This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Detention and cancelled charter flight dated 28.3.17'.



 
 
 
 
Immigration Enforcement Secretariat 
 
Sandford House 
 
41 Homer Road 
 
Solihull 
 
West Midlands  
 
B91 3QJ 
Ms. Strickland 
 
 
  
www.gov.uk/home-office 
mailto: request-525831-
 
 
xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx 
 
20 December 2018 
  
 
 
Re: Freedom of Information request – 50585 
 
Dear Ms. Strickland,  
 
Thank  you  for  your  four  e-mails  of  11  October  and  12  October  2018  in  which  you 
asked for information about  the Home Office Charter flight to Nigeria and Ghana  on 
28 March 2017.  
 
Your requests have been handled as a request for information under the Freedom of 
Information Act 2000.   
 
You specifically asked: 
 
“You've previously confirmed that there are 11 persons still in the country that 
were meant to be on the charter flight to Nigeria and Ghana on 28-3-17. 
 
In relation to each of these 11 persons, please confirm: 
 

1.  How many of these people are in detention (if any) 
2.  If the answer to question 1 is 1 or more, please confirm if any of these 

people have been recorded as having self harmed or being at risk of self 
harm 

3.  f the answer to question 1 is 1 or more, please confirm if any of these 
people are classed as 'adults at risk' or a vulnerable detainee. 
 
You've previously confirmed that there are 11 persons still in the country that 
were meant to be on the charter flight to Nigeria and Ghana on 28-3-17. 
 
In relation to each of these 11 persons, please confirm: 
 

1.  What is the basis of their claim to remain in the country (eg. asylum, 
human rights, domestic violence, etc.) 
2.  Whether any of these persons have since been granted the right to 
remain 
3.  How many of these persons have been granted the right to remain 
 
 

 



 
 
 
4. Assuming the answer to (2) is yes and the answer to (3) is more than 0, 
please confirm on what basis those persons have been granted the right 
to remain. 

 
Please confirm whether any of the 11 persons who remain in the country but 
were due to be deported on 28.03.17 on the cancelled charter flight from 
Stansted Airport to Nigeria or Ghana, have dependent children in the UK.  
 
Please confirm the job title of the person(s) that have been present at court 
during the legal proceedings in the case of R v Brewer, concerning persons 
who stopped a deportation flight at Stansted airport on 28.3.17 who are charged 
with an endangering offence.  
 

  Where different people have attended, please confirm all their job titles 
and the dates on which they attended court.  
 
  Please also confirm the purpose for which they attended.” 
 
We are now in a position to provide a reply to your request and our responses can be 
found in the enclosed annexes. 
 
If you are dissatisfied with this response you may request an independent internal 
review of our handling of your request by submitting a complaint within two months to 
xxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xxx.xx, quoting reference 50585.  If you ask for an 
internal review, it would be helpful if you could say why you are dissatisfied with the 
response.  
 
As part of any internal review the Department's handling of your information request 
would be reassessed by staff who were not involved in providing you with this 
response. If you were to remain dissatisfied after an internal review, you would have a 
right of complaint to the Information Commissioner as established by section 50 of the 
FOIA.  
 
Yours sincerely 
 
Immigration Enforcement Secretariat 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 



 
 
 

Annex A 
 
You've previously confirmed that there are 11 persons still in the country that 
were meant to be on the charter flight to Nigeria and Ghana on 28-3-17. 
 
In relation to each of these 11 persons, please confirm: 
 
1.  How many of these people are in detention (if any). 
 
A.  None of the eleven people referred to are in detention at the time of 
writing (12 December 2018). *  
 
2.  If the answer to question 1 is 1 or more, please confirm if any of these 
people have been recorded as having self-harmed or being at risk of 
self-harm. 

 
A.  Not applicable.  
 
3.  If the answer to question 1 is 1 or more, please confirm if any of these 
people are classed as 'adults at risk' or a vulnerable detainee. 
 
A.  Not applicable.  
 
*The  information  provided  for  this  response  has  been  taken  from  a  live  operational 
database.  As such,  numbers  may change as information on that  system is updated. 
The data has not been assured to the standard of Official Statistics. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 
Annex B 
 
You've previously confirmed that there are 11 persons still in the country that 
were meant to be on the charter flight to Nigeria and Ghana on 28-3-17. 
 
In relation to each of these 11 persons, please confirm: 
 

1.  What is the basis of their claim to remain in the country (eg. asylum, 
human rights, domestic violence, etc.) 
 
A. 
 
