This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Obligations under Education Act 1994 wrt Students' Union'.


 
 
 
Essential Information for Students 
ACADEMIC SESSION 2018/19 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Published 30 August 2018 
 
 
 

 
 
 

Contents: 
1. Terms and Conditions 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2. Academic Appeals 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

3. Acceptable Use Policy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
12 
4. Admissions Policy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
20 
5. Anti-Bullying and Harassment Policy   
 
 
 
 
 
 
33 
6. Assessment of Criminal Convictions   
 
 
 
 
 
 
41 
7. Code of Conduct for Students 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
43 
8. Complaints Procedure 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
52 
9. Complaint Handling/Unacceptable Behaviour  
 
 
 
 
 
56 
10. Data Protection: Student Privacy Statement   
 
 
 
 
 
59 
11. Discipline   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
66 
12. Ethics Regulations   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
75 
13. Examination Regulations 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
97 
14. Extenuating Circumstances   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
103 
15. Fitness to Practise   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
110 
16. Fitness to Study 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
122 
17. General Assessment Regulations and Policy including Grade Descriptors  
 
 
123 
18. Health & Safety 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
159 
19. Intellectual Property 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
188 
20. Learning Resource Centre Regulations 
 
 
 
 
 
 
203 
21. Professional Doctorate Regulations   
 
 
 
 
 
 
209 
22. Registration 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
210 
23. Smoking Policy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
220 
24. Student Attendance Policy   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
222 
25. Student Absence Policy 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
227 
26. Student Debt Recovery Procedure   
 
 
 
 
 
 
232 
27. Submissions Procedures 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
236 
28. Withdrawal & Deferral 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
237 
 

 



1.  TERMS AND CONDITIONS 
I. 
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this document is 
accurate at the time of publication. The University will use all reasonable endeavours to 
provide programmes of study listed in the prospectus and to deliver them in accordance 
with the descriptions of programmes set out. However, as the University is committed to 
ensuring that programmes remain up to date and relevant, it reserves the right to 
discontinue, merge or combine programmes and to make variations to the content or 
method of delivery of programmes, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary 
by the University. This, combined with the need to publish the prospectus well in advance, 
means that changes to the information presented in the prospectus may have occurred. 
Intending applicants are advised to visit the University website 
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/study-here or contact xxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx before applying. The 
content curriculum of a programme may change for a number of reasons, including that:  
  The change is required to ensure that the programme continues to deliver its key 
learning outcomes and the content of the programme is responsive to changes and 
developments in the areas covered by the programme;  
  For programmes leading to professional qualifications, accreditation or registration, 
the changes are required to continue to satisfy pre-requisites of a particular 
professional or regulatory body responsible for awarding such qualification, 
accreditation or registration;  
  The change is not a material change to the content or curriculum;  
  The change operates for the benefit of the students on the programme;  
  The change is required due to circumstances outside the control of the University;  
  It is necessary to ensure that the programme continues to align with the University’s 
aims, strategy and mission.  
Remedies for students impacted by any such change may include, but are not limited to, 
provision of alternative modules or programmes or the option to transfer to another 
programme at the University. It may be desirable or necessary to withdraw certain 
programmes from the University’s portfolio of provision as a result of a number of factors 
including changes in patterns of demand from prospective students, changes in staffing, a 
strategic realignment of the University’s portfolio or a major organisational change. The 
University will use its best endeavours to consult meaningfully with students who would be 
affected by any such change in order to assess any impact on students and mitigate any 
disruption arising from the change and to identify appropriate alternative arrangements. 
Arrangements to support the academic interests of existing students impacted by any 
programme withdrawal will be put in place. In all cases, the University will make every effort 
to advise students at the earliest possible opportunity of any changes to the course content 
or curriculum that may impact upon them.  
 
II. 
In the event of external factors, such as industrial action, the University undertakes to 
minimise any disruption that may subsequently arise, as far as is practicable. 
 
III. 
An offer of a place at the University is made on the understanding that, in accepting the 
offer, the student undertakes to observe and comply with these Terms and Conditions and 

 



to abide by, and to submit to the procedures of, the University’s Regulations, Policies and 
Codes of Conduct, as amended from time to time. The University’s Regulations, Policies and 
Codes of Conduct are set out in full within the University’s website at the following link: 
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/committees-regulations-policies-and-
procedures/regulations-policies-and-procedures/. 
Changes to the University’s Regulations 
may be made from time to time for one or more of the following reasons: to reflect changes 
to the statutory requirements with which the University is required to comply; to reflect 
best practice regulation across the higher education sector and more broadly; to ensure that 
the University’s Regulations remain fit for purpose as a result of changes or developments 
within the University and across the higher education sector. Where the University’s 
Regulations are changed and the operation of a new regulation would place a student in a 
less favourable position than they would otherwise have been under the old regulations, 
that student may rely on the old regulation as if it continued to apply. Whether a student 
would be in a less favourable position is a matter to be determined by the University on a 
case by case basis, depending on the facts and circumstances of a particular student. This 
would not apply to a situation where the new regulations seek to address a previously 
unregulated matter. All policies and procedures are subject to regular review and formal 
approval by the appropriate committee. The University Court has agreed that the University, 
recognising the need to protect the health of students, staff and visitors to the University, 
should aspire over time to become a non-smoking campus. The University is currently 
reviewing its Smoking Policy with a view to achieving this aspiration. Students’ attention 
shall be drawn to any amendments to policy in this area.  
 
IV. 
Applicants will have 14 days from receipt of their offer to challenge their Fee status. Only 
exceptionally will changes to Fee status be considered after the 14 day period. Applicants 
who accept an offer by distance communication (for example, via UCAS or online, without 
face to face contact) have a legal right to cancel the contract at any time within 14 days of 
the date of acceptance of the offer.  Where an applicant wishes to cancel the contract within 
14 days of acceptance, he or she must do so by informing the University in writing.  Where 
an applicant cancels within the 14 day period after acceptance, any advance payment made 
by that applicant shall be refunded in full.  Notwithstanding the aforementioned rights to 
cancel within the initial 14 day period from acceptance, applicants may withdraw from study 
at the University, and cancel the contract at any time after registration, by following the 
University’s withdrawal procedure.  Where the contract is cancelled in this way, applicants 
may lose all or part of the tuition fees paid by them or on their behalf, in accordance with 
University Procedures.  The University may cancel the contract at any time in accordance 
with the University’s Regulations, Policies and Codes of Conduct  
 
V. 
Tuition fees are payable for all programmes and are subject to review annually. Tuition fees 
for new and existing students are liable to increase each year as a result of review. For 
continuing students, any increase in the level of fee each year will be subject to a maximum 
percentage equivalent to the higher of the annual increase in the UK Retail Prices Index and 
5%. Factors that will determine the need for, and extent of, any increase include any 
increase set or prescribed by regulatory bodies such as the Scottish Funding Council, Scottish 
Government, Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS) and the UK Government, and/or 
increases in the costs of delivering and administering the programme. Tuition fees for the 
forthcoming academic session are published on the QMU website well in advance of the 
start of that academic year. Details on tuition fees and other charges can be found on our 

 





website at https://www.qmu.ac.uk/current-students/current-students-general-
information/fees-and-charges/. 
All students who are continuing with their studies should 
review their fee rates prior to starting their next academic session. No student will be 
deemed to be fully matriculated until his or her tuition fees have been paid in full, or 
satisfactory evidence is produced that such fees will be paid by a sponsoring authority. No 
student will be permitted to attend a graduation ceremony, or to proceed to the next year 
of their programme until tuition fees for all preceding years have been paid in full. Failure to 
settle tuition fees by the due date may lead to a student being excluded from attendance at 
classes. Ensuring tuition fees are paid is the responsibility of the student and, in the event of 
a student’s sponsoring authority refusing or failing to make payment in full or in part, the 
student will be held personally liable for payment. Students will also be liable for any travel 
and accommodation costs incurred whilst on placement. Such costs may be paid by a 
sponsoring authority but should a sponsoring authority refuse or fail to do so, the student 
will be personally liable for such costs.  
 
VI. 
For some programmes, an additional fee may be payable in respect of registration with a 
professional body. Additional charges will be made in respect of graduation and, where 
applicable, reassessment. Full details of registration fees and other charges are set out at 
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/current-students/current-students-general-information/fees-and-
charges/ 
and students are also personally liable for such fees.  
 
VII. 
Tuition Fees become due on the first day of study and should be paid within 21 days of the 
due date, or an arrangement made with the Finance Office for payment to be made by 
instalments. Where a student has opted to pay by instalments, a direct debit mandate must 
be completed prior to, or at the time of, matriculation. For returning students a new Direct 
Debit form is required for each year of study. If students experience payment difficulties 
resulting in tuition fees remaining unpaid for 21 days after falling due, interest on the full 
amount at 2.5% above the UK clearing bank base rate may be charged. Where payment is 
being made by instalments, interest will run on an instalment from the due date to the date 
when the instalment is paid. Where a student encounters difficulty in paying tuition fees, 
they are required to contact the Credit Controller at the University Finance Office for 
assistance in drawing up a payment schedule. Any payment schedule drawn up by the Credit 
Controller must be adhered to by the student until the fees in question are paid in full. 
Where no payment schedule has been arranged with the Credit Controller and tuition fees 
remain outstanding 8 weeks after the end of the 21 day period, or where an instalment is 
over 4 weeks late, a student may be asked to leave the University and the debt shall be 
transferred to a debt collector. If outstanding fees are then paid prior to the end of the 
academic year, the University may permit a student to be reinstated. However, where the 
University agrees to such a reinstatement, a student may be required to repeat parts of any 
programme which have been missed, resulting in additional fees being incurred. Students 
who leave the University more than 28 days after the start of a programme of study will be 
liable for the appropriate proportion of the fee, based on semesters attended in whole or in 
part. 
 
VIII. 
The University may withdraw or amend its offer or terminate a student’s registration at the 
University, if it finds that a false or materially misleading statement has been made in, or 
significant information has been omitted from, a student’s application form. 
 

 






IX. 
Admission to some degree programmes offered by the University, and to some of the 
professions for which it provides training, may be precluded by certain medical conditions. 
Students are obliged to include information regarding any medical condition, past or 
present, which may affect their participation on a programme when completing their UCAS 
or Queen Margaret University application form. If an individual has any doubt as to the 
effect that a medical or health-related condition may have on his/her application, he/she 
must contact the programme Admissions Tutor who will be able to advise accordingly. The 
University does not warrant or guarantee that a student admitted to a particular programme 
will necessarily be allowed to complete the programme if the student subsequently suffers 
from or contracts any material medical or health condition. All applicants are asked to 
disclose criminal convictions to help safeguard the welfare of our students. Applicants for 
certain programmes of study must declare all criminal convictions, and in these cases the 
Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 does not apply. As a condition of entry, candidates for 
these programmes will be required to provide a satisfactory Enhanced Disclosure from the 
Criminal Records Bureau, Disclosure Scotland, or an appropriate equivalent. If an applicant 
has any doubt as to the effect a criminal conviction may have on his/her application, he/she 
must contact the programme Admissions Tutor who will be able to advise accordingly. 
 
X. 
To safeguard the welfare of staff, students, visitors and the general public, the University 
scrutinises all criminal convictions declared by applicants. Continuing students must declare 
at the point of matriculation any criminal conviction acquired in the previous 12 months. The 
existence of a criminal conviction itself does not preclude entry to the University, but 
admission to, or progression within particular programmes may be precluded by certain 
types of convictions. Any student who is found to have falsified his/her self declaration at 
the point of application or at matriculation will be subject to disciplinary action. 
 
XI. 
Whilst programmes are designed to prepare students for employment, the University does 
not warrant or guarantee that students will obtain employment as a result of successfully 
completing any programme. 
 
XII. 
The University does not accept responsibility, and expressly excludes all liability, to the full 
extent permitted by law, for any loss, damage or injury incurred by a student or to his/her 
property, whether in connection with his/her studies or not, except in circumstances where 
the student has suffered personal injury or death caused by the negligence of the University 
or its employees. In particular, the University shall not be liable for any loss of, or damage to, 
any computer or electronic data or information owned or used by a student. 
 
XIII. 
Personal information on students will be held and processed according to the General Data 
Protection Regulations and the Data Protection Act (2018). This information will be used by 
the University to fulfil its part of the contract between it and the student. As part of the 
contract, the University is also required to release certain information on the student 
population to government agencies. Full details of the way in which the University uses 
students’ information are provided in the Student Privacy Statement which is issued as part 
of the matriculation process.
 
XIV. 
Every matriculated student is automatically a member of the Students’ Union. However 
under the 1994 Education Act, students have the right to opt out of being a member should 
they wish. 
 

 

2. ACADEMIC APPEALS REGULATIONS 
 
These regulations take effect from October 2014 and supersede all previous regulations. 
These regulations should be read in conjunction with the University’s Extenuating Circumstances 
Policy. 
Under these regulations, a University officer may act through his or her properly appointed nominee. 

Right to Academic Appeal 
An 'appeal' is a request for a review of a decision of a Board of Examiners that has been 
charged with decisions on student progression, assessment and awards. The appeal may be 
in respect of any decision that affects the student’s grade or progress.   

Nature of the appeal 
Those hearing the appeal will not attempt to re-examine the student, nor to appraise the 
professional judgement of the examiners, but will consider whether or not the decision of 
the Board of Examiners was fair, and whether or not all relevant factors were taken into 
account.  

Time limit 
The appeal must be submitted in writing to the University Secretary within 21 days of the 
publication of the decision of the Board of Examiners, or receipt of the academic transcript.  
An extension to this time limit will be permitted only in exceptional circumstances e.g. when, 
for reasons outside his or her control, a student did not receive timely notification of his/her 
result. 

Grounds for an appeal  
 
4.1
 
  The grounds for appeal are as follows: 
4.1.1 
additional information is available that was not, and could not, reasonably have been made 
available to the Board at the time it made its original decision and which had it been 
available could have led the Board to making a different decision (see also 4.3 below); 
4.1.2 
there was a material irregularity in the procedures of the Board of Examiners or in the 
conduct of the assessment. 
4.2 
A student may NOT appeal on grounds which: 
 
could have been considered by the Board of Examiners had notice been given prior to 
the meeting; and 
 
the student has no valid reason for having failed to give such notice. 
 
4.3 

References in 4.1 and 4.2 to information available to the Board of Examiners include 
recommendations on student cases made by the Extenuating Circumstances Panel (EC Panel). 
Appeals on the grounds of extenuating circumstances will not be accepted where there is 

 

evidence that the circumstances that form the basis of the submission could have been 
submitted to the EC Panel by the published deadline, and the student has no grounds for not 
submitting by that deadline. 
4.4 
A student’s disagreement with the academic judgement of a Board of Examiners does not 
provide a valid ground for appeal. 
4.5 
Any student considering an appeal is encouraged to contact the Students’ Union for advice 
and assistance. 
5      Stage 1 – Academic Appeal 
 
5.1 

A student wishing to appeal against a decision of the Board of Examiners should submit the 
appeal in writing to the University Secretary within the time limit stated in paragraph 3 of 
these procedures 
5.2 
The student’s written statement should provide the following information in support of 
his/her appeal: 
  name and matriculation number 
  up-to-date contact address for correspondence, including email address 
  title and year of programme  
  examination or result being appealed 
  the grounds for appeal 
  supporting evidence 
  the remedy being sought 
 
5.3
 
The University Secretary will acknowledge receipt of the Academic Appeal within 3 working 
days of receipt of the appeal, and pass the appeal to the relevant Dean of School who shall 
attempt to resolve the case. The Dean of School will normally respond to the student by first 
class post within 21 days of receipt of the appeal, either giving a decision or specifying a date 
for the decision. This timescale may be extended where the Dean of School is absent from 
the University through leave or illness.   
5.4 
The Dean will produce a report that documents fully the issues raised by the appellant, the 
facts established by the investigation, and the manner in which the facts were used to 
inform the judgement. The Dean of School will provide a copy of the response to the 
University Secretary. In coming to a judgment, the Dean may: 
  confirm the decision of the Board of Examiners, on the grounds that the evidence 
presented did not support the case; 
  provide the appellant with an additional first or second diet of examination, as the case 
may be, provided that, in upholding the appeal and granting an additional diet, the 
terms of the University’s Assessment Regulations are taking into consideration; or 
  should it not be possible to provide an additional diet for the appealed result, to 
provide a suitable alternative as the Dean thinks fit and is reasonable in all the 
circumstances. 

 

5.5 
If a reconsideration of the student’s case gives rise to a change in the student’s progression 
this must be ratified, depending on how material the changes are, by: 
  the Convener of the Board of Examiners; 
  the Convener of the Board of Examiners and the External Examiner/s 
  all the members of the Board of Examiners by correspondence 
  a meeting of a subset of the Board 
  a meeting of the full Board of Examiners. 
 
5.6 
The University Secretary, in consultation with the Dean of School, will determine the most 
suitable of those identified above to deal with the matter, and the procedure to be followed 
thereafter.  

Stage 2 - Academic Appeals Committee 
 
6.1 
If the appellant is dissatisfied with the decision at Stage 1, he/she may resubmit the appeal in 
the original or in a revised form to the University Secretary within 21 days of receipt of the 
response from the Dean of School.   
6.2 
The University Secretary will pass the appeal to the Deputy Principal, who, having considered 
the substance of the appeal and the previous attempts at resolution, will decide whether or 
not a prima facie case is established. If such a case is established, then the appeal will be 
referred to an Academic Appeals hearing.   
 
6.3 
Normally, an academic appeals hearing will be convened only where the Deputy Principal 
judges that: 
 
  there has been demonstrably an irregularity in the proceedings at Stage 1; 
  evidence has become available that it was not reasonable for the appellant to provide at 
Stage 1. 
 
6.4
 
If a prima facie case is judged not to have been established, the appeal shall fail and the 
student shall be duly informed in writing. 
6.5 
Exceptionally, where the Deputy Principal judges that the evidence provided at Stage 2 
provides unequivocal evidence to support the academic appeal under the grounds set out in 
regulation 6.3, the Deputy Principal may uphold the appeal. 
6.6 
In determining under regulation 6.5 above, the Deputy Principal shall enjoy delegated powers 
to review a decision reached by a Board of Examiners equivalent to those provided to the 
Academic Appeals Committee under paragraph: 7.9 below. 
7  
Proceedings of the Academic Appeals Committee 
 
7.1
 
In the event that an academic appeals hearing is judged appropriate, an Academic Appeals 
Panel will be convened. The Panel will be chaired by a Dean or Head of Division from outside 
the student's School.  A Panel will consist of two other members of academic staff drawn from 

 

an academic or support area unrelated to the appeal, and a representative from the Students’ 
Union Executive Committee. Care will be taken to ensure an appropriate gender balance in 
the composition of the Panel. The University Secretary will act as technical adviser to the 
Panel and will nominate a clerk to the committee.   
 
7.2 
The Academic Appeals Panel shall conduct its proceedings according to the principles of 
natural justice in that it will it will seek to act fairly, no person may be a judge in his or her own 
case and all parties shall have access to all the evidence used by the Committee in reaching its 
decision. 
 
7.3  The Appeals Panel shall meet, normally within one calendar month (excluding University 
vacations) of the referral from Part I, and communicate its conclusions to the student and the 
subject area/department concerned within one calendar month of its being convened.  The 
University Secretary will keep all parties informed of progress and will advise of any necessary 
extension of the timescale, for example, if an adjournment in the proceedings is necessary. 
 
7.4 

The appellant shall have the right to appear before the Committee and to be accompanied by 
one other person of his or her choice. Representation external to the University will not be 
permitted in the context of this procedure.  
7.5 
The Academic Appeals Panel may interview staff and/or students relevant to the appeal. If the 
appeal is on the ground of the actions of an individual, that individual has the right to be 
informed of the substance of the appeal, and to attend the appeal hearing and be 
accompanied by a friend or supporter. 
7.6 
Any person called to give evidence to the Appeal hearing will be given at least 72 hours’ notice 
of the time and place of the hearing. Copies of written submissions will also be made available 
to all parties prior to the hearing. 
7.7 
In the event that the appellant is unable to attend the Academic Appeals Committee due to 
illness or other good cause, the meeting will be rescheduled.  
7.8 
The University Secretary will act as technical adviser to the Panel and will nominate a clerk to 
the committee.   
 
7.9
 
The Committee may, acting under powers delegated to it by the Senate, review a decision 
reached by a Board of Examiners and determine: 
  to confirm the decision of the Board of Examiners, on the grounds that the evidence 
presented did not support the case; 
  to require the Board of Examiners to reconsider the results of the assessment of the 
students on an entire programme or part of a programme; the reconsidered results 
will be referred to the Convener of the Committee to decide the appropriate course of 
action; 
  to annul the relevant decision of the Board of Examiners and refer the case for 
decision back to the Board of Examiners (the subsequent decision of the Board of 

 

Examiners will be referred to the Convener of the Committee to decide the 
appropriate course of action); 
  to annul the relevant decision of the Board of Examiners and assign a revised result to 
the student concerned; 
  to make decisions on the student’s progress or award outside the University’s general 
assessment regulations. 
 
7.10
  The Panel will produce a report that documents fully the issues raised by the appellant, the 
facts established by the investigation, and the manner in which the facts were used to inform 
the judgement of the committee.  
7.11  The Panel shall report all these cases to the Senate for information. 
7.12  Consequent to the decision arising from the particular case, the Committee may ask the 
Senate or other senior committee to reconsider the wording of University’s academic 
regulations, and the Programme Committee to review its programme regulations and/or 
management. 
7.13  The University has the right to levy a fee for appeals. If the process involves the re-marking of 
a number of examination papers, it may charge per paper re-marked. The fee will be 
reimbursed if the appeal is upheld. 
7.14  The decision of the Academic Appeals Committee shall be final within the University. 

INDEPENDENT REVIEW 
 
8.1
 
The University’s internal procedures having been exhausted, a student may seek review of 
his/her complaint by an independent person, the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman [SPSO].  
8.2  The Ombudsman is independent and her staff will advise whether or not the complaint is one 
that they can investigate. Normally the student will have to tell the Ombudsman about his/her 
complaint within 12 months of first knowing about the problem about which they are 
complaining, although the Ombudsman may look at complaints outside this limit if she thinks 
there is good reason to do so.  
8.3  There are some restrictions on what the Ombudsman can investigate. For example, she cannot 
consider the subject matter of complaints about personnel matters or matters of academic 
judgement. However, she may be able to investigate the manner in which the complaint was 
handled. If the complaint is appropriate to his office and is investigated, the Ombudsman’s 
staff will send details of how this will be done. 
8.4  The complaint should be submitted in writing to the Ombudsman, and should include any 
relevant documents including correspondence with the University and the University’s 
response to the complaint. This can be sent to the Ombudsman without cost at the freepost 
address given below. A student may discuss the complaint with an Investigator at the SPSO 
before deciding to submit.  
10 
 

8.5  The Scottish Public Services Ombudsman has an online complaint form accessible through the 
website, although papers in support of the complaint would still have to be supplied to the 
Ombudsman by post or other means. The Scottish Public Services Ombudsman can also supply 
paper complaint forms direct to complainants. 
8.6  Further information may be accessed through the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman 
website, or by calling her office for advice. Contact details are: 
Scottish Public Services Ombudsman 
4 Melville Street, Edinburgh, EH3 7NS 
 
Freepost address 
Scottish Public Services Ombudsman 
Freepost EH641, Edinburgh, EH3 0BR 
 
Phone 0800 377 7330 
Fax 0800 377 7331 
website www.scottishombudsman.org.uk 
e-mail enquiries to xxx@xxxx.xxx.xx 
Text: 0790 049 4372 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11 
 

3. 
ACCEPTABLE USE POLICY 
Introduction 
Queen  Margaret  University  provides  its  users  with  access  to  state-of-the-art  Information  and 
Communication Technology (ICT) equipment and a wide range of electronic resources. All users need 
to be aware of what constitutes the Acceptable Use of these resources to enable them to be used in 
a safe and secure manner. This document outlines the policies relating to both ICT and e-resources 
and facilities.  
For  all  our  users;  staff,  students,  visitors  and  any  others,  using  our  technology  infrastructure 
constitutes an undertaking to abide by this acceptable use policy and the legal requirements implicit 
and explicitly contained within. 
For the purposes of this document, designations include staff and students at collaborative partners. 
You are reminded that accessing QMU ICT systems and resources via the Remote Desktop service you 
are bound by the laws and regulations in the UK as well as any applicable laws in the country from 
which you are connecting. 
Acceptable Use Policy 
 
1.  
Purpose  
 
The purpose of an Acceptable Use Policy is to ensure the proper use of all the University’s ICT 
facilities and resources. 
 
Access to the University’s ICT facilities and resources requires users to accept certain 
responsibilities and obligations. All users must be aware of and comply with the JANET 
Acceptable Use Policy, 
which covers all UK HE academic and research network activity. 
 
Use of IT and associated resources should always be legal and ethical and reflect academic 
integrity and the standards of the University community. 
2.  
Authorisation 
In order to use the ICT facilities in the University you must first be authorised. For students, this will 
require your matriculation number and password, which are distributed at matriculation. Staff will 
receive  a  confidential  mailing  containing  notification  of  their  username  and  password.  Your 
matriculation number/username and password is for the exclusive use of the individual to whom they 
are  allocated.  You  are  responsible  and  accountable  for  all  activities  carried  out  under  your 
matriculation number/username and password.  
3.  
Privacy 
It  should  be  noted  that  systems  staff,  who  have  appropriate  privileges,  have  the  ability,  which  is 
occasionally required, to access all files, including electronic mail files, stored on a computer which 
they  manage.  It  is  also  occasionally  necessary  to  intercept  network  traffic.  In  such  circumstances, 
appropriately privileged staff will take all reasonable steps to ensure the privacy of service users. The 
University fully reserves the right to monitor e-mail, telephone and any other electronically-mediated 
12 
 

communications,  whether  stored  or  in  transit,  in  line  with  its  rights  under  the  Regulation  of 
Investigatory Powers Act 2000. Rea
sons for such monitoring may include the need to: 
  ensure operational effectiveness of services 
  prevent a breach of the law, this policy, or other University policy 
  investigate a suspected breach of the law, this policy, or other University policy 
  monitor standards 
Access to staff files, including electronic mail files, will not normally be given to another member of 
staff, unless authorised by the appropriate line manager, Head of IT Services, or nominee, who will 
use  their  discretion,  in  consultation  with  a  senior  officer  of  the  University,  if  appropriate.  In  such 
circumstances, the Head of Division, or more senior line manager, will be informed and will normally 
be consulted prior to action being taken. Such access will normally only be granted in the following 
circumstances: 
  where a breach of the law or a serious breach of this or another University policy is 
suspected 
  when a documented and lawful request from a law enforcement agency such as the police 
or security services has been received 
  on request from the relevant Head of Division, where the managers or co-workers of the 
individual require access to e-mail messages or files, which are records of a University 
activity and the individual is unable, e.g. through absence, to provide them 
The University sees student privacy as desirable but not as an absolute right, hence students should 
not expect to hold or pass information, which they would not wish to be seen by members of staff 
responsible  for  their  academic  work.  In  addition  to  when  a  breach  of  the  law  or  of  this  policy  is 
suspected, or when a documented and lawful request from a law enforcement agency such as the 
police or security services has been received, systems staff are also authorised to release the contents 
of a student's files, including electronic mail files, when required to by any member of staff who has a 
direct academic work-based reason for requiring such access. 
After a student or member of staff leaves the University, files which are left behind on any computer 
system  owned  by  the  University,  including  servers  and  including  electronic  mail  files,  will  be 
considered  to  be  the  property  of  the  University.  When  leaving  the  University,  staff  should  make 
arrangements to transfer to colleagues any e-mail or other computer-based information held under 
their account, as this will be closed on their departure. 
4.  
Acceptable Use of ICT 
University  ICT  and  electronic  resources  are  provided  to  facilitate  your  work  as  a  member  of  the 
University community, specifically for educational, training, research or administrative purposes. Any 
other uses are a privilege and not a right and must never take priority over the needs of those who 
require the facilities for directed academic work.  
The  University  does  not  block  or  filter  keywords  or  search  terms,  nor  does  it  prevent  you  from 
accessing specific sites. That does not mean however, that you can access or download pornographic 
or other offensive or objectionable material. 
You should bear the following in mind:  
13 
 

  You must not share your QMU username and password with anyone else. This will result in 
your account being disabled immediately. For students, if your account has been disabled 
then you must appeal for its reinstatement. This must be done in the first instance to your 
Dean of School. There is no automatic reinstatement. Staff should contact Assist helpdesk 
  You must never use University ICT systems to alarm or inconvenience others 
  You must not display anything on your screen which is likely to cause offence or upset other 
users. However, it is recognised that sometimes it is necessary to display material which is 
medical in nature, in relation to some programmes/modules 
  You must respect other people’s electronic privacy. In particular, you may not use your QMU 
accounts to distribute spam and other chain emails 
  For your own security, you should be careful who you share your QMU email and other 
contact details with 
  You must never pass off other people’s work as your own. The University produces a guide 
to referencing, “Write and Cite” which is available online 
  You should not use data which is confidential or not already in the public domain in your 
work without first consulting the author; there may be copyright or data protection 
implications 
  You must not maliciously damage or interfere with any item of hardware 
 
Anyone  found  abusing  QMU  ICT  systems  will  usually  be  cautioned  in  the  first  instance.  Continued 
abuse will lead to your account being disabled. This means that you will be unable to access any of the 
networking  and  communications  services.  In cases  of  serious  abuse,  your  account  will  be  disabled 
immediately. Serious abuse includes the sharing of your username and password. 
5. Forms of Unacceptable Activities 
Unacceptable activities can take a variety of forms. Some examples of behaviour which is 
unacceptable are listed below:  
  Transmitting or downloading obscene or offensive material 
  Transmitting or downloading threatening material, or material intended to harass or frighten 
  Transmitting or downloading defamatory material 
  Infringing copyright (see below) 
  Hacking, attempted hacking or other deliberately disruptive activities such as introducing 
viruses to computer equipment 
  Sending a bulk email to everyone in the University 
  Interfering with hardware or software configurations 
  Installing or attempting to install unauthorised software to QMU ICT equipment 
  Adding software to University computer equipment 
  The use of QMU ICT services and equipment to distribute unsolicited advertising (spam), to 
run a business or similar activities 
  Downloading or distributing pirated software or data; 
  Viewing or hosting of any illegal streaming content. 
  Any other activities that disrupt QMU ICT services 
6. 
Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015 
All users are advised that the University has a statutory obligation under the Counter-Terrorism and 
Security Act (2015) to have ‘due regard to the need to prevent people being drawn into terrorism’.  
14 
 

The Terrorism Act (2000) makes it an offence for an individual to collect or make a record of 
information of a kind likely to be useful to a person committing or preparing an act of terrorism; or 
to possess a document or record containing information of that kind (e.g. a terrorist training 
manual). The Terrorism Act (2006) makes it an offence to disseminate terrorist publications in order 
to encourage others to engage in terrorism. 
The Terrorism Act (2000) defines terrorism in section 1 of the Act as set out in the following: 
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/11/section/1. 
7.  
Use of copyright software or datasets 
By accessing QMU ICT systems, you also agree to the following with regard to copyright: 
That  usage  of  any  Software,  Computer  Readable  Dataset  or  Courseware  or  other  similar  material, 
hereafter referred to as "the Product", issued or otherwise made available is subject to the following 
conditions: 
  You will ensure that all the requirements of the agreements, contracts and licences under 
which the Product is held by the Institution will be maintained. (Copies of the relevant 
agreements, contracts and licences may be seen by application to the School or Department 
which made the Product available) 
  You will adhere to the regulations governing the use of any service involved in the provision 
of access to the product whether these services are controlled by this institution or by some 
other organisation 
  You will not remove or alter the Copyright Statement on any copies of the Product used by 
yourself 
  You will ensure the Security and Confidentiality of any copy released to yourself and will not 
make any further copies from it or knowingly permit others to do so, unless permitted to do 
so under the relevant licence 
  You will use the Product only for purposes defined and only on computer systems covered 
by the agreement, contract or licence 
  You will only incorporate the Product, or part thereof, in any work, program or article 
produced by yourself, where this is permitted by the licence or by "Fair Dealing" 
  You will only incorporate some part or version of the Product in any work produced by 
yourself with the express permission of the Licensor or unless this is permitted under the 
Agreement 
  You will not reverse engineer or decompile the software products or attempt to do so, 
unless this is explicitly permitted within the terms of the Agreement for the use of the 
Product 
You will return or destroy all copies of the Product at the end of the programme/year/period of 
employment or when requested to do so. 
8.  
Legal constraints  
  You must adhere at all times to appropriate statutory law such as the Computer Misuse Act 
1990, Defamation Act 1996 and the General Data Protection Regulations and not commit 
the common law crimes of theft, reset or fraud. 
  You should be aware that the Terrorism Act (2000) 
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/11/section/1 makes it an offence for an 
15 
 

individual to collect or make a record of information of a kind likely to be useful to a person 
committing or preparing an act of terrorism; or to possess a document or record containing 
information of that kind (e.g. a terrorist training manual). 
  You must undertake to comply with the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988 and the 
provisions of the University’s licence with the Copyright Licensing Agency and with any 
other applicable legislation, statutory instrument or regulation 
  You should always consider the provisions of the General Data Protection Regulations 
when storing data on a computer. Please review the University’s Data Protection Policy 
2018. 
  You should be aware of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 when making use 
of ICT systems 
  You must respect the intellectual property rights, copyright and moral rights of authors 
  You must undertake to abide by all licence agreements for software entered into by the 
University with other parties (see below) 
  You may only use software and/or information provided by the University for educational 
purposes as a member of the University 
9.   Code of Conduct when using our facilities 
All users at QMU shall: 
  Accept individual and collective responsibility for maintaining a healthy working, studying 
and living environment within the University, respecting the institution’s policies on equal 
opportunities and anti-harassment and ensuring that their conduct complies with these 
policies 
 
  Accept individual and collective responsibility for keeping a clean and safe working and 
studying environment, ensuring personal guests act in an appropriate manner. Anything 
which you believe constitutes a health and safety hazard must be reported immediately to 
Reception 
 
  Have a mutual respect for others especially with regard to differing cultures 
 
  Have an individual and collective responsibility to contribute to a study environment that 
promotes scholarship and learning. All persons should be considerate of the needs of 
others for an appropriate study environment and share a common goal in learning 
 
  Have an individual and collective responsibility to ensure that the safety of themselves and 
others is not compromised 
 
  Ensure that their use of the computer systems and networks is always legal and ethical and 
reflects academic integrity and the standards of the University community 
 
  Have an individual and collective responsibility to ensure respect for other people and 
property is maintained. 
 
  Know that the use of mobile phones in lectures, seminars and computing laboratories is 
strictly prohibited. Mobile phones should be switched into silent mode before entering the 
secure area of the Learning Resource Centre.  
 
16 
 

  Know that the University will not tolerate antisocial behaviour: this includes the use of 
abusive language, physical abuse, obscene comments, verbal or physical harassment and 
comments or remarks that discriminate on the basis of sex, race or any other irrelevant 
distinction 
10.   Penalties for unacceptable use 
Infringements of this Policy will be dealt with within the University’s normal disciplinary procedures 
– see the Student Regulations website for more information. 
11. 
Using computers whilst on placement 
Most placement organisations allow QMU users access to their ICT facilities. Make sure you know and 
respect their requirements on how you use their computers. 
KNOW THE RULES 
External organisations may have very different attitudes in the use of ICT. It is important, therefore, 
when  you  go  out  on  a  placement  that  you  make  it  a  priority  to  familiarise  yourself  with  the  local 
regulations. Before you go out on your placement, your academic supervisor will try to ensure that 
you  get  a  copy  of  the  organisation’s  specific  ICT  usage  regulations.  When  you  get  onsite,  it  is 
worthwhile  going  over  these  regulations  with  your  placement  supervisor.  This  will  help  you  get  a 
better understanding of what is permitted and what is not. You may also find it helpful to make contact 
with the local ICT support department or helpdesk. The staff there will be able to give you more help 
and advice. 
Remember – all organisations have different regulations about what you can and cannot do with their 
ICT facilities. You must respect these when you are out on placement. It is your individual responsibility 
to familiarise yourself with the local regulations and to ensure that you do not abuse the ICT facilities 
offered to you when you are on placement. Any computer facilities offered to you whilst on placement 
will be provided for University work only, i.e. for use in learning, teaching and pursuit of studies. You 
must not abuse these facilities for any other purpose, e.g. to play computer games, for excessive social 
use of email, or for recreational internet use. 
KEEPING SAFE 
If you are a Health Sciences student, your research will require internet searches based on anatomical 
words  and  phrases.  This  may  generate  unwanted  links  to  pornographic  or  other  objectionable 
websites. To be safe, read the site summary carefully before clicking on a link. If you are not sure, do 
not click through! Where possible, you should use specific health science related search engines. 
WHAT YOU SHOULD DO IF SOMETHING UNEXPECTED HAPPENS 
Even if you are careful, you may accidentally access internet sites you did not mean to. This might 
happen because you clicked on a misleading link, you clicked on a link by accident, or because a site 
has been ‘hijacked’. You may also find that you get bombarded by unsolicited and explicit ‘popup’ 
advertising. If any of these things happens whilst you are out on placement: 
  Take a note of the URL (web address) of the site and the time you accessed it 
  Tell someone immediately. If possible, show them what happened. 
17 
 

  If you are working in a public area, you may want to ‘lock’ the PC before fetching help. (You 
can do this by pressing the CTRL-ALT-DEL keys at the same time, then clicking on Lock 
Computer. If you cannot lock the PC, then make sure you have the details of the site you 
accessed, then log off.) 
  Tell your placement supervisor as soon as possible 
  Tell local ICT staff (any alerts regarding inappropriate internet use will go to them first) 
Tell your QMU supervisor to advise them of what has happened 
There may be an investigation into your online activities, but if the accident was legitimate and these 
steps are followed, it will be resolved quickly. 
12.   Recording of lectures 
QMU recognises that from time to time students may wish to record lectures, seminars and tutorials 
for their own personal use to support their learning. As a matter of courtesy students should inform 
the lecturer prior to the commencement of the recording. If the student has not informed the lecturer, 
the lecturer may ask for the recording to be stopped. 
However, students are reminded that: 
  Distributing a recorded lecture/seminar/tutorial is an unacceptable activity. Students should 
always check with lecturers before distributing a recording; this includes distributing on the 
internet 
  Editing a recorded lecture/seminar/tutorial is also an unacceptable activity. Students should 
always check with lecturers before changing a recording 
 
13.  
Publishing to the Web 
The University provides the opportunity to publish web pages within the qmu.ac.uk domain to:  
  support research activity  
  enhance teaching  
  provide means of disseminating information about the University to its members, to 
potential staff and students and to the general public.  
  allow individual users to provide non-academic information as part of the general process of 
learning through our use of Google sites and wikis  
Guidelines  
All information provided using our web facilities will be seen as having, in some way, the support of 
the University and will affect how people view the University. Therefore, no provider should publish 
any information in a way which could adversely affect the good name or reputation of the University, 
nor provide material which is inappropriate for dissemination by the University. Included in this is any 
material that could lead to legal action, such as alleged libel or a breach of copyright. 
A disclaimer should also be included indicating that the University has no direct responsibility for the 
content and giving individual contact name and email address. 
18 
 

The information provided on this web page does not necessarily represent the views 
of Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh. The responsibility for all material in this 
page rests wholly on a personal basis with the owner of this page. The named owner 
of this page is responsible for liability for loss, liability for hypertext links, liability for 
defamation and for compliance with relevant acts of law. 

The page is also subject to the University Acceptable Use Policy.  
Google sites and wikis 
All of the above Guidelines apply to the Google sites/wikis service, except that contributions will in 
this case always be  at the page  level with automatic attribution made  to the  author,  such that no 
further use of the copyright symbol, linking to any Home Page, or disclaimer is necessary. 
The service is offered to certain members of the University either as part of their learning, research or 
other use considered appropriate by the Head of Information and Learning Services. 
All information published on our web pages is subject to our standard takedown policy whereby any 
report  of  issues  with  content  will  result  in  the  page  being  removed  immediately  and  subject  to 
investigation. 
 
May 2018 
 
 
19 
 

4.  ADMISSIONS POLICY  
 
 
Contents: 

1.  Introduction 
2.  Admissions Principles 
3.  Service delivery 
4.  Terms and Conditions 
5.  Roles and Responsibilities 
6.  Admissions Process 
7.  Entry requirements  
7.1  General  
7.2  Undergraduate  
7.3  Postgraduate Taught 
7.4  Postgraduate Research 
7.5  International 
8.  UKVI requirements  
9.  PVG/Disclosure Checks 
10. Criminal Convictions 
11. Selection and Offer Making 
12. Applicants with Disabilities 
13. Care Leavers 
14. Fraud and Plagiarism 
15. Complaints and Appeals 
16. Data Protection 
17. Admissions Contact Details 
 
1. 
Introduction 
 

1.1 
Queen Margaret University Admissions Policy supports the University Strategic Plan QM150 
to ‘build on our existing success in widening participation, to ensure that we fulfil people’s 
potential, whatever their background’. 
 
1.2 
This  policy  applies  to  the  admission  of  students  to  undergraduate  and  postgraduate 
programmes of study at Queen Margaret University. 
2.  
Admissions Principles 
2.1 
The  University  seeks  to  provide  access  to  its  courses  from  as  wide  a  range  of  entrants  as 
possible,  subject  to  the  essential  principle  that  entrants  have  a  reasonable  expectation  of 
completing their course successfully within the normal duration of the course. 
 
2.2 
This principle is codified through: 
 
  University-wide general minimum entrance requirements specified by level of course. 
  Specific  entrance  requirements  for  each  course  framed  to  apply  the  University’s  general 
entrance requirements to the particular needs of that course. 
  Clear provisions and procedures for the admission of students who do not meet these normal 
entrance requirements, but who fulfil the essential principle set out in point 2.1. 
 
20 
 

2.3 
Queen  Margaret  University  is  committed  to  equality  of  opportunity.  We  seek  to  promote 
diversity  amongst  our  students,  staff  and  applicants.  We  recognise  the  particular 
contributions that are made by individuals from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences, 
to the achievement of our vision and strategic objectives. We aim to promote entry to, and 
provide education at, undergraduate and postgraduate level to a diverse range of students, 
whatever their background. Our equal opportunities policy is available on our website. 
 
2.4 
Each application received by the University is considered carefully on its own merits, taking 
into account educational, professional and personal experience. 
 
In assessing candidates for admittance to the University, we are committed to the following 
principles: 
  Fairness – the University strives to use admissions assessment methods that are reliable 
and valid. 
  Transparency – details of our entry requirements are published in our prospectus and on 
our website, and are clear and transparent to applicants and their advisers. 
  Reflecting our community – we are committed to admitting as wide a range of applicants 
as possible to reflect our community. 
  Encouraging  participation –  we  aim to minimise  barriers  to applicants  and encourage 
progression  and  retention  through  our  targeted  pre-entry,  transition  and  post-entry 
support services. 
 
3.  
Service delivery 
3.1 
The University is committed to continuous improvement in all it does. We take a professional 
approach to admissions. 
 
3.2 
The  University  ensures  a  wide  range  of  pre-entry  and  outreach  activities  are  available  to 
applicants and stakeholders, along with individual advice and guidance.  
 
3.3 
Admissions,  student  recruitment  and  outreach  &  community  engagement  staff  receive 
regular  training,  support  and  guidance  to  ensure  that  they  provide  accurate,  timely  and 
consistent advice and guidance to applicants and other stakeholders. 
 
3.4 
A range of staff, including the Transition and Pre-entry Adviser, College Articulation Officer, 
Student  Funding  Adviser  and  the  Disability  Team  are  available  to  ensure  that  potential 
students  obtain  all  the  relevant  information  required,  so  they  are  appropriately  informed 
during their decision making process to come to the University.  
 
3.5 
Academic admissions tutors work closely with recruitment and admissions staff to ensure that 
entry requirements are fair and transparent. 
 
3.6 
Staff in admissions are trained and supported to ensure that they are able to make fair and 
equitable admissions decisions. 
 
3.7 
We aim to process applications as quickly as possible. However, where there is an application 
deadline, applications may not be processed until after the deadline in order to ensure equal 
consideration.  Where  a  decision  cannot  be  made  quickly,  we  inform  the  applicant  of  the 
reason for any delay. 
 
21 
 

3.8 
Offers of admission are communicated to applicants in clear and easy to understand language. 
 
3.9 
We  recognise  the  importance  of  providing  feedback  to  unsuccessful  applicants.  Where  an 
applicant is unsuccessful, we give a reason for this via UCAS for undergraduate applicants or 
by email for postgraduate applicants. We are always able to give further individual advice and 
feedback to applicants. 
 
3.10 
If the University makes a change to a course, which is deemed to impact significantly on the 
student, or withdraws a course after an application has been received, we will email applicants 
to  explain  the  reason  for  the  change  or  withdrawal  and  offer  advice  and  guidance  about 
alternative courses, either at QMU or elsewhere.  
 
4. 
Terms and conditions 
 
The University’s published terms and conditions apply to all applicants for undergraduate and 
postgraduate study. All applicants  are  referred to the  University’s Terms and Conditions in 
their offer letter, to which all students must agree, when accepting  the offer of a place to 
study at QMU. Terms and Conditions can be found on our website:  
 www.qmu.ac.uk/registry/ImportantInformation.htm  
5. 
Roles and responsibilities 
 

5.1 
The Admissions Policy is approved by the Student Experience Committee and any changes or 
updates  will  be  approved  by  that  committee.  A  full  review  of  the  policy  in  its  entirety  is 
undertaken every 5 years. The Head of Admissions and Recruitment are responsible for the 
operation of the policy and for its regular monitoring and review. The policy will be checked 
annually to ensure accuracy and to reflect any changes. 
5.2 
This  policy  is  underpinned  by  several  other  University  policies  which  are  available  on  our 
website: 
  Contextual Admissions Policy 
  Equal Opportunities Policy 
  Disability Policy 
  Widening Participation and Student Retention Strategy 
  Fitness to Practice Policy 
  Code of Practice on Criminal convictions and disclosure 
  Data protection policy 
  Undergraduate and postgraduate regulations. 
 
5.3 
The University has a centralised admissions service. All applications are dealt with by a team 
of professionally trained officers and administrators. Decisions on applications may be made 
by Admissions Officers or by Academic Admissions Tutors.  
 
5.4 
Admissions Tutors are responsible for setting entry criteria, subject to advice from programme 
teams, validation and review panels and School Academic Boards. 
 
22 
 

5.5 
Entry requirements are set when a new course is approved, or validated, and are reviewed on 
a regular basis. Any changes to entry requirements will be agreed by the School Academic 
Board. 
 
6. 
Admissions process 
 

6.1  
All full time applications for undergraduate courses must be made through UCAS. All part time 
applications  and  applications  for  postgraduate  courses  should  be  made  directly  to  the 
University using our on-line application form, accessible through each course page. 
6.2  
All UCAS applications received by the published UCAS deadline are given equal consideration. 
All postgraduate applications which are received by the application deadline are considered 
equally. Postgraduate applicants are encouraged to submit applications as early as possible. 
Where a programme has a specific deadline, this will be clearly published in the prospectus 
and on the course pages of our website.  
6.3  
A  number  of  courses  require  interviews  or  auditions  as  part  of  the  application  procedure. 
Where an interview or audition forms part of the selection criteria, we stipulate this in our 
prospectus and on our website. Arrangements are made to interview applicants by telephone 
or Skype where travel to the UK is not possible. 
We explain to applicants the nature and purpose of the interview and ensure that interviews 
are conducted fairly by appropriately qualified staff. 
6.4 
A  number  of  courses  require  the  inspection  of  a  portfolio  of  work.  Full  details  of  these 
requirements are published in our prospectus and on our website. 
6.5 
Where  applicants  have  made  more  than  one  application  to  study,  decisions  will  be  made 
separately. 
 
6.6 
Applicants  may  be  offered  an  alternative  programme  of  study  if  they  do  not  meet  the 
minimum entry requirements for their chosen programme. 
 
6.7 
Where  applicants  are  required  to  provide  photocopies  of  their  qualifications  with  their 
application, we will require sight of the original documentation at matriculation.  
  
6.8 
We allow applicants to defer entry to most of our programmes for one year. UCAS applicants 
wishing to defer are required to meet all the conditions for entry in the year that they apply. 
Postgraduate applicants can defer a conditional offer. An applicant can only defer the offer of 
a place once, and after that they will be asked to reapply unless in exceptional circumstances. 
Where  it  is  not  possible  to  defer  an  offer  of  study,  an  applicant  can  reapply  the  following 
academic year. 
 
6.9 
Where  an  applicant  has  compassionate  circumstances,  we  take  this  into  consideration. 
However,  where  these  circumstances  have  affected  the  grade  achieved  in  a  qualification 
required for entry, we would expect that this is dealt with by the examining body. 
 
 
 
23 
 


Entry requirements 
7.1 
General entry requirements 
7.1.1 
All  courses  have  prescribed  entry  requirements  relating  to  previous  academic 
attainment.  The  minimum  entry  requirements  for  each  course  are  published  each 
year in our prospectus and on our website. 
 
7.1.2 
Achieving the minimum entry standards does not guarantee an offer of a place on a 
course as there can be considerable competition for places. 
 
7.1.3 
For our professional courses we look for evidence of motivation, suitability, skills 
and attitudes and exploration of the profession, and for applicants to demonstrate 
this in their personal statement. 
 
7.1.4 
If an applicant does not have the normal entry requirements, but has relevant 
experience and can demonstrate that there is a reasonable expectation that they 
will complete the course, then it may still be possible to consider them.   
 
 We strongly recommend that applicants who have no formal qualifications, or have 
been out of formal education for some time, contact admissions to discuss 
appropriate pathways to study.  
 
7.2  
Undergraduate entry requirements 
7.2.1 
The  University  accepts  a  wide  range  of  qualifications  for  entry.    We  set  our  entry 
standards for Scottish Highers, A Levels and Irish Leaving Certificate using the UCAS 
Tariff  as  a  metric  to  ensure  equity.    We  also  consider  a  range  of  other  equivalent 
qualifications  using  established  bodies  such  as  UCAS  and  UKNARIC  to  compare 
qualifications 
7.2.2 
Our entry criteria and offers are expressed in grades. When making a grade based 
offer, we will make it clear when we expect those grades to be achieved by. Applicants 
are  expected  to  achieve  the  required  number  of  qualifications  at  specific  grades, 
dependent  on  the  degree programme  applied  for.  We  may  use  the  UCAS  Tariff  to 
calculate equivalencies for non-standard entry qualifications.  
 
7.2.3 
Where an applicant has attempted a qualification more then once, we normally count 
the highest grade achieved, but we do not double count the qualification.  
 
7.2.4 
The general minimum entrance requirement for an Undergraduate Degree is one of 
the following: 
• 
At least three SQA Highers at grade C or above. Most degrees also require 
passes in Maths and English at Standard Grade/Int2/ National 5 at grade C or 
above; 
24 
 

• 
At least three full A Levels at grade D or above. Most degrees also require 
passes in Maths and English at CGSE at grade C/ 4, or above; 
• 
The Irish Leaving Certificate with passes in the Higher Level subjects at grade H3 
or above; 
• 
Pass in the International Baccalaureate Diploma 
• 
Pass in the European Baccalaureate; 
• 
A BTEC national Diploma at level 3; 
• 
A relevant Access or Foundation course. 
 
7.2.5   Where we have requested Higher English as an entry requirement, we will also 
accept Higher ESOL as meeting that requirement. 
 
7.2.6 
Where National 5 Mathematics is required for entry to a course, National 5 Lifeskills 
Mathematics and National 5 Applications of Mathematics will be considered to meet 
this criteria, at the required grade.  
   
7.2.7 
The University welcomes the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence. Our entry criteria 
are largely based on qualifications achieved ‘on entry’ rather than over a particular 
number of sittings. The majority of entry requirements are for Scottish Highers taken 
over two or more sittings and we will accept Highers achieved over 2 years.  
 
7.2.8 
The  University acknowledges  that the  Curriculum for Excellence  gives  students the 
opportunity to take a broader range of qualifications, undertaken at different stages 
of learning. Some students may progress from general education to Highers, without 
achieving a National 5 qualification. If you do not hold a subject that is required at 
National 5, you must have achieved or be predicted to achieve that subject at SQA 
Higher.  
7.2.9 
QMU  values  the  Advanced  Higher  qualification  as  an  excellent  preparation  for 
University study, but will only count the highest level of qualification in any subject. 
This means that we wouldn’t count AS levels or SQA Highers if you have the full A 
Level, or an Advanced Higher in the same or similar subject. 
 
7.2.10  We will accept AS level qualifications in addition to the two A Levels.  We do not 
accept A Level General Studies for entry to any of our courses. 
7.2.11  We welcome applications from those studying the Extended Project Qualification 
(EPQ), however we recognize that not all students have access to the qualification, 
so we do not include them within entry requirements, and they do not carry 
additional credit in the selection process. 
7.2.12  The University welcomes applications from those studying Foundation 
Apprenticeships. The Foundation Apprenticeship will count as one subject within an 
applicant’s overall presentation of qualifications. Where specific subjects are 
required for entry to one of our degree programmes, a Foundation Apprenticeship 
will not replace that requirement, but will be counted as one of an applicant’s 
additional subjects. 
25 
 

 
7.2.13  The University welcomes and supports students seeking to apply for advanced entry 
to our undergraduate programmes of study. Applicants must apply through UCAS, by 
the UCAS deadline in order to be considered for a place.  
 
Advanced  entry  may  be  offered  to  applicants  with  evidence  of  accredited  prior 
learning, such as HNC, HND, Advanced Higher or A Level qualifications. Applicants who 
wish  to  be  considered  for  Advanced  Entry  should  state  this  clearly  on  their  UCAS 
application, using the Point of Entry box. 
7.2.14  We  have  established  articulation  agreements  with  local  colleges.  Applicants  must 
apply through UCAS by the UCAS deadline in order to be considered for a place. We 
aim to place applicants with a relevant HNC into the second year of our courses and 
those with an HND into the third year of our courses. 
 
Generally applicants applying for second year entry with an HNC will be required to 
get a B in their graded unit, while applicants applying for third year entry with an HND 
will be required to get C/B in their graded units. 
 
Where  advanced  entry  is  not  possible,  then  a  relevant  HN  qualification  may  be 
considered for entry into the first year of a programme. 
 
7.2.15  We  also  accept  a  wide  range  of  other  qualifications,  including  diplomas  and 
certificates that equate to SCQF level 7 or 8 for advanced entry. However, the content 
and level must match that of our courses sufficiently for us to be satisfied that the 
learning outcomes have been achieved. 
7.2.16  We are also able to consider accreditation of non certified learning (APL) and we have 
a rigorous process in place for assessing APL. See our website for further details.  
7.2.17  Students  presenting  with  Advanced  Highers  or  strong  A  Level  grades  in  relevant 
subjects may be eligible for entry to the second year of some of our courses
7.2.18  Admission to the joint degree BA (Hons) Acting for Stage and Screen is via UCAS to 
Queen Margaret University. The selection process requires an audition. 
7.3  Postgraduate Taught entry requirements 
 
7.3.1   All postgraduate applicants should have already achieved a first degree, normally at 
Honours  level  or  equivalent,  or  a  professional  diploma  which  is  recognised  by  the 
relevant  professional  body  as  the  equivalent  of  an  Honours  degree.    We  may  also 
accept diploma level qualifications and considerable relevant experience.  
 
7.3.2 
Exceptionally, we can accept applicants for postgraduate level study without a first 
degree for some courses if they have considerable relevant professional experience.   
 
26 
 

7.3.3  Postgraduate applicants are usually required to provide one reference in support of 
their application. This will usually be an academic reference, but may be a 
professional reference where the applicant has been out of education for longer 
than 3 years. The reference must be presented in one of the following formats:  
  On headed paper reflecting the referee's professional standing, signed and dated. 
This can be posted, scanned and emailed, or handed into the Admissions team. 
 
OR 
  In the form of an email sent to the Admissions team from an email address reflecting 
the referee's professional standing. Yahoo, Hotmail, Gmail, etc. email addresses are 
not acceptable. 
 
7.3.4  For certain postgraduate programmes students can be admitted as ‘associate 
students’ to allow them to take one or two modules, without registering for an 
award. 
 
 
 
Applicants will be required to complete an application via the relevant course page on 
the University’s website, including a short personal statement.  
 
 
A student can study as an ‘associate student’ for a maximum period of 2 years, or for 
2 modules. 
7.4 
Postgraduate Research entry requirements 
Applicants applying for a PhD by research must provide a proposal. This allows us to check 
how well the applicant understands the research process and to make sure the topic is in an 
area we can supervise. 
The research topic must be within the expertise of our staff. The topic must have academic 
merit and it must be capable of generating new knowledge. Research which is linked to the 
applicant's creative work may be considered.  
Applications to our PhD research degrees should be made via our Division of Governance 
and Quality Enhancement. Full details can be found on our website at: 
www.qmu.ac.uk/post_research/apply.htm 
7.5  
International applicants 
7.5.1 
We welcome applications from international applicants around the world and accept 
a wide range of international qualifications.  We use NARIC and other reliable sources 
to establish equivalences of international qualifications with UK standards of entry, 
and make offers on a like for like basis. We publish equivalencies for popular overseas 
qualifications  on  our  website  and  can  offer  advice  on  alternative  routes  for  entry 
where they do not meet our requirements (such as foundation level courses). 
7.5.2 
We work with a number of agents who act as official representatives of the 
University and can assist with advice on applications and suitable course options. 
27 
 

 
  7.5.3 
The University has a number of partners overseas through whom students can study 
for a QMU degree.  Minimum entry requirements for such arrangements are the 
same as those that apply to the course delivered in Edinburgh. 
      7.5.4  We welcome applications from students who have achieved one of our awards 
overseas and who wish to continue with further studies at QMU Edinburgh. 
7.5.5 
Applicants  who  are  non-native  speakers  of  English  must  demonstrate  English 
language proficiency in all four language competencies. We require a minimum IELTS 
score of 6.0 with no element below 5.5 or equivalent qualification. For many courses, 
the minimum score required is higher than this. Information about minimum scores 
is given in our prospectuses and on the course pages of our website. 
8. 
UKVI requirements 
 

8.1 
QMU is a registered Tier 4 Sponsor. QMU can issue Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies 
(CAS) allowing applicants to apply for immigration as a student. QMU has responsibilities as a 
Sponsor to report on Tier 4 students to the Home Office and UKVI.  
 
8.2 
Staff  at  QMU  can  provide  advice  and  guidance  on  applying  for  a  Tier  4  visa,  however  we 
strongly advise students to check the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) 
website www.ukcisa.org.uk  
 
8.3 
It is the student’s responsibility to abide by immigration laws and to notify the Home Office of 
any changes to circumstances. 
 
8.4 
We require any Tier 4 sponsored students to pay a deposit or to provide proof of full financial 
sponsorship prior to issuing a CAS. Applicants will also be required to demonstrate they hold 
sufficient funds to meet UKVI requirements, prior to issuing a CAS. Please see the International 
student pages on our website for further details.  
 
9. 
PVG/Disclosure checks 
 
Applicants for Health Science and certain other courses that involve interaction with children 
and/or  vulnerable  adults  must  declare  all  criminal  convictions,  and  in  these  cases  the 
Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 does not apply.   
 
Candidates for healthcare courses will be asked to provide a satisfactory criminal record check 
from the Protection of Vulnerable Groups (PVG) scheme, or an appropriate equivalent. Full 
details  about  those  courses  that  require  full  PVG/  Disclosure  checks  are  given  in  our 
prospectus and on our website. 
International and EU students are required to provide comparable information in English from 
their  own  country.  We  will  offer  guidance  regarding  how  an  applicant  can  obtain  this 
information  within  the  offer  letter.  Students  will  also  be  required to  provide  a  satisfactory 
criminal record check from the Protection of Vulnerable Groups (PVG) scheme, once they have 
arrived in the UK, as detailed above. 
28 
 

10. 
Criminal convictions 
 
To safeguard the welfare of our students, we require all applicants to declare any relevant 
unspent criminal convictions as part of the application process. This will either be through the 
UCAS  application  form  for  full-time  undergraduate  students  or  through  the  University 
application form for all other students.  
 
Applications from applicants who have declared a criminal conviction will be assessed in the 
first instance on the basis of standard selection criteria. If it is recommended that an offer be 
made, further investigation of the declared criminal conviction will be carried out. 
 
The Head of Admissions and Recruitment will contact the applicant to ascertain the nature of 
the  conviction,  requesting  further  information,  such  as  the  nature  of  the  conviction,  date, 
nature of sentence etc. The University Secretary, Head of Admissions and Recruitment, and 
the School Manager assess this information using established criteria including, but not limited 
to: 
 
Programme requirements 
 
Potential risk to other students and staff 
 
Responsibilities to employers and to the public 
 
The rights of the individual and entitlement to rehabilitation 
 
11   
Selection and offer making  
11.1      For all programmes the selection process will take into account the following: 
 
  Achieved and predicted academic qualifications 
  Interest in the subject area and motivation for study, demonstrated in the Personal 
Statement 
  Work experience, or other relevant non-academic experience, demonstrated in the 
personal statement 
  Academic and/or professional reference(s) 
  Where required, performance at interview or audition 
  Where required, an applicant’s portfolio 
  Where required, an applicant’s research proposal 
  English language proficiency 
 
11.2 
In  addition  to  the  factors  outlined  above,  we  aim  to  take  into  account  the  context  of  an 
applicant’s  academic  achievement,  giving  consideration  to  a  range  of  factors,  which  may 
impact on attainment. These factors include, but are not limited to: 
  Being eligible for the Lothian Equal Access Programme for Schools (LEAPS) 
  Attendance at a school where few students progress to University 
  Living  in  an  area  of  high deprivation,  as  defined  by  the  Scottish  Index  of Multiple 
Deprivation (SIMD) 
  Being Care experienced 
  Undertaking an alternative study route to higher education 
 
 
29 
 

Please see our Contextual Admissions Policy for further information.  
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/committees-regulations-policies-and-
procedures/regulations-policies-and-procedures/ 

11.3 
Each  application  is  considered,  and  a  decision  made,  on  an  individual  basis.  Admissions 
decisions  will  be  communicated  to  applicants  in  a  timely  manner.  Where  an  application 
requires an interview, portfolio submission or audition, the decision making process will take 
longer.  
11.4 
Postgraduate  applicants  should  receive  a  decision  on  their  application,  or  notice  of  an 
interview, within four weeks of submitting a completed application. 
11.5    Any  conditions  attached  to  an  offer  will  be  clear  and  specific.  The  offer  letter  will  contain 
details of any action the applicant needs to take in order to accept the offer. The offer letter 
will also give details on fee classification and fee levels for the programme. 
11.6 
The  University  also  provides  information  about  scholarships  and  bursaries  available  to 
applicants. Full details of eligibility and deadlines are available on the University website. 
 
11.7 
Applicants who accept their offer of admission will be sent further welcome information prior 
to the start of semester, to ensure they are ready to start their studies. Entrants should check 
the Induction website for details of matriculation. These may be tailored to different types of 
students such as direct entrants, international students etc. We offer a short pre-induction 
course, ‘QM Advance’, for mature undergraduate students, to help ensure smooth transition 
into our courses.  
 
11.8 
Direct  entry  students  benefit  from  the  ‘QM  Assist’  programme  which  includes  a  range  of 
activities in local colleges and a designated induction programme for direct entrants at the 
start of the academic year. 
11.9  
The University also supports a student mentoring scheme, ‘QM Connect’ which offers new 
students the opportunity to be matched with a trained mentor. 
12. 
Applicants with Disabilities 
 
The University welcomes a diverse learning community and aims to support all students to 
participate  fully  in  their  studies  and  in  University  life.  Applicants  are  strongly  advised  to 
declare  any  disability  on  their  application.  This  information  does  not  form  part  of  the 
admission selection process, but is used to identify support needs early on. 
 
We encourage applicants who disclose a disability to contact our Disability team to have an 
early discussion about their support needs. This discussion will not form part of the admissions 
decision process, but would focus on preparation for any support needed by the applicant. 
 
All applicants who have declared a disability and/or additional support needs and have 
accepted an offer of admission, will be contacted by a Disability Adviser to discuss their 
individual requirements and the support that may be available to them should they choose 
to study at QMU. 
 
30 
 

The University will make every effort to ensure that required support arrangements are put 
in place, however this is dependent on the student applying in sufficient time and identifying 
their disability clearly at the time of application.  
 
13. 
Care Leavers 
 
The University recognises that care leavers who have spent time in local authority care, either 
in residential accommodation, foster care or under supervision orders at home, may require 
additional advice and support during both the pre-entry and post-entry transitional period.  
We offer all care leavers additional support from our Student Funding Advisor, who will guide 
them to the support available across the University xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
 
  The University is committed to increasing the number of applications and entrants from 
applicants who have spent time in care. We therefore strongly encourage care leavers to 
declare this as part of their application. Please see the University’s Contextual Admissions 
Policy for further information. 
 
 
14. 
Fraud and Plagiarism 
 

14.1   All  applicants  are  responsible  for  ensuring  that  the  information  they  submit  within  their 
application is accurate and current.  
14.2 
Where it is discovered that an applicant has submitted incorrect or inaccurate information, 
the  University  will  investigate  the  fraud  or  plagiarism,  and  reserves  the  right  to  reject  an 
application, or withdraw an offer of admission.  
14.3 
Qualifications  submitted  in  support  of  an  application,  are  subject  to  verification  at 
matriculation. 
15  
Complaints and appeals 
 
15.1 
Appeals 
 
 STAGE 1 - If an applicant is not satisfied with the feedback on their application and wishes to 
appeal the decision, they can do so by contacting the admissions office by email in the first 
instance.  An administrative review of the decision will be conducted and if an error has 
been made then the decision will be corrected straight away. 
 
 
STAGE 2 – If there has been no administrative error and the appeal is concerning the 
judgment of the decision, then the decision will be reconsidered by the academic admissions 
tutor and the Head of Admissions and Recruitment.   
 
 
A decision will be communicated within 14 days of receipt of the appeal. 
 
 
 
 
31 
 

15.2 
Complaints 
 
Complaints about any aspect of our admissions policy or service should firstly be raised with 
the member of staff responsible.  If the complaint cannot be resolved, then applicants may 
submit a formal complaint either by using our complaints form or by emailing 
xxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx. All complaints will be answered within 10 working days. The 
University’s Complaints Procedure can be found within the Quality pages of the website. 
 
16 
Data Protection 
 
 The University needs to keep certain personal data about students to fulfil its purpose and to 
meet  its  legal  obligations  to  funding  bodies  and  government.  In  processing  and  holding 
personal data, supplied as part of the Admissions process, the University will comply fully with 
the Data Protection Act 2018.  
 
 
Please see our website for further information: www.qmu.ac.uk/foi/dp.htm  
 
17 
Admissions Contact Details 
 
 
The Admissions team can be contacted at: 
Admissions 
Queen Margaret University 
Queen Margaret University Drive 
Edinburgh  
EH21 6UU  
 
Tel: +44 (0)131 474 0000 
 
Email: xxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Reviewed November 2017 
Sarah Bailey, Head of Admissions and Recruitment 
 
 
 
32 
 

5. ANTI-BULLYING & HARASSMENT POLICY AND PROCEDURE FOR STUDENTS 
 
1. 
Principles 
Queen Margaret University is wholly committed to fostering an environment in which all 
students, regardless of their background and personal circumstances should be treated with 
dignity, respect and fairness.   
The University recognises that bullying and harassment can have a serious detrimental effect 
on the confidence, morale, performance and health of those affected, and may in extreme 
circumstances ultimately lead to students withdrawing from studies.  The University believes 
that this situation should never be permitted to materialise and will treat all reports of 
bullying and harassment seriously.    
The purpose of this policy is to promote a culture where bullying and harassment are 
acknowledged to be unacceptable and are not tolerated under any circumstances.  Where 
allegations of such behaviour occur, this policy seeks to ensure that they are dealt with fairly, 
and in a timely fashion, without fear of victimisation. 
2. 
Aims and Objectives 
 
The aim of this policy and procedure is to: 
 
Create and sustain a learning environment which is free from discrimination, bullying, 
harassment or victimisation; 
 
Tackle swiftly and effectively incidents of bullying, harassment or victimisation of, or by, 
students; 
 
Ensure that individuals are supported and encouraged in the event of any legitimate 
complaint; 
 
Establish that all members of the University - staff and students - are responsible for 
ensuring that individuals do not suffer any form of bullying or harassment; 
 
Safeguard the respect for students’ diverse talents, skills and experience;  
 
Promote the message that harassment, bullying or victimisation will not be tolerated in 
any form. 
3. 
Scope of this Policy 
This policy applies to all students at Queen Margaret University, irrespective of whether an 
alleged incident takes place on University premises or elsewhere.  All types of bullying and 
harassment, as described in this policy, are covered, whether or not the interactions have 
occurred between students and other students, or whether the allegations relate to students’ 
treatment by University staff.  This policy covers face-to-face actions, as well as non-face-to-
face interactions, for example email, written correspondence, social networking sites and text 
messages.     
 
33 
 

The University shall, where possible and appropriate, seek to ensure that partners have an 
equivalent policy in place. 
4. 
Data Protection 
All information gathered on individuals as part of the Anti-Bullying and Harassment Policy and 
Procedure will be processed in accordance with the Data Protection Act 2018.  
5. 
Monitor and Review 
Monitoring of the Bullying and Harassment policy will be undertaken by the University’s 
Governance and Quality Enhancement Team and Student Services. 
6. 
Harassment Defined 
The definition of harassment in the Equality Act 2010 is wide. It is ‘where a person (A) engages 
in unwanted conduct related to a relevant protected characteristic and the conduct has the 
purpose or effect of: 
(a)  
violating another person's (B's) dignity, or 
(b)   creating an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for B’ 
It should be noted that 'unwanted' does not mean that express objection has to be made, and 
a serious one-off incident can amount to harassment. 
It is important to note that differences of personality traits or culture and the 
misinterpretation of social signals can mean that what is perceived as harassment by one 
person may not seem so to another. The defining feature, however, is that the behaviour is 
offensive or intimidating to the recipient, and as such would be regarded as harassment by 
any reasonable person. It would need to be considered that, if the purpose of the conduct was 
to violate the individual’s dignity or create an intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or 
offensive environment, then this is sufficient to establish harassment. However if harassment 
was not the purpose, but an individual argues that this was the effect of the conduct, the 
Equality Act says that in deciding whether conduct has that effect, consideration must be 
given to: 
 
the perception of the claimant; 
 
the other circumstances of the case; and 
 
whether it is reasonable for the conduct to have had that effect. 
Forms of harassment involve offensive conduct or behaviour directed at a person’s racial 
origin, religion and beliefs (including non-belief), gender, disabilities, sexual orientation, age, 
family status (including their role as a carer or as a part-time worker, fixed term worker), 
marital status, political opinion, socio-economic status, or because he/she is a member of a 
trade union or similar associations or some other personal characteristic. It can also include 
the inappropriate use, or threat of use, of physical and mental power, authority or through 
social media. 
34 
 

With regard to religion and belief, it should be noted that there may be cultural differences 
which make some forms of behaviour generally regarded as acceptable by one group and 
unacceptable to another because such behaviour does not form part of the normal social 
interaction of that particular group. 
Examples of potential harassment could be: 
• 
Unwanted physical contact or physical attack. 
• 
Offensive, suggestive or derogatory remarks, gestures, mockery, taunts, pranks, jokes, 
insults or ridicule; in person, on the telephone, by emails or social networking sites. 
• 
Verbal abuse, threats or intrusive questioning. 
• 
Insulting remarks based on the grounds of personal appearance or personal 
circumstances. 
• 
Using an individual’s known disability to demoralise them. 
• 
Leering at another individual’s body. 
• 
Compromising invitations or gifts. 
• 
Requests or demands for sexual favours. 
• 
Circulation or displays of offensive, suggestive or degrading materials (such as pictures, 
graffiti or objects) in the teaching, learning, living or working environment. 
• 
Sending of unwanted messages via e-mail and social networking sites. 
• 
Ridicule for cultural differences such as appearance, dress, diet, religion or ethnic 
background. 
• 
Subjecting an individual to group pressure. 
• 
Derogatory or belittling remarks in front of others regarding appearance, work or 
personal attributes. 
• 
Deliberately or repeatedly ignoring someone. 
• 
Unwarranted exclusions. 
• 
Any comments which imply that gender, age, sexual orientation, disability, race or 
ethnic or national origins, religious or other belief impairs the individual’s ability to 
perform satisfactorily. 
• 
Any other unwelcome physical, verbal or non-verbal conduct. 
• 
Incitement to commit any such act. 
7. 
Discrimination  
Harassment may or may not be linked to discrimination and can be based on characteristics 
which are protected under the Equality Act 2010:  
  Age 
  Disability;  
  Gender reassignment; 
  Marriage or civil partnership; 
  Pregnancy and maternity; 
  Race; 
  Religion and belief; 
  Sex; 
35 
 

  Sexual orientation. 
Discrimination can be direct, associative, perceptive or indirect.  The table below defines these 
terms.  It is important to remember that the legislation focuses on the outcome of the 
discriminatory behaviour over the motive or intent.   
 
Concept 
Definition 
 
Direct Discrimination 
This occurs when an individual is treated less 
 
favourably than others are, or would be, treated in 
similar circumstances. 
 
Associative Discrimination 
This occurs when an individual is treated less 
favourably than another because they are 
associated with a person who has a protected 
equality characteristic. This is a form of direct 
discrimination. The key point to note is that the 
person bringing the claim does not need to have the 
protected characteristic (i.e. the protected 
characteristic can belong to another person). It is 
sufficient that the treatment is because of a 
protected characteristic. A student may also be able 
to bring a claim for harassment in those situations. 
 
Perceptive Discrimination 
This occurs when the protected characteristic is a 
 
perceived characteristic which the individual does 
not actually have. An individual may also be able to 
bring a claim for harassment in those situations. 
 
Indirect Discrimination 
This occurs when a condition is applied equally to all 
 
students but one group is particularly 
disadvantaged, and this disadvantage cannot be 
justified as being necessary for the efficient running 
of the University. 
 
 
8. 
Bullying Defined 
Bullying is a particular form of personal harassment and may be characterised as offensive, 
intimidating, malicious or insulting behaviour, as abuse or misuse of power, position or 
knowledge through means intended to undermine, humiliate, denigrate or injure the 
recipient.  It may be by an individual against an individual or involve groups of people.  It may 
be obvious or it may be insidious (such as ignoring a person). 
36 
 

Bullying can result from a misuse of individual power derived from perceived superior 
status/position, physical strength or force of personality.  It can also arise from the collective 
power that arises out of strength of numbers. 
Bullying is normally characterised by the emergence of a pattern of behaviour however if one 
act is deemed serious enough, this could amount to bullying. 
Examples of potential bullying could be: 
  Threats; 
  Abuse; 
  Public humiliation; 
  Ridicule 
  Repeated shouting or swearing at an individual; 
  Undermining an individual; and 
  Intimidating behaviour. 
9. 
Victimisation Defined 
Victimisation is when an individual is treated less favourably than they would otherwise have 
been because: 
  They have made a claim or complaint; 
  They have helped someone else to make a claim by giving evidence or information; 
or 
  It is known or suspected that they are contemplating bringing a complaint. 
Under the Equality Act 2010, these are known as ‘protected acts’.  If a member of the 
University treats a student less favourably because he or she has carried out a protected act, 
this could be regarded as unlawful victimisation.  There must be a link between the student’s 
protected act and the resulting treatment of that student. 
10. 
Criminal Offences 
Where  behaviour  has  been  alleged  that  would  amount  to  a  serious  criminal  offence,  e.g. 
physical or sexual assault, this should be immediately reported to the police. 
In  such  cases,  any  resulting  criminal  proceedings  would  normally  be  expected to  have  been 
completed before the University will take action under this policy (although suspension via the 
Student Disciplinary Regulations may be considered appropriate, if necessary). 
11. 
Malicious Complaints 
The presumption will always be that complaints are made in good faith and that the 
complainant genuinely believes that they have grounds for raising a grievance.  All cases will 
be investigated on this basis.  An unfounded complaint will not be considered as malicious 
unless a deliberate attempt to mislead or of dishonesty is shown.  However, should an 
investigation reveal a complaint to be malicious, this will be treated seriously and may lead to 
disciplinary action against the complainant. 
37 
 

 12.  The Procedure 
All complaints should be raised as soon as possible through one of the following procedures, 
ideally within 12 months.  Where it can be demonstrated that circumstances have prevented 
the individual concerned from raising the complaint within this time frame, the University will 
consider whether to allow an extension to this time scale.  
12.1  The Informal Procedure 
Every effort should be made for parties to aim to resolve issues informally in the first instance.  
If a student feels that he or she is being bullied or harassed by another student or by a 
member of University staff, he or she is encouraged first of all to seek to try to resolve the 
matter informally.  As a first step, the student should try to make it clear to the person causing 
the offence that such behaviour is unacceptable, is unwelcome and should be stopped.  This 
will sometimes be sufficient to put an end to the behaviour in question, as in some cases the 
person against whom the complaint is directed might be unaware that his or her behaviour 
had inadvertently caused offence.  Where this is the case, it is likely that the inappropriate 
behaviour ceases quickly. 
If students require any help or advice, they may consider approaching, for example, one of the 
following people: 
  Their Personal Academic Tutor 
  The Programme Leader  
  A member of Student Services  
  A trusted friend 
  A supportive lecturer or any other member of academic staff 
  The Students’ Union 
12.2  The Formal Procedure 
It is accepted that there may be instances where the nature of the complaint is too serious to 
be dealt with informally and it is necessary to undertake a formal investigation of the 
complaint from the outset.  It may be that a student feels unable to approach the alleged bully 
or harasser informally from the outset, or that, due to the nature of the alleged conduct, this 
is not appropriate.  Formal proceedings may also be appropriate where a previous attempt at 
an informal resolution has been unsuccessful. 
The student involved should set out the complaint, in writing, to the University Secretary.  
Complaints can be raised individually or as part of a group acting together. The student may 
be required to attend a meeting to give their side of events.   
An Investigating Officer will be appointed by the University Secretary to conduct an 
investigation into the alleged bullying or harassment.  
Where the complaint is by a student regarding alleged behaviour by another student, the 
investigation will be carried forward under the Student Disciplinary Procedure.  Where the 
complaint is by a student regarding alleged behaviour by a staff member, the investigation will 
38 
 

be carried forward under the Staff Disciplinary Procedure, and will be overseen by a member 
of the Human Resources Team.   
The purpose of the investigation, via either route, is for the University to establish a fair and 
balanced view of the facts relating to the complaint. The extent of investigation required will 
depend on the nature of the allegations and will vary from case to case. The Investigating 
Officer will conduct a full and thorough investigation as speedily as possible and document the 
results. 
It is important that any student alleging bullying or harassment co-operates fully and promptly 
in any investigation. This will include providing details of the names of any relevant witnesses, 
disclosing any relevant documents to the investigating officer and attending investigative 
interviews if required. 
The investigation may involve interviewing and taking statements from the student(s) and any 
staff member(s) involved and any witnesses, and/or reviewing relevant documents.  
The investigation will seek to:- 
  establish the nature and circumstances of the alleged offence or problem; 
  allow the complainant to provide details of his or her version of events to the 
investigating officer; and 
  take into account any personal or mitigating factors that may come to light during 
the investigation. 
Where the investigation is in relation to an allegation of bullying by a member of staff carried 
forward under the Staff Discipline Procedure, the decision on whether or not a complaint is 
upheld will be made by Human Resources. 
After completing the investigation under the appropriate procedure, the investigating officer 
will provide the University Secretary with a report and recommendations arising from the 
investigation. On the basis of the report, the University Secretary will advise the complainant 
in writing whether the complaint is upheld or not upheld.   
13. 
Independent external review (SPSO) 
Once the investigation stage has been completed, and the complainant remains dissatisfied 
with the manner in which the complaint was addressed by the University, the complainant is 
entitled to appeal to the Scottish Public Ombudsman Service (SPSO).  The SPSO considers 
complaints from those who remain dissatisfied at the conclusion of the University’s 
procedure, for example on grounds of an administrative failure by the University.  The SPSO 
will not investigate complaints on the grounds that the student is dissatisfied with the 
outcome of the University’s investigation in itself – the SPSO can only look at complaints 
where the complainant is alleging a fault or maladministration in the process followed by the 
University. 
The SPSO also cannot normally look at complaints where: 
 
Students have not gone all the way through the University’s procedures; 
39 
 

 
It  is  more  than  12  months  after  the  student  became  aware  of  the  alleged  offensive 
behaviour being complained about; or 
 
The matter is being considered in court. 
Contact details for the SPSO are as follows: 
 
 
 
SPSO 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Freepost SPSO 
4 Melville Street    
 
 
 
 
Freephone: 0800 377 7330 
Edinburgh EH3 7NS 
 
 
 
 
 
www.spso.org.uk/contact-us 
 
 
 
40 
 

6. ASSESSMENT OF CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS 
 
If you have a criminal conviction, you should have declared this on your application form. If a 
declaration has been made, the nature of the conviction will have been investigated and a decision 
made on whether or not you may be admitted to the programme.  
 
We would like to emphasise that a criminal record does not automatically prevent you from joining a 
programme. However, failure to disclose a criminal conviction is a disciplinary offence. Failure to 
declare on your application form and/or providing misleading information will result in your being 
asked to withdraw from your programme. 
 
Disclosure Scotland  
 
Students of certain programmes at QMU are required to complete a clinical placement. Duties on 
these placements may involve caring for children and vulnerable adults.  
 
In line with NHS policy and Scottish Government regulations, students will not be allowed to 
undertake clinical placement until the appropriate criminal record checks have been made. 
 
Below is a list of the specific programmes this covers at QMU:  
 
  BSc (Hons) Podiatry 
  BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy 
  BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography 
  BSc (Hons) Therapeutic Radiography 
  BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy 
  BSc (Hons) Speech and Language Therapy 
  BSc (Hons) Dietetics 
  BSc (Hons) Nursing 
  MSc/PgDip (pre-reg) Dietetics 
  MSc/PgDip (pre-reg) Occupational Therapy 
  MSc/PgDip (pre-reg) Physiotherapy 
  MSc/PgDip (pre-reg) Speech and Language Therapy 
  MSc/PgDip (pre-reg) Audiology 
  MSc/PgDip (pre-reg) Diagnostic Radiography 
  PgDip Radiotherapy & Oncology 
  MSc Art Psychotherapy (International) 
  MSc Music Therapy 
  MSc Person Centred Practice (professional pathways only) 
 
BA (Hons) Drama and Performance/ Theatre and Film Studies students may also require a PVG 
Scheme Record for working with Children, depending on their specialism/dissertation 
projects.  These are normally applied for during their second year of study (for specialisms) or third 
year for Honours projects. BSc (Hons) Physical Activity, Health & Wellbeing students may also 
41 
 

require a PVG Scheme Record for working with Children, depending on their placement experience, 
and this will be advised by the Programme Leader when required.  
As you may have been advised in your offer from Admissions, you need to provide “a satisfactory 
PVG check from Disclosure Scotland and/or equivalent police check.” If you have not applied for this 
yet, please do so as a matter of urgency.  
New UK students should have already received a PVG application pack from the Admissions office. 
However, if you do require a new pack, please contact the Admissions Office.  
 
For International or European applicants, this is in addition to a comparable check from the police in 
your home country. While we appreciate that the process is likely to be difficult depending on 
nationality, students are nevertheless asked to investigate the availability of alternative forms of 
evidence of their personal record.  
 
 
 
42 
 

7. CODE OF CONDUCT 
 
1. 
INTRODUCTION 
 
Queen Margaret University has introduced this Code of Conduct to help every student enjoy 
and benefit from their education and life with us. 
Our ethos is one of mutual understanding and respect, through the development of 
friendships and by adopting good citizenship skills and attitudes. Through this we wish to 
enhance each person’s experience throughout their time with us. 
This Code of Conduct has been developed to provide clear guidelines of acceptable 
behaviour. This general set of Principles is supported by more detailed Codes of Conduct 
specifically relating to Halls of Residence, Library, Learning Environments and IT facilities. 
It is expected that all students will wish to support and actively implement this Code of 
Conduct.  
 
This Code of Conduct should be read in conjunction with the following:  
The University’s current Student and Academic Regulations, Disciplinary, Fitness to Practise 
and Appeals Procedures outlined on the University’s Quality website: 
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/committees-regulations-policies-and-
procedures/regulations-policies-and-procedures/ 

The University’s Equality Policy, which is to be read in conjunction with the University’s 
Mainstreaming Report: https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/equality-and-
diversity/ 

The Code of Conduct is compatible with the University’s Data Protection Policy.  
The Code of Conduct is available in different formats. Details can be obtained from the 
Division of Governance and Quality Enhancement by emailing Dawn Martin: 
xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
STUDENTS’ UNION ENDORSEMENT 
The Students’ Union has worked closely with the University in providing this Code of 
Conduct for all students. The Students’ Union fully supports this Code of Conduct because 
we believe this will help create a better learning and working environment whilst also 
ensuring a safe and enjoyable place to live. The Students’ Union will also use this Code of 
Conduct for all activities undertaken by the Union and will use it in conjunction with our own 
Disciplinary Procedures should an incident take place within the Union or whilst 
representing the Students’ Union if the Union deems it necessary. 
 
 
43 
 

2. 
GENERAL PRINCIPLES 
 
2.1 
All students at the University shall: 
2.1.1  Accept individual and collective responsibility for maintaining a healthy working, studying 
and living environment within the University, respecting the institution’s policies on equal 
opportunities and harassment and ensuring that their conduct complies with these 
policies.  

All persons within the University have an individual and collective responsibility to 
contribute to an environment which is free from harassment (e.g. psychological, verbal, 
physical, racial, religious, gender, sexual or on grounds of disability) and from offensive 
behaviour (e.g. noise, language or bullying). All persons should promote tolerance and share 
a common goal in learning. 
 
2.1.2  Accept individual and collective responsibility for keeping a clean and safe working, 

studying and living environment, ensuring personal guests act in an appropriate manner. 
All persons within the University have an individual and collective responsibility to ensure 
that safety is not compromised and that respect for other people and property is 
maintained. 
 
2.1.3  Have a mutual respect for others especially with regard to differing cultures. 

All persons within the University should demonstrate respect for local and international 
cultures as well as each person’s learning needs. This refers to maintaining appropriate 
conduct in learning environments such as the library, lecture/seminar rooms and IT facilities 
as well as in Halls of Residence. 
 
2.1.4  Ensure that the University is not brought into disrepute. 
 
All persons within the University have an individual and collective responsibility to uphold 
the range of policies within the institution which underpin the overarching criteria of the 
Code of Conduct and which are designed to ensure that everyone can work, study and live in 
an environment characterised by mutual respect. 
 
3. 
LIBRARY CODE OF CONDUCT 
 
3.1 
This Library Code of Conduct has been developed to support the general University Code of 
Conduct.  
 
3.2 

General Principles 
3.3 
All students at QMU shall: 
44 
 

3.3.1  Accept individual and collective responsibility for maintaining a healthy working and 
studying environment within the University Library, promoting appropriate conduct and 
respecting the right of others to a quiet study environment. 

 
All persons within QMU have an individual and collective responsibility to contribute to a 
study environment in the Library which promotes scholarship and learning, and where these 
study areas are respected. All persons should be considerate of the needs of others for an 
appropriate study environment and share a common goal in learning. 
  Silence in areas designated as Silent Study Areas must be observed. 
 
3.3.2  Accept individual and collective responsibility for keeping a clean and safe working and 
studying environment. 
All persons using the QMU Library have an individual and collective responsibility to ensure 
that safety is not compromised, that food and drink packaging is disposed of correctly and 
that respect for other people and property is maintained. In particular that no library 
materials are damaged or defaced and that none are removed from the Library unless they 
have been properly issued. 
  All Library users should carry their matriculation card (smart card) with them at all 
times and be prepared to show it if asked. 
  All Library materials removed from the Library, by an individual, should be issued to 
their own card. 
  Any vandalised property should be reported immediately. 
 
3.3.3  Have a mutual respect for others especially with regard to differing cultures. 
 
All persons within QMU should demonstrate respect for the range of local and international 
cultures as well as each person's learning needs. This means maintaining appropriate 
conduct in learning environments such as the Library so that the needs of all users can be 
met. 
3.3.4  Ensure that the University is not brought into disrepute. 
 

All persons within QMU have an individual and collective responsibility to comply with the 
law, e.g. Copyright and Data ProtectionThis is to ensure that everyone can work and study 
in an environment characterised by mutual respect and free from the harassment and 
distress which the transmission of offensive or threatening material may cause. 
3.4 
Specific Codes 
The Library Code of Conduct is underpinned by the Library Regulations and the Acceptable 
use policy for information and communication technology and electronic resources. The 
Library Code of Conduct should be read in conjunction with the following:  
45 
 

The University’s current Student and Academic Regulations, Disciplinary and Appeals 
Procedures outlined on the University’s Quality website: https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-
university/quality/committees-regulations-policies-and-procedures/regulations-policies-
and-procedures/ 
 
The University’s Single Equality Scheme, which is to be read in conjunction with the 
Mainstreaming Report: https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/equality-and-
diversity/ 

4. 
ACCOMMODATION CODE OF CONDUCT 
 
4.1 
This Accommodation Code of Conduct has been developed to support the general University 
Code of Conduct.  
 
4.2 

General Principles 
4.3 
All students at QMU shall: 
4.3.1  Accept individual and collective responsibility for maintaining a healthy working, studying 
and living environment within the University, respecting the institution’s policies on equal 
opportunities and harassment and ensuring that their conduct complies with these 
policies. 

In particular all students should: 
  maintain rooms and communal areas in a clean, tidy and hygienic condition. 
  co-operate in fire evacuation practices.  
  show consideration for others by minimising noise levels, in particular between 11 p.m. 
and 8 a.m. 
 

4.3.2  Have a mutual respect for others especially with regard to differing cultures. 
All persons within QMU Halls of Residence should demonstrate respect for the range of local 
and international cultures within the University. You must not harass, threaten, bully or 
victimise other residents, staff or visitors. This will include displaying sexually explicit or 
politically offensive notices. 
 
  You are expected to show courtesy and consideration to those with whom you are 
sharing facilities, to your neighbours and to University staff and visitors. 
 
4.3.3  Ensure that the University is not brought into disrepute. 
  All persons within QMU Halls of Residence have an individual and collective 
responsibility to ensure that all students can live and study in an environment 
characterised by mutual respect. 
 
  You are asked to consider the impact that unacceptable behaviour may have on local 
residents and to behave as an ambassador of Queen Margaret University. 
 
 
46 
 

4.4 
Specific Codes 
 
The Accommodation Code of Conduct is underpinned by the Halls of Residence Code of 
Conduct, which is applicable for all students in halls of residence and all persons entering 
halls as visitors.   
 
5. 
CODE OF CONDUCT FOR LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS 
e.g. LECTURES, SEMINARS, TUTORIALS, LABORATORIES AND PLACEMENTS 

5.1 
This Code of Conduct for Learning Environments e.g. Lectures, Seminars, Tutorials, 
Laboratories and Placements has been developed to support the general University Code of 
Conduct.  
 
5.2 
General Principles 
 
5.3 
All students at QMU shall: 
 
5.3.1  Accept individual and collective responsibility for maintaining a healthy working, studying 
and living environment within the University, respecting the institution’s policies on equal 
opportunities and harassment and ensuring that their conduct complies with these 
policies.  

 
All persons within QMU have an individual and collective responsibility to contribute to a 
study environment which promotes scholarship and learning. All persons should be 
considerate of the needs of others for an appropriate study environment and share a 
common goal in learning. 

  Attendance at lectures, seminars etc. is essential, in particular where students’ absence 
may be detrimental to the performance of fellow students and the quality of learning 
experience gained. In addition, lateness is a discourtesy to the whole group and the 
group itself should make clear that lateness or other disruptive behaviour is not 
acceptable. 

  Students are expected to prepare for lectures, seminars etc. Students who attend 
tutorials or seminars without doing preparatory work or contributing to the discussion 
will be reminded of their obligations by the tutor and, when appropriate, by student 
members of the group. Suitable preparation enhances the overall learning experience. 

  The use of mobile phones in lectures, seminars etc. is strictly prohibited. All phones 
should be switched off before entry into lectures, seminars etc. 
 

5.3.2  Accept individual and collective responsibility for keeping a clean and safe working and 
studying environment. 
  All persons attending QMU lectures, seminars etc. should ensure that the safety of 
themselves and others is not compromised.  
  All persons attending QMU lectures, seminars etc. should ensure respect for other 
people and property is maintained. 
  Smoking, eating and drinking are strictly prohibited within the learning environment. 
47 
 

 
5.3.3  Have a mutual respect for others especially with regard to differing cultures. 
All persons within QMU should demonstrate respect for the range of local and international 
cultures as well as each person's learning needs. This means maintaining appropriate 
conduct in learning environments such as lectures and seminars so that the needs of all 
users can be met. 
  The University will not tolerate antisocial behaviour: this includes the use of abusive 
language, physical abuse, obscene comments, verbal or physical harassment, and 
comments or remarks that discriminate on the basis of sex, race or any other irrelevant 
distinction.   
 

5.3.4  Ensure that the University is not brought into disrepute. 
  All persons within QMU have an individual and collective responsibility to comply with 
the law, this is to ensure that all students can work and study in an environment 
characterised by mutual respect and free from harassment and distress.  

  You are asked to consider the impact that unacceptable behaviour may have on other 
people and to behave as an ambassador of Queen Margaret University. 
 
5.4 
Attendance Policy 
This Code of Conduct must be read in conjunction with the University’s Attendance Policy, 
available from the Quality website:  
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/committees-regulations-policies-and-
procedures/regulations-policies-and-procedures/ 

For some programmes, a more detailed attendance policy will apply, details of which will 
normally be available within individual programme documentation. 
6. 
IT FACILITIES CODE OF CONDUCT 
 
6.1 
This IT Facilities Code of Conduct has been developed to support the general University Code 
of Conduct.  
 
6.2 
General Principles 
6.3 
All students at QMU shall: 
6.3.1  Accept individual and collective responsibility for maintaining a healthy working, studying 
and living environment within the University, respecting the institution’s policies on equal 
opportunities and harassment and ensuring that their conduct complies with these 
policies. 

 
All persons within QMU have an individual and collective responsibility to contribute to a 
study environment which promotes scholarship and learning. All persons should be 

48 
 

considerate of the needs of others for an appropriate study environment and share a 
common goal in learning. 

  Use of the computer systems and networks should always be legal and ethical, and 
reflect academic integrity and the standards of the University community. IT facilities 
must never be used to cause offence, worry or inconvenience to anyone. 

  Users should accept the need to be restrained in the use of available resources. Electronic 
resources are provided to facilitate the work of students, specifically for educational, 
training, research or administrative purposes. Any other uses are a privilege and not a 
right, and must not take priority over the needs of those who require the facilities for 
directed academic work. 

 
6.3.2  Accept individual and collective responsibility for keeping a clean and safe working and 
studying environment, ensuring personal guests act in an appropriate manner. 
  All persons using QMU IT facilities have an individual and collective responsibility to 
ensure that the safety of themselves and others is not compromised.  
  All persons using QMU IT facilities have an individual and collective responsibility to 
ensure respect for other people and property is maintained. 
 
6.3.3  Have a mutual respect for others especially with regard to differing cultures. 

  All persons using QMU IT facilities have an individual and collective responsibility to 
ensure that the study environment is characterised by mutual respect, which can help 
enhance the quality of learning experience. 
 
  The University will not tolerate antisocial behaviour: this includes the use of abusive 
language, physical abuse, obscene comments, verbal or physical harassment, and 
comments or remarks that discriminate on the basis of sex, race or any other irrelevant 
distinction.
 
 
6.3.4  Ensure that the University is not brought into disrepute. 
All persons using QMU IT facilities should adhere to appropriate statutory law eg: the 
Computer Misuse Act 1990, the Defamation Act 2013, Copyright Designs and Patents Act 
1988 and the provisions of the University’s licence with the Copyright Licensing Agency, Data 
Protection Act 2014 and licence agreements for software. All persons using QMU IT facilities 
should also respect the intellectual property rights, copyright and moral rights of authors.  
 
  All persons within QMU have an individual and collective responsibility to comply with 
the law, this is to ensure that all students can work and study in an environment 
characterised by mutual respect and free from harassment and distress.  

  You are asked to consider the impact that unacceptable behaviour may have on other 
people and to behave as an ambassador of Queen Margaret University. 
 
 
 
 

49 
 

6.4 
Specific Codes 
The IT Facilities Code of Conduct is underpinned by the JANET Acceptable Use Policy, 
published by JISC) which covers all UK academic and research network activity. 
7. 
SCIENCE LABORATORY CODE OF CONDUCT 
 
7.1 
This Science Laboratory Code of Conduct has been developed to support the general 
University Code of Conduct.
 
 
7.2 
General Principles 
 
7.3 
All students at QMU shall: 
 
7.3.1  Accept individual and collective responsibility for maintaining a healthy working, studying 
and living environment with the University, respecting the institution’s policies on equal 
opportunities and harassment and ensuring that their conduct complies with these 
policies. 
 
All persons within QMU have an individual and collective responsibility to contribute to a 
study environment, which promotes scholarship and learning. All persons should be 
considerate of the needs of others for an appropriate study environment and share a 
common goal in learning. 
  The use of computer systems within laboratories is subject to the same code of conduct 
identified for IT laboratories in QMU. 
  The use of mobile phones within laboratory environments is strictly prohibited. All 
phones should be switched off before entry into laboratories. 
 
7.3.2  Accept individual and collective responsibility for keeping a clean and safe working and 
 
studying environment. 
All persons using the QMU science laboratories have an individual and collective 
responsibility to ensure that safety is not compromised, that food is not consumed and that 
respect for other people and property is maintained. In particular that no laboratory 
equipment is damaged and that no item is removed from the library unless it has been 
properly issued. 
  Smoking, eating and drinking are strictly prohibited within laboratories, with the 
following exceptions:  
Food or fluid intake specifically associated with experimental procedures and specified 
in laboratory schedules.
 

Fluid intake following exercise testing regimes in which an individual may become 
dehydrated.
 

Individuals should: 
50 
 

  Read and observe any special safety instructions displayed in the laboratory, or which 
have been issued to them (e.g. Local rules for Radiation Safety, Safe use of Gas 
Cylinders). 

  Ensure familiarity with equipment, including safety devices before beginning work. 
  Wear protective equipment as required and directed when working in the laboratory. 
  Report all breakages and spills to a member of staff. Broken glass, needles and other 
sharps should be placed in appropriate bins or sharps boxes and not mixed with waste 
paper. 

  Take responsibility for the safe storage of clothing, bags and personal items, so that 
they do not represent a hazard within the laboratory environment. 
  Students should not work in laboratories outwith timetabled classes, unless 
appropriate arrangements have been made for supervised group or individual project 
work. This should include the completion of a Risk Assessment, which must be fully 
understood and signed by both student and supervisor. COSHH forms must be 
completed if required. 

  Students should request equipment for project work using the appropriate form and 
should ensure its safe return to a member of staff. 
 
7.3.3  Have a mutual respect for others especially with regard to differing cultures. 
 
  The University will not tolerate antisocial behaviour: this includes the use of abusive 
language, physical abuse, obscene comments, verbal or physical harassment, and 
comments or remarks that discriminate on the basis of sex, race or any other irrelevant 
distinction.
 

 
7.3.4   Ensure that the University is not brought into disrepute.
 
7.4      Specific Codes 
 

Students are expected to follow specific codes of conduct, regarding equipment, hazards or 
procedures where these are in force in specific laboratory areas. 
 
 
 
51 
 

8. COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE – A GUIDE FOR STUDENTS 
Queen Margaret University is committed to providing an excellent education and high quality 
services to our students from enrolment to graduation. 
We value complaints and use information from them to help us improve our services. 
If something goes wrong or you are dissatisfied with our services, please tell us. This leaflet describes 
our complaints procedure and how to make a complaint. It also tells you about our service standards 
and what you can expect from us. Our Complaints Procedure can be found here. 
What is a complaint? 
We regard a complaint as any expression of dissatisfaction about our action or lack of action, or 
about the standard of service provided by us or on our behalf. 
What can I complain about? 
You can complain about things like: 
 
the quality and standard of any service we provide; 
 
the quality of our facilities and learning resources; 
 
the quality and standards of academic services and personal support services available to 
you; 
 
the quality and standards of administrative processes; 
 
unfair treatment by a student or staff member. 
 
Your complaint may involve more than one of the University’s services or be about someone 
working on our behalf. 
What can’t I complain about? 
There are some things we can’t deal with through our complaints handling procedure. These include: 
 
a routine first-time request for a service 
 
a request for information or an explanation of policy or practice 
 
a request under freedom of information or data protection legislation 
 
requests for compensation from the University 
 
things that are covered by academic appeals, such as academic judgements and decisions 
 
an issue which is being, or has been, considered by a court or tribunal 
 
an  attempt  to  reopen  a  previously  concluded  complaint  or  to  have  a  complaint 
reconsidered where we have already given our final decision following an investigation. 
If you are still not satisfied, you can ask the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) 
for an independent review of the complaint. 
 
If other procedures or rights of appeal can help you resolve your concerns, we will give information 
and advice to help you. 
52 
 

Who can complain? 
Anyone who receives, requests or is directly affected by the services of the University can make a 
complaint to us, including the representative of someone who is dissatisfied with our service. If you 
are making a complaint on someone else’s behalf you will need their personal written consent. 
Please also read the section on ‘Getting help to make your complaint’. 
How do I complain? 
You can complain in person on campus, by phone, in writing, or by email via our complaints form. 
It is easier for us to resolve complaints if you make them quickly and directly to the service 
concerned. So please talk to a member of our staff within the department you are complaining 
about. Then they can try to resolve any problems on the spot. 
When complaining, tell us: 
 
your full name and address 
 
as much as you can about the complaint 
 
what has gone wrong 
 
how you want us to resolve the matter. 
 
How long do I have to make a complaint? 

Normally, you must make your complaint within six months of: 
 
the event you want to complain about, or 
 
finding out that you have a reason to complain.  
 
In exceptional circumstances, we may be able to accept a complaint after the time limit. If you feel 
that the time limit should not apply to your complaint, please tell us why. 
Contact details 
Email: xxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
Write to: University Secretary 
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh 
Musselburgh 
EH21 6UU 
Telephone: +44 (0)131 474 000 
53 
 

What happens when I have complained? 
We will always tell you who is dealing with your complaint. Our complaints procedure has two 
stages: 
Stage one – frontline resolution 
We aim to resolve complaints quickly and close to where we provided the service. This could mean 
an on-the-spot apology and explanation if something has clearly gone wrong, and immediate action 
to resolve the problem. Where possible, your concerns should be raised with the relevant staff 
member, tutor, university representative or school office or at a staff/student liaison meeting. This 
can be done face-to-face, by phone, in writing or by email. 
We will give you our decision at Stage 1 in five working days or less, unless there are exceptional 
circumstances. 
If you are not satisfied with the response we give at this stage, we will tell you what you can do next. 
If you choose to, you can take your complaint to Stage 2 of the complaints procedure. You may 
choose to do this immediately or shortly after you get our initial decision. 
Stage two – investigation 
Stage 2 deals with two types of complaint: those that have not been resolved at Stage 1 and those 
that are complex and require detailed investigation. We have a complaint form, which will help you 
to state your complaint clearly to us. Although we will also accept complaints that are made in 
person or on the phone, we encourage you to complete the complaint form in the interests of clarity 
and in order to best assist the investigation process. 
When using Stage 2 we will: 
 
acknowledge receipt of your complaint within three working days 
 
discuss  your  complaint  with  you to  understand  why you  remain  dissatisfied  and  what 
outcome you are looking for 
 
give you a full response to the complaint as soon as possible and within 20 working days. 
 
If our investigation will take longer than 20 working days, we will tell you. We will agree revised time 
limits with you and keep you updated on progress. 
What if I’m still dissatisfied? 
After we have fully investigated, if you are still dissatisfied with our decision or the way we dealt 
with your complaint, you can ask the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman (SPSO) to look at it. 
The SPSO cannot normally look at: 
 
a complaint that has not completed our complaints procedure (so please make sure it 
has done so before contacting the SPSO

 
events that happened, or that you became aware of, more than a year ago 
 
a matter that has been or is being considered in court. 
54 
 

 
You can contact the SPSO: 
In Person: 
 
 
 
By Post 
SPSO 
 
 
 
 
SPSO 
4 Melville Street   
 
 
Freepost EH641 
Edinburgh 
 
 
 
Edinburgh 
EH3 7NS   
 
 
 
EH3 0BR 
Freephone:  0800 377 7330 
Online contact www.spso.org.uk/contact-us 
Website:  www.spso.org.uk 
Mobile site:  http://m.spso.org.uk 
 
Getting help to make your complaint 
We understand that you may be unable, or reluctant, to make a complaint yourself. We accept 
complaints from the representative of a person who is dissatisfied with our service. We can take 
complaints from a friend, relative, or an advocate, if you have given them your written consent to 
complain for you. 
Useful contacts details: 
  The Students’ Union: http://qmusu.org.uk/ 
  Division of Governance and Quality Enhancement: https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-
university/quality/quality-contacts/ 
  Citizens Advice Bureau: https://www.citizensadviceedinburgh.org.uk/ 
 
We are committed to making our service easy to use for all students. In line with our statutory 
equalities duties, we will always ensure that reasonable adjustments are made to help you access 
and use our services. If you have trouble putting your complaint in writing, or want this information 
in another language or format, such as large font, or Braille, please tell us in person, contact us at 
the above address or on the telephone or email us at xxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx. 
We can also give you this leaflet in other languages and formats (such as large print, audio and 
Braille) 
 
 
 
55 
 

8. 
COMPLAINTS HANDLING PROCEDURE & UNACCEPTABLE   
BEHAVIOUR  

 
FOREWORD 
Queen Margaret University’s Complaints Handling Procedure, under Section 4: Managing 
Unacceptable Behaviour, states as follows:- 
The actions of complainants who are angry, demanding or persistent may result in unreasonable 
demands on time and resources or unacceptable behaviour towards the University’s staff. The 
University will, therefore, put into place policies and procedures to protect staff from such 
unacceptable behaviour. These policies and procedures will include the requirement to inform the 
complainant of any decision to restrict their access, their right of appeal, and any procedures for 
reviewing such a decision to restrict contact. 

The University conforms to the principle that complainants have the right to be heard, understood 
and respected and the University strives to respond to all complaints in a fair, transparent and 
proportionate manner. However, occasionally the behaviour or actions of individuals prevents the 
University from dealing with the complaint under the Complaints Handling Procedure. The University 
is committed to equality of opportunity of all and expects all members of its community to be 
treated courteously and with respect. This Policy details the procedure to be followed in the event of 
unacceptable behaviour being determined, and procedures for reviewing that decision. 
1  DEFINING UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR 
 
It is recognised that people may act out of character at times of trouble, distress or as a symptom 
of illness. Behaviour that is forceful or determined is not, of itself, considered unacceptable. 
However, the actions of a person that result in unreasonable behaviour or demands on University 
staff or services or aggressive behaviour will be considered unacceptable. Examples of this are as 
follows:- 
1.  Unreasonable demands: a demand becomes unreasonable when it starts to (or complying 
with that demand would) impact substantially on the work of the staff or on University 
services. This could relate to the amount of information sought or the nature and scale of 
the service expected. All circumstances should be taken into account. Examples could be 
repeatedly changing the substance of a request or raising unrelated concerns. 
 
2.  Unreasonable levels of contact: if the level of contact from an individual exceeds what 
would be considered normal or reasonable, for example, numerous phone calls over a short 
space of time or being inundated with further information, then the contact may be 
considered unacceptable, particularly when this contact impacts on the complaint handler’s 
ability to undertake other work tasks. 
 
56 
 

3.  Unreasonable use of the complaints process: when an individual submits multiple 
complaints which have the objective of preventing the University pursuing a legitimate aim 
or implementing a legitimate decision. 
 
4.  Aggressive or abusive behaviour: behaviour or language, whether spoken or written, that 
may cause staff or students to feel afraid, threatened or abused will not be accepted. This 
can include threats, physical violence, inappropriate gestures, indecent comments, personal 
verbal abuse, discriminatory or derogatory remarks, rudeness, inflammatory statement or 
unsubstantiated allegations. 
 
2  MANAGING UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR 
If an individual’s behaviour adversely affects the ability of a member of staff to do their work or 
provide a service to others, that member of staff will be entitled to restrict the contact that 
individual has with the University. If that individual is a member of staff or a student then the 
relevant discipline procedures may need to be considered. In serious cases, there may be a 
termination of all direct (face-to-face, voice or email) contact with the individual and incidents 
may be reported to the police.   
The following actions may be used in situations where an individual shows unreasonable 
persistence:- 
  Limit contact to telephone calls from the complainant at set times on set days; 
  Restrict contact to a nominated member of staff; 
  See the complainant by appointment only;  
  Restrict contact to written correspondence only, this may be through a third party; 
  Return all correspondence and documents and in extreme cases, advise that further 
correspondence will be destroyed; or  
  Take other actions as appropriate, for example, restricting the complainant’s University 
email address or blocking emails from a specific address. 
 
The threat or use of physical violence, verbal abuse or harassment towards staff will not be 
tolerated and is likely to result in the termination of all contact with the complainant. If the 
complainant is a member of staff or student, the relevant discipline procedures will be 
considered.   
Staff have the right to politely end telephone calls or meetings if an individual is considered 
aggressive, abusive or offensive.   
3  PROCEDURE FOR MANAGING UNACCEPTABLE BEHAVIOUR 
Before determining whether to use one of the actions listed above, the member of staff should 
consider whether:- 
  The relevant complaints/appeals/freedom of information or subject access request 
procedure has been correctly and fully implemented in relation to that individual’s request; 
57 
 

  Due warning has been given to the complainant that continued contact may be deemed 
unacceptable; 
  Any reasonable adjustments have been made for that individual; and 
  There has been due regard to any of the protected characteristics in relation to the 
individual. 
 
Staff should, where possible, try to diffuse the situation by calmly informing the individual that 
their behaviour is unacceptable and must stop. Staff can ask their line manager to assist with this 
as appropriate. Should this approach not work, the member of staff should approach their line 
manager who will determine whether the actions of that person affects one member of staff or 
the whole team and then take the appropriate action to limit contact. When staff across the 
University are affected, the University Secretary should be consulted. 
Decisions to restrict contact can only be made after the individual has been given an opportunity 
to modify their behaviour. The decision should be communicated in writing, with clear contact 
arrangements specified and the length of time the restriction will be in place. 
4  APPEAL, RECORD AND REVIEW 
The individual concerned should be given the opportunity to appeal the decision to restrict 
contact. The appeal should be referred to the University Secretary who may nominate another 
senior member of staff to determine on whether the restriction was made appropriately. The 
procedure undertaken, the proportionality of the decision and the reasoning for the decision to 
restrict contact may all be reviewed. The appeal will be considered on the balance of 
probabilities. The decision of the University Secretary, or of their properly appointed delegate, is 
final. 
Any decision to restrict contact with an individual should be thoroughly recorded, with clear and 
transparent reasons, and an appropriate entry should be made in the individual’s file. 
The decision to restrict contact may be reconsidered should the individual display reasonable 
behaviour. A review procedure, at set intervals, should be included in the correspondence which 
communicates the decision to restrict contact. 
 
 
 
58 
 

10.   DATA PROTECTION: STUDENT PRIVACY STATEMENT 
 
Who we are 

This is the privacy statement of Queen Margaret University. This privacy statement explains how we 
collect and use personal information about you. 
Queen Margaret University (QMU) is a Data Controller in terms of the General Data Protection 
Regulations and the Data Protection Act 2018. The University is registered with the Information 
Commissioner’s Office. Our Registration Number Z6013920. 
https://ico.org.uk/ESDWebPages/Entry/Z6013920 
We are a public authority under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 and a Scottish public authority 
under the Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002.  Personal Information that we collect and 
hold about you is used by us for our statutory and/or public functions. Where we collect or share 
data it is on the basis of the exercise of official authority vested in us as a public authority, and on 
the basis of public interest.  
Processing of your personal information is necessary for the performance of a task carried out in the 
public interest or in the exercise of official authority vested in us as the Data Controller (See GDPR 
Article 6(1)(e)) and for statistical and research purposes (See GDPR Article 89).  Processing of Special 
Categories of data is necessary for statistical and research purposes in accordance with Article 89(1) 
based on the duties in the Equality Act 2010 (See GDPR Article 9(2)(j)). 
We process personal information to enable us to provide education and support services to our 
students and staff; advertising and promoting the university and the services we offer; publication of 
the university magazine and alumni relations, undertaking research and fundraising; managing our 
accounts and records and providing commercial activities to our clients.  
We also process personal information for the use of CCTV systems to monitor and collect visual 
images for the purposes of security and the prevention and detection of crime.  
QMU needs to process and retain certain personal information relating to you, because you are an 
applicant to, or student of the University. All of your personal information will be treated in 
accordance with the terms of the General Data Protection Regulation, which comes into effect on 25 
May 2018. This means that confidentiality will be respected and that appropriate security measures 
will be taken to prevent unauthorised disclosure. 
Queen Margaret Students’ Union is a data controller in its own right. You can read its privacy policy 
here: https://www.qmusu.org.uk/ 
How we collect your data 
The personal data QMU holds about you is obtained from a variety of sources, including but not 
limited to: 
 
59 
 

•  Information you have provided on your application form (including applications made 
directly to the University, via a third party such as UCAS, via a partner institution, or via an 
overseas agent);  
•  Information you provide us with annually at enrolment (matriculation) and during the course 
of your studies;  
•  Information related to performance, attendance and awards during your studies; 
•  Funding organisations such as SAAS or sponsorship bodies;  
•  Partner organisations such as professional bodies, employers, and other educational 
establishments for the purposes of external study or exchange. 
 

Why we collect and use your personal information  
This privacy statement explains how we collect and use personal information about you. When you 
apply and then accept your offer you enter into a contract with the University and agree to accept 
the University’s Terms and Conditions, and agree that the University can process your personal 
information for administrative and educational purposes. These include, but are not limited to: 
  Administering and providing education & training.  
  Managing and administering the University, including accommodation services.  
  Recruitment, admissions and enrolment. 
  Maintaining your student records and managing academic processes, including attendance 
and assessment. 
  Processing financial transactions including fee payments and the administration of grants 
and loans. 
  Providing advice and support to you, including disability services, counselling and wellbeing 
services, mentoring, health and safety, attendance monitoring, pastoral services (Personal 
Academic Tutor system) and careers guidance.  
  To protect your vital interests e.g. in an emergency situation. 
  Verifying your identity where this is required. 
  Contacting you by post, email or telephone. 
  Managing behavioural or disciplinary issues, appeals and complaints.  
  Providing you with information about educational programmes and services.   
  Managing and monitoring access to University services including library, IT, printing, sports, 
catering and events.  
  Research including monitoring quality and performance.  
  Seeking feedback on University programmes, services and facilities. 
  Graduation and confirmation of awards.  
  Alumni membership.   
  Statistical and archive purposes. 
  Preventing and detecting crime, fraud or corruption. 
  To meet our obligations under equality law. 
 
Special categories of personal information 
 
Under the UK Equality Act 2010, we need to collect sensitive personal data about our applicants and 
students on UK campuses to assist with monitoring equality of opportunity and eliminating unlawful 
discrimination. We hold this information in strictest confidence and only disclose it, again in 
confidence, to bodies with a statutory duty to collect it, such as the Higher Education Statistics 
Agency. You can choose whether you want to provide information for this purpose.   
60 
 

Special categories of personal information are afforded an extra level of security and confidentiality. 
This includes information about racial or ethnic origin, religious or philosophical beliefs, trade union 
membership, data concerning physical or mental health, data concerning sexual life or sexual 
orientation and data relating to criminal offences, convictions and sentences.  
If a student or applicant declares that they have a disability, we have a duty to disclose this 
information on a need-to-know basis to staff to ensure that reasonable adjustments are made, 
enabling disabled students to meet their full academic potential. 
Access to your personal information 
The University will manage your information securely and will restrict access to only those who need 
to use it in the course of their duties. The University will put in place technical and organisational 
measures necessary to ensure the security of your information.  
 The University will only disclose your information to third parties where we:  
• 
Have a legal basis to do so under the General Data Protection Regulation; or 
• 
Are required to under a statutory or regulatory obligation; or  
• 
Have your consent. 
 
Sharing your personal data  
 
To fulfil our statutory or legal obligations your data may be provided, without your explicit consent, 
to organisations or agents acting on their behalf including but not limited to:  
 
For academic purposes 
 

•  With a partner institution to deliver a programme collaboratively or jointly between the 
University and the partner institution. 
•  With our external examiners: to check that our assessment of your work is fair.  
•  For official independent assessment of our programmes e.g. by the QAA. 
•  Verify your attendance and qualifications, e.g. in a reference for a potential employer or 
agency (with consent). 
•  Confirm your attendance, progress and assessment marks to your sponsor or the institution 
through which you are studying (if this is not QMU). 
•  Arrange a suitable work placement if this is part of your course. 
•  If you have taken part in the Lothians Equal Access Programme for Schools (LEAPS), which 
provides advice and support to help eligible students to enter Higher Education, we may 
share limited information with LEAPS about your progress and outcome of your studies, in 
order to improve the LEAPS service for future participants. 
•  With relevant support agencies to enable appropriate adjustments to be made in line with 
an individual needs assessment. 
•  Publicise your award in our graduation programme and in the list of awards we provide in 
press releases. You have the right to opt out of your award being detailed in the press 
release. 
 
 
 
61 
 

To meet statutory and legal obligations 
•  The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA). For more information on what HESA does 
with your personal data please see the HESA Student Collection Notices  
(https://www.hesa.ac.uk/about/regulation/data-protection/notices); 
•  The Scottish Funding Council (SFC).  
•  The Student Loans Company (SLC).  
•  The Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS).  
•  Home Office/UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI).  
•  The Office for Students. 
•  UKRI, including agents managing the Research Excellence Framework (REF)   
•  HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC).  
•  Local authority for Council Tax exemption purposes. 
•  Electoral Registration Office in accordance with the Representation of the People (Scotland) 
Regulations 2001. 
•  Professional bodies, for example HCPC, NMC, GTCS.  
•  Embassies and other Governments.  
•  Law enforcement agencies and debt controllers.  
•  Potential employers or education and placement providers.  
•  Research surveys approved by the University covering student progress, attitudes, social and 
financial circumstances including the National Student Survey (NSS) and the International 
Student Barometer (ISB).  
•  Relevant authorities dealing with emergency situations at the University.  
•  The University also provides limited information to the QMU Students’ Union for the 
purpose of academic representation, running of elections, administering clubs, societies and 
sports clubs and social marketing activities.  
 
International data transfer 
As an international organisation, the University may need to process your personal information in a 
country other than the one you are studying in, when this is necessary to provide you with academic 
and support services, meet a legal obligation, fulfil a contract with you, or where we have your 
consent. 
Personal data may be transferred outside the European Union, to countries which may not have 
equivalent data protection laws. Examples of circumstances when personal data may be transferred 
outside the EU include:  
  Managing collaborations with overseas educational institutions including student exchanges 
and partnership programmes.  
  Working with overseas recruitment agencies.  
  Information posted on our website which is accessible outside the EEA.  
  Some of the systems and services the University uses to store data in the Cloud which may 
include storage facilities based outside the EEA.  
Personal information processed by consent  
Where the processing of personal information falls outwith the scope of your contract with the 
University (i.e. the information that the University is required to process to manage and administer 
62 
 

your time at University) then we will require another legal reason to process your data. This may 
require us to ask for your consent for processing. Consent will be sought when it is required.    
Profiling or automated decision making 
We do not use profiling or automated decision-making processes.  Some processes are semi-
automated but a human decision maker will always be involved before any decision is reached in 
relation to you.    
Graduation ceremonies  
Graduation ceremonies are public events. Audio and visual images of ceremonies may be made 
publically available via the sale of DVDs and live broadcast at the venue, on campus and on the 
Internet. Names of graduands, including those graduating in absentia, are published in the 
graduation programme. Lists are published in the press and you will be offered the opportunity to 
opt out of this.  
The University may take photographs and other images for possible use in University publicity and 
promotional material. Graduands who do not wish to be included, must inform the photographer at 
the time the photograph is taken. 
A separate Privacy Notice is provided for Alumni Engagement. 
Use of our Website 
QMU respects the privacy of every individual who visits our websites or responds to our interactive 
advertisements. The Privacy Statement on our website outlines the information we collects via its 
various web pages and how we use that information. The Statement also instructs you on what to do 
if you do not want your personal information collected or shared when you visit QMU's website or 
respond to our advertisements: https://www.qmu.ac.uk/footer/privacy-statement/ 
Retention of your personal information 
The University will retain your personal data only as long as necessary for its purposes as described. 
Please note, however, that even after termination of your student relationship with the University, 
QMU may still need to retain your personal data to satisfy its obligations to keep certain records for 
particular periods under applicable law. Such retention is documented in the University Records 
Retention Schedule, held by the Data Protection Officer.  
Your rights relating to your personal information 
You have the right to:   
Access your information 
Find out what personal data we process about you and obtain a copy of the data, free of charge 
within one month of your request. We may make a charge for additional copies of the same 
information. 
 
 
 
63 
 

Correcting your information 
We want to make sure that your personal information is accurate, complete and up to date and you 
may ask us to correct any personal information about you that you believe does not meet these 
standards. 
Deletion of your information 
You have the right to ask us to delete personal information about you where: 
 
•  You consider that we no longer require the information for the purposes for which it was 
obtained. 
•  We are using that information with your consent and you have withdrawn your consent – see 
Withdrawing consent to using your information below. 
•  You have validly objected to our use of your personal information – see Objecting to how we may 
use your information below. 
•  Our use of your personal information is contrary to law or our other legal obligations. 
 
Objecting to how we may use your information 
You have the right at any time to require us to stop using your personal information for direct 
marketing purposes.  In addition, where we use your personal information to perform tasks carried 
out in the public interest or pursuant to the legitimate interests of us or a third party then, if you ask 
us to, we will stop using that personal information unless there are overriding legitimate grounds to 
continue. 
Restricting how we may use your information 
In some cases, you may ask us to restrict how we use your personal information.  This right might 
apply, for example, where we are checking the accuracy of personal information about you that we 
hold or assessing the validity of any objection you have made to our use of your information.  The 
right might also apply where this is no longer a basis for using your personal information but you 
don't want us to delete the data.  Where this right to validly exercised, we may only use the relevant 
personal information with your consent, for legal claims or where there are other public interest 
grounds to do so. 
Portability 
If we process personal information that you provide to us on the basis of consent or because it is 
necessary for the performance of a contract to which you are party, and in either case that 
processing is carried out by automated means, then you have the right to have that personal 
information transmitted to you in a machine readable format. Where technically feasible, you also 
have the right to have that personal information transmitted directly to another controller. 
Automated processing 
If we use your personal information on an automated basis to make decisions which significantly 
affect you, you have the right to ask that the decision be reviewed by an individual to whom you 
may make representations and contest the decision.  This right only applies where we use your 
information with your consent or as part of a contractual relationship with you 
64 
 

Please contact us in any of the ways set out in the Contact information and further advice section 
below if you wish to exercise any of these rights. 
Changes to our privacy statement 
We keep this privacy statement under regular review and will place any updates on this website.  
We will publish any changes we make to this data protection policy on our website at the following 
link: https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/committees-regulations-policies-and-
procedures/regulations-policies-and-procedures/  
or at: 
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/footer/foi-and-data-protection/data-protection/ 
Paper copies of the privacy statement may also be obtained by request from the Data Protection 
Officer.  
This privacy statement was last updated on 10 May 2018. 
Contact details and further advice  
If you have any queries about the processing of your personal data as described above, please 
contact the University’s Data Protection Officer.  You can do this by email: xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx; 
telephone: 0131 474 0000 or post: 
  
Data Protection Officer 
Queen Margaret University 
Queen Margaret University Drive 
Musselburgh 
EH21 6UU  
 
Complaints 
We seek to resolve directly all complaints about how we handle personal information. If you have 
any issues about this statement or the way the University has handled your personal information, 
please contact the University Data Protection Officer in the first instance.   
If you are dissatisfied with the response from the University, you have the right to lodge a complaint 
with the Information Commissioner’s Office:  
 Information Commissioner’s Office  
Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire, SK9 5AF  
Email:  xxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx; Telephone: 0303 123 1113  
 

 
 
Version 1 – May 2018 
 
65 
 

11. REGULATIONS GOVERNING DISCIPLINE  
 

Preliminary matters 
 
1.1 
All students of the University are subject to the jurisdiction of the Principal in respect of their 
studies and their conduct. It is a condition of entry to the University that each student shall 
conform to the published rules and regulations. 
 
1.2  Under these regulations the University has the power to discipline students and to suspend or 
expel any student for good cause. 
 
1.3  Once disciplinary proceedings have been instituted against a student under these regulations, 
no disciplinary action will normally be taken against the student under other disciplinary rules 
or regulations within the University for the same misconduct. However, where an allegation of 
misconduct is upheld against a student on a health care programme that requires professional 
registration, that student may be referred to a Fitness to Practise Panel. 
 
1.4  References within these regulations to any University officer shall include his or her properly 
appointed nominee. 
 

Misconduct 
 
2.1  Any student studying or registered at the University shall be subject to disciplinary measures if 
he or she is found to be guilty of misconduct as defined below.   
 
2.2  The essence of misconduct under these regulations is: 
 
a)  Improper interference with the functioning or activities of the University, or of those who 
work or study in the University; or 
 
b)  Action which otherwise improperly damages the University or its reputation. 
 
2.3  In particular, the following shall constitute misconduct, whether occurring on University 
premises or elsewhere: 
 
a)  Any conduct which constitutes a criminal offence. 
b)  Disruption of, or improper interference with, the academic, administrative, sporting, social 
or other activities of the University.  
c)  Obstruction of, or improper interference with, the functions, duties or activities of any 
student or member of staff of the University, or any visitor to the University.  
d)  Violent, indecent, disorderly, threatening, intimidating or offensive behaviour or language. 
e)  Harassment of any student or member of staff of the University, or any visitor to the 
University, on the grounds of sex, sexual orientation, race or disability. 
66 
 

f)  Fraud, deceit, deception or dishonesty in relation to the University or its staff, students or 
visitors 
g)  Cheating or plagiarism in academic course work or in examinations 
h)  Theft, misappropriation or misuse of University property, or the property of the 
University’s staff, students or visitors, including computer misuse. 
i)  Misuse or unauthorised use of University premises. 
j)  Damage to University property, or the property of the University's staff, students or 
visitors, caused intentionally or recklessly. 
k)  Action likely to cause injury or impair safety on University premises. 
l)  Failure to respect the rights of others to freedom of belief and freedom of speech. 
m)  Breach of the provisions of any University code, rule or regulation 
n)  Failure to disclose personal details to a member of staff of the University in circumstances 
in which it is reasonable to require that such information be given. 
 

Involvement of the police and criminal courts 
 
3.1  The following procedures apply where alleged misconduct is reported to the Principal, and the 
misconduct, if proved, would also constitute a serious offence under the criminal law.    
 
3.2  A serious offence is one that is likely to attract a custodial sentence if proved in a criminal 
court or one that can be tried as a criminal offence only at the High Court/Crown Court. 
 
3.3  Where the Principal does not regard the alleged misconduct as constituting a serious offence, 
s/he may decide that it is dealt with internally. If the offence is reported to the police, the 
Principal may decide to defer action until the police and/or courts have dealt with the matter. 
 
3.4  If the Principal regards the alleged offence as serious, no internal disciplinary action, other 
than suspension or exclusion from the University, will normally be taken until the matter has 
been reported to the police, and either a prosecution has been completed or a decision not to 
prosecute has been taken. 
 
3.5  The University has the right to report any alleged criminal offence to the police. However, if a 
person claims to be the victim of a serious offence committed by a student, but does not wish 
the police to be involved, the Principal may agree not to report the matter to the police. In 
such circumstances the University will not normally proceed with internal disciplinary 
measures for the serious offence, although it may take disciplinary action over other related 
offences. 
 
3.6  Where a finding of misconduct has been made under these regulations, and a student has also 
been sentenced by a criminal court on the same facts, the penalty imposed by the criminal 
court will be taken into account in deciding the penalty under these regulations. 
67 
 


Suspension or exclusion 
4.1  A student who is the subject of a complaint of misconduct or against whom a criminal charge 
is pending or who is the subject of police investigation, may be suspended or excluded from 
the University by the Principal, pending disciplinary hearing or trial. 
 
4.2  A student who is suspended is prohibited from entering University premises and from 
participating in University activities. Suspension may be subject to qualification, such as 
permission to take an examination. The terms of the suspension will be notified in writing to 
the student. An order of suspension may include a requirement that the student shall have no 
contact with a named person or persons. 
 
4.3  A student who is excluded from the University has restricted rights to enter University 
premises and to take part in University activities. The terms of the exclusion will be notified in 
writing to the student. An order of exclusion may include a requirement that the student shall 
have no contact with a named person or persons. 
 
4.4  Orders of suspension and exclusion pending a disciplinary hearing or trial are normally to be 
used where necessary to protect a member or members of the University, or the property of 
the University or the property of a member or members of the University community. Written 
reasons for the decision will be recorded and made available to the student. 
 
4.5  Unless the matter is deemed to be urgent by the Principal, no student shall be suspended or 
excluded unless he or she has been given an opportunity to make representation to the 
Principal. The representation may be made in person or in writing, as the student chooses, and 
may be put forward by the student or by the student's adviser, friend or representative. In 
cases deemed to be urgent by the Principal, a student may be suspended or excluded with 
immediate effect. An opportunity will be given to the student to make representation as soon 
as reasonably practicable. 
 
4.6  A decision to suspend a student, or to exclude a student from academic activities associated 
with the student's programme of study, shall be subject to review at the request of the 
student after four weeks. Such a review will not involve a hearing, but the student, either 
personally or through his or her adviser, friend or representative, will be entitled to make 
written representation. The Principal will conduct the review. 
 
4.7  In addition to the initial review, the Principal shall review the suspension or exclusion on 
receipt of evidence of altered circumstances that might affect the order. 
 
4.8  A student may appeal against an order of suspension or exclusion using the process set out 
under section 9 of these Regulations. 
 
 
 
68 
 


Summary procedure  
 
5.1  Allegations of misconduct under these regulations should be made to the University Secretary, 
who will refer them to the Principal. The Principal may dismiss the allegation immediately if he 
or she believes that there is no case for the student to answer, or that it is for some other 
reason appropriate to do so.   
 
5.2  If the allegation is not so dismissed, and the offence does not lead the Principal to suspend or 
exclude the student under the provisions outlined in section 4 above, the matter will be 
referred to the relevant Dean of School. The Dean of School will consult with the University 
Secretary to determine whether or not the matter should be dealt with summarily or referred 
to a Disciplinary Panel, subject to paragraph 5.6 below.   
 
5.3  If the matter is dealt with summarily, the Dean will consider written or oral evidence as he or 
she thinks fit. The Dean will find the student guilty of misconduct only if, on the available 
evidence, he or she is satisfied of the student's guilt. If a finding of guilt is made, he or she may 
impose any of the penalties set out in these regulations, other than expulsion from the 
University. 
 
5.4  At the termination of the proceedings, the Dean will write a short report. In the event of a 
finding of guilt, the report will set out the misconduct alleged, a brief summary of evidence 
received, the grounds for the finding of guilt, the penalty imposed, and the factors taken into 
account in deciding the penalty. A copy of the report will be sent to the student. Where the 
misconduct relates to examinations or other assessed work, the report may contain 
recommendations concerning examination marks, and a copy of the report will also be sent to 
the appropriate Board of Examiners. 
 
5.5  There is a right of appeal against a finding of guilt as set out in section 9 below. 
 
5.6  If the University Secretary does not consider it appropriate to deal with the matter summarily, 
or if the student does not agree to its being dealt with in that way, then it shall be referred to a 
Disciplinary Committee under the procedure set out in section 6 below. 
 

Disciplinary committee 
 
6.1  The University Secretary will appoint the members of the Disciplinary Committee, and invite 
one of them, other than a student, to act as Convener. The Committee will have three or five 
members, at the discretion of the University Secretary. The members will normally include 
both a member of the academic staff of the University and a student of the University. The 
University Secretary shall have regard to the need to ensure that all members of the 
Committee are impartial and have had no previous involvement with the matter. Care will be 
taken to ensure an appropriate gender balance in the composition of the panel. 
 
6.2  The University Secretary will appoint a clerk to the Committee and will arrange for a note of 
the proceedings to be taken. The Committee may seek advice from a qualified lawyer. 
69 
 

 
6.3  The student may attend the disciplinary hearing, and may be accompanied by an adviser, 
friend, or other representative. If a student is accompanied and opt to have their adviser, 
friend or representative speak on their behalf, should it become necessary to ensure good 
order in the hearing, the Committee may stipulate that the student may speak only when 
called upon to give evidence by his or her representative. Legal representation is not 
permitted. 
 
6.4  The Committee will rely only on evidence presented at the hearing. The deliberations and 
decisions of anyone previously considering the matter shall be irrelevant for the Committee's 
purposes. 
 
6.5  The Committee will find a student guilty of misconduct only if, on the evidence before it, it is 
satisfied of the student's guilt. If the members of the Committee cannot agree, the verdict of 
the Committee will be that of the majority of its members. Any decision of the Committee 
shall be based on the balance of probabilities. 
 
6.6  Subject to the provisions of these regulations, the order of proceedings shall be at the 
discretion of the Committee. Members of the Committee may ask questions of any witness 
called before it. The Committee may ask for additional enquiries to be undertaken, and may 
call for additional witnesses to attend. 
 
6.7  If two or more students are involved in related misconduct, the Committee may at its 
discretion deal with their cases together. 
 
6.8  The evidence presented at the hearing will normally be oral evidence, given by witnesses 
appearing in person. The Committee may accept a witness's written statement in evidence 
where it agrees that the witness need not attend, or where it is impracticable for the witness 
to attend, or where in the opinion of the Committee it is for some other reason in the interests 
of justice to do so. 
 
6.9  The allegation or allegations will be notified to the student at least one week before the 
hearing. 
 
6.10  The University Secretary may call for written witness statements in support of the allegation in 
advance of the hearing. If such statements are obtained, members of the Committee will be 
entitled to see them in advance of the hearing and copies will be made available to the 
student at least one week before the allegation is heard.   
 
6.11  The Committee may impose time limits on oral addresses and submissions. 
 
6.12  The Committee will refuse to admit evidence that is in its opinion irrelevant to the issues 
raised. 
 
6.13  The Committee shall have power to adjourn a hearing to another date, as it thinks fit. 
70 
 

 
6.14  If the Committee finds that there is no case for the student to answer, it must dismiss the 
allegation. 
 
6.15  At the termination of the proceedings, the Convener of the Disciplinary Committee will write a 
short report. In the event of a finding of guilt, the report will set out the misconduct alleged, a 
brief summary of evidence received, the grounds for the finding of guilt, the penalty imposed, 
and the factors taken into account in deciding the penalty. A copy of the report will be sent to 
the student and to the Principal. Where the misconduct relates to examinations or other 
assessed work the report may contain recommendations under section 7 of these regulations, 
and a copy of the report will also be sent to the appropriate Board of Examiners. 
 
6.16  The Convener of the Committee, on the advice of the University Secretary, has the power to 
suspend the activity of the Disciplinary Committee at any time and to stop the proceedings 
against the student, if he or she believes it appropriate to do so. 
 

Penalties 
 
7.1  If a student is found guilty of an allegation of misconduct, penalties may be imposed by the 
Dean in the case of matters dealt with summarily, or by the Disciplinary Committee in other 
cases. The penalties are set out below. A student may not be expelled following an allegation 
heard under the summary procedure. The student or his or her representative shall be entitled 
to make representations in mitigation before the penalty is decided. 
 
7.2  When determining penalties, consideration will be given to the seriousness of the misconduct, 
the circumstances of the misconduct, and the means and general personal circumstances of 
the student. 
 
7.3  A student found guilty of misconduct may be: 
 
a.  Absolutely discharged, which means that although the student may be technically guilty of 
the misconduct alleged, no blame should be attached to his or her actions 
 
b.  Admonished 
 
c.  Cautioned, which means that no penalty is imposed, but if the student is found guilty of 
misconduct on a subsequent occasion in the following twelve months, or some other 
specified period, he or she will then be dealt with for both offences 
 
d.  Conditionally discharged, which means that no penalty is imposed, subject to the student 
fulfilling certain stipulated conditions including future good behaviour over the following 
twelve months or some other specified period. If the conditions are not met, a penalty 
may be imposed following a further hearing 
 
71 
 

e.  Required to pay a fine or a reasonable sum by way of compensation for identified and 
quantified loss. 
 
f.  Required to perform unpaid services for the University community to a maximum of 40 
hours 
 
g.   Excluded from the University for a fixed period of time, up to a maximum of twelve 
months. A student who is excluded from the University has restricted rights to enter 
University premises and to participate in University activities. The terms of the exclusion 
will be notified to the student in writing. An order of exclusion may include a requirement 
that the student shall have no contact with a named person or persons 
 
h.  Suspended from the University for a fixed period of time, up to a maximum of twelve 
months. A student who is suspended is prohibited from entering University premises, and 
from participating in University activities. Suspension may be subject to qualification, such 
as permission to take an examination. The terms of the suspension will be notified to the 
student in writing. An order of suspension may include a requirement that the student 
shall have no contact with a named person or persons 
 
i.  Expelled from the University, which means that the student ceases to be a member of the 
University, and loses all rights and privileges of membership. 
 
7.4  Where misconduct relates to examinations or other assessed work, a recommendation may be 
made to the appropriate Board of Examiners that it should: 
 
a)  Award the student lower marks than those which he or she would otherwise have been 
awarded, or award no marks, for the examination or assessed work in which the student 
committed the offence 
 
b)  Award the student lower marks than those which he or she would otherwise have been 
awarded, or award no marks, for the unit of which the examination or assessed work was 
part 
 
c)  Award the student a lower class of degree or other academic award than that which he or 
she would otherwise have been awarded. 
 
d)  Exclude the student from the award of a degree or other academic award. This may be 
either permanent or for a stated period, and may be absolute or subject to compliance with 
stipulated requirements. 
 
7.5  Where an allegation of misconduct is upheld against a student on a health care programme 
that requires professional registration, that student may be referred to a Fitness to Practise 
Panel. The University Secretary will consult with the Dean of School and advise accordingly. 
 
 
72 
 


Mental illness 
 
If it appears to those considering an allegation of misconduct that the student in question is 
suffering from mental illness or mental instability, the proceedings may be adjourned for the 
preparation of a medical report. 
 
If there is medical evidence that the student is suffering from mental illness or mental 
instability, those dealing with the case may suspend or terminate the proceedings, if it is felt 
appropriate to do so. It may be made a condition of suspension or termination of the 
proceedings that the student seeks medical treatment. 
 

Appeals 
 
9.1  A student may appeal against a finding of guilt. The appeal must be made to the University 
Secretary within twenty-eight days of the conclusion of the proceedings, which includes the 
imposition of a penalty. The student must set out in writing the grounds on which the appeal is 
based.   
 
9.2  There will be no entitlement to a rehearing of the case, which will be allowed only in 
exceptional circumstances.   
 
9.3  The appeal will be submitted to the Principal, who will judge whether or not a prima facie case 
exists on the basis that: 
 
 there has been demonstrably an irregularity in the disciplinary procedure; 
 
 evidence has become available that it was not reasonable to present during the original 
hearing. 
 
9.4  In the event that a re-hearing is judged appropriate by the Principal, a panel will be convened.  
 
9.5  An appeals committee will be constituted as described in Section 6.1 above. The Legal Adviser 
will act as technical adviser to the Panel and the University Secretary will nominate a clerk to 
the committee. The student may be accompanied by a friend or representative at this 
meeting. 
 
9.6  The committee hearing the appeal may overturn the finding of guilt where they consider it just 
to do so. In particular, a finding may be overturned in the light of new evidence; or where it is 
considered that the original hearing was not conducted fairly; or where the finding of guilt was 
unreasonable in the light of the findings of fact. The student may present the appeal in person 
or in writing as he or she chooses, and may be accompanied by an adviser, friend or other 
representative. 
 
73 
 

9.7  A student may appeal against a penalty imposed following a finding of guilt. The appeal must 
be made to the University Secretary within twenty-eight days of the conclusion of the 
proceedings. The student must set out in writing the grounds on which the appeal is based.   
 
9.8  The committee hearing an appeal against penalty may impose a lesser or greater penalty, 
having considered whether the original penalty imposed was fair and reasonable in the light of 
all the circumstances of the case, and the student's means and general personal 
circumstances. 
10 
Independent review 
 
10.1  The University’s internal procedures having been exhausted, a student may seek review of 
his/her complaint by an independent person, the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman [SPSO].  
10.2  The Ombudsman is independent and her staff will advise whether or not the complaint is one 
that they can investigate. Normally the student will have to tell the Ombudsman about his/her 
complaint within 12 months of first knowing about the problem about which they are 
complaining, although the Ombudsman may look at complaints outside this limit, if she thinks 
there is good reason to do so.  
10.3  There are some restrictions on what the Ombudsman can investigate. For example, she cannot 
consider the subject matter of complaints about personnel matters or matters of academic 
judgement. However, she may be able to investigate the manner in which the complaint was 
handled. If the complaint is appropriate to her office and is investigated, the Ombudsman’s 
staff will send details of how this will be done. 
10.4  The complaint should be submitted in writing to the Ombudsman, and should include any 
relevant documents including correspondence with the University and the University’s 
response to the complaint. This can be sent to the Ombudsman without cost at the freepost 
address given below. A student may discuss the complaint with an Investigator at the SPSO 
before deciding to submit.  
10.5  The Scottish Public Services Ombudsman has an online complaint form accessible through the 
website although papers in support of the complaint would still have to be supplied to the 
Ombudsman by post or other means. The Scottish Public Services Ombudsman can also supply 
paper complaint forms direct to complainants. 
10.6  Further information may be accessed through the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman 
website or by calling her office for advice. Contact details are: 
Scottish Public Services Ombudsman 
4 Melville Street, Edinburgh, EH3 7NS 
Freepost address: 
Scottish Public Services Ombudsman, Freepost EH641, Edinburgh, EH3 0BR 
 
Phone 0800 377 7330: Fax 0800 377 7331; website www.scottishombudsman.org.uk 
e-mail enquiries to xxx@xxxx.xxx.xx. Text: 0790 049 4372 
 
 
74 
 

12. RESEARCH ETHICS GUIDELINES, PROCEDURES AND REGULATIONS 
The University’s procedures for Research Ethics are under review (2018-19). Any changes to the 
procedure for submitting an application will be communicated to staff and students once approved 
by the Research Strategy Committee
. 
SECTION 1 
Ethical Principles to guide research involving human participants 
1.    Introduction 
 
Ethics permeates all research, so only by getting it right can research excellence be achieved. 
It is essential for researchers to gain an understanding of ethical principles, because in practice 
ethical issues are often complex, relative to the particular research project, relative to the 
competence of the research team and require the reasonable anticipation of likely future risks 
and problems. The core of ethical research is the ethical sensitivity of the research team, 
which is an art based on principles rather than a rule-governed process, or a set of tick box 
barriers to be overcome before the real work can begin.  
Ethical research requires a balance to be struck between minimising probable harm and 
advancing academic knowledge, being appropriate in terms of human dignity, and in social 
and cultural impact. Researchers should use the basic ethical principles outlined here to guide 
their decisions about how to conduct research, how to treat their research participants and 
how to handle the data that they gather about them. For much research the relevant 
decisions are straightforward or have sound precedents.  
Issues such as protection of identity, privacy, obtaining informed consent, communicating 
appropriately with participants, ensuring participant autonomy and freedom of choice, and 
ensuring that no harm comes to participants or researchers are among the many ethical issues 
that people planning research must have in their minds. Additionally, researchers have a 
moral responsibility to tell the truth and to preserve participant confidentiality.  
However, in some cases deciding on an acceptable ethical approach within a study may be 
more difficult. Top quality research is by definition innovative and may pose new ethical 
challenges. For these reasons, although the competence of the research team is critical 
(imagine surgery by the untrained), neither the track record of the team, nor the prestige of 
the institution waives the need for an adequate ethical review process. 
The ethics review process at QMU aims to be collaborative and constructive. In considering 
ethical issues from the conceptual stage of a proposal it is intended to enhance the quality of 
research and increases the chances of productive funding and publication outcomes. In cases 
where ethical approval is not granted at the first stage, the aim is that discussion with 
members of the School or University Ethics Panel is used to achieve an acceptable approach 
that should also facilitate positive research outcomes for students and staff. 
 
75 
 

2.    The Main Ethical Principles 
 
 
There are four ‘clusters’ of moral principles which provide a framework for making decisions 
about the ethical aspects of a study (Beauchamp and Childress, 2001). 
 
 
*  Respect for people’s autonomy 
 
*  Non-maleficence; do no harm 
 
*  Beneficence; do good 
 
*  Justice 
 
It is hard at the ethical approval stage for research to guarantee doing good and being just, 
but it is critical for it to avoid disrespecting people’s autonomy or harming them. 
2.1   Respect for Autonomy 
2.1.1  Dignity 
Participants in research should be treated with appropriate dignity. A rule of thumb test is for 
researchers to ask whether they would consider it appropriate for a beloved family member 
to participate in the research. Historical cases abound of research participants being treated in 
undignified, even brutal, ways that are clearly unethical. Nonetheless, sometimes research 
requires intrusive, invasive, tedious or unpleasant treatment of participants. Participating can 
be boring, stressful, challenging, upsetting or even painful. Such ‘invasive’ research protocols 
need to be justified by the potential benefits of the research. It is essential to consider also the 
social impact of the research results, independently of the scientific impact. Cases have 
occurred where because of the rarity or uniqueness of participants, their anonymity has easily 
been violated and social stigma and other harm has resulted. 
2.1.2  Informed Consent 
Respect for autonomy also requires ensuring that research participants have truly consented 
to participate in the research, of their own free will, without coercion or manipulation of any 
kind and fully informed of the risks, benefits and consequences of their participation. This is 
not simply about getting the required signature on the consent form.  
All research involving human beings requires informed consent. This applies even to tissue 
samples or data acquired about those people for other purposes.  
To ensure genuine informed consent, it is essential that researchers consider the extent to 
which the people being recruited are capable of fully and freely giving their informed consent. 
There are two common restrictions on this, which often need to be dealt with. First, when the 
people to be recruited are, in some sense, vulnerable or limited in their capacity to consent in 
an autonomous fashion. Researchers who are working with vulnerable people such as 
children, prisoners, those with some form of mental illness or incapacity or the very sick or old 
will need to pay particular attention to the way in which they gain informed consent. The 
process of gaining informed consent from young people and children is complex and must be 
informed by current legislation (BMA, 2000). 
76 
 

Second, when the demand characteristics of the social situation where the research occurs 
implicitly or explicitly coerces people into participating in the research. Examples include 
potential participants believing that the research will benefit them, believing that their 
therapy or treatment will suffer if they do not participate, believing that significant others, 
whether friends, family or professionals, will think badly of them, and believing that they will, 
in some sense, ‘stand out’ or be incriminated by refusal. For example, does refusal imply that 
they have something to hide?  
A third, rarer, limitation is when research offers money or other benefits that are so large as 
to easily persuade people to participate for the benefits alone. This is generally considered to 
exclude modest payments to cover the costs of travel and inconvenience. Pay and other 
benefits offered should be modest in proportion to the effort required to participate.  
2.1.3  Who Should Consent?  
Only persons able to freely understand, question and refuse without fear of sanction or 
reprisal can give informed consent. For research involving participants who may lack the 
capacity for understanding and questioning, such as children, people with mental or 
intellectual difficulties, or people severely ill or heavily medicated, consent should be obtained 
from a parent, carer or other person serving in a responsible capacity AND from the 
participant themselves, to the extent that they are capable of understanding and offering 
consent. Ingenuity needs to be exercised in providing satisfactory consent procedures in such 
cases. Consent from the parent or carer alone is rarely adequate.  
The freedom to refuse to participate in research is potentially threatened where there is a 
power imbalance between the prospective participant and the researcher, along with their 
perceived allies. For example, students may believe that refusing to participate in staff 
research will not count well for them when they are being educationally assessed. This can 
occur even if the researcher is not directly one of the student’s teachers. The two key 
methods of ensuring true refusal are: 
-  to ensure whenever possible that the research team is completely independent of anybody 
in a position of power over the potential participants, and 
-  that the procedures to ensure independence are explicit during the informed consent 
process. For example, should the medical consultant be one of the research team (as is 
often the case), it should be clear that they will have no knowledge of whether an 
individual patient has participated or not. Where this is impossible, other means of 
enabling true refusal should be actively written into the research protocol. 
 
It is also important to remember that research on groups, societies, organisations, institutions 
and their members also ‘involves human beings’ who ought to consent to it occurring. This 
does not necessarily mean obtaining consent from everybody, but appropriate procedures 
should be in place for collective consent, treating the organisation as the ‘participant’.  
2.1.4  The Process of Informed Consent 
77 
 

 
  All international declarations stipulate that, prior to consent, each participant in a research 
project should be clearly informed of its goals, its possible adverse events, and the possibility 
to refuse to enter or to retract at any time with no consequences. How to inform is a critical 
part of the process. Participants are rarely able to recall what they have agreed upon when 
signing an informed consent form. An example Information Sheet and Consent Form can be 
found in Appendix 2.  
 
The following strategies may help to safeguard informed consent: 
  Close attention to the language and readability of written material, which includes 
translation procedures for non-native language speakers. 
  Honest explanation of the possible risks and benefits of participation. Particular caution 
should be exercised to avoid ‘lies of omission’; if the research procedure is boring, 
unpleasant or simply lengthy, it is best to make this clear. 
  The opportunity for potential participants to discuss the project and ask questions with 
somebody sympathetic who understands the research: Ideally one of the research team. 
  Use of alternative media, such as visual information. 
  In complex or hazardous cases, the informed consent procedure should involve a detailed 
interview and discussion, rather than the mere signing of paperwork. 
 
2.1.5  The Informed Consent Form 

 
This usually includes an actual form to be signed, along with an information sheet and as 
much additional material as is appropriate. This entire pack constitutes ‘the consent form’.  
 
Two general questions should be answered on the information sheet:  
  What are the likely benefits of the research for science, for society and for the research 
participants? This should enable potential participants to make an informed choice to 
participate, even if there are risks. Researchers should avoid the temptation to exaggerate 
about benefits. 
 
  How will participants and the data about them be protected? This should include 
explanation of how confidentiality will be ensured and what data will be retained where, in 
what format.   
 
 
Other information that should be included in the information sheet includes: 
  A clear explanation of who is involved in the research, what their roles are, and who to 
contact for further information or in case of concern. 
  A clear and appropriately brief description of the research explaining its purposes, how 
long participation will take, what will happen and which, if any, parts of the research 
involve new or experimental procedures.  
  An explanation of any screening procedures used to select participants. 
  An accurate description of any reasonably foreseeable risks or discomforts. Notably, much 
research interviewing people poses some risk of participant distress, should the topics 
covered include ones sensitive to individual people.  
78 
 

  A modest description of any benefits that may reasonably be expected as a result of 
participating, to the participants and to others. 
  In research involving more than minimal risk, an explanation of insurance and 
compensation procedures, should harm occur. 
  An explanation of the procedures that will be followed should the research discover 
important information about the participant. Two common dilemmas are: 
 
o  When research incidentally discovers signs of disease or abnormality. In most cases the 
appropriate procedure is to notify the participant and refer to appropriate health care 
professionals. In some cases it is appropriate for the participant to choose to not be 
informed, or be informed, as part of the consent procedure. Genetic screening research 
is one example. 
o  When research incidentally discovers a significant risk of harm to the participant by 
others, or by the participant to others. With children under 16, researchers are legally 
obliged to disclose such risks to appropriate people and this is a limit on confidentiality. 
 
  In research involving interventions or treatments, a clear explanation of alternative 
approaches that participants might use instead. 
  An explanation of procedures used to preserve confidentiality and anonymity (see 2.4.1).  
  A statement explaining that participation is entirely voluntary and that participants may 
withdraw at any time, for any reason, without explanation or obligation to the research 
team and without repercussions elsewhere. 
 
2.2   Non-Maleficence; Do no harm 
Researchers must not harm their study participants. But, even simple time-wasting can be 
harmful, so it is the research team’s duty to weigh up the potential for harm against the 
benefits of the study and to come to a justifiable conclusion. It is also the team’s duty to 
ensure that research which carries a risk of harm should only be conducted by competent 
research teams. Many potential ethical issues can be resolved by ensuring that the research 
team has sufficient competence to manage problems appropriately. For example, a badly 
designed survey by an undergraduate may waste participants’ time, where a well-designed 
one would not.  
2.2.1  Competence 
 
The normal model for a research team is that there are one or more researchers who directly 
interact with participants and one or more supervisors who oversee. Part of the ethics review 
process is to establish that the research team is competent to (a) minimise harm, (b) conduct 
research that is like to be of sufficient quality to be worth any risks of harm, which at the 
mildest level includes wasting participants’ time and effort, and (c) manage serious harm 
should it arise, even if it is very unlikely. Competence is a function of relevant skills, 
experience, training to be achieved during the research process and the devotion of 
appropriate time and effort to the research project. A good research team has an appropriate 
mix of competencies. When researchers are less competent, then supervisors need to be 
more competent and supervise more closely. Therefore, particular care should be exercised in 
79 
 

decisions about what types of research can be conducted by undergraduates. Staff teaching 
loads can sometimes make close supervision difficult, so unless a student has special 
demonstrable competencies caution should be exercised in developing undergraduate 
research that raises major ethical issues. Conversely, a team with specialist expertise can 
conduct research that might be unethical conducted by a team without such competencies. 
Where appropriate, it is important to report on the team’s competence in the ethics 
application. A track record of publications in the area is not always sufficient. There are also 
specialised competencies that need to be considered. For instance,  researchers working with 
young people or other vulnerable groups will need to be police checked according to current 
Disclosure Scotland guidelines (www.disclosurescotland.co.uk) Researchers who intend to 
work with children should consider this when planning the timescale of their research. 
2.2.2  Risk Assessment and Risk Management 
In order to address the issue of ‘risk of harm’, researchers must demonstrate that they have 
exercised a standard of due care. As well as being competent, this involves identifying the 
likely risks, assessing the probability that they will occur, evaluating the risk to determine its 
acceptability in relation to the objectives of the research and finally managing the risks which 
involves the steps that can be taken to minimise them (Beauchamp and Childress, 2001:199). 
Common examples of managing risk include: 
  Screening procedures that identify participants more likely to come to harm through the 
research. 
  Competence to work with participants who become distressed, including being able to 
listen and communicate appropriately about the distress and being able to refer to 
further counselling should this be required 
  Sufficient knowledge to provide advice about services or help as a result of discussing 
needs which are not being met 
  Sufficient knowledge to discuss the benefits of appropriate interventions 
  Adequate post-research debriefing, including offering explanations of any necessary 
deception or withholding of information. 
  Appropriate research training on the proposed research techniques: For example,  
appropriate specialist interview skills; specific experimental methods; specialist biological 
sampling. 
  Appropriate risk assessment for the conduct of the research, including any physical or 
biological risks faced by researchers and participants. 
  Adequate supervisory procedures to address researchers’ difficult thoughts and feelings 
about the research and the participants, to reduce harm to researchers. 
 
2.3   Beneficence: Do good 
Will the research truly benefit the individual participants, or those like them? Will the research 
truly benefit some wider or more abstract entity such as science, knowledge, or society? 
Naturally, researchers generally hope the answer to at least some of these questions is ‘yes’. 
However, in justifying research it is important to reflect upon and respect conflicting notions 
80 
 

of benefit. It is unethical to assume that benefit to participants, to science, or to society are an 
absolute good. Contemporary disagreements abound: For example, over animal rights, over 
the age at which the foetus becomes a person, or the appropriate balance between eroding 
individual liberties and promoting safety.  
When research can genuinely indicate likely beneficence, then this is important ethically and 
may justify research that would otherwise seem excessively hazardous to participants. 
However, this situation is relatively rare. Usually, ethical research involving human 
participants is about minimising harm, rather than increasing likely benefits.  
2.4   Justice 
It is important to treat people equally and fairly and ensure that they are accorded their full 
rights. In research practice, much of this occurs under issues of truly informed consent (see 
2.4.2). It is also worth mentioning the need to consider issues of participant selection criteria. 
There are often legitimate reasons for restricting a study to a specific gender, or excluding 
non-native speakers of the predominant language, or excluding specific ethnicities. However, 
sometimes these choices are made mainly for convenience, which may be ethically debatable 
and can require justification. There are many instances where convenient sampling criteria 
have resulted in a consequent lack of knowledge of whether findings apply to excluded 
groups. Any inclusion or exclusion criteria to be employed in the research should be clearly 
outlined and justified in the ethical approval application. There are also issues, now widely 
recognised by research councils and the NHS, of the extent to which research participants are 
entitled to help form the research agenda. Participant involvement in research design is good 
practice. 
2.4.1  Confidentiality 
As well as being a basic rule of research ethics, confidentiality is also the subject of 
considerable literature and legislation including the Data Protection Act 2018. It is important 
to keep confidentiality distinct from anonymity. 
Anonymity involves the protection of the participant so that even the research team cannot 
link them to the information provided. Nowadays, this not only requires the avoidance of 
names, but also other identifier information such as postcodes. Moreover, particularly in 
small-scale more qualitative studies, some participants may be identifiable solely by the data 
they provide. Consequently, true anonymity from start to finish is relatively rare in research 
and should not be offered unless it is really provided. 
Confidentiality in contrast involves the prevention of disclosure of identity other than to 
authorised people, for authorised purposes. For example in the NHS, patient records are 
confidential, but may be accessed by any NHS staff for appropriate purposes; but not for 
inappropriate ones. Using records for malicious gossip would be a serious breach of 
confidentiality.  
In most research projects confidentiality is a process, rather than a condition. It is important 
to make clear to participants what confidentiality involves and what measures will be in place 
to protect participants from unwanted violations of confidentiality.  
81 
 

If the data are retained for further research researchers need to ensure that the informed 
consent form explains and justifies this. Applicants should describe the measures taken to 
encode or anonymise stored data. Generally, data sets should be anonymised as soon as it is 
reasonable to do so, even if this requires the loss of potentially useful information. Even 
where only anonymised data are used, adequate security for storage and handling of such 
data must be demonstrated. This includes avoiding the unnecessary duplication of electronic 
data sets, which increases the chances of their being misused. 
2.4.2. Data Storage 
 
The data protection act and confidentiality requirements (see above) pose a dilemma for data 
storage, which is another ethical requirement of research. If research is not going to be 
published in the public domain, but was conducted primarily for educational purposes, then 
raw data should be destroyed once the research work has been educationally assessed. Any 
data retained electronically should have all personal identifying information removed. QM has 
electronic (eResearch, QMU Research Repository: http://eresearch.qmu.ac.uk/ ) and physical 
data repositories and is developing a thesis repository (http://etheses.qmu.ac.uk/). Please 
contact Information Services for further details. For research that may be published in the 
public domain whether this is student or staff work, raw research data needs to be stored for 
a reasonable period of time so that it can be re-accessed and checked should issues or queries 
arise (for example from conflicting findings by other research teams). The QMU Retention 
Policy is that raw data, including interview tapes, completed questionnaires,  and other 
material, generally should be retained for five years after the research programme is 
completed, although this can vary depending on funder and other requirements. Additionally, 
signed consent forms should be kept separately from the data for 12 months on campus and 
thereafter in remote secure storage for the duration of the retention of the physical data. It is 
the responsibility of the principal researcher to store data securely for the appropriate length 
of time. Storage will normally be in the Subject Area.  
2.5.   Academic freedom and restrictions on publication 
 
QMU policy is opposed to research that has restrictions placed on the publication of findings 
(see Appendix 4). These restrictions are usually placed by some funders, including some NHS, 
government and industry sources. Sometimes there are legitimate ethical reasons for 
restricting publication, for example to protect commercial interests. However, is becoming 
more common for funders to stipulate that they own the intellectual rights to research they 
have funded, simply to control the information and, potentially prevent or manage its release 
into the public domain. This is contrary to the spirit of academic inquiry and such research is 
arguably unethical because it colludes in the suppression of information. Research at QMU 
should not be contracted with strong clauses restricting publication. This should have been 
negotiated during the funding application process, but the Ethics Panel reserves the right to 
challenge the ethical probity of research where publication of findings has been restricted by 
the funding contract.  
 
 
82 
 

SECTION 2 
Procedures for Ethical Approval  
1. 
SUBMISSION OF AN APPLICATION FOR ETHICAL APPROVAL 
 
Without recorded ethics approval, under no circumstances can a research project proceed at 
QMU. The process of applying for ethical approval at QMU is described in this section, and is 
outlined in the flowchart in Appendix 1. The research team are responsible for applying for 
approval in a timely manner.  
Research should not collect any data from participants, or use other data that is not in the 
public domain until Ethical Approval has been granted. So doing potentially constitutes serious 
research misconduct. In some circumstances, the data collected may be inadmissible. In 
serious cases students or staff involved may be subject to disciplinary procedures. If anyone 
becomes aware that research data is being collected or used without Ethical Approval, then 
they should immediately notify their Head of Division/Research Centre and the Research 
Ethics Panel. At minimum, staff and students will be required to suspend data collection/use 
immediately until Ethical Approval is obtained. The Research Ethics Panel cannot guarantee 
that approval will be granted retrospectively for data already collected. 
The first step in gaining ethical approval is to complete an ‘Application for Ethical Approval for 
a Research Project’. This form is available on QMU’s website, or can be obtained from the 
Secretary to the Research Ethics Panel: xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
Most questions on the form are self-explanatory. Section 1 of this document – Ethical 
Principles to guide research – should be read before the Application for Ethical Approval is 
completed. 
 
It is the researcher’s responsibility to ensure that the Application for Ethical Approval form is 
fully completed, legible and literate, and has any supplementary material such as consent 
forms or information sheets attached as appropriate. Any form that deviates markedly from 
this standard will be returned to the applicant by the Head of Division, without review. 
2.  
THE ROLE OF THE HEAD OF DIVISION/RESEARCH CENTRE OR OTHER AUTHORISED PERSON 
 
The completed application with information sheet and consent form included as appropriate, 
should be submitted to the Head of Division/Research Centre for consideration. The Head of 
Division/Research Centre will review the application and supplementary material, and will 
make a decision from four possible alternatives. External applicants wishing to conduct 
research using staff or students at QMU should apply directly to the University Research Ethics 
Panel, providing a copy of the approved ethics application obtained from their own 
organisation. If ethical approval has not been granted by their own organisation then they 
should complete the QMU standard form and submit it to the Secretary of the Research Ethics 
Panel.  
2.1 
If the application has been incorrectly completed, relevant information omitted or necessary 
supplementary material not included, the Head of Division should tick ‘I refer this application 
83 
 

back to the applicant because…’ The reason(s) for referring the form back should be given, and 
the form signed and returned to the applicant. No record of the application need be kept by 
the Head of Division in this case.  
2.2   If the application has been completed correctly and all relevant information included, there 
are three remaining alternatives, which should be considered in the order they are listed. The 
first, ‘I refer this application to the Research Ethics Panel’, should be chosen if any of the 
following circumstances apply: 
  where any non-routine harm, physical or psychological discomfort, or physical, biological or 
psychological risk is involved; 
  where participants are used who are under 16 or over 65 years of age or whose ability to 
give voluntary consent is limited, including cognitively impaired persons, prisoners, persons 
with a chronic physical or mental condition, or those who live in or are connected to an 
institutional environment; 
  where any invasive technique is involved, DNA testing, or collection of bodily fluids or 
tissue; 
  where a degree or duration of exercise or physical exertion is involved that might be 
painful, stressful or hazardous to some participants; 
  where manipulation of cognitive or affective human responses are involved which could 
cause stress or anxiety; 
  where drugs, including liquid and food additives or other substances, are administered for 
research purposes; 
  where deception of participants is used of a nature which might cause distress or which 
might reasonably affect their willingness to participate in the research; 
  where highly personal, intimate or other private or confidential information is sought; 
  where payment is made to participants other than to cover expenses or time involved. 
  Where restriction is intended on the publication of results (see Appendix 4) 
  Where the research involves a ‘sensitive’ research topic. Researchers, in particular 
undergraduate students, should carefully consider the implications of conducting research 
in sensitive topic areas which may cause emotional distress to participants or the 
researcher themselves, for example: 

domestic abuse 

rape or sexual assault 

psychological disorders e.g. Self-harm, eating disorders 

Illegal or unethical activities e.g., crime, drug abuse 

acute or terminal illness 
 
Please note this list is not exhaustive. 
Unless there are established research procedures at QM to deal with a specific sensitive 
topic that have previously been agreed to be minor invasive, research involving sensitive 
topics should be referred to the REP. 
84 
 

2.3   The second option, ‘I find this application acceptable and an application for ethical approval 
should now be submitted to a relevant external committee’, should be chosen if any of the 
following apply: 
  The proposed research includes use of NHS patients or employees as subjects, NHS data, or 
it will be carried out (wholly or partly) on NHS premises. 
  The applicant has indicated that ethical approval from another body will be required. 
  The Head of Division knows that ethical approval from another body will be required. 
 
 
Where a student is submitting to an external committee, the application should be seen and 
checked by the Head of Division before it is submitted externally. 
2.4   The third option, ‘I grant ethical approval for this research’, should be chosen if none of the 
above bullet points apply and the Head of Division (or other authorised person) is satisfied 
that the research can proceed ethically. 
2.5 
 In all three cases, once signed by the Head of Division/Research Centre, the application form 
must be submitted to the Secretary to the Research Ethics Panel to be logged on a centrally-
maintained record of applications. Applications referred to the Research Ethics Panel must be 
received before the submission deadline in order to be considered at the next review period. 
Submission deadlines will be published by the Secretary to the Panel at the start of the 
academic year, and reminders will be circulated throughout the year. 
3.  
THE ROLE OF THE RESEARCH ETHICS PANEL 
 
The Research Ethics Panel reviews applications on a monthly basis. The application submission 
deadline will be the second Friday of each month and the dates will be published online 
before the start of each academic year. The Panel’s membership and remit can be found in 
Appendix 3. External applicants wishing to conduct research using staff or students at QMU 
should apply directly to the University Research Ethics Panel (see 2. above).  
3.1   Applications for ethical approval referred to the Panel by a Head of Division/Research Centre 
are reviewed by three members of the Panel and a decision regarding approval is reached. 
The members’ comments are submitted to the Secretary who will communicate the Panel’s 
decision to the applicant in writing approximately two working days after the  decision is 
reached.  
3.2   There are three possible options available to the Panel when considering an application. The 
first, ‘The Panel agrees that full ethical approval could be granted for the research’, will be 
chosen when the Panel are satisfied that the researcher has taken all necessary steps to 
ensure that the research will be conducted ethically, and that any potential risk to applicants 
has been considered and minimised. 
3.3   The second option is ‘The Panel agrees that amendments to the application are required 
before ethical approval can be granted for the research’. This will be chosen when the Panel 
supports the proposed research in principle, but agree that amendments to the application 
must be made before ethical approval can be granted. The amendments required by the Panel 
will be communicated to the applicant in writing by the Secretary. The amended application 
85 
 

should be submitted to the Secretary in the first instance. It will then be reviewed by three 
members of the Panel and the Convener. If satisfied that the required amendments have been 
appropriately completed, ethical approval may be granted by Convener’s Action.  
3.4   The third option available to the Panel is ‘The Panel invites the applicant to resubmit a revised 
application to its next meeting’. This option will be chosen when the Panel agrees that the 
proposed research involves significant ethical issues that have not been adequately addressed 
by the applicant in the application for ethical approval. The issues raised by the Panel when 
considering the application will be notified to the applicant in writing by the Secretary, along 
with the submission deadline and date of the next meeting. The revised application should be 
submitted to the Secretary for review by the Panel members that reviewed the original 
application . If the applicant chooses to resubmit on another topic, an application should be 
submitted to the Head of Division/Research Centre in the first instance and should be treated 
as a new application. 
3.5   Where applicants require an urgent decision on their application, a special request for fast 
track approval should be lodged with the Secretary. Fast track involves the review process 
described above, but reviewers’ comments are returned directly to the Convener for decision.. 
The Panel reserves the right to delay fast tracked applications to the next application cycle,  
should the Convener deem this necessary. 
3.6   Please note that fast tracking should only be requested in exceptional circumstances. 
Researchers should allow sufficient time in the planning of their research for completing the 
ethical approval process, including, if necessary, revisions to the application or resubmission 
to the Panel. 
4.  
ATTENDANCE OF THE APPLICANT AT A PANEL MEETING 
If the application has been referred by the Head of Division/Research Centre to the Research 
Ethics Panel, the applicant may be invited to attend a meeting of the Panel to answer further, 
verbal questions. The purpose of attendance would be to help Panel members gain a better 
understanding of the proposal. This could speed up the process of approval. 
Staff applicants would normally attend the meeting on their own. Undergraduate and MSc 
students should be accompanied by the supervisor of the research project as named on the 
application form, or an alternate if the supervisor is not available. Taught doctorate students 
and PhD students have the option of attending alone or with their supervisor.  
The Secretary of the Panel will inform applicants of the date of the relevant meeting and ask 
that this time is kept free. Applicants will be informed approximately three days in advance of 
the meeting whether attendance will be necessary. 
5.  
CONTINUING RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE RESEARCHER 
 
Any changes to the programme of research which are made following the granting of ethical 
approval and which would result in different information being given in any section of the 
Application for Ethical Approval form, should be notified to the Secretary to the Research 
Ethics Panel, who will advise on any action required. A report is also required should there be 
86 
 

any adverse occurrences or any results that raise questions about the safety of the research. 
Notification should be submitted to the Panel on completion of the research. 
6.    DEFINING DIFFERENT RESEARCH PROCEDURES – NON-INVASIVE, MINOR INVASIVE AND 
MAJOR INVASIVE RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES 
 
 
These distinctions originated in medical research, where the distinctions are relatively obvious 
in terms of physical harm or disturbance. Invasive procedures involve the possibility of major 
harm, even if there may also be major benefits. