This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Centre for Economic Performance applications (December 2016 to Septembrer 2018)'.





Almost all our projects involve cross comparative data from around the world (see table of all 
projects with datasources at http://cep.lse.ac.uk/esrc/ password ESRCXXXXXXX).  Growth 
depends on understanding the impact of Britain's international economic integration on her 
exporting and productive capacity, and this motivates our Trade programme. A core policy 
question is what will be the UK's future relationship with other countries, in particular the European 
Union (EU) and South-East Asia. Our Labour Programme Project L2 will compile a new 
international data map of the changing pattern of wealth inequality both within and between 
countries across the globe (L2B) Existing work by 
 has examined only 8 countries 
(
 
 will now extend this to all countries and examine and test the 
causes of wealth changes.Our Growth programme will lead an international effort to create the 
world's first large-scale panel database on inventors (e.g. patenters) and the organisations they 
work for (G1A) across multiple countries. We evaluate the EU Emissions Trading System, carry 
out  field experiments on energy consumption in China and the UK; our Urban programme will also 
examine the policy influences on Chinese urbanisation as a possible model for other countries.Our 
Education programme will create a longitudinal database of all universities in the world using 
UNESCO historical archives from 1947,to investigate universities' impact on economic 
performance.  Our collaboration is international for all programmes: e.g. our Growth programme 
depends on a nexus between CEP,(
) Stanford (
 Harvard Business School 
(
 for the development of its projects on productivity; we have theme Leaders from Paris 
(
 Bocconi (
 Princeton (
 and project research contributions from Beijing, 
Berkeley, Columbia, Edinburgh, Frankfurt,MIT, and Nuremberg. As examples of our international 
scope consider: i) we present over 160 papers a year at international conferences; ii) in the past 
two years we have organised sessions at NBER Summer Institute, the European and American 
Economic Association meetings and Davos; iii) we have organised international conferences 
abroad, for example at Harvard Business School and iv) have made many invited contributions to 
the Econometrics Society World Congress and Handbooks of Economics. 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 3 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 

Objectives 
 
List the main objectives of the proposed research [up to 4000 chars] 
Our overall objectives is to perform analysis that will form the basis for policies to (i) improve the rate of economic growth; 
(ii) share the benefits of this growth more equitably and (iii) improve the quality of growth so that it increases wellbeing. 
Specifically, 
 
 
G1A What makes a successful inventor? 
G1B Did the financial crisis cause a permanent fall in innovation? 
G1C What stimulates entrepreneurship? 
G2A Does management explain why some countries are richer than others? 
G2B Do better management practices simply reflect managerial talent? 
G2C Can we use RCTs to see what policies improve management? 
G2D How can Big Data measure firm "culture"? 
G3A Did the ETS and CRC work? 
G3B How big are technology spillovers from low-carbon innovation? 
G3C Can nudges reduce energy consumption in UK & China? 
G3D Can we use the past shocks to help climate change adaptation? 
E1A What is the effect of academies on pupil achievement? 
E1B How effective are school networks for raising attainment? 
E1C How does choice influence pupil outcomes? 
E1D What are the drivers of school segregation? 
E2A What are long-term impacts of early educational interventions? 
E2B How important are English & Maths to later outcomes? 
E2C Can FE be improved to raise intermediate skills? 
E2D How do schools influence HE choice? 
E2E How do universities affect growth? 
T1A What is impact of UK leaving EU? 
T1B Do immigrants help service trade? 
T1C What determines FDI? 
T2A Can we use RCT on policies to improve exports? 
T2B How do industrial policies affect growth? 
T2C What is the impact of trade agreements? 
T3A How can trade boost productivity? 
T3B How do firms use online offshoring? 
T3C Does the hierarchical structure of firms affect performance? 
T4A How much does credit affect exports? 
T4B What is the role of credit during the life-cycle of the exporter? 
T4C Has banking globalisation increased risk to trade? 
U1A What are triggers of city decline? 
U1B Can we re-balance industries across areas? 
U1C What is infrastructure's impact on local performance? 
U1D How do policies affect Chinese urbanisation? 
U2A How does diversity of building use affect city performance? 
U2B What is role of geography in determining prime location? 
U2C How do financial services influence spatial patterns? 
U2D Do tech incubators identify how ideas spread? 
U3A Do land policies affect geographical mobility? 
U3B Has the "bedroom tax" worked? 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 4 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 