Asylum 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
10 
Leave to remain  
 
 
 
 
 

Naturalisation 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Further representations 
 
 
 
 

Human Rights   
 
 
 
 
 

Application as dependant of a person from the EEA 

Leave to enter   
 
 
 
 
 

 
As of 12 December 2018, some of the eleven people had multiple grounds 
in  their  applications,  which  included  applications  or  representations  under 
consideration;  or  appeals/litigation  pending.  Therefore,  the  number  of 
grounds will add up to more than 11 bases of claims. 
 
2.  Whether any of these persons have since been granted the right to 
remain. 
 
A.  Yes. 
 
3.  How many of these persons have been granted the right to remain. 
 
A.  As  of  12  December  2018,  decisions  have  been  made  to  grant  limited 
Leave to Remain to two of the eleven people.  
 
In  addition,  one  other  person  has  been  issued  with  a  residence  card 
recognising their right to remain in the UK by virtue of their relationship 
with an EEA national currently in the UK exercising their treaty rights.  
 
4. Assuming the answer to (2) is yes and the answer to (3) is more than 0, 
please confirm on what basis those persons have been granted the right 
to remain. 

 
A. Decisions were made to grant limited Leave to Remain in the two cases 
on human rights or compassionate grounds. 
 
One  person  has  been  issued  with  a  residence  card  recognising  their 
right  to  remain  in  the  UK  by  virtue  of  their  relationship  with  an  EEA 
national currently in the UK exercising their treaty rights.  
 



 
 
 
Annex C 
 
Please confirm whether any of the 11 persons who remain in the country but 
were due to be deported on 28.03.17 on the cancelled charter flight from 
Stansted Airport to Nigeria or Ghana, have dependent children in the UK.  
 
I can confirm that having reviewed the Home Office Case Information Database, three 
of the eleven people have records that indicate that they have dependent children in 
the UK or have claimed to have dependent children in the UK. Any further 
submissions made in respect of these cases, including submissions based on the 
relationship with any dependents, would have been carefully considered and 
responded to (and in two of the cases through the courts in appeals against these 
decisions) in advance of their planned return on this charter flight.   
 
These records were accessed on 12 December 2018.* 
 
*The  information  provided  for  this  response  has  been  taken  from  a  live  operational 
database.  As such,  numbers  may change as information on that  system is updated. 
The data has not been assured to the standard of Official Statistics. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 
Annex D 
 
Please confirm the job title of the person(s) that have been present at court 
during the legal proceedings in the case of R v Brewer, concerning persons 
who stopped a deportation flight at Stansted airport on 28.3.17 who are charged 
with an endangering offence.  
 

  Where different people have attended, please confirm all their job titles 
and the dates on which they attended court.  
 
  Please also confirm the purpose for which they attended. 
 
Some of the exemptions in the FOI Act, referred to as ‘qualified exemptions’, are 
subject to a public interest test (PIT).  This test is used to balance the public interest 
in disclosure against the public interest in maintaining the exemption.  We must carry 
out a PIT where we are considering using any of the qualified exemptions in response 
to a request for information.  
 
The ‘public interest’ is not the same as what interests the public.  In carrying out a PIT 
we consider the greater good or benefit to the community as a whole if the information 
is released or not.  Transparency and the ‘right to know’ must be balanced against the 
need to enable effective government and to serve the best interests of the public. 
 
The FOI Act is ‘applicant blind’.  This means that we cannot, and do not, ask about 
the motives of anyone who asks for information.  In providing a response to one 
person, we are expressing a willingness to provide the same response to anyone, 
including those who might represent a threat to the UK. 
 
Considerations in favour of disclosing the information 
 
There is a general public interest in openness and transparency in government, which 
will serve to increase public trust and promote public confidence in the operation of 
our immigration controls and in the way we carry out our work, in particular the 
detention and removal of immigration offenders. Clearly by disclosing the information 
requested this would support the interest in being open and transparent about the 
way we work.  
 
Considerations in favour maintaining the exemption 
 
Against this there is a very strong public interest in safeguarding national security.  It 
is important that this sensitive information is protected, as disclosure of information 
about operational working practices could damage national security and potentially 
undermine existing border controls and agreements with other countries, reducing 
their willingness to co-operate with the UK. Any disclosure that could prejudice 
national security would be contrary to the public interest. 
 
 
 
 
 



 
 
 
Having considered the arguments above, we conclude that the balance of the public 
interest lies in disclosing the information. 
 
The information you have requested has been summarised in the following table: 
 
Job Title 
Date Attended 
Purpose of attendance 
Head of Unit,                    
16/10/2018 
Observing  
Returns Logistics, 
Immigration Enforcement.