,062 Movement in pension liability
28,616
28,616
107

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Authority
Group
Authority
Group
2016/17 2016/17
2017/18
2017/18
£'000
£'000
£'000
£'000
-3,546
-3,546 Carrying amount of non-current assets and non-
-4,222
-4,222
current assets held for sale, sold or de-recognised
-1,091
-1,091 Other non-cash items charged to the net surplus or 
1,326
1,326
deficit on the provision of services
72,232
72,232
78,552
78,552
The surplus or deficit on the provision of services has been adjusted for the following items that 
are investing and financing activities:
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
-29,118 Any other items for which the cash effects are investing or financing cash 
-21,650
flows
-29,118
-21,650
26. Cash Flow Statement - Investing Activities
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
-90,795 Purchase of property, plant and equipment, investment property and 
-78,354
intangible assets
-88,459 Purchase of long and short term investments
-987,095
3,988 Proceeds from the sale of property, plant and equipment, investment 
5,492
property and intangible assets
67,722 Proceeds from short-term and long-term investments
1,014,093
29,118 Other receipts from investing activities
21,650
-78,426 Net cash flows from investing activities
-24,214
27. Cash Flow Statement - Financing Activities
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
49,063 Cash receipts of short and long-term borrowing
47,168
-6,729 Repayments of short and long-term borrowing
-33,476
42,334 Net cash flows from financing activities
13,692
108

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
28. Trading Operations
In accordance with the Service Reporting Code of Practice (SeRCOP) which has been
issued by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance and Accountancy (CIPFA) the Authority
undertakes a number of activities which are defined as trading activities within the meaning
of the Code.
All the Authority's trading operations are an integral part of one of the Authority's services to
the public and are incorporated into the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure
Statement. 
2017/18
Turnover Expenditure Surplus/- Deficit
£'000
£'000
£'000
Council Car Parks
4,448
1,732
2,716
Grand Theatre
2,948
4,419
-1,471
Indoor Market
1,156
822
334
Council Catering including school meals 
6,815
7,209
-394
Trade Waste
2,222
1,709
513
Swansea Marina
2,490
187
2,303
20,079
16,078
4,001
2016/17
Turnover Expenditure Surplus/- Deficit
£'000
£'000
£'000
Council Car Parks
4,495
2,570
1,925
Grand Theatre
3,393
4,640
-1,247
Indoor Market
1,146
731
415
Council Catering including school meals 
6,978
7,033
-55
Trade Waste
2,444
1,961
483
Swansea Marina
260
372
-112
18,716
17,307
1,409
29. Members' Allowances
The Authority paid the following amounts to members of the Council during the year.
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
Allowances
1,441
1,521
Expenses
14
19
Total
1,455
1,540
109

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
30. Officers’ Remuneration
(a) The following tables set out the remuneration for Senior Officers whose salary is less than £150,000 but equal to or more than
£60,000 per year.
Table 1 - 2017/18
Total 
Total 
Remuneration 
remuneration 
remuneration 
(including 
Compensation 
excluding 
Pension 
including 
Fees & 
for loss of 
pension 
contributions 
pension 
Allowances)
office
contributions
(23.4%)
contributions
£
£
£
£
£
Chief Executive *
142,814
0
142,814
33,418
176,232
Director People
107,111
0
107,111
25,064
132,175
Director Resources (a)
18,983
0
18,983
4,343
23,326
Director Place
101,968
0
101,968
23,739
125,707
Chief Transformation Officer (b)
25,422
0
25,422
5,949
31,371
Head of Education Planning and Resources
72,835
0
72,835
17,043
89,878
Head of Housing & Public Protection (c)
83,240
0
83,240
19,478
102,718
Head of Planning & City Regeneration
83,240
0
83,240
19,478
102,718
Head of Communications & Marketing
72,835
0
72,835
17,043
89,878
Head of Human Resources (d)
70,870
48,889
119,759
16,790
136,549
Interim Director Resources (e)
69,614
0
69,614
16,290
85,904
Head of Financial Services & Service Centre (f)
71,951
0
71,951
16,764
88,715
Interim Head of Legal and Democratic Services (g)
6,720
0
6,720
1,572
8,292
Head of Legal, Democratic Services & Business 
74,237
17,297
91,534
Intelligence (h)
74,237
0
Head of Poverty & Prevention
70,234
0
70,234
16,435
86,669
Head of Digital & Transformation (i)
30,926
0
30,926
7,237
38,163
Head of Waste Management & Parks
83,240
0
83,240
19,478
102,718
Balance c/f
1,186,241
48,889
1,235,130
277,419
1,512,549
110

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Table 1 - 2017/18 continued
Total 
Total 
remuneration 
remuneration 
Remuneration  Compensation  excluding 
Pension 
including 
(including Fees  for loss of 
pension 
contributions  pension 
Post title
& Allowances) office
contributions (23.4%)
contributions
£
£
£
£
£
Balance b/f
1,186,241
48,889
1,235,130
277,419
1,512,549
Head of Cultural Services
80,639
0
80,639
18,870
99,509
Head of Education Improvement (j)
71,534
0
71,534
16,739
88,273
Head of Highways and Transportation 
83,554
0
83,554
19,478
103,032
Chief Social Services Officer
101,449
0
101,449
23,739
125,188
Head of Child and Family Services
75,436
0
75,436
17,652
93,088
Head of Adult Services
72,835
0
72,835
17,043
89,878
Head of Commercial Services
72,835
0
72,835
17,043
89,878
Chief Education Officer
95,097
0
95,097
22,253
117,350
Head of Achievement & Partnership Service (k)
14,307
0
14,307
3,348
17,655
Interim Head of Corporate Building Services (l)
59,483
0
59,483
13,905
73,388
Interim Head of Corporate Property services (m)
59,671
0
59,671
13,842
73,512
Head  of Vulnerable Learner Service (n)
11,272
0
11,272
2,638
13,910
Interim Head of Housing and Public Protection (o)
5,636
0
5,636
1,319
6,955
Total
1,989,989
48,889
2,038,878
465,287
2,504,165
111

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
* In 2017/18 the Chief Executive received additional remuneration of £5,845 for Returning Officer Fees relating to General and 
European Elections. There is no additional remuneration to the Chief Executive for any local elections.
No bonus payments or benefit in kind payments were made to the Officers detailed in these notes.
(a)  The Director of Resources retired on 31st May 2017.
(b) The Chief Transformation Officer is the Interim Director of Resources since 17th July 2017.
(c) The Head of Housing and Public Protection will be retiring on 6th April 2018.
(d) The Head of Human Resources took voluntary redundancy on 31st March 2018.
(e)  The Interim Director of Resources commenced on 17th July 2017.
(f) The Head of Financial Services and Service Centre commenced on 1st May 2017.
(g) The interim Head of Legal and Democratic Services is the Head of Legal, Democratic Services and Business Intelligence since 1st
May 2017.
(h) The Head of Legal, Democratic Services and Business Intelligence commenced on 1st May 2017.
(i) The Head of Digital and Transformation commenced on 16th October 2017.
(j) The Head of Education Improvement is a joint post with Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council as part of the ERW academic 
regional consortium. The Head of Education Improvement is the Head of Achievement and Partnership Service since 1st February 
2018.
(k) The Head of Achievement and Partnership Service commenced on 1st February 2018.
(l) The Interim Head of Corporate Building Services commenced on 1st May 2017.
(m) The Interim Head of Corporate Property Services commenced on 1st May 2017.
(n) The Head of Vulnerable Learner Service commenced on 1st February 2018.
(o) The Interim Head of Housing and Public Protection was remunerated from 1st March 2018 in a one month handover period prior to 
the retirement of the Head of Housing and Public Protection.
112

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The following tables set out the remuneration for Senior Officers whose salary is less than £150,000 but equal to or more than £60,000 per year.
Table 1 - 2016/17
Remuneration 
Total 
(including 
Compensation  Total remuneration 
Pension 
remuneration 
Fees & 
for loss of 
excluding pension  contributions  including pension 
Allowances)
office
contributions
(22.4%)
contributions
£
£
£
£
£
Chief Executive * (a)
23,792
0
23,792
0
23,792
Director Place (b)
9,258
0
9,258
2,074
11,332
Chief Executive (c)
129,617
0
129,617
29,034
158,651
Director Corporate Services (d)
13,738
0
13,738
3,077
16,815
Director People
103,525
0
103,525
23,190
126,715
Chief Operating Officer (e)
8,156
0
8,156
1,827
9,983
Director Place (f)
90,225
0
90,225
20,096
110,321
Chief Education Officer (g)
95,875
0
95,875
20,657
116,532
Head of Legal and Democratic Services (h)
55,261
48,967
104,228
9,201
113,429
Head of Education Planning and Resources
72,114
0
72,114
16,154
88,268
Head of Housing & Public Protection
81,947
0
81,947
18,356
100,303
Head of Planning & City Regeneration
82,416
0
82,416
18,461
100,877
Head of Communications & Customer Engagement
72,114
0
72,114
16,154
88,268
Head of Human Resources & Organisational 
72,313
0
72,313
16,154
88,467
Development
Head of Finance and Delivery (i)
6,181
0
6,181
1,385
7,566
Director Resources (j)
95,761
0
95,761
21,450
117,211
Head of Poverty & Prevention (k)
19,039
0
19,039
4,265
23,304
Interim Head of Poverty & Prevention (l)
14,013
0
14,013
3,139
17,152
Head of Poverty & Prevention (m)
33,121
0
33,121
7,419
40,540
Head of Waste Management & Parks
82,416
0
82,416
18,461
100,877
Balance c/f
1,160,882
48,967
1,209,849
250,554
1,460,403
113

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Table 1 - 2016/17 continued
Total 
Total 
remuneration 
remuneration 
Remuneration  Compensation  excluding 
Pension 
including 
(including Fees  for loss of 
pension 
contributions  pension 
Post title
& Allowances) office
contributions (22.4%)
contributions
£
£
£
£
£
Balance b/f
1,160,882
48,967
1,209,849
250,554
1,460,403
Head of Cultural Services
77,265
0
77,265
17,307
94,572
Head of Education Improvement (n)
84,966
0
84,966
19,032
103,998
Head of Information & Business Change (o)
13,908
0
13,908
3,115
17,023
Interim Chief Transformation Officer (p)
16,306
0
16,306
3,653
19,959
Head of Highways and Transportation 
82,728
0
82,728
18,461
101,189
Interim Chief Social Services Officer (q)
12,628
0
12,628
2,829
15,457
Chief Social Services Officer (r)
85,241
0
85,241
19,094
104,335
Interim Head of Child and Family Services (s)
17,461
0
17,461
3,911
21,372
Head of Child and Family Services (t)
53,982
0
53,982
12,092
66,074
Head of Adult Services
69,539
0
69,539
15,577
85,116
Head of Commercial Services
72,114
0
72,114
16,154
88,268
Head of Learner Support Services (u)
71,540
0
71,540
16,025
87,565
Chief Education Officer (v)
2,991
0
2,991
670
3,661
Interim Head of Legal and Democratic Services (w)
38,539
0
38,539
8,561
47,100
Chief Social Services Officer (x)
7,582
15,016
22,598
1,182
23,780
Chief Transformation Officer (y)
49,627
0
49,627
11,116
60,743
Total
1,917,299
63,983
1,981,282
419,333
2,400,615
114

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
* In 2016/17 The Chief Executive received additional remuneration of £12,973 for Returning Officer Fees relating to General and 
European Elections. There is no additional remuneration to the Chief Executive for any local elections.
No bonus payments or benefit in kind payments were made to the Officers detailed in these notes.
(a)  The Chief Executive retired on 31st May 2016.
(b) The Director of Place is the Chief Executive since 1st June 2016.
(c) The Chief Executive formally commenced on 1st June 2016 but was remunerated from 1st May in a one month handover period prior 
approved by Council decision.
(d)  The Director of Corporate Services left the Authority on 15th May 2016.
(e) The Chief Operating Officer is the Director of Place since 1st June 2016.
(f) The Director of Place commenced on 1st June 2016.
(g) The Chief Education Officer left the Authority on 19th March 2017.
(h) The Head of Legal and Democratic Services left the Authority on 30th September 2016.
(i) The Head of Finance and Delivery is the Director of Resources since 28th April 2016.
(j) The Director of Resources commenced on 28th April 2016.
(k) The Head of Poverty and Prevention left the Authority on 17th July 2016.
(l) There was an Interim Head of Poverty & Prevention from 4th July 2016 until 2nd October 2016.
(m) The Head of Poverty and Prevention commenced on 3rd October 2016.
(n) The Head of Education Improvement is a joint post with Neath Port Talbot County Borough Council as part of the ERW academic 
regional consortium.
(o) The Head of Information & Business Change is the Interim Chief Transformation Officer since 13th June 2016.
(p) The Interim Chief Transformation Officer commenced on 13th June 2016. The Interim Chief Transformation Officer is the Chief 
Transformation Officer since 25th August 2016.
(q) The Interim Chief Social Services Officer is the Chief Social Services Officer since 18th May 2016.
(r) The Chief Social Services Officer commenced on 18th May 2016.
(s) The Interim Head of Child and Family Services is the Head of Child and Family Services since 5th July 2016.
(t) The Head of Child and Family Services commenced on 5th July 2016.
(u) The Head of Learner and Support Service is the Chief Education Officer since 20th March 2017.
(v) The Chief Education Officer commenced on 20th March 2017.
(w) The Interim Head of Legal and Democratic Services commenced on 3rd October 2016.
(x) The Chief Social Services Officer left the Authority on 30th April 2016.
(y) The Chief Transformation Officer commenced on 25th August 2016.
115

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
(b) The number of employees (excluding Senior Officers) whose remuneration (excluding
employer’s pension contributions) was £60,000 or more, in bands of £5,000, were:
2016/17
2017/18
Number of 
Remuneration Band
Number of 
employees
employees
32
£60,000 - £64,999
38
30
£65,000 - £69,999
24
14
£70,000 - £74,999
16
9
£75,000 - £79,999
10
9
£80,000 - £84,999
9
6
£85,000 - £89,999
4
2
£90,000 - £94,999
3
1
£95,000 - £99,999
0
1
£100,000 - £104,999
1
1
£105,000 - £109,999
1
1
£110,000 - £114,999
0
1
£120,000 - £124,999
1
0
£150,000 - £154,999
1
107
Total
108
The remuneration bands above include one off payments regarding compensation for
loss of office. These payments are not paid in return for services rendered to the
Authority and are therefore not strictly remuneration, but the regulations covering
disclosure of salary bandings require these amounts to be included in the calculation.
The numbers shown relate to Authority employees which predominantly include teaching
staff. Senior Officers' remunerations are shown in the tables on pages 110 to 115.
The Authority is required to disclose the organisation's pay multiple. This is the ratio
between the highest paid employee and the median earnings across the organisation.
In 2017/18 the remuneration of the Chief Executive was £142,814k (2016/17 £140k).
This was 7 times (2016/17 6.3 times) the median remuneration of the organisation, which
was £20,528 (2016/17 £22,147). 
116

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
(c) The numbers of exit packages with total cost per band and total cost of the compulsory
and other redundancies are set out in the table below:
2016/17
Total number 
Exit package cost 
Number of 
Number of other  of exit 
Total cost of 
band (including 
Compulsory 
departures 
packages by  exit packages 
special payments)
Redundancies agreed
cost band
in each band
£'000
£0 - £20,000
7
148
155
1,230
£20,001 - £40,000
0
64
64
1,848
£40,001 - £60,000
0
20
20
970
£60,001 - £80,000
0
17
17
1,189
£80,001 - £100,000
0
7
7
632
£100,001 - £150,000
0
14
14
1,657
£150,001 - £200,000
0
2
2
309
Total
7
272
279
7,835
2017/18
Total number 
Exit package cost 
Number of 
Number of other  of exit 
Total cost of 
band (including 
Compulsory 
departures 
packages by  exit packages 
special payments)
Redundancies agreed
cost band
in each band
£'000
£0 - £20,000
3
89
92
854
£20,001 - £40,000
1
54
55
1,589
£40,001 - £60,000
0
36
36
1,765
£60,001 - £80,000
0
17
17
1,213
£80,001 - £100,000
0
7
7
651
£100,001 - £150,000
0
8
8
956
£150,001 - £200,000
0
1
1
153
£200,001 to £250,000
0
1
1
242
Total
4
213
217
7,423
The average payback period against all early retirement / voluntary redundancy packages 
agreed for 2017/18 is just over 1 year.
117

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
31. External Audit Costs
The Authority has incurred the following costs in relation to the audit of the Statement of
Accounts, certification of grant claims and statutory inspections and to non-audit
services provided by the Authority's external auditors:
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
257 Fees payable to the Auditor General for Wales with regard to
257
external audit services carried out under the Code of Audit
Practice prepared by the Auditor General for Wales
99 Fees payable to the Auditor General for Wales in respect of
99
statutory inspections
54 Fees payable to the Auditor General for Wales for the certification
55*
of grant claims and returns
2 Fees payable to the Auditor General for Wales for any other
2
services
412
413
* The £55k fee for the certification of grant claims and returns is an estimated figure.
32. Grant Income
The Authority credited the following grants, contributions and donations to the
Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement in 2016/17 and 2017/18:
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
Credited to Taxation and Non Specific Grant Income
105,152 Council Tax Income
109,236
73,224 Non Domestic Rates
79,531
234,543 Revenue Support Grant
231,169
4,771 School Building Improvement Grant
147
943 Local Transport Fund and Local Transport Network Fund
2,284
9,140 Housing MRA Grant
9,158
703 Road Safety / Safe Route in Communities
1,026
257 Heritage Lottery Fund
0
3,876 General Capital Grant
3,873
3,051 Vibrant & Viable Places
0
23 Wales Retail Relief / High Street Relief
505
320 Intermediate Care Fund
0
0 Highways Refurbishment grant
1,786
1,096 Other Grants and Contributions
1,244
437,099  
439,959
118

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
Credited to Services
9,937 Education Improvement Grant
9,771
51,499 Rent allowance subsidy
50,343
36,412 Rent rebate subsidy
37,446
3,056 Families First
3,095
14,026 Supporting people
13,984
5,520 Department for Children, Education, Lifelong Learning and 
5,749
Skills
4,544 Environment and Sustainable Development Grant (ESD)
4,438
1,096 Housing Benefit Administration
987
6,482 Concessionary fares
6,209
6,075 Flying Start
6,096
6,926 Pupil Deprivation Grant
7,300
2,192 Communities First
1,974
0 School Building Improvement Grant
1,009
439 Communities for Work
662
184 Cynnydd Project (ESF)
560
85 Rural Development Plan
179
7,199 Bus Services Support Grant (BSSG)
4,739
1,309 Western Bay Intermediate Care Fund
0
0 Independent Living Fund
1,222
0 Social Care Workforce Grant
1,500
0 Winter Pressures
837
0 Funded Nursing Care
663
2,533 Intermediate Care Fund
2,586
1,893 Vibrant and Viable Places
761
2,120 Sandfields Renewal Area
675
280 ENABLE grant
280
567 Mayhill Family / Medical centre grant
0
9,822 Other Grants
11,267
174,196
174,332
33. Related Parties
The Authority is required to disclose material transactions with related parties -
bodies or individuals that have the potential to control or influence the council or to be
controlled or influenced by the council. Disclosure of these transactions allows
readers to assess the extent to which the council might have been constrained in its
ability to operate independently or might have secured the ability to limit another
party's ability to bargain freely with the Authority.
119

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
a) Central Government
The Authority receives significant funding from the Welsh Government. Details of the
sums received in respect of Revenue Support Grant and redistributed Non Domestic
Rates are shown in the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement, with details of
other grant income being shown in note 32 to the Accounts.
b) Charitable and Voluntary Bodies
The Authority appoints members to represent it on numerous charitable and voluntary
bodies which operate primarily within Swansea Council, as well as to a number of national
bodies where it is deemed in the Authority's interest to be represented. Any transactions
with these bodies are not significant.
c) Other Bodies
The Authority has appointed members and officers to a number of outside organisations
which include the following:-
Gower Commoners Association
Gower College Swansea
Mid and West Wales Fire Authority
Swansea Bay Port Health Authority
Swansea City Waste Disposal  Ltd (LAWDAC)
University of Wales Swansea – Court of Governors
Welsh Local Government Association Council
A
full
listing
can
be
obtained
from
the
Finance
department, Civic Centre,
Oystermouth Road, 
Swansea, SA1 3SN and on the Authority’s website (www.swansea.gov.uk/councillors).
In respect of the Mid and West Wales Fire Authority and the Swansea Bay Port Health
Authority, amounts are paid by the Authority in respect of levies and precepts to these
bodies. The Section 151 Officer of the Council also acts as the Clerk and Treasurer of the
Swansea Bay Port Health Authority.
Levies / Contributions paid to the two bodies were:-
Mid and West Wales Fire Authority:-            £12.275m (2016/17: £11.912m)
Swansea Bay Port Health Authority:-              £0.084m (2016/17: £0.093m)
The Authority is responsible for the collection of Council Taxes on behalf of the South
Wales Police Authority. The total collected and paid over to the South Wales Police
Authority for 2017/18 was £19.525m (2016/17 £18.530m).
120

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
d) Subsidiary, Associates and Joint Ventures
The Authority has an interest in seven companies, details of which are shown below:-
Swansea City Waste Disposal Company Limited (SCWD Co Ltd.) - Subsidiary
The Swansea City Waste Disposal Company Limited (“the Company”) is a wholly owned
subsidiary of the Authority. On 31st July 2013 the assets, liabilities and balances
transferred from the company to the Authority. The Authority owns the total issued share
capital of the company comprising of 4,879,000 ordinary shares of £1. The activities of
the Company involved the management of the baling plant, civic amenity sites and the
central land disposal site at Tir John.
In January 2013 the Authority made a decision to undertake future waste disposal
operations in-house rather than through the Company. This was formally undertaken with
effect from 31st July 2013 and as of that date all Assets, Liabilities and Balances of the
Company were transferred to Swansea Council. The Swansea City Waste Disposal
Company has ceased trading and is a dormant company.
During 2014/15 the Swansea City Waste Disposal Company Limited issued 150,000
ordinary shares of £1 each.
The net liabilities of Swansea Waste Disposal Company Limited as at 30th September 
2017 were £32k.
The National Waterfront Museum Swansea - Joint Venture
The National Waterfront Museum Swansea (“the Company”) is limited by guarantee and is 
a registered charitable trust (charity number 1090512). The Company has seven directors, 
of which three are appointed by Swansea Council, three by the National Museums and 
Galleries of Wales, with the seventh director being an independent chairman.
The purpose of the Company was to develop the National Industrial and Maritime Museum 
at Swansea which opened in Spring 2006. The Company derives its funds from several 
sources, including the Welsh Government, the National Museums and Galleries of Wales, 
the former Welsh Development Agency and the Heritage Lottery Fund. 
During the 2002/03 financial year the Authority granted a lease to the Company of a 
substantial portion of the site on which the new museum has been developed.  The lease 
was granted at a peppercorn rental and constitutes the Authority’s commitment to the 
scheme.
121

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The museum has been leased to the National Museums and Galleries of Wales at a
peppercorn rent by the Company. Due to the nature of the Company and its constitution
there will be no direct beneficial interest arising to the Authority from its activities.
A contribution of £2,275 was made in 2017/18 and 2016/17 to National Waterfront
Museum Swansea towards 50% of the governance costs of the charitable company.
There were no creditors outstanding as at 31st March 2018 (2016/17 zero) . There was
an oustanding debtor of £33,551 as at 31st March 2018 (2016/17 £1,315).The
charitable company is deemed to be influenced significantly by the Authority through its
representation on the Board of Trustees.
The net assets of the National Waterfront Museum Swansea at 31st March 2018 are
£18,697,922  (2017 £18,849,975).
Copies of the accounts of the Company are available from the National Waterfront
Museum Swansea Project Office, Queens Buildings, Cambrian Place, Swansea SA1
1TW.
The Wales National Pool (Swansea) - Joint Venture
The Wales National Pool (Swansea)
(“the Company”) is a company limited by
guarantee. The purpose of the company is to operate the Wales National 50 Metre Pool
which is located in Swansea.
Swansea Council was responsible for the construction of the pool complex, with the bulk
of funding being supplied by the National Lottery Sports Foundation. The pool has been
constructed on land owned by the University of Wales, Swansea.
The pool complex is leased to the company at a peppercorn rent. Due to the nature of
the facility, which is unlikely to show profitability, the development is not thought to have
a high commercial value.
The pool complex was opened in April 2003. Details of the Authority’s transactions with
the Company during the year are as follows:-
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
331 Funding provided by the Authority towards operating costs of the 
275
pool
101 Sum paid for the free use of the pool by schools and other bodies
62
-868 Recharges of wages, salaries and other costs to the Company
-884
122

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Company has seven directors, of which three are appointed by Swansea Council,
three by the University of Wales (Swansea), with the seventh director being an
independent chairman.
By agreement with the University of Wales Swansea, the Authority funds 50 per cent of
the operational deficit that the Company makes during its financial year which operates
from 1st August to 31st July. There are no other guarantees in place that could increase
the Authority’s liability in respect of the operations of the Company.
There was an outstanding debtor of £72k (2016/17 £144k) and no outstanding creditors at 
31st March 2018 and 31st March 2017.
The net assets of Wales National Pool (Swansea) Limited at 31st March 2018 are 
£5,068,000 (2017 £5,483,000).
Copies of the accounts of the Company are available from the University of Wales
Swansea, Finance Department, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP.
Swansea Stadium Management Company Limited (SSMC Limited) - Associate
In March 2005, Swansea Council purchased shares to the value of £50,000 in Swansea
Stadium Management Company Limited, a company formed to operationally run the
Liberty Stadium in Swansea. The stadium is a circa - 20,000 seater stadium, and is the
home to Swansea City Association Football Club (The) Limited and Ospreys Rugby
Limited. The stadium also has a number of banqueting and hospitality suites which can
also be used for activities outside of sporting events.
The Council incurred £115k of expenditure in respect of the Swansea Stadium
Management Company Limited in 2017/18 (2016/17: £116k). These sums were re-
imbursed by SSMC Ltd.
The outstanding debtors and creditors at 31st March 2018 were £61k and £0 (2017 £79k 
and £0).
The stadium was constructed by Swansea Council, and was leased to SSMC Limited on
a 50 year lease. The shareholding represents a one-third holding in the company with the
other shares held by the above organisations equally. The constitution of the company is
such that although all shareholders have an equal vote in operational issues, for matters
deemed to be of a significant nature the Swansea Council may veto any decisions made
by the Board, including the appointment of senior officers and the commisioning of events
to be held at the stadium. The terms of a supplementary agreement entered into with the
joint shareholders of the Company exempts the Authority from contributing to any past or
future losses of the Company. 
123

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The Company has been loss making during 2017/18 and 2016/17. On the basis that the
Authority is exempt from contributing to such losses, the company's results have not been
consolidated into the Group Accounts.
On the 16th February 2018, a new higher yielding lease directly with Swansea City
Association Football Club (The) Limited was agreed and the Authority surrendered the
residual shareholding for a nominal sum. From this date, the Swansea Stadium
Management Company Limited (SSMC Limited) is no longer an associate of the
Authority.
Accounts for the company can be obtained from the Liberty Stadium, Landore, Swansea,
SA1 2FA.
Swansea Bay Futures Limited
This company has been treated as dormant given no ongoing financial support from the
Council but was dissolved in 2018/19 and as sole beneficial shareholder, on a goodwill
basis the Council injected £12k to extinguish all accumulated predominantly statutory
liabilities.
                                                
Bay Leisure Limited - Associate
The Company was incorporated on 6th August 2007. The principal activity of the
Company is to manage and operate the main Leisure Centre within the Authority’s area –
the ‘LC’.
The company is a trust limited by guarantee, and, as such, the Authority has no direct
shareholding or financial interest in the Company. The Company is treated as an
associate within the group structure of the Authority. There has been no consolidation for
Bay Leisure Limited due to the immateriality of the Company's results. 
In terms of overall control, the Company has a Board consisting of eleven directors of
which the Authority is able to nominate two.
The LC was constructed by Swansea Council and remains classified as an operational
asset within the Authority’s accounts.
The LC is leased to Bay Leisure Limited until 30th September 2018 with the Company
being responsible for all operational matters including day to day maintenance and
repairs.
As
owner
of
the
building
the
Authority
is
responsible
for
major
repair/replacement/refurbishment items and, as such, is making an annual contribution to
an earmarked reserve for future expenditure in this area.
124

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
In terms of future funding, the Authority is under an obligation to consider an annual
funding request from the Company to provide sufficient funding by way of a
management agreement to fund any operating deficit evidenced by the Company’s
business plan. Due consideration will be given to such requests taking into account any
balances or reserves that the Company may hold.
Funding set aside in the Authority's revenue budget for 2017/18 amounts to £0.362m
(2016/17 £0.362m) which reflects the management fee payable to the company.
The net assets of Bay Leisure Limited at 31st March 2018 are £2,500,720 (2017
£2,094,339).
Copies of the accounts of the Company are available from the LC, Oystermouth Road,
Swansea, SA1 3ST.
Swansea Community Energy & Enterprise Scheme (SCEES) - Associate
In 2017, Swansea Council purchased 100,000 shares in Swansea Community Energy &
Enterprise Scheme. Swansea Community Energy & Enterprise Scheme is a community
owned renewable energy company which was established by Swansea Council but is
now run independently by a group of local Directors. The company develops and
manages renewable energy projects for the benefit of residents in some of the more
deprived areas in Swansea.
The Company has 6 Directors and one of the directors is a Cabinet Member of Swansea 
Council.
There was an outstanding debtor of £72k (2016/17 £144k) and no outstanding creditors 
at 31st March 2018.
The net assets of Swansea Community Energy & Enterprise Scheme at 31st March 
2018 is £390,997.
There has been no consolidation for Swansea Community Energy & Enterprise Scheme 
due to the immateriality of the Company's results.
Copies of the accounts of the Company are available from Swansea Community Energy 
& Enterprise Scheme Limited,  The Environment Centre, Pier Street, Swansea, SA1 
1RY.
e) Other Organisations
Members of the Authority have direct control over the Authority’s financial and operating
policies. 
The spouse of a member of the Senior Management Team has provided therapy servies
to Western Bay Adoption Services via her own business . The amount paid for services
provided in 2017/18 was £10,088 (2016/17 £18,283) . The senior manager's interest in
this company was properly recorded in the Register of interests.
125

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
During 2016/17 a member was employed by Dimensions UK as a Business Development
Manager. Dimensions UK provide domiciliary care to adults with learning disablities in a
supported living service in the individuals own tenancy. Services provided by Dimensions
to the Authority in 2016/17 totalled £125,062. The member's interest in this company was
properly recorded in the Register of members interests which is available on the
Authority's public website.
During 2017/18 the member was still employed by Dimensions UK as a Business
Development Manager. However the member ceased to be a member as at 4th May
2017.  Services provided to the Authority in 2017/18 until this date totalled £30,112.
f) Duties imposed on Council Directors
It is important to note that where Councillors are appointed to act as Directors of
Companies or as Board Members of Statutory Agencies then they must, when carrying
out such appointments, seek to act in the best interests of the Company / Statutory Body
when acting in that official capacity.
g) Pension Fund
Swansea Council acts as administering Authority for the Swansea Council Pension Fund
(formerly the West Glamorgan Pension Fund).
Transactions between the Authority and the Pension Fund mainly comprise the payment
to the Pension Fund of employee and employer payroll superannuation deductions,
together with payments in respect of enhanced pensions granted by Former Authorities.
The Pension Fund currently has 35 scheduled and admitted bodies. Management of the
Pension Scheme Investment Fund is undertaken by a committee. The committee is
advised by two independent advisors.
34. Group Accounts
The following are the dates of relevant company accounts used for consolidation:
─ Swansea City Waste Disposal Company Limited - Draft Unaudited Annual Report for
the year ending 30th September 2017.
─ National Waterfront Museum Swansea - Management Accounts for the year ending
31st March 2018.
─ Wales National Pool Swansea - Management Accounts for the year ending 31st
March 2018.
In the opinion of the Authority the use of the above information is likely to adequately
reflect the extent and nature of group income and expenditure and assets and liabilities
that exist as at 31st March 2018 and the use of current information would not be
significant in relation to the group position as stated.
126

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
In accordance with IFRS 5 "Non-current assets held for sale and discontinued
operations", all Group activities were classified as ‘Continuing’ during the year. There
were no material acquisitions or discontinuations of services as defined by the Standard.
The total net assets of the Group can be analysed according to the relevant entity to
which they relate, as follows:
31st March 
31st March 
2017
2018
£’000
£’000
1,063,579 Swansea Council (Parent)
1,062,349
32 Swansea City Waste Disposal Company Limited (Subsidiary)
32
9,425 National Waterfront Museum Swansea (Joint Venture)
9,349
2,742 Wales National Pool (Joint Venture)
12,021
1,075,778 Net Assets Employed (exc. Pension Fund) *
1,083,751
-679,092 Net Group Pension Fund Liabilities
-712,028
396,686 Net Assets Employed
371,723
* Some of the component Group assets have been valued on a different basis to that
used by the Authority. If the Wales National Pool had been valued at depreciated
replacement cost then the asset would have a value of £24,050m. The Wales National
Pool currently has a net book value in the region of £5m. Given the material scale of the
difference in value the Authority has restated their share of the higher valuation which
results in an unrealised gain of £9.5m. It is expected that under the terms of the
agreement the final value at the end of the lease (24th Decemver 2023) will be zero.
Therefore the difference in book valuations will be fully amortised by the 2023/24
Statement of Accounts.
Swansea Council (the Parent company) does not believe that it will receive a material
benefit in the form of income or dividends from the related companies, and does not
expect to make any contributions over and above the normal budgeted requirement.
Since the related companies are limited by guarantee, any losses to the Authority will be
limited to the value of the guarantee in each entity.
127

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS 
35. Capital Expenditure and Capital Financing
The total amount of capital expenditure incurred in the year is shown in the table below,
(including the value of assets acquired under finance leases), together with the resources
that have been used to finance it. Where capital expenditure is to be financed in future
years by charges to revenue as assets are used by the Authority, the expenditure results
in an increase in the Capital Financing Requirement (CFR), a measure of the capital
expenditure incurred historically by the Authority that has yet to be financed. The CFR is
analysed in the second part of this note.
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
462,919 Opening Capital Financing Requirement
476,381
Capital investment
86,319 Property, Plant and Equipment
77,916
8 Heritage Assets
74
189 Investment Properties
215
154 Intangible Assets
327
11,765 Revenue Expenditure Funded from Capital under Statute
6,946
0 Investment
100
Sources of finance
-5,716 Capital receipts
-5,117
-77 Capital receipts - set aside
-14
-32,941 Government grants and other contributions
-23,167
Sums set aside from revenue:
-32,380 Direct revenue contributions
-29,742
-13,859 MRP/loans fund principal
-17,440
476,381 Closing Capital Financing Requirement
486,479
Explanation of movements in year
16,350 Increase in underlying need to borrowing
9,698
125 Assets acquired under finance leases
159
-3,013 Other movements in year
241
13,462 Increase/(decrease) in Capital Financing Requirement
10,098
128

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
36. Leases
Authority as Lessee

Finance Leases
The assets acquired under finance leases are carried as Property, Plant and Equipment in the
Balance Sheet at the following net amounts:
31 March 2018
31 March 2017
£’000
£’000
Vehicles, Plant, Furniture and 
Equipment
646
620
The Authority is committed to making minimum payments under these leases comprising
settlement of the long-term liability for the interest in the property acquired by the Authority and
finance costs that will be payable by the Authority in future years while the liability remains
outstanding. The minimum lease payments are made up of the following amounts:
31 March 2018
31 March 2017
£’000
£’000
Finance lease liabilities (net present 
value of minimum lease payments) : 
 - current
175
137
 - non-current
362
402
Finance costs payable in future 
years
33
41
Minimum lease payments
570
580
The minimum lease payments will be payable over the following periods:
Minimum Lease Payments Finance Lease Liabilities
31 March
31 March 31 March
31 March
2018
2017
2018
2017
£’000
£’000
£’000
£’000
Not later than one year
179
141
175
137
Later than one year and not later 
than five years
380
432
353
396
Later than five years
11
7
9
6
570
580
537
539
129

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Operating Leases
The Authority has acquired IT equipment and telecommunications by entering into
operating leases.
The future minimum lease payments due under non-cancellable leases in future years
are:
31 March 
31 March 
2018
2017
£’000
£’000
Not later than one year
1,582
808
Later than one year and not later than five 
years
3,451
1,014
5,033
1,822
The operating lease charge for the year was £1,898,283.54 (2016/17 £894,368.61).
37. Impairment Losses
During 2017/18 the Authority has recognised impairment charges of £1.90m (2016/17
£2.35m) within the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement. This was
attributable to non enhancing expenditure.
38. Termination Benefits
During 2017/18 the Authority incurred significant expenditure in terms of redundancy
costs paid to leavers together with costs incurred in compensation payments to the Local
Government Pension Fund in respect of early access pension costs.
In particular on 17th November 2011, in order to meet significant budget savings
required for the financial year 2011/12 and onwards, the Cabinet authorised officers to
seek expressions of interest for voluntary redundancy and/or early retirement from within
selected employee groups of the Authority in accordance with the Authority's agreed
ER/VR policy. The offer remains extant on a rolling basis.
There is an enhanced offer for voluntary early departure from the Authority to accelerate
the pace and scale of change and budgetary savings. This offer came to an end on 30th
March 2018 for all staff except school based staff where the offer will end on 30th June
2018.
130

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Costs were incurred relating to redundancy payments and early access to pension costs
totalling £7.423m (2016/17 £7.835m) for the year.
These costs include provision for costs for a limited number of employees whose service
will be terminated in 2018/19 but who had been offered - and accepted - severance terms
as at 31st March 2018.
All costs relating to termination benefits have been included as part of service definitions
within the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement.
The above costs include both teaching and non teaching staff.
39. Pension Schemes Accounted For As Defined Contribution Schemes
Teachers employed by the Authority are members of the Teachers' Pensions Scheme,
administered by Capita Teachers' Pensions on behalf of the Department for Education.
The Scheme provides teachers with specified benefits upon their retirement, and the
Authority contributes towards the costs by making contributions based on a percentage of
members' pensionable salaries.
The scheme is a multi-employer defined benefit scheme. The scheme is unfunded and
the Department for Education uses a notional fund as a basis for calculating the
employers' contribution rate paid by local authorities. Valuations of the notional fund are
undertaken every four years.
The scheme has in excess of 3,700 participating employers and consequently the
Authority is not able to identify its share of the underlying financial position and
performance of the scheme with sufficient reliability for accounting purposes. For the
purposes of this Statement of Accounts, it is therefore accounted for on the same basis
as a defined contribtuion scheme. As a proportion of the total contributions into the
Teachers' Pension Scheme during the year ending 31st March 2018, the Authority's own
contributions equate to approximately 0.2%.
In 2017/18 the Authority paid £12.1m to Teachers' Pensions in respect of teachers'
retirement benefits, representing 16.5% of pensionable pay. The figures for 2016/17 were
£12.1m and 16.48%. The March 2018 contributions of £1,009,107 were paid on the 7th
April 2018. The contributions due to be paid in the next financial year are estimated to be
£12.2m at an employer rate of 16.48%.
The Authority is responsible for the costs of any additional benefits awarded upon early 
retirement outside of the terms of the teachers' scheme. These costs are accounted for 
on a defined benefit basis and detailed in Note 40.
The Authority is not liable to the scheme for any other entities' obligations under the plan.
131

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
40. Defined Benefit Pension Schemes
Participation in Pension Schemes
As part of the terms and conditions of employment of its officers, the Authority makes
contributions towards the cost of post-employment benefits. Although these benefits
will not actually be payable until employees retire, the Authority has a commitment to
make the payments (for those benefits) and to disclose them at the time that
employees earn their future entitlement.
The Authority participates in two post-employment schemes:
─ The Local Government Pension Scheme (LGPS), administered locally by the City
and County of Swansea - this is a funded defined benefit final salary scheme,
meaning that the Authority and employees pay contributions into a fund,
calculated at a level intended to balance the pensions liabilities with investment
assets.
─ Arrangements for the award of discretionary post-retirement benefits upon early
retirement - this is an unfunded defined benefit arrangement, under which
liabilities are recognised when awards are made. However, there are no
investment assets built up to meet these pension liabilities, and cash has to be
generated to meet actual pension payments as they eventually fall due.
The City and County of Swansea pension scheme is operated under the regulatory
framework for the Local Government Pension Scheme and the governance of the
scheme is the responsibility of the pensions committee of the City and County of
Swansea. Policy is determined in accordance with the Pensions Fund Regulations.
The investment managers of the fund are appointed by the committee and the
committee consist of the Chief Finance Officer, Council members and independent
investment advisers.
The principal risks to the Authority of the scheme are the longevity assumptions,
statutory changes to the scheme, structural changes to the scheme (i.e. large-scale
withdrawals from the scheme), changes to inflation, bond yields and the performance
of the equity investments held by the scheme. These are mitigated to a certain extent
by the statutory requirements to charge to the General Fund and Housing Revenue
Account the amounts required by statute as described in the accounting policies note.
Discretionary Post-retirement Benefits
Discretionary post-retirement benefits on early retirement are an unfunded defined
benefit arrangement, under which liabilities are recognised when awards are made.
There are no plan assets built up to meet these pension liabilities.
132

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Transactions Relating to Post-employment Benefits
The cost of retirement benefits in the reported cost of services is recognised when they
are earned by employees, rather than when the benefits are eventually paid as pensions.
However, the charge we are required to make against council tax is based on the cash
payable in the year, so the real cost of post-employment/retirement benefits is reversed
out of the General Fund and Housing Revenue Account via the Movement in Reserves
Statement. The following transactions have been made in the Comprehensive Income
and Expenditure Statement and the General Fund Balance via the Movement in Reserves
Statement during the year:
Local Government Discretionary Benefits
Pension Scheme
Arrangements
2017/18
2016/17 2017/18
2016/17
£m
£m
£m
£m
Comprehensive Income and 
Expenditure Statement
Cost of Services:
Service cost comprising:
 - current service cost
53.33
39.53
0.00
0.00
 - past service costs
3.02
2.67
1.71
0.00
Financing and Investment Income and 
Expenditure
 - Net interest expense
14.09
15.68
2.34
3.01
Total Post Employment Benefits 
Charged to the Surplus or Deficit on the 
Provision of Services

70.44
57.88
4.05
3.01
Other Post Employment Benefits 
Charged to the Comprehensive Income 
and Expenditure Statement

Remeasurement of the net defined benefit 
liability comprising:
 - Return on plan assets
-7.48
-135.14
0
0
 - Actuarial gains and losses arising on 
changes in demographic assumptions
0
-35.63
0
-1.41
 - Actuarial gains and losses arising on 
changes in financial assumptions
-1.32
332.81
0.40
9.33
 - Other
7.39
-79.87
5.33
-0.70
Total Post Employment Benefits 
Charged to the Comprehensive Income 
and Expenditure Statement

69.03
140.05
9.78
10.23
133

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Local Government
Discretionary Benefits
Pension Scheme
Arrangements
2017/18
2016/17
2017/18
2016/17
£m
£m
£m
£m
Movement in Reserves Statement
 - reversal of net charges made to the 
Surplus or Deficit on the Provision of 
Services for post employment benefits in 
accordance with the Code
-70.44
-57.88
-4.05
-3.01
Actual amount charged against the 
General Fund Balance for pensions in 
the year:

 - employers' contributions payable to the 
scheme
40.09
35.00
 - retirement benefits payable to 
pensioners 
5.78
5.83
Pension Assets and Liabilities Recognised in the Balance Sheet
The amount included in the Balance Sheet arising from the Authority's obligation in 
respect of its defined benefit plans is as follows:
Local Government  Discretionary Benefits 
Pension Scheme
Arrangements
2017/18
2016/17
2017/18
2016/17
£m
£m
£m
£m
Present value of the defined benefit 
obligation
1,706.39
1,628.46
99.61
95.61
Fair value of plan assets
1,093.97
1,044.98
0.00
0.00
Net liability arising from defined 
benefit obligation

-612.42
-583.48
-99.61
-95.61
134

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Reconciliation of the Movements in the Fair Value of Scheme (Plan) Assets
Discretionary 
Local Government 
Benefits 
Pension Scheme
Arrangements
2017/18
2016/17 2017/18 2016/17
£m
£m
£m
£m
Opening fair value of scheme assets
1,044.98
869.63
0.00
0.00
Interest income
26.32
29.75
0.00
0.00
Remeasurement gain/(loss):
 - The return on plan assets, excluding the 
amount included in the net interest expense
7.48
135.14
0.00
0.00
Contributions from employer
40.09
35.00
5.78
5.83
Contributions from employees into the scheme
10.03
9.55
0.00
0.00
Benefits paid
-34.93
-34.09
-5.78
-5.83
Closing fair value of scheme assets
1,093.97
1,044.98
0.00
0.00
Reconciliation of Present Value of the Scheme Liabilities (Defined Benefit 
Obligation)

Unfunded 
Liabilities: 
Funded Liabilities: 
Discretionary 
Local Government 
Benefits 
Pension Scheme
Arrangements
2017/18
2016/17 2017/18 2016/17
£m
£m
£m
£m
Opening Balance at 1st April
1,628.46
1,348.06
95.61
91.21
Current service cost
53.33
39.53
0.00
0.00
Interest cost
40.41
45.43
2.34
3.01
Contributions from scheme participants
10.03
9.55
0.00
0.00
Remeasurement (gains) and losses:
 - Actuarial gains/losses arising from changes 
in demographic assumptions
0.00
-35.63
0.00
-1.41
 - Actuarial gains/losses arising from changes 
in financial assumptions
-1.32
332.81
0.40
9.33
 - Other
7.39
-79.87
5.33
-0.70
Past service cost
3.02
2.67
1.71
0.00
Benefits paid
-34.93
-34.09
-5.78
-5.83
Closing balance at 31st March
1,706.39
1,628.46
99.61
95.61
135

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Local Government Pension Scheme assets comprised:
Fair value of scheme assets
2017/18
2016/17
£'000
£'000
Cash and cash equivalents
77,046
67,561
Equity instruments:
By industry type
 - Consumer
197,828
207,153
 - Manufacturing
141,200
130,692
 - Energy and utilities
127,519
112,307
 - Financial institutions
207,120
187,941
 - Health and care
98,497
97,144
 - Information technology
90,019
81,790
 - Telecommunications services
25,800
38,375
 - Property
1,933
4,459
889,916
859,861
Pooled Equity Investment Vehicles
- UK
164,264
160,652
- Overseas
343,594
332,091
507,858
492,743
Property
85,256
87,240
85,256
87,240
Fixed Interest:
- Fixed Interest
194,091
195,320
- Index-Linked
32,547
32,282
226,638
227,602
Hedge Funds
54,601
52,318
Private Equity
65,051
58,246
Cash Funds
761
1,664
Cash
3,672
3,211
Net Current Assets
3,232
3,107
Total assets
1,914,031
1,853,553
136

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Fair value of scheme assets
2017/18
2016/17
£'000
£'000
Equity instruments:
By company size
- Large capitalisation
634,212
679,442
- Small capitalisation
255,704
180,419
Sub-total equity instruments
889,916
859,861
Basis for Estimating Assets and Liabilities
Liabilities have been assessed on an actuarial basis using the projected unit credit
method, an estimate of the pensions that will be payable in future years dependent on
assumptions about mortality rates, salary levels, etc. Both the Local Government Pension
Scheme and discretionary benefits liabilities have been assessed by Aon Hewitt Limited,
an independent firm of actuaries, estimates for the Fund being based on the latest full
valuation of the scheme as at 31st March 2016.
The significant assumptions used by the Actuary have been:
Local 
Government 
Pension 
Discretionary 
Scheme
Benefits
2017/18 2016/17 2017/18 2016/17
Mortality assumptions:
Longevity at 65 for current pensioners: (years)
 - Men
22.9
22.9
22.9
22.9
 - Women
24.5
24.4
24.5
24.4
Longevity at 65 for future pensioners: (years)
 - Men
24.6
24.5
 - Women
26.3
26.2
Rate of inflation %
2.1
2.0
2.1
2.0
Rate of increase in salaries %
3.6
3.5
Rate of increase in pensions %
2.1
2.0
2.1
2.0
Rate for discounting scheme liabilities %
2.6
2.5
2.6
2.5
137

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The estimation of the defined benefit obligations is sensitive to the actuarial
assumptions set out in the table on the previous page. The sensitivity analyses below
have been determined based on reasonably possible changes of the assumptions
occurring at the end of the reporting period and assumes for each change that the
assumption analysed changes while all the other assumptions remain constant. The
assumptions in longevity, for example, assume that life expectancy increases or
decreases for men and women. In practice, this is unlikely to occur, and changes in
some of the assumptions may be interrelated. The estimations in the sensitivity
analysis have followed the accounting policies for the scheme, i.e. on an actuarial
basis using the projected unit credit method. The methods and types of assumptions
used in preparing the sensitivity analysis below did not change from those used in the
previous period.
Impact on the Defined Benefit 
Obligation in the Scheme
Increase in 
Decrease in 
Assumption
Assumption
£m
£m
Longevity (increase or decrease in 1 year)
1,654.70
-1,758.39
Rate of increase in salaries (increase or decrease 
1,715.59
-1,697.30
by 0.1%)
Rate of increase in pensions (increase or 
1,727.92
-1,685.15
decrease by 0.1%)
Rate for discounting scheme liabilities (increase or 
1,676.13
-1,737.19
decrease by 0.1%)
Asset and Liability Matching (ALM) Strategy
The pensions committee of the City and County of Swansea has agreed to an asset
and liability matching strategy (ALM) that matches, to the extent possible, the types of
assets invested to the liabilities in the defined benefit obligation. The fund has
matched assets to the pensions' obligations by investing in long-term fixed interest
securities and index linked gilt edged investment with maturities that match the
benefits payments as they fall due. This is balanced with a need to maintain the
liquidity of the fund to ensure that it is able to make current payments.
As is required by the pensions and investment regulations the suitability of various
types of investment has been considered, as has the need to diversify investments to
reduce the risk of being invested in too narrow a range. A large proportion of the
assets relate to equities (77.6% of scheme assets) and bonds (11.4%). These
percentages are materially the same as the comparative year. The scheme also
invests in properties as a part of the diversification of the scheme's investments.
There is a limited use of derivatives to manage the bond risk for the shorter-term
instruments. The ALM strategy is monitored annually or more frequently if necessary.
138

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Impact on the Authority's Cash Flows
The objectives of the scheme are to keep employers' contributions at as constant a rate
as possible.The Authority has agreed a strategy with the scheme's actuary to achieve a
funding level of 100% over the next 25 years. Funding levels are monitored on an annual
basis. The next triennial valuation is as at 31st March 2019.
The scheme will need to take account of the national changes to the scheme under the
Public Pensions Services Act 2013. Under the Act, the Local Government Pension
Scheme in England and Wales and the other main existing public service schemes may
not provide benefits in relation to service after 31st March 2014. The Act provides for
scheme regulations to be made within a common framework, to establish new career
average revalued earnings schemes to pay pensions and other benefits to certain public
servants.
The Authority expects to pay £40.08m contributions to the scheme in 2018/19.
The weighted average duration of the defined benefit obligation for scheme members is 
17.9 years (2016/17 17.9 years).
41. Contingent Liabilities
The Authority has identified a number of contingent future liabilities arising from current
and past activities.
Nature of Liability
Potential 
Comment
Timing
Financial 
Effect
£’000
Personal Social Services
Unknown Relates to potential negligence Unknown
claims relating to those cared
for
by
the
Council
or
its
contractors. The Authority is
not currently aware of any
major claims.
139

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Nature of 
Potential 
Comment
Timing
Liability
Financial 
Effect
£’000
Personal 
Unknown The Employment Appeal Tribual has previously Unknown
Social 
ruled that the National Minimum Wage applies to
Services
overnight sleep in personal care support. In line
with previous custom and practice in the wider
sector the Council was paying a night time
allowance to direct carers and via providers of
social care which following the ruling would not be
compliant with the National Minimum Wage.
Whilst the Council has already changed its
payment arrangements in light of that ruling,
retrospective claims by individuals and HMRC
enforcement action could be made going back 6
years.
Infrastructure  Unknown There are potential claims regarding infrastructure Unknown
and retaining 
and retaining walls which may be taken against
walls
the Authority - such claims will be rigorously
defended through the Authority's insurers and any
successful claims will be met from future capital or
revenue funding.
Equal pay 
Unknown During 2008/2009 and 2009/10, in common with
2018/19
and Equal 
many other local authorities, the Authority made
Value claims
payments to certain staff in full settlement of
potential equal pay claims. However, a number of
claims remained unsettled and a considerble
number of additional claims were subsequently
received. The Authority has settled the majority of
the liabilities by the 31st March 2016 but there are
still some costs yet to be in incurred. In respect of
known future liabilities the Authority has made
what it considers to be
adequate revenue
provision within the Accounts to cater for the
estimated value of such residual liabilities.
There is a potential for further (as yet unknown)
claims in respect of equal pay claims and in
respect of equal value claims which are not
provided for in these accounts.
140

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Nature of 
Potential 
Comment
Timing
Liability
Financial 
Effect
£’000
Landlord / 
Unknown There
is
potential
risk
around
lease/HRA Unknown
Tenant 
properties where there are disputes as to whether
Liability 
it is a tenant or landlord property maintenance
Claims
obligation.
Retention or 
Unknown The Council undertakes a range of activities under  Unknown
Clawback on 
which payment is made specifically on evidenced
Grant and 
performance over an extended period. Full receipt
Contract 
is not guaranteed until the end of the grant or
Claims
contract period. There is potential risk that grant
clawback may arise if not all grant terms and
conditions are fulfilled.
Legal and 
Unknown The Council is regularly challenged on a range of Unknown
Insurance 
issues that are either subject to litigation or
related 
insurance claims. The Council at all times will
matters
vigorously defend such claims, and in cases
where claims are identified, the result can be
anticipated and the potential financial effect
evaluated then adequate provision is made with
the Accounts for any such liabilities. There
remains the possibility however of future claims
arising as a result of past actions that are either
unknown at the Balance Sheet date or where the
outcome is so unpredictable in terms of outcome
or financial liability that no reliable estimate of
liability can be made.
Swansea 
Unknown There are stadium construction matters to be Unknown
Stadium 
resolved
between
the
Swansea
Stadium
Management 
Management Company, tenant clubs and the
Company
Council.
Flooding
Unknown There are potential claims regarding flooding Unknown
which may be taken against the Authority - such
claims will be rigorously defended through the
Authority's insurers and any successful claims will
be met from future capital or revenue funding.
141

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Nature of 
Potential 
Comment
Timing
Liability
Financial 
Effect
£’000
City Deal
£ millions The Council has incurred, and continues to do so, 
2018/19 
significant initial work up costs on a range of 
and then 
regeneration and redevelopment schemes within 
up to 15 
the City Centre using a mix of its own funds and 
years 
Welsh Government support. These continue to be 
thereafter
considered capitalisable and thus treated as 
capital where appropriate but the final build out of 
schemes is heavily contingent upon decisions by 
the UK and Welsh Government over individual 
business cases under the City Deal and the terms 
and conditions of any final City Deal grant offer, 
and further funding flexibilities. If schemes were 
not to progress, for any reason, the costs incurred 
to date would potentially need to be written back 
to revenue.
Client care 
£1million+ The interface between local authority social care, 
2018/19
costs
and to a much lesser extent some specialist 
education provision, and local health boards and 
other local authorities is a complex one involving 
discussion and decisions on lead responsibility for 
payment of client care costs, and in some cases 
appropriate sharing of costs. Whilst client care is 
of course the utmost priority, the contractual 
obligations and disputes between the various 
parties over costs is growing significantly and 
there remain substantial unresolved sums 
between the parties.
142

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
42. Council Tax
Council Tax income derives from charges raised according to the value of residential
properties, which have been grouped into nine valuation bands using 1st April 2003
values for this specific purpose. Charges are calculated by taking the amount of
Income required for the Council, police authorities and community councils for the
forthcoming year and dividing the amount by the Council Tax base.
The Council Tax base is the number of properties in each band adjusted by a multiplier
to convert the number to band ‘D’ equivalent and adjusted for discounts. The base was
89,465 in 2017/2018 (89,151 in 2016/2017).
The basic amount for a band 'D' property is £1,426.49 (£1,383.75 for 2016/17) is
multiplied by the proportion specified for the particular band to give the individual
amounts due.
Council Tax bills are based on multipliers for bands A to I. The following table shows
the multiplier applicable to each band together with the equivalent number of Band ‘D’
properties within each band. In addition there is one lower band (A*) designed to offer
the appropriate discount in respect of disabled dwellings where legislation allows a
reduction in banding to that one below the band in which the property is actually valued.
The band ‘D’ numbers shown have been adjusted for an assumed collection rate of
97.5% (97.5% in 2016/17) to arrive at the Council Tax base for the year.
Band          A*        A          B          C           D           E           F         G          H        I
Multiplier   5/9     6/9        7/9        8/9        9/9       11/9      13/9     15/9     18/9   21/9
Band 'D'    14    9,050  18,227  18,111 14,018   13,282   10,193   5,693  2,136 1,035 
Number
143

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
Analysis of the net proceeds from Council Tax:
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
125,494 Council tax collectable
129,618
-469 Less:- Provision for non payment of Council tax
-529
-19,873 Less:- Council Tax Support Scheme
-19,853
105,152 Net proceeds from Council Tax
109,236
Application of Council Tax proceeds: 
2016/17
2017/18
£'000
£'000
123,363 City & County of Swansea precept
127,621
967 Community Council precept
965
124,330 Council Tax requirement
128,586
-19,873 Less:- Council Tax Support Scheme
-19,853
695 Transfer to reserves (Surplus)
503
105,152 Net application of proceeds
109,236
43. National Non-Domestic Rates (NNDR)
NNDR is organised on a national basis. The Welsh Government specifies an
amount of the rate per pound of rateable value which for 2017/18 was 0.499p
(0.486p in 2016/17) and, subject to the effects of transitional arrangements, local
businesses pay rates calculated by multiplying their rateable value by that amount.
The Council is responsible for collecting rates due from ratepayers in its area but
pays the proceeds into the NNDR Pool administered by the Welsh Government. The
Welsh Government redistributes the sums payable back to local authorities on the
basis of a fixed amount per head of population.
144

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
The NNDR income (after reliefs and provisions) of £70.004m for 2017/18 (£72.222m
for 2016/17) was based on a rateable value at year end of £186.503m (£192.298m
2016/17).
The £70.004m represents the NNDR income collected by the Council and paid into the
NNDR Pool that is administered by the Welsh Government. The £79.531m disclosed in
Note 10 (Taxation and Non Specific Grant Income) is the receipt the Council received
back from the Welsh Government.
Analysis of the proceeds from non domestic rates:
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
73,776 Non – domestic rates due
71,526
-363 Council funded contribution to rate relief
-350
73,413
71,176
-467 Less: cost of collection
-471
-724 Provision for bad debts
-701
72,222 NNDR due to pool
70,004
73,224 Net receipt from pool 
79,531
44. Jointly Controlled Operations
A joint arrangement is defined as "a contractual arrangement under which the
participants engaged in joint activities that do not create an entity because it would not
be carrying on a trade or business of its own. A contractual arrangement where all
significant matters of operating and financial policy are predetermined does not create
an entity because the policies are those of its participants, not of a separate entity".
The CIPFA Code states that where such joint arrangements exist, each participant
should account directly for its share of the assets, liabilities, income, expenditure and
cash flows held within or arising from the arrangements.
The Authority works in partnership with many other Local Authorities in the joint
provision of services. Traditionally one Authority acts as lead in these arrangements
and will incur all expenditure for the service with the other Authorities making a
contribution for a calculated or negotiated share of the costs. Where contributions in
cash during the year are less than or exceed the final amount due a debtor / creditor is
kept in the lead Authority's books to add / deduct from the next year's contribution.
145

NOTES TO THE ACCOUNTS
45. Heritage Assets: Summary of Transactions
2016/17 2017/18
£'000
£'000
Cost of acquisition of heritage assets
Heritage Land, Buildings & Infrastructure
4
6
Art & Museums
0
15
Furniture, Fixtures & Fittings
0
0
Other
4
0
Total Cost of purchases
8
21
Value of heritage assets acquired by Gifts
Heritage Land, Buildings & Infrastructure
0
0
Art & Museums
0
64
Furniture, Fixtures & Fittings
0
0
Other
0
0
Total Gifts
0
64
Revaluation recognised in the Revaluation Reserve in the period
Heritage Land, Buildings & Infrastructure
0
0
Art & Museums
2,037
3
Furniture, Fixtures & Fittings
0
0
Other
0
0
Total
2,037
3
Revaluation recognised in the Surplus/Deficit on the Provision                                  
of Services in the period
Heritage Land, Buildings & Infrastructure
0
-6
Art & Museums
0
0
Furniture, Fixtures & Fittings
-224
0
Other
0
0
Total
-224
-6
Impairment recognised in the period
Heritage Land, Buildings & Infrastructure
-4
0
Art & Museums
0
0
Furniture, Fixtures & Fittings
0
0
Other
-4
0
Total
-8
0
146

HOUSING REVENUE ACCOUNT
INCOME AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT
The HRA Income and Expenditure Statement shows the economic cost in the year of
providing housing services in accordance with generally accepted accounting practices,
rather than the amount to be funded from rents and government grants. Authorities
charge rents to cover expenditure in accordance with the legislative framework; this
may be different from the accounting cost. The increase or decrease in the year, on the
basis on which rents are raised, is shown in the Movement on the Housing Revenue
Account Statement.
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
Note
£’000
£’000
Expenditure
12,934
Repairs and maintenance
13,671
12,777
Supervision and management
13,848
601
Rent, rates, taxes and other charges
604
5,984
Depreciation and impairment of non-current 
6
7,993
assets
67
Debt management costs
67
336
Movement in the allowance for bad debts
623
32,699
Total Expenditure
36,806
Income
-54,754
Dwelling rents
-57,303
-103
Non-dwelling rents
-136
-2,737
Charges for services and facilities
-2,861
-1,132
Contributions towards expenditure
-988
-58,726
Total Income
-61,288
147

HOUSING REVENUE ACCOUNT
INCOME AND EXPENDITURE STATEMENT
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
-26,027
Net cost of HRA services as included in the 
-24,482
whole authority Comprehensive Income and 
Expenditure Statement

672
HRA services' share of Corporate and 
729
Democratic Core
-25,355
Net Cost for HRA Services
-23,753
HRA share of the Operating Income and 
Expenditure included in the Comprehensive 
Income and Expenditure Statement:

6,221
Interest payable and similar charges
6,420
-47
Interest and investment income
-29
Net interest on the net defined benefit liability 
935
(asset)
821
-9,140
Capital grants and contributions receivable
-9,158
124
Income and expenditure in relation to 
0
investment properties and changes in their fair 
value
-1,907
-1,946
-27,262
Surplus(-)/deficit for the year on HRA 
-25,699
services
148

MOVEMENT ON THE HRA BALANCE
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
15,233
Balance on the HRA at the end of the previous year
9,821
27,262
Surplus or (deficit) for the year on the HRA Income and
25,699
Expenditure Statement
-32,674
Adjustments between accounting basis and funding basis under
-28,739
statute
-5,412
Net decrease before transfers to or from reserves
-3,040
0
Transfers from / to reserves
0
-5,412
Increase or (decrease) in year on the HRA
-3,040
9,821
Balance on the HRA at the end of the current year
6,781
Adjustments between accounting basis and funding basis under statute 
Adjustments to Revenue Resources
Amounts by which income and expenditure included in the Comprehensive Income and
Expenditure Statement are different from revenue for the year calculated in accordance
with statutory requirements:
1,198
Pension costs (transferred to (or from) the Pensions Reserve)
1,590
-3
Financial instruments (transferred to the Financial Instruments 
-6
Adjustment Account)
-133
Holiday pay (transferred to the Accumulated Absences 
74
Reserve)
-3,033
Reversal of entries included in the Surplus or Deficit on the 
-1,165
Provision of Services in relation to capital expenditure (these 
items are charged to the Capital Adjustment Account):
-1,971
Total Adjustments to Revenue Resources
493
Adjustments between Revenue and Capital Resources
-2,703
Statutory provision for the repayment of debt (transfer from the
-2,882
Capital Adjustment Account)
-28,000
Capital expenditure financed from revenue balances (transfer to 
-26,350
the Capital Adjustment Account)
Total Adjustments between Revenue and Capital 
-30,703
Resources
-29,232
-32,674
Total Adjustments
-28,739
149

NOTES TO THE HOUSING REVENUE ACCOUNT
1.  Housing Stock
As at 31st March 2018 the Authority owned a total of 13,528 properties, made up of
different types of dwelling including detached houses, semi-detached houses, bungalows,
low level flats, high rise accommodation and sheltered accommodation. 
The change in stock numbers can be summarised as follows:
31/03/2017
31/03/2018
Units
Units
13,493
Stock at 1st April
13,500
10
Additions
28
-3
Sales 
0
13,500
Stock at 31st March 
13,528
2.  Rent arrears and provisions for bad debts
Rent arrears
31/03/2017
31/03/2018
£'000
£'000
1,413
Current tenants
1,714
529
Former tenants
668
1,942
2,382
Former tenants arrears written off during 2017/18 totalled £0.281m (2016/17 £0.316m). A
bad debts provision has been made in the accounts in respect of potentially uncollectable
rent arrears. The value of the provision at 31st March 2018 is £1.428m (31st March 2017
£1.086m).
Provision for bad debts
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
-1,066
Provisions as at 1st April 
-1,086
316
Arrears written off during year
281
-336
Increase in provision required
-623
-1,086
Provisions as at 31st March 
-1,428
150

NOTES TO THE HOUSING REVENUE ACCOUNT
3.  Capital expenditure
During 2017/18 £44.136m (2016/17 £54.564m) was spent on HRA Properties.
This was financed as follows:-
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
9,140
Grants – Major Repairs Allowance 
9,158
4,607
Capital Contributions
178
28,000
Revenue and Balances
26,350
12,817
Borrowing
8,450
54,564
44,136
The capital expenditure was incurred on HRA assets as follows:
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
42,690
HRA Properties
42,665
11,874
HRA Properties (work in progress at 31st  March)
1,471
54,564
44,136
The Major Repairs Allowance was used in full in 2017/18 and 2016/17.
With the exception of £2.788m for new council homes at Milford Way, capital
expenditure on council housing did not increase the value of the council properties
and has been written down against the revaluation reserve.
4.  Revenue expenditure funded from capital under statute (REFCUS)
Capital expenditure, which does not result in a non-current asset to the Authority
(e.g. housing renovation grants), is classified as revenue expenditure funded from
capital under statute.
No revenue expenditure funded from capital under statute was charged to the
Housing Revenue Account in 2017/18 and 2016/17.
151

NOTES TO THE HOUSING REVENUE ACCOUNT
5.  Capital receipts during the year
Capital receipts received during the year in respect of the sale of HRA properties
amounted to £197k (£220k 2016/17). Of this £14k (£77k 2016/17) was set aside for the
repayment of debt.
The following is a summary of the Capital Receipts Reserve as it applies to the Housing
Revenue Account:-
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
2,305
Opening balance 1st April 
583
220
Receipts during the year
197
-77
Less set asides
-14
-4
Less other costs
0
-1,861
Less used to fund HRA Capital Programme
0
583
Balance available as at 31st March 
766
        Capital receipts were as follows:
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
107
Council Houses
19
113
Land
178
220
197
6.  Depreciation charges and impairment
The total charge for depreciation and impairment made to the HRA for 2017/18
amounted to £7.993m (2016/17 £5.984m) and is analysed as follows:-
2016/17
2017/18
£’000
£’000
Depreciation on operational assets 
5,719
        - dwellings
5,747
34
        - other property
36
Revaluation Losses
231
        - dwellings
2,210
5,984
Total
7,993
152

NOTES TO THE HOUSING REVENUE ACCOUNT
The depreciation charge in respect of HRA assets is not an actual charge against the
HRA Balance. It is reversed out in the Movement on the HRA Statement, and replaced
with HRA Minimum Revenue Provision specified in the Item 8 Determination, via a
transfer to or from the Capital Adjustment Account.
7.  IAS 19 – Accounting for pension costs.
Supervision and management costs shown within the income and expenditure account
includes a sum of £3.348m (2016/17 £2.804m) which is the cost calculated by the
Authority's actuary as being the employers contribution required to meet the current year
pension costs of HRA employees. This does not represent a statutory charge to HRA
balances and is reversed out and replaced by the actual employers superannuation
payments made before the final transfer to/from Housing Revenue Account balances is
calculated.
8.  Reserve Transfer
No net transfer to or from capital reserves was made during 2016/17 and 2017/18.
153














































  AUDITORS’ REPORT TO THE CITY & COUNTY OF SWANSEA .   
The independent auditor’s report of the Auditor General for Wales to the Members of 
the City and County of Swansea 
Report on the audit of the financial statements 
Opinion 
I have audited the financial statements of: 
  City and County of Swansea; and 
  City and County of Swansea Group  
for the year ended 31 March 2018 under the Public Audit (Wales) Act 2004.  
The City and County of Swansea’s financial statements comprise the Movement in Reserves 
Statement, the Comprehensive Income and Expenditure Statement, the Balance Sheet, the 
Cash Flow Statement, the Movement on the Housing Revenue Account Statement and the 
Housing Revenue Account Income and Expenditure Statement and the related notes, 
including a summary of significant accounting policies.  
The City and County of Swansea Group’s financial statements comprise the Group 
Movement in Reserves Statement, the Group Comprehensive Income and Expenditure 
Statement, the Group Balance Sheet and the Group Cash Flow Statement and the related 
notes, including a summary of significant accounting policies.  
The financial reporting framework that has been applied in their preparation is applicable law 
and the Code of Practice on Local Authority Accounting in the United Kingdom 2017-18 
based on International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs). 
In my opinion the financial statements:  
  give a true and fair view of the financial position of City and County of Swansea and City 
and County of Swansea Group as at 31 March 2018 and of its income and expenditure 
for the year then ended; and 
  have been properly prepared in accordance with legislative requirements and the Code 
of Practice on Local Authority Accounting in the United Kingdom 2017-18. 
 
Basis for opinion 
I conducted my audit in accordance with applicable law and International Standards on 
Auditing in the UK (ISAs (UK)). My responsibilities under those standards are further 
described in the auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements section of 
my report. I am independent of the council and its group in accordance with the ethical 
requirements that are relevant to my audit of the financial statements in the UK including the 
Financial Reporting Council’s Ethical Standard, and I have fulfil ed my other ethical 
responsibilities in accordance with these requirements. I believe that the audit evidence I 
have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my opinion. 
 
Conclusions relating to going concern 
I have nothing to report in respect of the fol owing matters in relation to which the ISAs (UK) 
require me to report to you where: 
  the use of the going concern basis of accounting in the preparation of the financial 
statements is not appropriate; or 
  the responsible financial officer has not disclosed in the financial statements any 
identified material uncertainties that may cast significant doubt about the council’s or 
group’s ability to continue to adopt the going concern basis of accounting for a period of 
155 
 

  AUDITORS’ REPORT TO THE CITY & COUNTY OF SWANSEA .   
at least twelve months from the date when the financial statements are authorised for 
issue. 
 
Other information 
The responsible financial officer is responsible for the other information in the annual report 
and accounts. The other information comprises the information included in the annual report 
other than the financial statements and my auditor’s report thereon. My opinion on the 
financial statements does not cover the other information and, except to the extent otherwise 
explicitly stated later in my report, I do not express any form of assurance conclusion 
thereon. 
In connection with my audit of the financial statements, my responsibility is to read the other 
information to identify material inconsistencies with the audited financial statements and to 
identify any information that is apparently material y incorrect based on, or material y 
inconsistent with, the knowledge acquired by me in the course of performing the audit. If I 
become aware of any apparent material misstatements or inconsistencies I consider the 
implications for my report. 
 
Report on other requirements 
Opinion on other matters 
In my opinion, based on the work undertaken in the course of my audit: 
  the information contained in the Narrative Report for the financial year for which the 
financial statements are prepared is consistent with the financial statements and the 
Narrative Report has been prepared in accordance with the Code of Practice on Local 
Authority Accounting in the United Kingdom 2017-18;  
  The information given in the Governance Statement for the financial year for which the 
financial statements are prepared is consistent with the financial statements and the 
Governance Statement has been prepared in accordance with guidance.  
 
Matters on which I report by exception 
In the light of the knowledge and understanding of the council and the group and its 
environment obtained in the course of the audit, I have not identified material misstatements 
in the Narrative Report or the Governance Statement. 
I have nothing to report in respect of the fol owing matters, which I report to you, if, in my 
opinion: 
  adequate accounting records have not been kept; 
  the financial statements are not in agreement with the accounting records and returns; or 
  I have not received al  the information and explanations I require for my audit. 
 
Certificate of completion of audit 
I certify that I have completed the audit of the accounts of City and County of Swansea and 
City and County of Swansea Group in accordance with the requirements of the Public Audit 
(Wales) Act 2004 and the Auditor General for Wales’ Code of Audit Practice. 
 
 
156 
 


  AUDITORS’ REPORT TO THE CITY & COUNTY OF SWANSEA .   
Responsibilities 
Responsibilities of the responsible financial officer for the financial statements 
As explained more ful y in the Statement of Responsibilities for the Statement of Accounts, 
the responsible financial officer is responsible for the preparation of the statement of 
accounts, including the City and County of Swansea Group’s financial statements, which 
give a true and fair view, and for such internal control as the responsible financial officer 
determines is necessary to enable the preparation of statements of accounts that are free 
from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. 
In preparing the statement of accounts, the responsible financial officer is responsible for 
assessing the council’s and group’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing as 
applicable, matters related to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting 
unless deemed inappropriate.  
 
Auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements 
My objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as 
a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an 
auditor’s report that includes my opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, 
but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with ISAs (UK) wil  always 
detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error 
and are considered material if, individual y or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be 
expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of these financial 
statements. 
 
A further description of the auditor’s responsibilities for the audit of the financial statements is 
located on the Financial Reporting Council's website www.frc.org.uk/auditorsresponsibilities. 
This description forms part of my auditor’s report. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anthony J Barrett 
 
 
 
 
 
 
24 Cathedral Road 
For and on behalf of the Auditor General for Wales   
 
Cardiff 
25 September 2018   
 
 
 
 
 
CF11 9LJ 
 
 
The maintenance and integrity of the Council’s website is the responsibility of the Council. 
The work carried out by auditors does not involve consideration of these matters and 
accordingly auditors accept no responsibility for any changes that may have occurred to the 
financial statements since they were initial y presented on the website. 
 
157 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
1.  
Scope of Responsibility 
1.1 
The City and County of Swansea is responsible for ensuring that its business 
is conducted in accordance with the law and proper standards, and that public 
money  is  safeguarded  and  properly  accounted  for,  and  used  economically, 
efficiently  and  effectively.  The  Authority  also  has  a  duty  under  the  Local 
Government  (Wales)  Measure  2009  to  make  arrangements  to  secure 
continuous improvement in the way in which its functions are exercised, having 
regard to a combination of economy, efficiency and effectiveness. 
1.2 
In discharging this overal  responsibility, the City and County of Swansea   is 
responsible for putting in place proper arrangements for the governance of its 
affairs,  facilitating  the  effective  exercise  of  its  functions  which  includes 
arrangements for the management of risk. 
1.3 
The  City  and  County  of  Swansea  has  approved  and  adopted  a  Code  of 
Corporate  Governance,  which  is  consistent  with  the  principles  of  the  new 
CIPFA/SOLACE  Framework  ‘Delivering  Good  Governance  in  Local 
Government 2016’.  The  revised  framework  applies  to  al   annual  governance 
statements prepared for the financial year 2017/18 onwards. A copy of the Code 
can be obtained by contacting the Chief Auditor on 01792 636463 or e-mailing 
xxxxx.xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xx. This statement explains how the Authority 
has complied with the Code and also meets the requirements of the Accounts 
and Audit (Wales) Regulations 2014 to review the effectiveness of its internal 
control systems at least once a year. 
2.  
The Purpose of the Governance Framework 
2.1 
The governance framework comprises the systems and processes, culture and 
values,  by  which  the  Authority  is  directed  and  control ed  and  its  activities 
through which it accounts to, engages with and leads the community. It enables 
the  Authority  to  monitor  the  achievement  of  its  strategic  objectives  and  to 
consider  whether  those  objectives  have  led  to  the  delivery  of  appropriate 
services and value for money. 
 
2.2 
The  system  of  internal  control  is  a  significant  part  of  that  framework  and  is 
designed  to manage  risk to a reasonable level. It cannot  eliminate al  risk of 
failure to achieve policies, aims and objectives and can therefore only provide 
reasonable and not absolute assurance of effectiveness. The system of internal 
control is based on an ongoing process designed to identify and prioritise the 
risks  to  the  achievement  of  the  Authority’s  policies,  aims  and  objectives,  to 
evaluate the likelihood and potential impact of those risks being realised and to 
manage them efficiently, effectively and economically. 
 
158 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
2.3 
The  governance  framework  has  been  in  place  at  the  City  and  County  of 
Swansea  throughout  the  year  ended  31  March  2018  and  up  to  the  date  of 
approval of the Statement of Accounts. 
 
3. 
The Governance Framework 
3.1 
The  Delivering  Good  Governance  in  Local  Government  Framework  2016 
 
Edition  produced  by  CIPFA  and  SOLACE  (the  Framework)  defines 
 
governance as 
 
‘Governance comprises the arrangements put in place to ensure that the 
 
intended outcomes for stakeholders are defined and achieved.’ 
 
The Framework also states that 
 
‘To deliver good governance in the public sector, both governing bodies and 
 
individuals working for public sector entities must try to achieve their entity’s 
 
objectives while acting in the public interest at all times, 
 
Acting in the public interest implies primary consideration of the benefits for 
 
society, which should result in positive outcomes for service users and other 
 
stakeholders.’ 
3.2 
In local government, the governing body is the full council. 
4. 
Background 
4.1 
The Delivering Good Governance in Local Government Framework published 
 
by  CIPFA  and  SOLACE  in  2007  set  the  standard  for  local  authority 
 
governance in the UK. CIPFA and SOLACE reviewed the Framework in 2015 
 
to  ensure  it  remained  fit  for  purpose  and  published  a  revised  Framework  in 
 
spring 2016. 
4.2 
The new Delivering Good Governance in Local Government Framework 2016 
 
edition  applies  to  annual  governance  statements  prepared  for  the  financial 
 
year 2017/18 onwards. 
4.3 
The new Framework introduces 7 new principles as fol ows:  
A)  Behaving  with  integrity,  demonstrating  strong  commitment  to  ethical 
values, and respecting the rule of law. 
B)  Ensuring openness and comprehensive stakeholder engagement. 
C)  Defining  outcomes  in  terms  of  sustainable  economic,  social  and 
environmental benefits. 
D)  Determining the interventions necessary to optimise the achievement of 
the intended outcomes. 
E)  Developing the entity’s capacity, including the capability of its leadership 
and the individuals within it. 
F)  Managing  risks  and  performance  through  robust  internal  control  and 
strong public financial management. 
159 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
G)  Implementing  good  practices  in  transparency,  reporting  and  audit  to 
deliver effective accountability. 
 
4.4 
The  concept  underpinning  the  Framework  is  that  it  is  helping  local 
 
government  in  taking  responsibility  for  developing  and  shaping  an  informed 
 
approach  to  governance,  aimed  at  achieving  the  highest  standards  in  a 
 
measured  and  proportionate  way.  The  Framework  is  intended  to  assist 
 
authorities  individual y  in  reviewing  and  accounting  for  their  own  unique 
 
approach. The overall aim is to ensure 
  Resources  are  directed  in  accordance  with  agreed  policies  and 
according to priorities 
  There is sound and inclusive decision making 
  There is clear accountability for the use of those resources in order to 
achieve desired outcomes for service users and communities 
4.5 
The  term  local  Code  of  Corporate  Governance  essential y  refers  to  the 
 
approved  governance  structure  in  place,  as  there  is  an  expectation  that  a 
 
formal y set out local structure should exist, although in practice it may consist 
 
of a number of local codes or documents. 
4.6 
To  achieve  good  governance,  each  local  authority  should  be  able  to 
 
demonstrate  that  its  governance  structures  comply  with  the  core  and  sub-
 
principles  contained  in  the  Framework.  It  should  therefore  develop  and 
 
maintain  a  local  Code  of  Corporate  Governance  reflecting  the  principles  set 
 
out in the Framework. 
4.7 
It is also crucial that the Framework is applied in a way that demonstrates the 
 
spirit and ethos of good governance, which cannot be achieved, by rules and 
 
procedures  alone.  Shared  values  that  are  integrated  into  the  culture  of  an 
 
organisation and are reflected in behaviour and policy are hal marks of good 
 
governance. 
4.8 
The Accounts and Audit (Wales) Regulations 2014 require that a review of the 
 
effectiveness  of  the  governance  arrangements  must  be  undertaken  at  least 
 
annual y  and  reported  on  within  the  authority  e.g.  to  the  Audit  Committee or 
 
other appropriate member body and externally with the published accounts of 
 
the authority. In doing this, the authority is looking to provide assurance that  
  Its  governance arrangements are  adequate  and  working  effectively  in 
practice 
  Where  the  reviews  of  the  governance  arrangements  have  revealed 
significant  gaps,  which  wil   impact  on  the  authority  achieving  its 
objectives, what action is to be taken to ensure effective governance in 
future. 
160 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
4.9 
In  2016/17  a  new  Annual  Governance  Statement  Group  was  established, 
tasked with the compilation of a revised Code of Corporate Governance, as 
wel  as a revised Annual Governance Statement. The Group is comprised of 
the Head of Financial Services & Service Centre (S151 officer), the Head of 
Legal, Democratic Services & Business Intelligence (Monitoring Officer), the 
Chief  Internal  Auditor  and  the  Business  Performance  Manager.  The  Group 
meets periodically to discuss the governance arrangements of the Council.  
4.10 
The key elements of the policies, systems and procedures that comprise the 
governance  framework  in  the  Council  are  shown  on  the  pages  that  fol ow, 
linked to the 7 fundamental principles.  
 
 
 
161 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Principle A - Behaving with integrity, demonstrating strong commitment to ethical values, and respecting the rule of law  
Local government organisations are accountable not only for how much they spend, but also for how they use the resources 
under their stewardship. This includes accountability for outputs, both positive and negative, and for the outcomes, they have 
achieved. In addition, they have an overarching responsibility to serve the public interest in adhering to the requirements of 
legislation and government policies. It is essential that, as a whole, they can demonstrate the appropriateness of all their actions 
and have mechanisms in place to encourage and enforce adherence to ethical values and to respect the rule of law.  
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Behaving with 
Ensuring members and officers behave with 
  Members Code of Conduct in Constitution which 
integrity  
integrity and lead a culture where acting in the 
reflects Local Authorities (Model Code of Conduct) 
 
public interest is visibly and consistently 
(Wales) Order 2016  
demonstrated thereby protecting the reputation    Officers Code of Conduct in Constitution 
of the organisation  
  Member/Officer  Protocol in Constitution 
Ensuring members take the lead in establishing    Member led authority principles/document 
specific standard operating principles or values    Council Values – people focused, working 
for the organisation and its staff and that they 
together and innovation 
are communicated and understood. These 
  Whistleblowing Policy 
should build on the Principles of Public Life (the    Data Protection Policy 
Nolan Principles)  
  Money Laundering Policy 
Leading by example and using these standard 
  HR Policies 
operating principles or values as a framework 
  Anti-Fraud and Corruption Policy 
for decision making and other actions  
  Financial, land transaction and procurement 
Demonstrating, communicating and embedding 
procedure rules in Constitution 
the standard operating principles or values 
  Standards Committee with Annual Report 
through appropriate policies and processes 
presented to Council 
which are reviewed on a regular basis to 
  Member Dispute Resolution  
ensure that they are operating effectively  
  Monitoring Officer training on Code 
  Officers/members declaration of interest  
  Officer Secondary Employment Policy 
162 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea – Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Demonstrating strong  Seeking to establish, monitor and maintain the    Council Values – people focused, working together 
commitment to ethical  organisation’s ethical standards and 
and innovation 
values  
performance  
  Commitment to the Nolan principles 
Underpinning personal behaviour with ethical 
  Code of Conduct 
values and ensuring they permeate al  aspects    Swansea Pledge 
of the organisation’s culture and operation  
  Constitution contains comprehensive Procurement 
Developing and maintaining robust policies 
and Financial Procedure Rules 
and procedures which place emphasis on 
 
agreed ethical values  
Ensuring that external providers of services on 
behalf of the organisation are required to act 
with integrity and in compliance with high 
ethical standards expected by the organisation  
Respecting the rule 
Ensuring members and staff demonstrate a 
  Member and Officer code of Conduct in Constitution 
of law 
strong commitment to the rule of the law as 
  Role of Head of Paid Service, Section 151 Officer 
 
wel  as adhering to relevant laws and 
and Monitoring Officer established in Constitution 
regulations  
  CIPFA statement on the Role of the Chief Financial  
Creating the conditions to ensure that the 
Officer  
statutory officers, other key post holders and 
  Robust Scrutiny function 
members are able to fulfil their responsibilities 
  Anti-Fraud and Corruption Policy 
in accordance with legislative and regulatory 
  Audit Committee 
requirements  
  Internal Audit Section 
Striving to optimise the use of the ful  powers 
  Corporate Fraud Team 
available for the benefit of citizens, 
  External Auditors 
communities and other stakeholders  
  Annual Audit Letter 
Dealing with breaches of legal and regulatory 
  Standards Committee 
provisions effectively  
  Whistleblowing Policy  
Ensuring corruption and misuse of power are 
dealt with effectively  
163 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Principle B – Ensuring openness and comprehensive stakeholder engagement 
Local government is run for the public good; organisations therefore should ensure openness in their activities. Clear, trusted 
channels of communication and consultation should be used to engage effectively with al  groups of stakeholders, such as 
individual citizens and service users, as wel  as institutional stakeholders. 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Openness 
Ensuring an open culture through 
  Agendas published in advance of meetings 
demonstrating, documenting and 
  Minutes published fol owing meetings 
communicating the organisation’s commitment    Decision making process described in Constitution 
to openness  
  Forward Plan published on Internet showing key 
Making decisions that are open about actions, 
decisions to be made by Council and Cabinet 
plans, resource use, forecasts, outputs and 
  Consultation and Engagement Strategy & 
outcomes. The presumption is for openness. If 
Consultation Toolkit 
that is not the case, a justification for the 
  Annual budget consultation 
reasoning for keeping a decision confidential 
  Publication Scheme 
should be provided  
  Freedom of Information Scheme 
Providing clear reasoning and evidence for 
  Challenge Panel and cal -in procedure 
decisions in both public records and 
  Public questions at Council and Cabinet 
explanations to stakeholders and being 
  Engagement with hard to reach groups, such as 
explicit about the criteria, rationale and 
BME, Disability and LGBT communities. As wel  as 
considerations used. In due course, ensuring 
engagement with children and young people to 
that the impact and consequences of those 
meet the requirement of the UNCRC 
decisions are clear  
Using formal and informal consultation and 
engagement to determine the most 
appropriate and effective interventions/ 
courses of action  
 
 
164 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Engaging 
Effectively engaging with institutional 
  Public Service Board and One Swansea Plan/Wel -
comprehensively with  stakeholders to ensure that the purpose, 
Being Plan 
institutional 
objectives and intended outcomes for each 
  Western Bay 
stakeholders  
stakeholder relationship are clear so that 
  ERW 
outcomes are achieved successful y and 
  Community Safety Partnership 
sustainably  
  Partnership agreements. 
Developing formal and informal partnerships 
  Co-production on policy and decision making 
to al ow for resources to be used more 
Effective use of website and social media. 
efficiently and outcomes achieved more 
effectively  
Ensuring that partnerships are based on: 
  trust  
  a shared commitment to change  
  a culture that promotes and accepts 
challenge among partners  
and that the added value of partnership 
working is explicit  
 
 
165 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Engaging 
Establishing a clear policy on the type of 
  Ward role of Council ors 
stakeholders 
issues that the organisation wil  meaningfully 
  Consultation and Engagement framework 
effectively, including 
consult with or involve individual citizens, 
  ‘Have Your Say’ consultations on Internet 
individual citizens 
service users and other stakeholders to 
  Residents telephone surveys 
and service users  
ensure that service (or other) provision is 
  Consultation principles and toolkit available on 
contributing towards the achievement of 
Intranet 
intended outcomes  
  Role of Consultation Co-Ordinator and Equality 
Ensuring that communication methods are 
Impact Assessments 
 
effective and that members and officers are 
  Co-production 
clear about their roles with regard to 
  Annual Staff Survey 
community engagement  
  Complaints Policy and Annual Report. 
Encouraging, col ecting and evaluating the 
views and experiences of communities, 
citizens, service users and organisations of 
different backgrounds including reference to 
future needs  
Implementing effective feedback mechanisms 
in order to demonstrate how their views have 
been taken into account  
Balancing feedback from more active 
stakeholder groups with other stakeholder 
groups to ensure inclusivity  
Taking account of the interests of future 
generations of tax payers and service users  
 
 
 
166 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Principle C – Defining outcomes in terms of sustainable economic, social and environmental benefits 
The long-term nature and impact of many of local government’s responsibilities mean that it should define and plan outcomes 
and that these should be sustainable. Decisions should further the authority’s purpose, contribute to intended benefits and 
outcomes, and remain within the limits of authority and resources. Input from al  groups of stakeholders, including citizens, 
service users and institutional stakeholders, is vital to the success of this process and in balancing competing demands when 
determining priorities for the finite resources available 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Defining outcomes  
Having a clear vision which is an agreed 
  Corporate Plan produced annual y in accordance 
 
formal statement of the organisation’s purpose 
with Local Government (Wales) Measure 2009 and 
and intended outcomes containing appropriate 
‘Wel being Objectives’ in Wel being of Future 
performance indicators, which provides the 
Generations (Wales) Act 2015 
basis for the organisation’s overal  strategy, 
  Quarterly & annual Performance Monitoring 
planning and other decisions  
Reports  
Specifying the intended impact on, or changes    Annual Performance Review 
for, stakeholders including citizens and service    Wel -Being Plan produced by Public Service Board 
users. It could be immediately or over the 
  Service Plan produced annually by each Head of 
course of a year or longer  
Service 
Delivering defined outcomes on a sustainable 
  Monthly Performance and Financial Monitoring 
basis within the resources that wil  be available  
meetings held for each Directorate 
Identifying and managing risks to the 
  Corporate Risk Policy and Framework 
achievement of outcomes  
  Corporate, Directorate Service and Information 
Managing service users’ expectations 
Risk Registers 
effectively with regard to determining priorities 
  Capital Review Programme and workshops with 
and making the best use of the resources 
senior staff managing large scale capital projects 
available  
to ensure an efficient, coordinated and structured 
approach to capital projects and the City Deal.  
 
 
167 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Sustainable 
Considering and balancing the combined 
  Medium Term Financial Plan covering 3 financial 
economic, social and  economic, social and environmental impact of 
years approved annual y by Council 
environmental 
policies, plans and decisions when taking 
  Corporate Plan produced annual y  
benefits  
decisions about service provision  
  Publication of Wel -Being Objectives 
Taking a longer-term view with regard to 
  Service Plans 
decision making, taking account of risk and 
  Corporate Risk Management Policy and 
acting transparently where there are potential 
Framework 
conflicts between the organisation’s intended 
  Strategic Equality Plan 
outcomes and short-term factors such as the 
 
political cycle or financial constraints  
Determining the wider public interest 
associated with balancing conflicting interests 
between achieving the various economic, 
social and environmental benefits, through 
consultation where possible, in order to ensure 
appropriate trade-offs  
Ensuring fair access to services  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
168 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Principle D – Determining the interventions necessary to optimise the achievement of the intended outcomes 
Local government achieves its intended outcomes by providing a mixture of legal, regulatory and practical interventions. 
Determining the right mix of these courses of action is a critical y important strategic choice that local government has to make to 
ensure intended outcomes are achieved. They need robust decision-making mechanisms to ensure that their defined outcomes 
can be achieved in a way that provides the best trade-off between the various types of resource input while stil  enabling effective 
and efficient operations. Decisions made need to be reviewed continually to ensure that achievement of outcomes is optimised 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Determining 
Ensuring decision makers receive objective and    Policy development by Policy Development and 
interventions  
rigorous analysis of a variety of options 
Delivery Committees  
 
indicating how intended outcomes would be 
  Scrutiny function 
achieved and including the risks associated with    Finance, Legal and Access to Services 
those options. Therefore ensuring best value is 
implications in al  Council, Cabinet and Committee 
achieved however services are provided  
reports 
Considering feedback from citizens and service    Results of consultation exercises 
users when making decisions about service 
  Annual Internal Audit consultation exercise 
improvements or where services are no longer 
  Annual Service Planning 
required in order to prioritise competing 
  Annual Review of Wel -Being Objectives 
demands within limited resources available 
  Annual Review of Performance Indicators and 
including people, skil s, land and assets and 
targets 
bearing in mind future impacts  
 
 
 
 
 
169 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Planning 
Establishing and implementing robust planning 
  Timetable exists for producing or reviewing plans, 
interventions 
and control cycles that cover strategic and 
priorities etc. on an annual basis 
operational plans, priorities and targets  
  Consultation and Engagement framework 
Engaging with internal and external 
  Monthly Performance and Financial Monitoring 
stakeholders in determining how services and 
meetings for each Directorate reviews progress 
other courses of action should be planned and 
and authorises corrective action where necessary 
delivered  
  Quarterly and Annual Performance Monitoring 
Considering and monitoring risks facing each 
reports to Cabinet including achievement of 
partner when working collaboratively including 
national and local performance indicators 
shared risks  
  Medium Term Financial Plan 
Ensuring arrangements are flexible and agile so    Annual budget setting process in place including 
that the mechanisms for delivering outputs can 
consultation exercise 
be adapted to changing circumstances  
 
Establishing appropriate local performance 
indicators (as wel  as relevant statutory or other 
national performance indicators) as part of the 
planning process in order to identify how the 
performance of services and projects is to be 
measured  
Ensuring capacity exists to generate the 
information required to review service quality 
regularly  
Preparing budgets in accordance with 
organisational objectives, strategies and the 
medium-term financial plan  
Informing medium and long-term resource 
planning by drawing up realistic estimates of 
revenue and capital expenditure aimed at 
developing a sustainable funding strategy  
170 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea – Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Optimising 
Ensuring the medium term financial strategy 
  Quarterly Financial Monitoring reports to Cabinet 
achievement of 
integrates and balances service priorities, 
  Mid-Year Budget Statement to Cabinet 
intended outcomes  
affordability and other resource constraints  
  Medium Term Financial Plan 
 
Ensuring the budgeting process is al -inclusive, 
  Sustainable Swansea – Fit for the Future 
taking into account the full cost of operations 
  Beyond Bricks and Mortar (community benefit 
over the medium and longer term  
clauses in council contracts) 
Ensuring the medium-term financial strategy 
 
sets the context for ongoing decisions on 
significant delivery issues or responses to 
changes in the external environment that may 
arise during the budgetary period in order for 
outcomes to be achieved while optimising 
resource usage  
Ensuring the achievement of ‘social value’ 
through service planning and commissioning. 
The Public Services (Social Value) Act 2012 
states that this is “the additional benefit to the 
community...over and above the direct 
purchasing of goods, services and outcomes”  
 
 
 
 
 
 
171 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Principle E – Developing the entity’s capacity, including the capability of its leadership and the individuals within it. 
Local government needs appropriate structures and leadership, as wel  as people with the right skil s, appropriate qualifications 
and mindset, to operate efficiently and effectively and achieve their intended outcomes within the specified periods. A local 
government organisation must ensure that it has both the capacity to fulfil its own mandate and to make certain that there are 
policies in place to guarantee that its management has the operational capacity for the organisation as a whole. Because both 
individuals and the environment in which an authority operates wil  change over time, there will be a continuous need to develop 
its capacity as wel  as the skil s and experience of the leadership of individual staff members. Leadership in local government 
entities is strengthened by the participation of people with many different types of backgrounds, reflecting the structure and 
diversity of communities 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Developing the 
Reviewing operations, performance and use of 
  Commissioning Review as part of Sustainable 
entity’s capacity  
assets on a regular basis to ensure their 
Swansea – Fit for the Future strategy 
 
continuing effectiveness  
  Annual performance review for al  staff under the 
Improving resource use through appropriate 
Employee Performance Management Policy. 
application of techniques such as benchmarking 
Training and development needs included in 
and other options in order to determine how the 
review 
authority’s resources are al ocated so that 
  Departmental service planning including 
outcomes are achieved effectively and efficiently  
succession plans and service resilience 
Recognising the benefits of partnerships and 
  Engagement with benchmarking groups such as 
col aborative working where added value can be 
APSE, CIPFA 
achieved  
  Service planning process includes workforce 
Developing and maintaining an effective 
planning and this is included in the overarching 
workforce plan to enhance the strategic 
Workforce Plan 
al ocation of resources  
  Quarterly financial and performance reports to 
Cabinet 
  Col aborative working with partners including the 
Public Service Board, Western Bay.  
 
 
 
172 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Developing the 
Developing protocols to ensure that elected and 
  Member/Officer Protocol in Constitution 
capability of the 
appointed leaders negotiate with each other 
  Scheme of Delegation published in Constitution 
entity’s leadership 
regarding their respective roles early on in the 
  Cabinet portfolio roles agreed and documented in 
and other 
relationship and that a shared understanding of 
Constitution 
individuals  
roles and objectives is maintained  
  Monthly One to One meetings are held involving 
Publishing a statement that specifies the types of 
the Leader. Cabinet Members, Chief Executive, 
decisions that are delegated and those reserved 
Corporate Directors, Chief Officers, Heads of 
for the col ective decision making of the 
Service and 3rd tier staff 
governing body  
  Council or Training Programme developed based 
Ensuring the leader and the chief executive have 
on a Training Needs Assessment 
clearly defined and distinctive leadership roles 
  Annual performance review for al  staff under the 
within a structure, whereby the chief executive 
Employee Performance Management Policy. 
leads the authority in implementing strategy and 
Training and development needs included in 
managing the delivery of services and other 
review. Occupational Health and Wel being Policy 
outputs set by members and each provides a 
exists with aim of promoting the health and 
check and a balance for each other’s authority  
wel being of al  employees to enable them to 
achieve their full potential at work 
 
 
173 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea – Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
 
Developing the capabilities of members and 
  Mandatory corporate induction course for new 
senior management to achieve effective 
staff 
shared leadership and to enable the 
  Mandatory courses for staff i.e. safeguarding 
organisation to respond successful y to 
  Corporate learning and development courses 
changing legal and policy demands as wel  as 
  Stress and health advice available online  
economic, political and environmental changes    Helping Hands support, information and guidance 
and risks by:  
service.  
  ensuring members and staff have 
  WLGA Peer Review of Swansea Council 2014 
access to appropriate induction tailored 
to their role and that ongoing training 
and development matching individual 
and organisational requirements is 
available and encouraged  
  ensuring members and officers have the 
appropriate skil s, knowledge, resources 
and support to fulfil their roles and 
responsibilities and ensuring that they 
are able to update their knowledge on a 
continuing basis  
  ensuring personal, organisation and 
system-wide development through 
shared learning, including lessons learnt 
from both internal and external 
governance weaknesses  
 
Ensuring that there are structures in place to 
encourage public participation  
 
 
174 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea – Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
 
Taking steps to consider the leadership’s own 
 
effectiveness and ensuring leaders are open to 
constructive feedback from peer review and 
inspections  
Holding staff to account through regular 
performance reviews which take account of 
training or development needs  
Ensuring arrangements are in place to maintain 
the health and wel being of the workforce and 
support individuals in maintaining their own 
physical and mental wel being  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
175 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Principle F – Managing risks and performance through robust internal control and string public financial management 
Local government needs to ensure that the organisations and governance structures that it oversees have implemented, and can 
sustain, an effective performance management system that facilitates effective and efficient delivery of planned services. Risk 
management and internal control are important and integral parts of a performance management system and crucial to the 
achievement of outcomes. Risk should be considered and addressed as part of all decision making activities. A strong system of 
financial management is essential for the implementation of policies and the achievement of intended outcomes, as it wil  ensure 
financial discipline, strategic allocation of resources, efficient service delivery and accountability. It is also essential that a culture 
and structure for scrutiny is in place as a key part of accountable decision making, policy making and review. A positive working 
culture that accepts, promotes and encourages constructive chal enge is critical to successful scrutiny and successful delivery. 
Importantly, this culture does not happen automatical y, it requires repeated public commitment from those in authority. 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Managing risk 
Recognising that risk management is an 
  Risk Management Policy with sophisticated risk 
integral part of all activities and must be 
matrix Framework 
considered in al  aspects of decision making  
  Corporate, Directorate, Service and Information 
Implementing robust and integrated risk 
risk registers 
management arrangements and ensuring that 
  Quarterly  review of Corporate Risks by Corporate 
they are working effectively  
Management Team 
Ensuring that responsibilities for managing 
  Monthly review of Directorate Risks at PFM 
individual risks are clearly al ocated  
meetings 
   
Managing 
Monitoring service delivery effectively including    Corporate Plan produced annual y 
performance 
planning, specification, execution and 
  Annual Performance Report produced 
independent post-implementation review  
  Quarterly performance monitoring report to Cabinet 
Making decisions based on relevant, clear 
  Annual Service Plan produced by each Head of 
objective analysis and advice pointing out the 
Service 
implications and risks inherent in the 
  Scrutiny function  
organisation’s financial, social and 
  Monthly Directorate Performance and Financial 
environmental position and outlook  
Monitoring meetings 
176 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
 
Ensuring an effective scrutiny or oversight 
 
function is in place which encourages 
constructive chal enge and debate on policies 
and objectives before, during and after 
decisions are made, thereby enhancing the 
organisation’s performance and that of any 
organisation for which it is responsible  
Providing members and senior management 
with regular reports on service delivery plans 
and on progress towards outcome 
achievement  
 
Ensuring there is consistency between 
specification stages (such as budgets) and 
post-implementation reporting (e.g. financial 
statements)  
Robust internal 
Aligning the risk management strategy and 
  Audit Committee provides assurance on 
control 
policies on internal control with achieving 
effectiveness on internal control, risk management 
objectives  
and governance 
 
Evaluating and monitoring risk management 
  Audit Committee Annual Performance Review 
and internal control on a regular basis  
  Audit Committee Annual Report to Council 
Ensuring effective counter fraud and anti-
  Anti-Fraud and Corruption Policy 
corruption arrangements are in place  
  Role of Internal Audit Section and Corporate Fraud 
Ensuring additional assurance on the overal  
Team 
adequacy and effectiveness of the framework 
  Internal Audit and Corporate Fraud Annual Plans 
of governance, risk management and control is 
approved by Audit Committee 
provided by the internal auditor  
  Internal Audit and Corporate Fraud Annual Reports 
to Audit Committee 
  Annual Governance Statement 
 
 
177 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
 
Ensuring an audit committee or equivalent 
 
group or function which is independent of the 
executive and accountable to the governing 
body:  
  provides a further source of effective 
assurance regarding arrangements for 
managing risk and maintaining an 
effective control environment  
  that its recommendations are listened to 
and acted upon  
Managing data 
Ensuring effective arrangements are in place for    Data Protection Policy 
the safe collection, storage, use and sharing of 
  Information Governance Unit 
data, including processes to safeguard personal    The Council is signed up to the Wales Accord for 
data  
Sharing Personal Information (WASPI) 
Ensuring effective arrangements are in place 
  Information management governance 
and operating effectively when sharing data 
arrangements 
with other bodies  
  Senior Information Risk Officer (SIRO) in place 
Reviewing and auditing regularly the quality and    Information Asset Register 
accuracy of data used in decision making and 
  Information sharing guidance published 
performance monitoring  
  Annual Performance Data Quality Audits 
 
Strong public 
Ensuring financial management supports both 
  Financial Procedure Rules in Constitution 
financial 
long-term achievement of outcomes and short-
  Contract Procedure Rules in Constitution 
management 
term financial and operational performance  
  Accounting Instructions on Intranet 
Ensuring well-developed financial management    Spending Restrictions document on Intranet 
is integrated at all levels of planning and 
  Adoption of the CIPFA Treasury Management in 
control, including management of financial risks 
the Public Services: Code of Practice 
and controls  
178 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
  Al  borrowing and long term financing is made in 
accordance with CIPFA’s Prudential Code. 
Treasury Management update reports are made to 
Audit Committee.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
179 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Principle G – Implementing good practices in transparency, reporting and audit to deliver effective accountability 
Accountability is about ensuring that those making decisions and delivering services are answerable for them. Effective 
accountability is concerned not only with reporting on actions completed but also ensuring that stakeholders are able to 
understand and respond as the organisation plans and carries out its activities in a transparent manner. Both external and 
internal audit contribute to effective accountability. 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
Implementing good 
Writing and communicating reports for the public    Reports Authors Protocol exists to ensure 
practice in 
and other stakeholders in an understandable 
consistency in reports 
transparency 
style appropriate to the intended audience and 
  Clear Writing guide published on Intranet 
ensuring that they are easy to access and 
  The Council’s Publication Scheme is available on 
interrogate  
the website 
Striking a balance between providing the right 
amount of information to satisfy transparency 
demands and enhance public scrutiny while not 
being too onerous to provide and for users to 
understand  
Implementing good 
Reporting at least annual y on performance, 
  Annual Statement of Accounts audited by 
practices in reporting  value for money and the stewardship of its 
external auditor and approved by Council and 
resources  
published on website 
Ensuring members and senior management 
  Code of Corporate Governance based on 
own the results  
CIPFA/SOLACE Framework 2016 
Ensuring robust arrangements for assessing the    Annual Governance Statement  
extent to which the principles contained in the 
  Annual Review of Performance  
Framework have been applied and publishing 
 
the results on this assessment including an 
action plan for improvement and evidence to 
demonstrate good governance (annual 
governance statement)  
 
180 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Sub-Principles 
Behaviours and Actions that Demonstrate 
City and County of Swansea - Evidence 
Good Governance in Practice 
 
Ensuring that the Framework is applied to jointly   
managed or shared service organisations as 
appropriate  
Ensuring the performance information that 
accompanies the financial statements is 
prepared on a consistent and timely basis and 
the statements al ow for comparison with other 
similar organisations  
Assurance and 
Ensuring that recommendations for corrective 
  External Audit provided by Wales Audit Office 
effective 
action made by external audit are acted upon  
  Performance of Internal Audit Section monitored 
accountability 
Ensuring an effective internal audit service with 
by Audit Committee 
direct access to members is in place which 
  Implementation of WAO and Internal Audit 
provides assurance with regard to governance 
recommendations monitored by Audit Committee 
arrangements and recommendations are acted 
  Peer Review, Corporate Assessment and 
upon  
Corporate Governance Review action plan 
Welcoming peer challenge, reviews and 
monitored by Corporate Management Team  
inspections from regulatory bodies and 
  Annual Governance Statement 
implementing recommendations  
  The Strategic Delivery Unit tracks and monitors 
Gaining assurance on risks associated with 
al  corporate and audit recommendations 
delivering services through third parties and that 
including peer reviews, which are reviewed by 
this is evidenced in the annual governance 
CMT. This is being reviewed as part of a review 
statement  
of the procedures for scrutiny examination of 
Ensuring that when working in partnership, 
WAO reports and action plans. 
arrangements for accountability are clear and 
that the need for wider public accountability has 
been recognised and met.  
 
 
181 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
5.  
Review of Effectiveness 
5.1 
The City and County of Swansea has responsibility for conducting, at least 
annual y,  a  review  of  the  effectiveness  of  its  governance  framework 
including  the  system  of  internal  control.  The  review  of  effectiveness  is 
informed by the work of the executive managers within the Authority who 
have  responsibility  for  the  development  and  maintenance  of  the 
governance  environment,  the  Chief  Auditor’s  annual  report  and  also  by 
comments made by the external auditors and other review agencies and 
inspectorates.  The  newly  formed  Annual  Governance  Statement  Group 
discuss  the  governance  arrangements  in  place  across  the  Authority  and 
provide updates to the Corporate  Management  Team and Cabinet when 
necessary.  
 
5.2 
Heads  of  Service  and  Corporate  Directors  completed  a  Senior 
Management Assurance Statement which were reported to the Corporate 
Management Team for review. 
 
5.3 
The  processes  for  maintaining  and  reviewing  the  effectiveness  of  the 
governance  framework  within  the  Council  include  the  fol owing  broad 
headings.  
 

Internal Control Self-Assessment 
 
  Each  Head  of  Service  has  provided  a  signed  Senior  Management 
Assurance  Statement  for  2017/18  which  provides  assurance  over  the 
internal control, risk management and governance framework for their area 
of responsibility. 
  The  Senior  Management  Assurance  Statement  contains  10  questions 
covering  governance  issues  and  requires  a  ‘Yes’,  ‘No’  or  ‘Partly’  answer. 
The vast majority of answers provided by Heads of Service were ‘Yes’ with 
a  smal   number  of  ‘Partly’  responses.  There  were  no  ‘No’  assurance 
responses.  The main areas  where  ‘Partly’  answers  were  given  related  to 
limitations of central control given the delegated budgets within Education 
and rectifying contract non compliance. However, in each case assurance 
was provided that sufficient monitoring was in place so as not to pose a risk 
to  governance.  Attached  at  Appendix  A  is  the  Senior  Management 
Assurance Statements Analysis for 2017/18.  
 
 
6.1 
Internal Sources of Assurance 
 
 The  fol owing  provide  assurance  based  on  reports  covering  2016/17:  as  the 
reports for 2017/18 are not yet available. The 2017/18 reports wil  be reflected 
in the next Annual Governance Statement. 
  The Annual Performance Review 2016/17 was approved by Cabinet on 
19/10/17  in  accordance  with  the  publishing  requirements  of  the  Local 
Government (Wales) Measure 2009. The report showed the results of each 
182 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
performance measure for the 5 Key Priorities (‘Improvement Objectives’) set 
out  in  the  Corporate  Plan  2015/17  ‘Delivering  for  Swansea’.  The  results 
showed  that  the  Council  was  ‘mainly  successful’  in  achieving  the 
performance  measures  for  5 of  the  Key  Priorities  and  that,  ‘Improvement 
prospects are good with no major barriers’. 
  The  Standards  Committee  met  on  4  occasions  during  2017/18  and  the 
Standards Committee Annual Report 2016/17 was presented to Council 
on  26/10/17.  The  report  described  the  work  of  the  Committee  during 
2016/17 including an update on the new model Code of Conduct adopted 
by Council on 19/05/17 and an update on the new Ethical Framework – new 
statutory provisions. The Committee noted that of the 12 complaints made 
to the Public Service Ombudsman, the Ombudsman refused to investigate 
10  and  discontinued  his  investigation  into  2  complaints.  There  were  no 
referrals to the Monitoring Officer and Standards Committee. The Members 
Internal Dispute Resolution Process has not yet been utilised and underpins 
the strong commitment to and provides assurance that the Council’s Code 
of Conduct is adhered to. 
  The Corporate Complaints Policy was in place throughout 2017/18 and 
the  Corporate  Complaints  Annual  Report  2016/17  was  presented  to 
Cabinet on 19/10/17. The Annual Report noted that in 2016/17 there was a 
16% increase in the number of complaints and requests for service handled 
by the team. Requests for information also remained high. There was a 22% 
rise in the number of corporate complaints referred to the Ombudsman with 
4  being  resolved  at  an  early  stage.  There  is  assurance  in  that  the 
Ombudsman  did  not  consider  any  complaints  needed  to  be  taken  to  ful  
investigation. The highest number of complaints recorded were in Highways 
and Transportation and Waste management and Parks. The majority were 
dealt  with  as  stage  1  complaints  or  requests  for  service  which  provides 
assurance that the majority of complaints were dealt with initially and did not 
proceed to stage 2.  
  Adult Services stage 1 complaints increased by 14%. There is assurance 
that  of  the  stage  2  complaints  only  9  out  of  25  complaints  were  upheld. 
There is also assurance in that there were no findings of maladministration 
by the Ombudsman in relation to adult services. 
  Children Services stage 1 complaints were broadly similar to the previous 
year at 118. There were 3 stage 2 complaints with various complaints being 
made and a number of those were upheld. There is assurance that there 
were  no  findings  of  maladministration  by  the  Ombudsman  in  relation  to 
children services. 
  The report also provides assurance that a number of service improvements 
have been introduced as a result of complaint investigations.  
  The  Internal  Audit  Annual  Report  2016/17  was  reported  to  the  Audit 
Committee on 08/08/17 and included the Chief Auditor’s opinion that based 
on  the  audit  reviews  undertaken  in  2016/17,  Internal  Audit  can  give 
reasonable assurance that the systems of internal control, risk management 
and  governance  were  operating  effectively  and  that  no  significant 
weaknesses were identified. 
  The Audit Committee Annual Report 2016/17 was presented to Council 
on  14/12/17  and  outlined  the  assurance  the  Committee  had  gained  over 
183 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
control,  risk  management  and  governance from  various  sources  over  the 
course of 2016/17. 
  The  Scrutiny  Programme  Committee  and  Panels  met  throughout 
2016/17 and were supported by the Scrutiny Support Team. The Scrutiny 
Annual Report 2016/17 was presented to Council on 27/07/17.  The report 
highlighted the work carried out by Scrutiny, showed how Scrutiny had made 
a  difference  and  supported  continuous  improvement  for  the  Scrutiny 
function. The  report  also  highlighted the  increase  in  pre  decision  scrutiny 
and the high level of council or commitment with 104 meetings held.  
  The End of Year 2016/17 Performance Monitoring Report was approved 
by Cabinet on 20/07/17, which presented the detailed performance results 
for  2016/17.  In  summary,  62%  of  indicators  that  had  targets  met  their 
targets. 73% comparable indicators also showed improvement compared to 
2015/16. The results of the review are used to inform executive decisions 
on resource al ocation and to take corrective action to improve performance 
and efficiency. 
 
 
The following provides assurance based on reports covering 2017/18: 
  The  Internal  Audit  Annual  Report  2017/18  was  reported  to  the  Audit 
Committee on 14/08/18 and included the Chief Auditor’s opinion that based 
on  the  audit  reviews  undertaken  in  2017/18,  Internal  Audit  can  give 
reasonable assurance that the systems of internal control, risk management 
and  governance  were  operating  effectively  and  that  no  significant 
weaknesses were identified in 2017/18 which would have a material impact 
on the Council’s affairs or the achievement of its objectives.  
  The  Wel -Being  Objectives  and  Statement  2017/2018  were  approved  by 
Council on 23/3/17 and carried forward into the Corporate Plan after May 
elections in line with Wel  Being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015.  
  The  Corporate  Plan  2017-22  ‘Delivering  a  Successful  and  Sustainable 
Swansea  2017-22’  produced  in  accordance  with  the  Local  Government 
(Wales) Measure 2009 and the ‘Wel being Objectives’ under the Wel being 
of  Future  Generations  (Wales)  Act  2015  was  approved  by  Council  on 
24/8/17.  The Plan describes the Council’s vision for Swansea, its 5 Wel -
being  Objectives  and  the  organisation  values  and  principles  that  will 
underpin the delivery of the priorities and the overal  strategy. The Corporate 
Plan  feeds  into  service  planning  process  across  Directorates  and  the 
process  is  managed  corporately  by  the  Strategic  Delivery  Unit  to  ensure 
consistency. The Wales Audit Office audited the Council’s Corporate Plan 
in accordance with section 17 of the Local Government (Wales) Measure 
2009  and  WAO  Code  of  Audit  Practice  and  determined  that  the  Council 
discharged its duties under section 15(6) to (9) of the Measure and acted in 
accordance with Welsh Government guidance  sufficiently to discharge its 
duties.  
  The  adoption  of  the  Council  Constitution  was  reaffirmed  at  the  Annual 
Meeting of the Council on  25/05/17. Various reports have been approved 
by Council throughout 2017/18 making changes to the Constitution. 
  The Audit Committee met on 7 occasions during 2017/18 and fol owed a 
structured  work-plan,  which  covered  al   areas  of  the  Committee’s 
184 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
responsibilities with the aim of obtaining assurance over the areas included 
in its terms of reference. The Committee includes a lay member as required 
by the Local Government (Wales) Measure 2011. The lay member is also 
the Chair of the Committee.  
  As in previous years, some audits that had original y been included in the 
2017/18 Internal Audit Plan had to be deferred to 2018/19, with those audits 
being prioritised where appropriate in the fol owing year. However, this has 
not had a significant impact on the overal  assurance that can be given on 
the  effectiveness  of  the  internal  control.  The  2018/19  plan  contains 
governance and risk which wil  be undertaken early 2018/19 to give level of 
assurance.  
  The Scrutiny Programme Committee met on 13 occasions in 2017/18 and 
had overal  responsibility for the scrutiny function. 
  The  annual  Scrutiny  Work  Planning  Conference  2017/18  was  held  on 
19/6/17  and  a  report  on  the  Scrutiny  Work  Programme  2017/18  was 
agreed by the Scrutiny Programme Committee on 10/7/17. 
  The  Constitution  Working  Group  met  twice  during  2017/18  to  consider 
issues relating to local authority governor appointments requiring a change 
to the Council Constitution and nominations to the office of Lord Mayor and 
Deputy Lord Mayor.  
  The  Medium  Term  Financial  Plan  2019/20  –  2021/22  was  approved  by 
Council  on  6/03/18.  The  Plan  outlined  the  significant  shortfal   in  funding 
faced  by  the  Council  over  the  period  and  the  strategy  to  be  adopted  to 
address  the  shortfal   as  well  as  the  inherent  risks  to  the  success  of  the 
adopted strategy. 
  The  revised  Corporate  Risk  Management  Policy  and  Framework  was 
approved  by  Cabinet  in  2017/18  and  is  being  implemented.  Corporate 
Management  Team  and  Cabinet  review  the  risks  on  a  regular  basis  and 
from  2018/19  Audit  Committee  wil   in  future  receive  the  Corporate  Risk 
Register  
  Each  Corporate  Director  held  monthly  Performance  and  Financial 
Monitoring meetings where Chief Officers and Heads of Service reported 
on progress in terms of continuous improvement and budgets.   
  Quarterly  Performance  Monitoring  Reports  were  presented  to  Cabinet 
during 2017/18, which provided detailed performance tables and identified 
the  Council’s  performance  outturn  for  the  indicators,  which  had  been 
selected for their suitability to measure performance against the Council’s 5 
Wel -being  objectives.    The  reports  were  scrutinised  each  quarter  by  the 
Service Improvement and Finance Scrutiny Panel. 
  Quarterly  Financial  Monitoring  Reports  were  presented  to  Cabinet 
throughout  2017/18.  The  reports  consistently  identified  a  revenue  budget 
overspend  at  year  end  based  on  available  information  and  stressed  the 
need for expenditure to be contained within the budget set by Council. That 
overspend has now been confirmed and a draw from General Fund reserves 
of  over  £3m  wil   be  necessary  for  2017/18,  a  position  that  is  clearly 
unsustainable and unrepeatable in future years, given the S151 Officer has 
already ruled reserves to be at the absolute minimum.   
  A  Mid  Term  Budget  Statement  2017/18  was  presented  to  Council  on 
26/10/17 which provided a strategic and focussed assessment of the current 
185 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
year’s  financial  performance  and  an  update  on  strategic  planning 
assumptions  over  the  next  3  financial  years.  The  conclusion  of  the 
Statement was that the Council would struggle to deliver within the overal  
resources identified to support the budget in 2017/18 and beyond. The likely 
projected  outturn  was  dependent  upon  the  wil ingness  and  ability  of  the 
Council to reduce and restrict ongoing expenditure across all areas.  
  Al   reports  presented  to  Cabinet  and  Council  during  2017/18  had  been 
reviewed by Finance, Legal and Access to Services staff and included the 
appropriate  paragraphs  detailing  the  Financial,  Legal  and  Equality  and 
Engagement Implications of the report. 
  The  Council  is  the  Administering  Authority  for  the  City  and  County  of 
Swansea Pension Fund (the Pension Fund) and Swansea Bay Port Health 
Authority (SBPHA). The governance arrangements detailed in this Annual 
Governance Statement apply equally to the Council’s responsibilities to the 
Pension Fund and SBPHA. There are further specific requirements for the 
Pension Fund which are: 
 
 
- the Statement of Investment Principles 
 
- Funding Strategy Statement 
 
- A full actuarial valuation to be carried out every third year 
 
  During  2015/16  the  governance  structure  for  the  Pension  Fund  was 
amended to include the Local Pension Board, in compliance with the Public 
Service Pensions Act 2013. The role of the Board is to assist the Council as 
Scheme  Manager  and  Administering  Authority  to  secure  compliance  with 
LGPS  regulations  and  other  legislation  relating  to  the  scheme.  Board 
members were appointed and the Board first met on 21/07/15. The Board 
met on 05/09/17 in 2017/18 and met 3 times during that year. 
  The  Pension  Fund  Committee  met  on  5  occasions  during  2017/18  and 
dealt with al  issues relating to the governance of the Pension Fund. 
 
6.2 
External Sources of Assurance 
   In determining the breadth of work undertaken during the year, the Auditor 
General  considered  the  extent  of  accumulated  audit  and  inspection 
knowledge as wel  as other available sources of information including the 
Council’s  own  mechanisms  for  review  and  evaluation.  For  2016-17,  the 
Wales Audit Office undertook improvement assessment work at all councils 
under  three  themes:  governance,  use  of  resources,  and  improvement 
planning and reporting. Based on, and limited to, the work carried out by the 
Wales Audit Office and relevant regulators, the Auditor General determined 
within the Annual Improvement Report 2016-17 on Swansea Council that 
the  Council  was  likely  to  comply  with  the  requirements  of  the  Local 
Government Measure (2009) during 2017-18.  The Auditor General did not 
make  any  formal  recommendations.  However,  a  number  of  proposals  for 
improvement were made Progress meeting proposals for improvement are 
monitored by Audit Committee on a six monthly basis. 
  In June 2017, the Wales Audit Office issued a report on Good governance 
when  determining  service  changes.  The  report  concluded  that  the 
186 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Council  has  a  clear  governance  framework  for  determining  significant 
service change but needs to clarify how the impact of change for service 
users  wil   be  evaluated.  Proposals  for  improvement  included:  Improving 
public  access  to  information  about  the  Council’s  Commissioning  Review 
activity and outcomes by linking together all the web site information about 
the  overal   programme  and  signposting  its  availability;  whilst  potential 
financial savings are consistently identified the Council should ensure that 
the  process  for  concluding  a  review  consistently  identifies  the  intended 
impact  for  service  users  and  the  means  by  which  that  impact  wil   be 
evaluated in the future. 
  Six month status update reports track progress on WAO proposals .  
  The  Appointed  Auditor’s  Annual  Audit  Letter  2016/17  was  issued  in 
November  2017  and  presented  to  the  Audit Committee  on  12/12/17.  The 
letter stated that ‘The Council complied  with its responsibilities relating  to 
financial  reporting  and  use  of  resources’.  The  letter  also  stated  that  an 
unqualified  audit  opinion  had  been  issued  on  the  accounting  statements 
confirming that they present a true and fair view of the Authority’s and the 
Pension  Fund’s  financial  position  and  transactions.  The  letter  also  stated 
that  ‘The  Auditor  General  for  Wales  is  satisfied  that  the  Authority  has 
appropriate  arrangements  in  place  to  secure  economy,  efficiency  and 
effectiveness  in  its  use  of  resources  but  the  financial  outlook  is  very 
challenging’. 
  The  Wales  Audit  Office  published  in  March  2017  a  Savings  Planning 
Review of the Council’s financial savings arrangements, including how well 
it is delivering the required savings and whether it has robust approaches to 
plan, manage and deliver budget savings, at a pace that supports financial 
resilience. The Wales Audit Office concluded that whilst the Council has a 
sound  financial  planning  framework,  the  Council  recognises  the  delay  in 
delivering savings plans to required timescales presents risks to its financial 
resilience.  Proposals  were  made  to  strengthen  financial  planning 
arrangements  by:  ensuring  that  savings  plans  are  sufficiently  well 
developed  and  risk  assessed  before  inclusion  in  the  budget;  assigning 
responsibility for the delivery of all planned savings to specific managers’ 
services. 
  When reviewing the Council’s statutory improvement planning and reporting 
duties under the 2009 Measure, the Wales Audit Office concluded that the 
Council  had  complied  with  its  duties  and  the  relevant  certificates  of 
compliance were issued. 
  The Wales Audit Office on behalf of the Auditor General for Wales presented 
the Audit of Financial Statements Report 2016/17 to Audit Committee on 
26/09/17 and to Council on 28/09/17. The report highlighted any significant 
issues to those charged with governance that needed to be considered prior 
to the approval of the financial statements. The report concluded that the 
Auditor General intended to issue an unqualified audit report on the financial 
statements for both the City & County of Swansea and the City and County 
of Swansea Pension Fund. 
  The Wales Audit Office undertook an assessment of the Council’s Corporate 
Plan  fol owing  publication  in  August  2017  and  issued  a  Certificate  of 
187 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Compliance  as  the  Council  had  discharged  its  duties  under  the  Local 
Government (Wales) Measure 2009 and Code of Audit Practice.   
The Council is subject to Statutory External Inspections by various bodies 
including  Wales  Audit  Office,  ESTYN  and  CSSIW.  ESTYN  inspected  11 
educational  establishments  during  2017/18  with  inspection  reports  being 
provided to the Governing Body in each case. Work continued in 2017/18 to 
implement  the  5  recommendations  arising  from  ESTYN’s  Education 
Services for Children and Young People Inspection Report 2013/14. A final 
update  report  was  taken  to  Cabinet  on  14/12/17  where  it  was  noted  that 
future reports would provide updates on future new and emerging priorities. 
In future the Audit Committee wil  receive reports on external inspections but 
this wil  be considered during 2017/18 as part of the review of procedures 
for WAO reports and proposals to scrutiny. 
6.3 
The Annual General Meeting of the Council held on 25/05/17 appointed the 
required  number  of  Council ors  to  sit  on  the  Boards  of  the  companies 
included in the Council’s Statement of Accounts.  
 
6.4 
The Council has partnership arrangements in place with the Wales National 
Pool  Swansea,  National  Waterfront  Museum  Swansea,  Liberty  Stadium 
and the LC. Cabinet agreed a new legal agreement with the Liberty Stadium 
on 16 November 2017. In addition, partnership arrangements are also in 
place with the 360 Beach and Watersports Centre,  Swansea Indoor Bowls 
Centre and Swansea Tennis 365 but there is no Council representation on 
the Board and the Council’s financial contribution is nil or limited.  
 
6.5 
Corporate  Management  Team  have  reviewed  the  Annual  Governance 
Statement and governance arrangements, which operated for 2017/18  and 
are satisfied with the level of assurance and that no major issues exist. 
 
6.6 
The evidence gathered as part of the governance review for 2017/18 i.e. 
the Internal Control Self-Assessment and the review of internal and external 
sources of assurance supports the view that the governance arrangements 
continue  to  be  fit  for  purpose  although  a  small  number  of  issues  were 
identified  where  improvements  can  be  made  which  are  highlighted  in 
Section 7.   
 
 

Significant Governance Issues 
 
7.1 
The  following  table  shows  the  significant  governance  issues  which  were 
identified during the review of effectiveness undertaken when preparing the 
Annual  Governance  Statement  2016/17  and  the  action  taken  during  the 
year to address the issues.  
 
 
 
188 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Issue 
Proposed Action 
Action Taken  
1.Regionalisation  Senior Officers time 
Regional legal and 
and associated 
wil  continue to be 
financial working groups 
governance 
devoted to developing  were set up to consider 
issues  
regional working and 
City Deal structure and 
joint committee 
governance issues. Work 
structures, particularly  in this area is ongoing and 
in relation to the City 
wil  continue into 2018/19.  
Deal and any other 
emerging work. Work 
in this area is ongoing 
and wil  continue into 
2017/18.   
2.Major Projects 
Significant Officer time  A range of officer support 
(including Capital  wil  continue to be 
and programme 
Schemes) 
committed to relevant 
management has been 
projects in 2017/18. 
provided for major projects 
 
Wider issues in 
with regular updates to 
 
relation to support to 
CMT/Cabinet. Legal, 
schemes from a Legal,  financial and procurement 
Finance, Procurement  officers have all been 
and Governance view 
involved in project work 
point wil  be reviewed 
including governance 
and address during 
considerations.  
2017/18 in line with 
the ongoing Capital 
Commissioning 
Review. 
3.Ongoing 
Senior Officers are 
An interim Director of 
Council 
aware of the 
Resources was appointed 
restructures and 
governance risks 
in 2017/18 to ensure 
consideration of 
resulting from 
overal  corporate 
remaining Officer  continued and ongoing  governance. Further 
Capacity 
reductions in 
changes to the senior 
resources. This wil  be  management structure will 
 
monitored throughout 
mean ongoing monitoring.  
2017/18. The retention 
of the Director of 
The roles of s 151 officer 
Resources position wil   and Corporate Director 
ensure overal  
remain segregated.  
corporate governance 
189 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
and control issues are 
identified and 
addressed where 
necessary. The roles 
of the Section 151 
Officer and the 
Director wil  continue 
to be split to ensure 
adequate segregation 
is in place and to al ow 
for arrangements to be 
effectively challenged 
throughout 2017/18. 
4.Risk 
A new risk policy and 
A revised risk management 
Management 
framework wil  be 
policy was reported to 
reported to Council for  Cabinet on 17/08/17. Audit 
 
adoption, which will 
committee wil  receive a 
then be implemented 
quarterly report on the 
during 2017/18. 
overal  status of risk.  
5. Public Service 
Current post-holders 
A governance review of the 
Board 
are leaving / going to 
PSB wil  take place in 
management and  different job. A 
2018/19. 
co-ordination 
temporary co-ordinator 
wil  be appointed for 1 
year after which there 
wil  be a review. 
6. Wales Audit 
The proposals made 
Audit Committee reviews 
Office Annual 
by the Wales Audit 
progress meeting WAO 
Improvement 
Office wil  continue to 
proposals on a six monthly 
Report 2016/17– 
be addressed during 
basis. 
proposals for 
2017/18. 
improvement  
7. Wales Audit 
The proposal made by  Audit Committee reviews 
Office Savings 
the Wales Audit Office  progress meeting WAO 
Planning Review 
wil  continue to be 
proposals on a six monthly 
2016/17 – 
addressed during 
basis. 
proposal for 
2017/18. 
improvement  
190 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
7.2 
The fol owing table identifies issues, which have been identified during the 
review  of  effectiveness,  and  also  highlights  any  other  significant 
governance issues that need to be considered, together with the proposed 
actions to be taken during 2018/19 to address the issues. 
 
 
Issue 
Proposed Action 
1. Budgetary pressures 
Cabinet, CMT and al  Heads of service 
within the Council. 
have been reminded that: 
The Council is facing 
  No one is authorised to 
unprecedented financial 
overspend against budget; 
pressures and budget savings 
  Al  spend must be contained 
have to be made by 
within service budgets at Head 
departments in a timely 
of service and Director level; 
manner.  
  Any material deviation must be 
escalated immediately through 
 
the monthly monitoring; 
 
processes to CMT and 
ultimately to Cabinet if 
necessary to enable corrective 
action to be undertaken;  
  Corrective action requiring a 
policy decision wil  go to 
Cabinet with clear S151 officer 
advice to reduce spend back to 
within budget immediately;   
  Corrective action beyond this 
point wil  be determined by the 
S151 officer having due regard 
to the wider public interest and 
statutory intervention powers.  
2. Sustainable savings – there  CMT/Cabinet to continue future budget 
needs to be ful  consideration 
discussion/proposals  with  sufficient 
and robust business case 
and adequate information available for 
underpinning savings proposals  consideration.  
particularly relating to staff cuts. 
With wel being of future 
CMT monitors staff 
generations in mind 
vacancy/recruitment on weekly basis.  
sustainability of service, delivery 
together with mitigation of risks 
should be part of any proposals.  
191 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
3. Regional working–with 
Reports to Cabinet/Council, where 
col aboration/merger on 
appropriate, setting out governance 
national agenda going forward  arrangements/benefits. This wil  
it is essential that not only are 
include City Deal, Western Bay and 
governance issues around 
regional working appropriate 
ERW and any new regional 
and transparent but also that 
col aborations.  
regional working benefits CCS.  
 
4. Workforce capacity and 
Staff development through workforce 
performance- Directorates 
planning and review of the appraisal 
have seen a reduction in staff 
system to ensure staff are performing 
resources and it is essential 
and are being supported in their role. 
that workforce performance is 
monitored through an effective 
system of appraisal which 
supports and upskil s existing 
officers.  
5. Delivery of Leisure 
A combined Annual Leisure 
Partnership Report to be 
Partnership Report for 2015/16 and 
done on an annual basis. This 
2016/17 is scheduled to go to Council 
should include reference to 
in July 2018. 
activity with other entities 
within the group structure as 
part of the review of 
effectiveness of the system of 
internal control. 
6. Major projects – significant  Revised programme management 
officer time wil  continue to 
around Sustainable Swansea, City 
need to be dedicated to major 
Deal, City Centre Regeneration, 21st 
projects to ensure 
Century Schools and other significant 
transparency around decision 
projects with reporting to CMT by 
making and good governance.  exception 
 
 
7.3 
We  propose  over  the  coming  year  to  take  steps  to  address  the  above 
matters to further enhance our governance arrangements. We are satisfied 
that these steps wil  address the need for improvements that were identified 
in  our  review  of  effectiveness  and  wil   monitor  their  implementation  and 
operation as part of our next annual review. 
 
 
192 
 


ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
193 
 

ANNUAL GOVERNANCE STATEMENT 2017/18 
 
 
Appendix A 
 
Assurance Statement 
Yes 
Partly 
No 
Category 
1. Risk Management – 
100% 
 
 
escalation to Directorate 
or Corporate Risk Register 
2. Risk Management – 
88% 
12% 
 
management of risk 
(2 respondents) 
monitored 
3. Internal Controls 
100% 
 
 
4. Compliance with 
94% 
6% 
 
Procedure Rules 
(1 respondent) 
5. Internal Control / risk 
100% 
 
 
management and 
governance process 
6.Internal controls around  100% 
 
 
service change / system 
development 
7. Monitoring of Savings 
94% 
6% 
 
proposals and impact 
(1 respondent) 
8. Partnerships / 
100% 
 
 
collaborative working 
9. Audit report monitoring  100% 
 
 
10. Fraud and Financial 
100% 
 
 
Impropriety 
 
A total of 18 responses were received from Heads of Service and Corporate Directors. 
 
 
 
 
194 
 

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
We appreciate that the Statement of Accounts as presented contains a number of technical
terms which may be unfamiliar to the lay reader. Wherever possible we have sought to
minimise the use of technical terms but in some instances this has not been possible. The
following section attempts to explain the meaning of some of those technical terms that are
used in the Statements.
Accrual
Sums due to the Authority or payable to external organisations in the financial year
irrespective of whether the cash has been received or paid.
 
Actuary
An actuary is a person who works out insurance and pension premiums, taking into account
factors such as life expectancy.
Agency Services
Agency services are services provided for us by an outside organisation.
Amortised Cost
Amortised costs are used to spread the financial impact of depreciation or using an
equivalent interest rate or the effect of a premium or discount over a number of years on
the income and expenditure account.
Associate
An associate is an entity other than a subsidiary or joint venture in which the reporting
authority has a participating interest and over whose operating and financial policies the
reporting authority is able to exercise significant influence.
Audit
An audit is an independent examination of our activities.
Balance Sheet
This is a statement of our assets and liabilities at the date of the balance sheet.
Budget
A budget is a spending plan, usually for the following financial year.
Capital Adjustment Account
This Account represents timing differences between the amount of the historical cost of
fixed assets that has been consumed by depreciation, impairment and disposals, and the
amount that has been set aside to finance capital expenditure.
Capital Expenditure
Capital expenditure is spending on fixed assets. These are assets which will be used for
several years to provide services such as buildings, equipment and vehicles.
195

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Capital Receipts
Capital receipts are proceeds from the sale of fixed assets such as land or buildings.
Cash Equivalents
Cash Equivalents refer to short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible to
known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.
Cash flow Statement
This is a statement that summarises the movement in cash during the year.
Consolidated Balance Sheet
This balance sheet combines the assets, liabilities and other balances of all our
departments, at our year end date.
Corporate and Democratic Costs
The corporate and democratic core comprises all activities which local authorities engage in
specifically because they are elected, multi-purpose authorities. The costs of these
activities are thus over and above those which would be incurred by a series of
independent, single-purpose, nominated bodies managing the same services. There is
therefore no logical basis for apportioning these costs to services. 
Credit Risk
This is the risk of loss due to a debtors inability to make interest or principal repayments on
a loan/investment.
Creditor
A creditor is someone we owed money to at the date of the balance sheet for work done,
goods received or services rendered.
Current Assets
These are short-term assets which are available for us to use in the following accounting 
year.
Current Liabilities
These are short-term liabilities which are due for payment by us in the following accounting
year.
Debtor
A debtor is someone who owed money to us at the date of the balance sheet.
Depreciation
Depreciation is the theoretical loss in value of assets, which we record, in our annual 
accounts.
Direct Labour Organisation or Direct Service Organisation (DLO or DSO)
This is our own organisation.
It consists of workers we directly employ (including
supervisory staff), accommodation, equipment and so on, used to carry out specified tasks
for us.
196

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Earmarked Reserves
These are reserves we have set aside for a specific purpose.
Financial Year
This is the accounting period. For local authorities it starts on 1st April and finishes on 31st 
March in the following year.
Finance Leases
When we use finance leases, we take on most of the risks (and rewards) of owning the 
assets.
Fixed Asset
These are long-term assets we use (usually for more than one year).
Gilt Edged Stocks
These are investments in government or local authority stocks. They are regarded as risk-
free.
Government Grants
Assistance by government and inter-government agencies and similar bodies, whether
local, national or international, in form of cash or transfers of assets to an Authority in return
for past or future compliance with certain conditions relating to the activities of the Authority.
Housing Revenue Account
This account contains all our housing income and spending.
Investments
A long-term investment is an investment that is intended to be held for use on a continuing
basis in the activities of the Authority. Investments should be so classified only where an
intention to hold the investment for the long term can clearly be demonstrated or where
there are restrictions as to the investor's ability to dispose of the investment.
Joint Venture
A joint venture is an entity in which the reporting authority has an interest on a long-term
basis and is jointly controlled by the reporting authority and one or more other entities under
a contractual or other binding arrangement.
Leasing
This is a method of financing capital expenditure by paying the owner to use property or
equipment for a number of years.
Liability
A liability is an amount payable at some time in the future.
197

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Liquidity Risk
This is the risk that investments cannot be readily turned into cash or realised because
there is no ready market for the instrument or there are restrictive clauses in the agreement.
Minimum Revenue Provision (MRP)
This is the amount we have to set aside to repay loans.
National Non-Domestic Rates (NNDR)
The NNDR, or Business Rate, is the charge occupiers of business premises pay to finance
part of local authority spending. The NNDR is set by Government and is a percentage of
the rateable values. The percentage is the same throughout Wales. The total collected is
split between individual authorities in proportion to their adult populations.
Net Realisable Value
The selling price of the asset, reduced by the relevant cost of selling it.
Non Distributable Costs
These are costs that relate to past activity costs, such as the cost of redundant assets or
information technology, or past service pension that cannot be allocated to services.
Operating leases
These are leases where risks (and rewards) of ownership of the asset remain with the
owner.
Precepts
This is the amount we pay to a non-billing authority (for example a community council) so
that it can cover its expenses (after allowing for its income).
Provision
A provision is an amount we set aside in our accounts for expected liabilities which we
cannot measure accurately.
Public Works Loan Board (PWLB)
This is a Government agency which provides longer-term loans to local authorities. It
charges interest rates only slightly higher than those at which Government itself can borrow.
Related party transactions 
These are the transfer of assets or liabilities or the performance of services by, to or for a
related party no matter whether a charge is made.
Reserves
These are sums set aside to meet future expenditure. They may be earmarked to fund
specific expenditure or be held as general reserves to fund non specific future expenditure.
Revaluation Reserve
This reserve represents the difference between the revalued amount of fixed assets in the
Balance Sheet and their depreciated historical cost.
198

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Revenue account
This is an account which records our day-to-day spending and income on items such as
salaries and wages, running costs of services and the financing of capital expenditure.
Scheduled organisation
An organisation whose employees have an automatic right to be members of a pension fund.
Securities
These are investments such as stocks, share and bonds.
Stocks
Stocks are raw materials we purchased for day to day use. The value of those items we had
not used at the date of the balance sheet is shown in current assets in the balance sheet.
Subsidiary
An entity is a subsidiary of the reporting authority if:
● the authority is able to exercise control over the operating and financial policies of the
entity, and
● the authority is able to gain benefits from the entity or is exposed to the risk of potential 
arising from this control.
Temporary Borrowing or Investment
This is money we borrowed or invested for an initial period of less than one year.
Transfer value
This is the value of payments made between funds when contributors leave service with one
employer and decide to take the value of their pension contributions to their new employer’s
fund.
Trust Funds
Trust funds hold an individual’s or organisation’s money on their behalf. Trustees administer
the money for the owners.
Unit Trusts
These are investment companies which accept money from many different investors. The
money is pooled and used to buy investments.
Venture Capital Units
These are investments we have made in businesses where there is a higher risk but where
rewards are also likely to be higher, if the businesses are successful.
Work in Progress
Work in progress is the value of work done on an unfinished project at the date of the balance
sheet and which has not yet been recharged to the appropriate revenue account.
199

Document Outline