U4A Why do people like living in cities? 
U4B What are the causes and consequences of London gentrification? 
L1A What has happened to UK pay structures over last 40 years? 
L1B Why have real wages stagnated? 
L1C Does CEO pay affect firm performance? 
L2A What are the causes of fall in labour's share? 
L2B How has wealth inequality changed across the world? 
L2C How have tasks within occupations changed? 
L2D How has automation affected skill demand and inequality? 
L3A How has the rise of services changed women? 
L3B What determines female job satisfaction? 
L3C Can we explain male-female gaps in education choice? 
L4A How to improve youth labour markets? 
L4B How can unemployment benefits be reformed? 
L4C How do financial markets affect labour markets? 
C1A How do economic shocks affect community wellbeing? 
C1B How does local ethnic & migrant composition affect communities? 
C1C Does public expenditure crowd-out charity? 
C1D Have welfare to work reforms increased crime? 
C2A How are values changing? 
C2B How have ideas diffused historically? 
C2C Have attitudes to LBGT changed? 
W1A How to develop a model of wellbeing? 
W1B How to control for influence of genes in happiness studies? 
W1C Can we redesign Green Book to take wellbeing seriously 
W2A Do policies to improve mental health work? 
W2B Do interventions to improve mental health by firms succeed? 
W2C How do interventions interact with genes & environment? 
 
Summary 
 
Describe the proposed research in simple terms in a way that could be publicised to a general audience [up to 4000 chars] 
Three core questions bind this proposal together: how to foster growth; how to share growth and how to sustain growth 
 
1   HOW CAN WE FOSTER GROWTH? We plan to develop a new Growth Programme focussing on bolstering innovation 
in its widest sense, both technological and organisational. It will co-ordinate the Centre's growth work agenda and follow up 
the LSE Growth Commission's policy proposals. Next, the Trade programme will analyse the impact of globalisation with a 
targeted focus on how to make a dramatic improvement in British export performance. A core policy question is what the 
UK's future relationship with other countries will be, in particular with the European Union (EU) and South-East Asia. Third, 
the Education and Skills programme will examine human capital investment by analysing the recent transformation of the 
educational system using new tools of competition and organisation theory. Two core questions are: have educational 
reforms worked - especially for the disadvantaged - and, what can be done to improve the intermediate skills base, a long- 
standing area of UK weakness. 
 
 
2  HOW CAN WE SHARE THE BENEFITS OF GROWTH? A problem with growth in the decades prior to the global 
financial crisis was that prosperity was shared very unequally. To study the spatial dimensions of inequality, we propose a 
new Urban programme. This will emphasise cities as key economic units and address why so much UK growth is 
concentrated in the South East.This is a key policy issue in the light of the commitment to decentralise power within 
England by all main UK parties. Following the City Growth Commission, the policy focus will be how local policy makers 
can help their cities prosper. Alongside the large productivity fall since the crisis, there has been a big fall in real wages - 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 5 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 

something unique in post-war UK recessions. Some wage stagnation occurred also in the run-up to the crisis, as it has over 
a longer time in the US. The Labour programme will examine these changes and whether they are linked to the declining 
share of GDP going to employees across the world.  We will look at earnings, income and wealth inequalities across 
individuals, but also on why women's progress has stalled. In all these aspects, we are interested not just in explaining why 
growth is unequally shared, but also how we could design institutions and policies that generate a "double dividend" of 
more growth and less inequality. 
 
 
3   WHAT KIND OF GROWTH DO WE WANT?  Increasing GDP per capita remains important as UK average incomes 
track this over the long run. But growth must be sustainable, it must deal with environmental challenges, it should expand 
not undermine people's happiness and it should not be at the expense of social cohesion. Dealing with climate change 
requires both containing demand for greenhouse gases and stimulating clean technologies and we propose a wide portfolio 
of green growth projects directed to this.  Of course, it is not just technology that affects people's lives - it is also the beliefs 
and norms that regulate the interactions between people. Growth involves change that has significant impacts on people's 
lives and neighbourhoods, often causing great stress. Our Community programme will investigate the impact of economic 
changes (both direct and indirect through changes like immigration) on social cohesion, and will help to develop policies to 
ensure that growth benefits all communities. CEP has been at the forefront of looking beyond GDP and our Wellbeing 
programme will ambitiously develop a model of subjective well-being over the life-course, in order to show the quantitative 
causal impact of factors like parenting, schooling, employment, income and health. Without such knowledge it is impossible 
for policy-makers to aim effectively at greater wellbeing, even if that is their objective. 
 
Academic Beneficiaries 
 
Describe who will benefit from the research [up to 4000 chars]. 
 
 
The proposed research will make fundamental global contributions to social science across a wide range of disciplines and 
fields. It will be particularly relevant to economists, above all those working in growth, trade, labour, education, behavioural 
economics and innovation. The research will also benefit scholars in the related disciplines of psychology, management 
science and geography, in particular, but also political science, sociology and history. More broadly our work bringing Big 
Data together with the causal analysis should have intellectual spillovers in engineering and computer science.(We have a 
partnership with engineers from Oxford University's Robotics Research Group and start-up analytics firm GrowthIntel to use 
Big Data from a wide variety of web-based sources.) 
 
 
We will ensure the benefits are spread by publishing widely (in academic journals, discussion paper series and non- 
academic outlets in the mass media, including social media), hosting events and having joint cross-disciplinary work (see 
"Interdisciplinary" section). 
 
 
Our modeling and methodological innovations will be passed to the research community through our planned MOOCs and 
e-books; through a State of Working Britain Blog, our recent Higher Education Hub (http://economicsofhe.org/). 
 
 
We believe the research we produce will also have an impact on the way economics is taught. A lesson from the crisis is 
that this does not reflect the new developments that CEP has pioneered. An important part of this is empirical work that 
focuses on causality, particularly policy evaluations. This is referred to as the "credibility revolution" by CEP's 
 who 
will develop online materials to make it easier to understand and implement the methods that are central to CEP's 
research, including our new methodological innovations using Big Data. This will be integrated with our social media 
strategy and join up with the Carlin/Coyle CORE/INET initiative on reforming the economics curriculum. 
Membership of cross-disciplinary learned societies by senior CEP staff such as the British Academy, Econometric Society, 
European Economic Association and Royal Economic Society will also help this knowledge diffusion. We will continue to 
coordinate sessions for the American Economic Association, the Royal Economic Society Annual Meetings and to bring 
together work arising out of our conferences into special journal issues and e-books. 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 6 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 

Finally, the fact that we have a strong policy focus will mean that the policies that flow from our research will benefit society 
in general. For example, if we succeed in our ambition to improve the rate of equitable and sustainable UK growth, this will 
benefit academics as members of society as well as intellectually. 
 
Staff Duties 
 
Summarise the roles and responsibilities of each post for which funding is sought [up to 2000 characters] 
 
Impact Summary 
 
Impact Summary (please refer to the help for guidance on what to consider when completing this section) [up to 4000 chars] 
Academics will benefit across global social science as discussed in the previous section. We publish in the world's top 
economic (and other social science) journals so we clearly benefit academics, especially as we emphasise pushing out the 
frontier, rather than publishing small increments to the literature. 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 7 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 

Improving our knowledge about what drives growth can have a powerful impact on the wellbeing of all people. The power 
of basic social scientific breakthroughs is that many benefit, even though the effects are long-run and hard to quantify. 
 
 
Our key non-academic beneficiaries are national and international policy-makers, civil servants, international financial 
institutions, businesses, journalists, think tanks, NGOs and, above all, the general public. We have discussed our proposal 
with many users such as BIS, the DE and UK Treasury (see letters of support from Permanent Secretary of HMT and 
BIS,Head of the NHS and others at http://cep.lse.ac.uk/ esrc/  password ESRCXXXXXXXX) 
 
