This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Local Growth Fund (LGF) Round 3B Expressions of Interest - application for funding for Queensway Gateway road'.


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
 
 
 
Expression of Interest Local Growth Fund 
 
This Expression of Interest (EoI) template should be completed for all projects looking to secure a 
LGF funding allocation (or an additional LGF allocation) through LGF 3B.  
 
The EoI will be used to inform the initial sifting of projects by Federated Areas (Stage 1). For 
projects which are successful in progressing to Stage 2, for prioritisation by SELEP, a Business 
Case will be required.  
 
For further information on the assessment approach, please see the guidance note on the 
prioritisation of projects for LGF R3B. 
 
Please note that the information included within this template will be shared with the SELEP 
Independent Technical Evaluator, Steer Davies Gleave, who will be providing independent advice 
and supporting the prioritisation of projects.  
 
 
Summary Information  
 
Project Title 
Queensway Gateway Road 
 
Project Location  
St Leonards on Sea, East Sussex 
 
Lead contact for the Project 
Name 
John Shaw 
Organisation  
Sea Change Sussex 
Job Title 
Chief Executive 
Contact number 
01424 858287 
Email Address 
xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xx.xx 
 
Lead contact for County Council/Unitary Authority (if different from above) 
Name 
Marwa Al-Qadi 
Organisation  
East Sussex County Council   
Job Title 
Project Co-ordinator – Economic Growth 
Contact number 
01273 336439 
Email Address 
xxxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
 
Project Information  
 
Brief Description (No more than 300 works) 
 
Please state explicitly what the LGF investment would be used to pay for and provide a succinct 
summary of the project. 
This LGF investment is for the completion of the Queensway Gateway Road which is nearing 
60% complete. 



Expression of Interest Template LGF 
The Queensway Gateway Road forms a key infrastructure investment in the Hastings - Bexhill 
Growth Corridor, as defined in the South East Strategic Economic Plan. It comprises a single 
carriageway road link between the A21 Sedlescombe Road North and Queensway. The road will 
connect with Queensway running south of its junction with the Ridge West, crossing the 
Hollington Stream valley on an embankment and then running south of Whitworth Road to join 
the A21 at a new junction north of the existing Sainsbury’s store.  It includes roundabout 
junctions at either end and a roundabout junction with Whitworth Road facilitating access to 
employment sites to the north and south. 
 
 
Figure 1 – A21/A259 Bexhill Hastings Growth Corridor 
The road serves a strategic purpose in linking Bexhill in the west and the A21 to the east of the 
Growth Corridor by relieving congestion on The Ridge and improving traffic flows onto the A21. 
Critically, Queensway Gateway Road connects the Bexhill Hastings Link Road (BHLR) to the A21, 
redistributing traffic from the BHLR and The Ridge heading towards the A21.  The opening of 
the BHLR changed the balance of traffic movements in the Hastings/Bexhill area, increasing 
traffic volumes along The Ridge and Queensway. The link between The Ridge and the A21 
already displays signs of capacity problems. By relieving congestion, the Queensway Gateway 
Road will improve strategic connectivity in the Growth Corridor, improving employment 
development potential in Queensway and employment and housing growth potential in North 
Bexhill. 
 
 
 
 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
 
Project Objectives 
 
Please set out the project objectives and how these will support SELEP’s ambitions to support 
economic growth. 
By relieving congestion, the Queensway Gateway Road will improve strategic connectivity in the 
Growth Corridor, improving employment development potential in Queensway and employment 
and housing growth potential in North Bexhill.  Importantly, the Queensway Gateway Road will 
provide access to designated employment development sites within the Bexhill Hastings Growth 
Corridor which would otherwise not be brought forward.  The new road allows land to be released 
around the road for employment development as set out in Policy E1 of the Hastings Local Plan 
2004 and policies LRA 7 and 8 of the Hastings Planning Strategy.  Specifically, the road opens up 
the development potential of key sites south of the Ridge, with capacity for up to 12,000 sqm of 
employment floorspace. 
 
The objectives of the project are: 
1.   To  support  the  development  and  employment  potential  of  the  Bexhill  Hastings  Growth 
Corridor;   
2.   To improve strategic access between the A21 and Queensway / BHLR and thereby strategic 
access to employment and housing sites in North Bexhill and Hastings; 
3.   To  alleviate  congestion  at  junctions  to  the  A21  enabling  the  BHLR  to  perform  its  full 
potential as a driver of economic growth. 
 
 
Policy Context 
 
Specify how the intervention aligns with national/regional/local planning policies and the SELEP 
SEP 
 
A solution for what has previously been referred to as the Baldslow junction improvement with 
the A21 has been at issue for many years. In 2006 the scheme was included in regional funding 
allocations  and  retained  in  the  refreshed  allocations  in  2009.  The  original  intention  was  to 
complete the improvement in parallel with the BHLR. Following delays in the project and post the 
May  2010  election,  the  previous  scheme  was  cancelled  as  part  of  the  Coalition  Government’s 
Comprehensive Spending Review. A range of alternative options have been subject to review, 
with the current scheme emerging as the preferred solution on grounds of value for money. 
 
The  South  East  Strategic  Economic  Plan1 has  identified  the  area  to  the  north  of  Bexhill  and 
Hastings as a Growth Corridor, referred to as the ‘A21/A259 Hastings-Bexhill Growth Corridor. 
                                            
1 South East LEP Strategic Economic Plan, March 2014 - http://southeastlep.com/about-us/activities/our-growth-deal-and-
strategic-economic-plan 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
The  area  contains  some  of  the  most  severe  deprivation  in  the  SELEP  area,  but  also  major 
opportunity sites to accommodate growth in employment and housing.  
 
The  Bexhill  Hastings  Link  Road  forms  the  core  infrastructure  for  the  Growth  Corridor,  with 
Queensway Gateway Road providing a critical link to the A21 and opening up specific development 
sites north of Hastings, and the North Bexhill Access Road performing a similar function in opening 
up development sites in North Bexhill. This corridor has suffered from severe congestion which 
has inhibited growth. The strategic rationale for Queensway Gateway Road is therefore linked 
directly to the delivery of the growth objectives of the BHLR and the Growth Corridor.  
 
The SEP highlights the significant development sites north of Hastings, with Queensway Gateway 
Road identified as having potential to enable delivery of a significant proportion of the employment 
growth anticipated from the Growth Corridor. 
 
The  scheme  supports  the  delivery  of  a  range  of  spatial  planning  and  economic  development 
priorities promoted by East Sussex County Council, Hastings Borough Council and Rother District 
Council. The Hastings  Planning Strategy promotes an efficient  and effective transport system, 
referring specifically to securing improvements such as the BHLR and improved links to the A21 
and  A259  in  Policy  FA1  and  T1  /  T2.  In  terms  of  employment  growth,  the  Hastings  Planning 
Strategy indicates that up to 70,000sqm of new employment floorspace is required up to 2028. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Options sifting 
 
Please provide details of any alternative options for the project scope which have been 
considered. Explain why the option detailed above has been identified as the preferred option. 
This should include consideration of impact of non-intervention (do nothing). 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
Context – Baldslow scheme 
 
This is a variation on the southern route options which avoids the need to cross the Hollington 
Stream valley. The eastern half of the new link would be very similar but it would then turn north 
and link up with the Ridge West at a junction halfway between the Queensway and Junction Road 
junctions. It would include new accesses to existing and allocated employment land to the east 
and west of it. 
 
Originally  the  Baldslow  junction  improvement  formed  an  integral  part  of  the  Bexhill  Bypass 
proposals. The July 2001 decision of the Secretary of State on the Access to Hastings Study, which 
cancelled the bypasses, also announced that the Highways Agency was being “asked to prepare 
a draft programme of work to identify possible measures” for the A21 as a whole. 
 
The Government’s instruction led to the Highways Agency’s A21 South of Pembury Study and, as 
part  of  that,  two  stakeholder  workshops  were  held  in  2002.  At  the  workshops,  East  Sussex 
authorities  urged  that  a  Baldslow  improvement  should  be  included  among  measures  brought 
forward for the A21. 
 
The Secretary of State’s decision on the South Coast Multi Modal Study in July 2003 had a bearing 
on the Baldslow issue. His decision not only asked ESCC to develop proposals for the BHLR, it also 
asked the Highways Agency to “liaise with the East Sussex County Council in addressing issues of 
access  between  the  Link  Road  and  the  A21”.    Hyder  Consulting  were  commissioned  by  the 
Highways Agency to undertake this work. 
 
Option Development and Assessment 
 
In  February  2004,  the  Highways  Agency  used  the  County  Council’s  Link  Road  route  options 
consultation to display, for public reaction, options for the Baldslow junction improvement.  Nearly 
80%  favoured  an  improvement,  with  option  2A  being  most  popular,  a  southern  route 
which  is  comparable  to  the  alignment  of  the  Queensway  Gateway  Road,  currently 
being promoted by Sea Change Sussex. 
 
In September 2005, a stakeholder workshop was held which looked at three options – a northern 
route, a southern route with a bridge, and a southern route with an embankment.  Two years 
later, in September 2007 a second workshop was held. This time, six options were considered: 
 
•  Options 1A/1B - two northern variants; 
o  Option 1A - a link from the northern end of Queensway B2092 through Beauport Park 
to join with the A21 opposite the present A28 Westfield Lane junction and widening 
of the A21 north of The Ridge West A2100 bridge to create additional approach lanes 
either side of the improved A21/A28 Westfield Lane junction It would be in cutting 
and involve extensive earthworks. 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
o  Option  1B  -  Same  as  Option  1A  except  the  A21  improvements  would  be  more 
extensive. 
 
•  Options 2A/2B - two southern variants; 
o  2A - Provides a new link from Queensway, to the south of its junction with The Ridge 
West, to join the A21 at a new junction just north of the Sainsbury’s store, crossing 
the Hollington Stream valley on a viaduct. 
 
o  2B - Same as Option 2A except the road would cross the Hollington Stream valley on 
an embankment with a short bridge across the stream. 
 
•  Option 3 - a hybrid on-line/off-line route; 
A variation on the southern route options which avoided the need to cross the Hollington 
Stream valley. The eastern half of the new link would be very similar but it would then 
turn north and link up with The Ridge West at a junction halfway between the Queensway 
and  Junction  Road  junctions.  It  would  include  new  accesses  to  existing  and  allocated 
employment land to the east and west of it. 
 
•  Option 4 - On-line improvements. 
Comprised improvements to the A21 between Whitworth Road and north of the A21/A28 
Westfield Lane junction and improvements to junctions on the A21 and The Ridge with 
limited widening of The Ridge West carriageway to allow for turning movements  
 
The aim was, from these options, to arrive at a Preferred Route to recommend to the Minister to 
be  taken  forward  to  publishing  Orders.    A  technical  appraisal  report  was  produced  by  Hyder 
Consulting in December 2007 which brought together the findings of the workshop with other 
work  on  environmental  assessment,  traffic  forecasting  and  modelling,  and  economic  appraisal 
which had already been carried out. 
 
The Highways Agency’s original consultants, Hyder, were replaced by Mott MacDonald, who were 
asked to review the work carried out to date on the northern and southern route options (Options 
3 and 4 identified above were sifted out and not reviewed as they were considered to 
have failed to meet the project objectives)
 and undertake further environmental assessment 
work.   
 
Mott  MacDonald  reported  back  in  January  2009  and  concluded  that  the  Option  2  routes 
(southern routes which are comparable to the alignment of the Queensway Gateway 
Road) scored the most strongly
 compared to the Option 1 routes. Taking into account both 
the Hyder and Mott MacDonald reports, Option 2 was the best route with the least impact for the 
majority of the specialist environmental topics and therefore the Option 1 routes were sifted from 
the process. 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
However, whilst the Option 2 routes were the most preferable they were costed at between £33 
- 44m, Mott MacDonald asked to look again at a more cost effective and affordable solution.  This 
work did not progress far enough to allow a Preferred Route announcement to be achieved before 
the general election in May 2010.  Later in that year, in October 2010, as a consequence of the 
National Spending Review, the Baldslow scheme were formally cancelled because it was unlikely 
that it would be delivered in that or the next spending review period (no earlier than 2019). 
 
Review of former Baldslow scheme and identification of preferred option for 
Queensway Gateway Road 

 
In 2013. Sea Change Sussex – a not for profit regeneration company – reviewed the previous 
Hyder  and  Mott  MacDonald  designs  and  costs  for  the  Baldslow  scheme  and  believed  that  a 
southern route, which would open up the ‘North Queensway’ employment sites allocated in the 
Hastings Local Plan: Planning Strategy, could be constructed at much lower cost than the previous 
estimates. 
 
