This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Labour Party'.

 
 
Annex B 
Section 31 (1) (g) – Law Enforcement 
 
Section  31  (1)  (g)  provides  an  exemption  from  the  ‘right  to  know’,  if 
disclosure  of  the  information  would  or  would  be  likely  to  prejudice  the 
exercise  by  any  public  authority  of  its functions  for any  of  the purposes 
specified in subsection (2). 
 
We consider that disclosure of documents relating to  CAA’s allegations, 
would  be  likely  to  prejudice  the  Commission’s  ability  to  carry  out  the 
following functions as set out in subsection 2: 
 
(a) ascertaining whether any person has failed to comply with the law 
 
(b) ascertaining whether any person is responsible for any conduct which 
is improper 
 
(c)  ascertaining  whether  circumstances  which  would  justify  regulatory 
action in pursuance of any enactment exist or may arise. 
 
This  is  because  disclosure  of  information  relating  to  an  ongoing 
investigation  could  influence  relevant  parties’  responses  to  the 
Commission’s enquiries. This in turn may hinder the Commission’s ability 
to  ascertain  whether  there  are  circumstances  which  would  justify 
regulatory action in pursuance of the Equality Act. 
 
Additionally, disclosure of correspondence between the Commission and 
organisations may erode trust and lead to organisations being less open 
in their interactions with the Commission.  
 
It is essential that for the Commission to perform its role as a regulator 
effectively, we ensure that our ability to obtain relevant information is not 
compromised. 
 
As section 31 is a qualified exemption we have considered whether the 
public  interest  lies  in  maintaining  the  exemption  or  disclosing  the 
information. 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Factors in Favour of Disclosure 
1.  Presumption under the Freedom of Information Act of disclosure. 
 
2.  Significant  public  interest  in  the  Commission’s  investigation  on 
CAA’s allegations. 
 
Factors  in  Favour  of  Maintaining  the  Exemption  (i.e.  Non-
Disclosure) 

1.  As a regulator we must be able to consider areas of concern within 
a  ‘safe  space’  to  allow  for  a  considered  and  proportionate 
response. 
2.  Disclosure could adversely affect the Commission’s ability to carry 
out effective pre-enforcement work. 
3.  Disclosure could prejudice the exercise of our functions by 
decreasing the amount of information supplied voluntarily from 
organisations. Third parties must feel confident to share 
information freely with the Commission. 
 
On balance, we have concluded that the public interest in maintaining the 
exemption outweighs the public interest in disclosing the information. This 
is  because  we  consider  there  is  a  stronger  public  interest  in  the 
Commission  being  able  to  exercise  its  statutory  functions  under  the 
Equality Act 2006 effectively.  
 
It  is  essential  that  the  Commission  is  able  to  effectively  monitor, 
investigate and ascertain compliance with the equality laws and to work 
with others to encourage and promote good practice and compliance with 
the law.