 
We have involved stakeholders in almost all of the proposals. Examples include government agencies, the Bank of 
England (G1C), BIS (T1A), DECC (G3A), Department of Education. (E1A), European Commission (G2D), HMT (W1C), 
ILO(G2C), NHS(W2A), OFCOM(U1C), ONS(G2A), UKTI(T2A), UN(W1A), NESTA (G2C);US Census (P1A), World 
Bank(U1D); Multinationals Coca-Cola (W2B), Google (G3B) McKinsey (P1A), Towers Watson (L1C), United Health (P1A); 
Start-Ups Crowdcube (G1D), GrowthIntel (G2D), GroveIS (G3C), TechHub (U2D); Charities ARK (E1B) and How to Thrive 
(W2A), London Rebuilding Society (G3C) NIESR (G2D),  and Society of Motor Manufacturers (T2C). Our partnerships with 
different stakeholders depends on the question at hand and involves discussions at the genesis of a project, sharing of 
data, analysis and early findings and finally help with events and subsequent dissemination through a variety of 
mechanisms. 
 
 
To increase benefits to UK Treasury (the department who make most use of our research) we will build on the success of 
the CEP/HMT academic associates scheme where individual CEP researchers give early stage pro bono advice on areas 
of our expertise. We are proposing a series of training events and Executive Education courses to the UK civil service (led 
by CEP's Daniel Sturm) which will diffuse techniques and CEP research findings. 
Our tools for measuring management practices and suggesting improvements (www.managementsurvey.org) will be useful 
for businesses trying to improve their profitability. We focus on firms which are smaller than those who are usually the 
customers of major international consultancy firms. 
 
The general public benefits through our wide dissemination. On average, every year we run 164 events.  In 2013 we 
appeared in the print and broadcast media on average 3 times a day and there were 4.66 million website downloads of 
papers. Our international profile is rising, with 37% of our web visitors and 37% of our media mentions coming from outside 
the UK. Most of our top ten papers (downloaded more than 50,000 times each during the year) were non-technical 
presentations of our work, suggesting that our appeal is broad and not confined to academic users.  We will produce a 
professionally produced research magazine, CentrePiece, thrice yearly and reports on those key policy developments to 
which our research can contribute rigorous evidence. We will press release key pieces of research work each month. 
 
Ethical Information 
Has consideration been given to any ethical matters raised by this proposal ? 
Yes 
 
 
 
Please explain what, if any, ethical issues you believe are relevant to the proposed research project, and which ethical 
approvals have been obtained, or will be sought if the project is funded?  If you believe that an ethics review is not 
necessary, please explain your view (available:  4000 characters) 
 
 
 
Most projects involve anonymised secondary data and therefore do not raise ethical issues. For projects where ethical 
issues arise - usually those involving us in the collection of primary data - researchers are required to submit them for 
Review by the LSE Research Ethics Committee following  the self completion of an LSE Ethics checklist and 
questionnaire.No potential participant may be approached to take part in any research before this has been done. When 
we are conducting field experiments and collecting our own data on individuals we follow the highest standards such as 
obtaining informed consent from subjects, keeping strict control over anonymising any data in publications. 
When there are partner institutions involved, the project is also passed for consideration by the relevant ethics committee of 
that institution. For example, Project G2B is consistent with the Institutional Review Boards of Harvard and Stanford 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 8 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 

Universities. Where  we  work  with outside  organisations,  such as with  schools  in Hertfordshire  through  "How  To Thrive" 
ethical issues  concerning  the research  will need  to be  reviewed  by their ethics  committee. 
With  administrative  secondary  data we always  follow the  strictures  of the  data providers.  Sometimes  this  will be the rules  of 
working  in "white  rooms"  like  the Virtual  Micro Lab in ONS  or HMRC  where  no data is  allowed  to be  removed  or recorded 
and the researcher  has  to physically  go to the Lab.  other  times,  we will be  using  the Secure  Data Service  provided  by the 
ONS which  can  be accessed  from  secure  sites  within the  CEP  itself.  All researchers  who  use the  SDS  have  to be certified 
in ethical  and  legal training,  typically  attending  a one  day course.  Confidential  data  released  by such  providers  does  not 
allow  identification  of individual  people  or institutions. 
ESIM010341/1 
Page  9 of21 
Date  Saved:  10/10/2014  17:08:20 
 
Date  Printed:  10/10/201417:17:56 

Summary of Resources Required for Project 
 
 
Financial resources 
Summary of staff effort requested 
Summary   
Full economic  ESRC 
% ESRC 
 
Months 
Fund heading 
fund heading 
Cost 
contribution 
contribution 
Investigator 
Directly 
 
Researcher 
Technician 
Incurred 
Other 
 
Visiting Researcher 
Student 
 
Total 
 
 
 
 
Directly 
 
Allocated 
 
 
 
 
 
Indirect Costs 
 
 
Exceptions 
 
 
 
 
 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 10 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 

Other Support 
 
Details of support sought or received from any other source for this or other research in the same field. 
Other support is not relevant to this application. 
 
Related Proposals 
Proposal is related to a previous proposal to ESRC 
 
Reference Number 
How related? 
ES/M007898/1 
Follow up to outline proposal 
 
Previous Proposals 
 
 
 
ES/L015080/1 
 
ES/L012537/1 
 
 
ES/L000105/1 
 
 
ES/J009474/1 
 
ES/J009164/1 
 
 
ES/I038012/1 
 
ES/J000167/1 
 
 
ES/I024174/1 
 
 
ES/I017720/1 
 
ES/H046615/1 
 
 
ES/H030301/1 
Enter the ESRC reference numbers of any support sought or received from ESRC in the past five  ES/H011846/1 
years. 
ES/H010866/1 
ES/H00176X/1 
ES/H004963/1 
ES/G032130/1 
ES/G011966/1 
ES/G010390/1 
ES/H002715/1 
ES/H025812/1 
ES/J003867/1 
ES/J004006/1 
ES/J006440/1 
ES/J01138X/1 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 11 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 

Staff 
 
Directly Incurred Posts 
   
 
 
EFFORT ON 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
PROJECT 
   
 
 
Period   
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
Basic 
London 
Super-   
on 
% of Full 
Increment 
Total cost on 
  Role 
Name /Post Identifier 
Start Date 
Scale 
Starting 
Allowan  annuation 
 
Project 
Time 
Date 
grant (£) 
 
Salary 
ce (£) 
and NI (£) 
 
(months) 
  Co-Investigator 
  Co-Investigator 
 
  Researcher 
  Researcher 
  Researcher 
 
  Researcher 
  Researcher 
  Researcher 
 
  Researcher 
  Other Staff 
  Other Staff 
 
  Other Staff 
  Other Staff 
  Other Staff 
 
  Other Staff 
 
   
Applicants 
 
 
 
Post will 
 
 
Average number of   
 
 
 
Contracted 
Total number of hours to be 
Rate of 
 
outlast 
hours per week 
Role 
Name 
working week as a  charged to the grant over 
Salary 
Cost estimate 
project 
charged  to the 
% of full time work  the duration of the grant 
pool/banding 
(Y/N) 
grant 
 
Principal 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 12 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 
 

 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
Co- 
Investigator 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 13 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 
 

 
Co- 
 
Investigator 
Co- 
 
Investigator 
Co- 
 
Investigator 
Co- 
 
Investigator 
Co- 
 
Investigator 
 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 14 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 
 







 
Direct contribution to project 
Indirect contribution to project 
 
Description 
Value £  
Description 
Value £ 
 

Name of partner organisation 
Division or Department  Name of contact 
 
International 
 
Tech Hub 
 
Development 
Direct contribution to project 
Indirect contribution to project 
 
Description 
Value £  
Description 
Value £ 
 
 

Name of partner organisation 
Division or Department  Name of contact 
Grove Information Systems Ltd 
Grove Group UK 
 
Direct contribution to project 
Indirect contribution to project 
 
Description 
Value £  
Description 
Value £ 
 
 
 
 

Name of partner organisation 
Division or Department  Name of contact 
Crowdcube Limited 
The Innovation Centre 
 
Direct contribution to project 
Indirect contribution to project 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 18 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 
 

 
 
 
 
Total Contribution from all Project partners 
 
 
Timetable estimates of the number of months after the start of the project to reach the following stages: 
 
Stage 
Number of Months 
Completion of all preparation and design work 
10 
Commencement of fieldwork or material/information/data collection phase   20 
of study 
Completion of fieldwork or collection phase of study 
30 
Commencement of analysis phase of study (substantive phase where 
 
40 
research facilities are involved) 
Completion of analysis phase of study 
45 
Commencement of  writing-up of the research 
50 
Completion of preparation of any new datasets for archiving 
55 
Completion of writing-up 
60 
 
Data Collection 
If the research involves data 
For each project we describe (and list in the grid) the 
collection or acquisition, please 
datasets used,http://cep.lse.ac.uk/ esrc/  password 
indicate how existing datasets have  ESRCXXXXXXX. We have looked at all existing datasets to 
been reviewed and state why 
see if appropriate and where this is not the case we merge 
currently available datasets are 
datasets or go out and collect our own data. In some cases 
inadequate for this proposed 
detailed data on firms is available only commercially. There 
research. If you do not state to the 
will be around 70 datasets created. 
contrary, it will be assumed that you 
(as principal applicant) are willing for 
your contact details to be shared 
with the affiliated data support 
service (UK Data Service) working 
with the Research Councils. 
Will the research proposed in this 
Yes 
application produce new datasets? 
Will this data be: 
✔ Quantitative 
✔ Qualitative 
Please give a brief description of the  worker-firm data on income matched to patenting; UKSME 
datasets. 
Finance survey; Crowdfunder data; Customs an 71 datasets 
detail at above URL 
It is a requirement to offer data for 
See Data Management Attachment. CEP posts anonymised 
archiving. Please include a 
versions of our data (and methods) on our website, attaches 
statement on data sharing. If you 
to publications and lodges with UKDA. 
believe that further data sharing is 
not possible, please present your 
argument here justifying your case. 
Who are likely to be the users 
Other researchers mainly,but in the case of e.g 
(academic or non-academic) of the 
management practices and emissions trading survey, firms 
dataset(s)? 
who can use data to benchmark own performance 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 19 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56 
 

Please  outline  costs  of preparing 
Included  in  our RA  and hourly  paid  data support  staff costs; 
and documenting  the  data  for 
not  separately  calculable  stages  of work  but  continued 
archiving  to  the  standards  required 
throughout  data  collection  process 
by the affiliated  data  support  service 
(UK  Data  Service)  working  with the 
Research  Councils. 
ESIM010341/1 
Page  20 of21 
Date  Saved:  10/10/2014  17:08:20 
 
Date  Printed:  10/10/201417:17:56 

Classification of Proposal 
 
(a) User Involvement 
 
The nature of any user engagement should be indicated 
 
Design 

Execution 

Dissemination 

Training 

Not applicable 
 
 
Proposal Classifications 
 
Research Area: 
 
Research Areas are the subject areas in which the programme of study may fall and you should select at least one of 
these. Once you have selected the relevant Research Area(s), please ensure that you set one as primary. To add or 
remove Research Areas use the relevant link below. To set a primary area, click in the corresponding checkbox and then 
the Set Primary Area button that will appear. 
 
 
Please select one or more Research Areas 
Subject 
Topic 
Keyword 
Economics 
Economics (General) [Primary] 
 
 
Economics (General) [Primary] 
 
Economics 
Economics 
[Primary] 
Human Geography 
Economic Geography 
 
 
Management & Business Studies 
 
Management and business studies 
(General) 
Mechanical engineering 
Robotics and Autonomy 
 
Psychology 
Psychology (General) 
Psychology 
Psychology 
Psychology (General) 
 
 
Qualifier: 
Qualifiers are terms that further describe the area of study and cover aspects such as approach and geographical focus. 
Please ensure you complete this section if relevant. 
 
 
To add or remove Qualifiers use the links below. 
 
 
 
Free-text Keywords: 
Free-text keywords may be used to describe the programme of study in more detail. To add a keyword, you first need to 
search existing Research Areas by entering the keyword in the Search box and selecting the Filter button. 
 
 
If the keyword is adequately reflected by one of the terms displayed below, click in the corresponding checkbox then select 
Save. If no potential matches are displayed, or none of those displayed are suitable, select the Add New button followed by 
the Save button to add it as a descriptor. 
 
 
To add or remove those previously added use the links below. 
ES/M010341/1 
Page 21 of 21 
Date Saved: 10/10/2014 17:08:20 
 
Date Printed: 10/10/2014 17:17:56