Sea Change Sussex re-examined the previous designs for the Baldslow southern route options in 
order to develop an alignment for the ‘Queensway Gateway Road’ which would open up these 
allocated employment sites but in doing so, minimised the cost and reduced the impact on the 
landscape.   
 
In rationalising the design for the Queensway Gateway Road and seeking to deliver 
a cost effective and affordable solution, the previous option 2A design was seen as an 
unnecessarily expensive way of crossing the valley as its alignment ran against the contours rather 
than with them – necessitating a very expensive viaduct. 
 
Therefore,  by  refining  the  previously  developed  Option  2B  design  (which  put  the  road  on 
embankment) to provide a more sweeping alignment from Queensway which uses the contours 
of the land (as Queensway itself begins to climb steeply towards The Ridge) removed the need 
for a viaduct and minimised the amount of embankment works required. 
 
Recommended Option  
 
A  refined  version  of  Hyder’s/Mott  MacDonald’s  Option  2B  for  the  former  Baldslow 
scheme is the recommended option and the subject of this business case.
  This refined 
design for the now known Queensway Gateway Road was the subject of a planning permission 
(HS/14/0832) granted by Hastings Borough Council on 4th February 2015. 
 
 
 
 



Expression of Interest Template LGF 
Figure 3 – Queensway Gateway Road alignment 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Expression of Interest Template LGF 
Figure 4 – Queensway Gateway Masterplan 
 
 
 
 
The Hyder and Mott MacDonald option development and assessment work undertaken between 
2004 and 2009 concluded that the southern route options scored most strongly in terms of value 
for money. 
 
As  highlighted  above,  Sea  Change  Sussex  reviewed  the  previous  Hyder  and  Mott  MacDonald 
designs and costs and believed that a southern route, which would open up the North Queensway 
employment sites allocated in the Hastings Local Plan: Planning Strategy, could be constructed at 
much lower cost than the previous estimates and would offer more potential to manage traffic 
movements and discourage increased use of The Ridge. 
 
The previous option 2A design required a very expensive viaduct to cross the Hollington Stream 
valley and was discounted because of this overly expensive and over-engineered solution.   
 
Therefore,  the  preferred  and  approved  design  for  the  Queensway  Gateway  Road  refines  the 
previously developed Option 2B design (which puts the road on embankment) by: 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
•  providing a more sweeping alignment from Queensway which uses the contours of the land 
(as Queensway itself begins to climb steeply towards The Ridge) and thereby removes the 
need for a viaduct; 
•  minimising the amount of embankment works required; 
•  utilising the existing alignment of Whitworth Road (as opposed to running the road parallel to 
it) for the eastern section of the road. 
 
Through these amendments to the previously sifted designs developed by the Highways Agency, 
the recommended option for the Queensway Gateway Road is  a cost effective and affordable 
solution, which has received planning permission, and which will unlock the allocated employment 
sites at North Queensway in Hastings. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
Total amount of LGF sought 
  
Please state the amount of LGF sought, identify any flexibility to reduce the amount of funding 
or to adjust the LGF spend profile to fit with LGF available. 
 
If an additional LGF allocation is being sought for an existing LGF project, please provide an 
explanation in this section. 
Funding of £3,000,000 is sought (including £1,000,000 contingency) to provide a total of £13m 
LGF funding for the project. 
 
The original business case, as reviewed by Steer Davies Gleave in March 2015, was based on a 
scheme cost of £15m.  Only £10m of LGF has been committed to date.  The scheme was the 
subject of delays due to planning matters including a challenge of the planning consent. The 
delivery partner has committed its remaining £2m of regeneration reserves in the absence of 
any previously identified further LGF to make up the funding difference.  The delivery partner is 
also proceeding with minimal contingency reserves when a requirement for £3.7m was agreed 
in the original ITE approved appraisal.  
 
The 2015 Business Case conclusion assumptions on contingencies remains unchanged and there 
is no known financial risks that are not covered by the contingencies. 
 
In the event of any contingency not being spent then it will go back to reallocate. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
Funding breakdown 
 
The funding profile should include all project costs including risk contingency and consideration 
for project inflation costs.  
Source 
2015/16 
2016/17 
2017/18 
2018/19 
2019/20 
Total 
 
LGF 
15,000,000*   
 
 
 
 
LGF 
 
6,000,000**   
 
 
 
LGF 
 
 
10,000,000 
 
 
10,000,000 
LGF 3B 
 
 
 
 
3,000,000  3,000,000 
Total 
 
 
12,000,000***   
 
13,000,000 
* original scheme cost 
** budget reduced  
*** scheme total including £2m of regeneration resources from delivery partner 
 
 
Certainty of local funding contributions 
 
Provide comment on the status and risk of all funding contributions to the project (received, committed, 
identified but not secured, unsecure). Will the local funding sources be available to spend in the 
timescales required to meet the project spend forecast? 
As outlined above. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Value for Money 
 
Expected outputs 
 
Provide a description of the outputs which will be achieved through LGF investment 
 
As outlined in the original Business Case.  This project will deliver a critical piece of infrastructure 
for the Hastings-Bexhill Link Road contributing directly to the delivery of a key objective of the 
SELEP Strategic Economic Plan.  The Strategic Added Value of the project relates to the significant 
impact of the project in unlocking employment generating development potential in the Growth 
Corridor at identified sites north of Hastings as well as employment and housing growth sites in 
North Bexhill.  The project is critical to enabling the BHLR (Combe Valley Way) to perform its 
intended function in relieving congestion and improving connectivity across the Growth Corridor 
to the A21 and thus enabling the intended growth outcomes from the BHLR to be delivered. 
 
 
 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
Expected outcomes/benefits 
 
Provide information about the benefits which are expected to be achieved through LGF 
investment. This should include details of the timescales over which the benefits will be 
achieved.  
 
If any quantitative value for money analysis is available, please provide here. 
 
The scheme will:  
 
•  Support the development and employment potential of the Bexhill Hastings Growth 
Corridor 
•  Provide strategic access between the A21 and Queensway/BHLR and thereby strategic 
access to employment and housing sites in North Bexhill and Hastings 
•  Alleviate congestion at junctions to the A21 enabling the BHLR to perform its full 
potential as a driver of economic growth. 
 
The original business case, as reviewed by Steer Davies Gleave in March 2015, was based on a 
scheme cost of £15m, with a BCR of 2.7:1.  It was stated that this represented high Value for 
Money, with a medium/high level of certainty of that Value for Money. 
 
 
Delivery and Risk 
 
Stakeholder Support for the Project 
 
Please provide details of any public consultation or stakeholder engagement which has been 
undertaken in relation to the project and the main findings of this engagement work 
Consultations 
 
Throughout the project’s development, from the option development undertaken on behalf of the 
Highways Agency for the former Baldslow scheme through to the planning application submitted 
for the road now known as the Queensway Gateway Road, there has been extensive consultation 
with stakeholders.  This engagement includes: 
 
A21 South of Pembury Studies 
 
•  March 2002, A21 South of Pembury Study: Value Management Workshop 
Attended by representatives from Highways Agency, Hyder, ESCC, Kent CC Hastings BC, 
Rother DC and Tunbridge Wells BC. 
 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
Among aspirations of participants recorded by the workshop was ‘more work to look at 
short and long term schemes’ for Baldslow and ‘at Hastings seek optimum improvement to 
A21 approach to Hastings reflecting prevailing circumstances; if a link to Bexhill is created 
(Queensway) a compatible solution is required’ 
 
The  workshop  looked  at  problems  on  the  route  and  possible  interventions  –  preferred 
interventions were then developed by Hyder for consideration at a second workshop. 
 
•  April 2002, A21 South of Pembury Study: Second Value Management Workshop 
 
Attended by same representatives as before; looked at improvement options along the 
route prepared by consultants. 
 
Development of Baldslow Improvement options 
 
•  February 2004, Public consultation on Bexhill Hastings Link Road route options 
 
Following the Secretary of State’s decision on the South Coast Multi-Modal Study in July 
2003  and  his  invitation  for  ‘the  Highways  Agency  to  liaise  with  ESCC  and  the  SEBs  in 
addressing the issues of access between the Link Road and the A21’, the Highways Agency 
provided information on preliminary ideas for the Baldslow Link and sough comments from 
the public. 
 
Three options were displayed: 
o  Option 1 - Northern route 
o  Option 2a –southern route with new link to The Ridge midway between Queensway 
and A21 & dualling of A21 from Westfield Lane to the new link. 
o  Option 2b - as 2a but without link to The Ridge & simple link into Whitworth Road 
 
Of the 1,100 questionnaires, 78% supported an improvement with Option 2a (49%) being 
the most popular. 
 
•  September 2005, A21 Baldslow to Queensway Link Stakeholder Workshop 
Attended by representatives of Hyder, Highways Agency, GOSE, Environment Agency, High 
Weald  AONB  unit,  Hastings  and  Rother  Councils,  Sea  Space.    Three  options  were 
considered:   
o  Option 1 - Northern route 
o  Option 2a –southern route with bridge 
o  Option 2b – southern route without bridge 
 
Detailed comments on pro’s and con’s of the three routes were collected. Views of the SEBs 
to be sought and then submission for ‘preferred route’ announcement. 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
•  September 2007, A21 Baldslow Junction Improvements Submission for PAG Workshop 
 
Attended  by  representatives  from  Hyder,  Mott  MacDonald,  Highways  Agency,  GOSE, 
Environment Agency, High Weald AONB, ESCC, Hastings BC, Rother DC and Sea Space. 
 
Second Project Advisory Group (following the first held in September 2005) to discuss work 
carried out since then and seek a consensus view on a preferred route which would then 
be included in the report to the Minister for a preferred route announcement. 
 
The options considered were: 
o  Option 1A – northern route with A21 improvements around Westfield Lane junction 
o  Option  1B  –  northern  route  with  more  extensive  A21  improvements  south  beyond 
Junction Road 
o  Option 2A – southern route with bridge; A21 improvements similar to 1B 
o  Option 2B – southern route on embankment; A21 improvements similar to 1B 
o  Option 3 – new link from A21 as southern route but then turns north to join The Ridge; 
A21 improvements same as 1B 
o  Option  4  –  on  line  improvement;  more  limited  improvements  to  the  A21  between 
Westfield  Lane  junction  and  south  of  Whitworth  Road  and  limited  junction 
enhancements at Junction Road and The Ridge/Queensway. 
 
Development of Queensway Gateway Proposals and submission of Planning Application 
 
Ahead of the submission of the planning permission in October 2014, the strategy for community 
engagement on the Queensway Gateway Road was to: 
•  explain the purpose of the scheme, and 
•  receive comments from stakeholders and the community involving representatives from 
the following groupings: 
o  Local residents – especially those living nearest to the site and key community groups; 
o  The business community; 
o  Relevant councillors and council officers; 
o  Approving authorities including the Local Highway Authority, Local Drainage Authority, 
the Environment Agency and Natural England. 
 
These  messages  and  the  collection  of  feedback  were  achieved  through  both  information 
dissemination and face-to-face consultation: 
•  A limited consultation event held with residents of Maplehurst Rd on the 15th September 
2014; 
•  A public consultation ‘Planning Forum’ event facilitated by Hastings Borough Council held 
on the 24th September 2014; 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
•  A small number of one to ones held with residents and Councillors who were unable to 
attend the planning forum event; and 
•  A briefing held for local councillors in the area of the planning application. 
 
A report detailing the consultation approach and feedback received in relation to the proposed 
scheme was submitted as part of the planning application.  The main themes of the comments 
related to: 
•  Approval of the job creation objective that the project would generate by unlocking the 
employment allocations in the Hastings Local Plan 
•  The residents of Maplehurst Road strongly agreed that their road is a dangerous rat-run 
and so they generally welcomed proposals to close it at one end, albeit some opposing 
views about which end it would be best to close, with roughly equal numbers favouring 
the north and south ends, and queries about how emergency access to the road would be 
provided for.  
•  Whilst most Maplehurst Road residents approved of the idea of closing one end some who 
regularly use the road as a cut-through were more concerned with the inconvenience it 
would cause them.  
•  The new road would benefit small residential roads that currently experience too much 
traffic.  
•  If closed to vehicles, keep Junction Road open for pedestrian and cycle access to enable 
people on Sedlescombe Road North to reach the hospital – and people living on The Ridge 
to  reach  Sainsbury’s  -  on  foot  or  by  bike  without  having  to  use  the  longer  loop  of  the 
Queensway Gateway Road 
•  Concerns about the time gap between the opening of the Link Road and the Queensway 
Gateway  
•  Dislike of plans to close Junction Road and the associated longer travel ‘loop’ needed to 
head eastwards on The Ridge  
•  The importance of the landscaping and the retention of as many of the native trees as 
possible and to ensure good screening of the road and business sites. 
 
All these comments were considered by the Project Team and used to inform the final  design 
development  of  the  scheme  submitted  as  part  of  the  Queensway  Gateway  Road  planning 
application in October 2014. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
 
 
 
State Aid Implications 
 
Please indicate how your project complies with State Aid Regulations.  
 
NB. A declaration of compliance with EU State Aid regulations will be required prior any funding 
award to the project. If your project is awarded LGF it will be subject to a condition requiring 
the repayment of funding in the event that the European Commission determines that the 
funding constitutes unlawful State Aid. 
 
The project comprises the provision of general infrastructure and therefore does not constitute 
State Aid.        
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Key Milestones (including expected project completion date) 
 
Key Milestones 

Description  
Indicative Date 
Queensway Roundabout 
Roundabout open to traffic 
2018 
Execution of a Section 278 
Agreement (Section 278) with East 
 
agreement 
Sussex County Council to connect 
to the new road to the A21 
Completion of advanced Utility  Where possible early completion of 
2018 
diversions 
Utility diversions in advance of the 
main works 
Relocation Bartletts car 
Relocation of business to allow 
 2019 
showroom 
demolition of existing premises 
A21 Roundabout 
Roundabout open to traffic 
 2019 
Queensway to A21 highway 
Open to traffic 
 2019 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
 
 
 
Project dependencies, risks and delivery constraints 
 
Provide a description of any scheme dependencies, risks and delivery constraints which may impact on 
the delivery of the project or the benefits achieved through LGF investment in the project.  
 
Sea Change Sussex has developed the project taking full account of the full range of delivery 
risks.  Sea Change Sussex has extensive experience of managing the risks associated with this 
type of infrastructure scheme and ensuring that delivery and cost management arrangements 
are robust.   
 
The scheme originally approved in 2015, has managed to overcome major engineering 
challenges and is now 60% complete.  A key challenge has been the construction of a major 
embankment crossing the Hollington Valley with a maximum height of 13m and bridging the 
strategic water main serving the Hastings area.   
 
There is expectation in the community of opening Queensway Gateway and diverting a 
significant part of the traffic congestion which has now built up on the Ridge, with additional 
traffic from the Bexhill Hastings Link Road adding to this congestion.   
 
The scheme is proceeding with the construction of highways works on top of the new 
embankment and the roundabout connection to Queensway is under construction.  Further 
measures are being taken to reduce the cost of business relocation and the remaining works 
include highways work, a new connection to the A21 which includes the formation of a 
roundabout and the diversion of public utilities in the highway which is the main public utility 
artery into Hastings. 
 
The biggest risk remains any stall in the completion phases due to the need to meet unforeseen 
cost rises.  All efforts are being made to eliminate these with prior imminent letting of utility 
diversion contracts based on current negotiations with the providers.  A change of site for the 
business relocation will reduce development costs arising from planning conditions and advance 
tendering of the remaining works. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
 
 
 
 
Risk Analysis 

 
This should consider the risks in delivering the projects and the project benefits being delivered. 
 
*Likelihood and impact scores: 
5: Very High, 4: High, 3:Medium, 2:Low, 1:Very Low 
Risk 
Likelihood Score* 
Impact Score* 
Mitigation 
Third party land 


With the majority of 
ownership 
land already in 
public ownership 
 
there is ongoing 
 
engagement with 
the principal third 
 
party business to 
progress a cost 
effective relocation 
solution which is in 
the interests of 
both parties. 
Statutory Undertakers 


Ongoing 
Delay 
engagement with 
the utility providers.  
Adverse weather 


The development 
conditions 
programme, 
commends the 
letting of discrete 
contract elements 
by separate types 
of contractor, seeks 
to avoid “winter 
working” for the 
earth works. 
As the principle 
earthworks are now 
complete there are 
no significant 
“winter working” 
implications for the 
project 
Local Authority 


Early discussions 
Agreements 
with both Councils 
to secure necessary 
consents and to 
reduce where 
possible the 
imposition of 
onerous conditions 
Third party licences 


Early discussion 
once detailed 


Expression of Interest Template LGF 
programme dates 
are known. 
Unforeseen ground 


Mitigation by way of 
conditions 
Site Investigation 
has been 
completed. 
However, some risk 
remains.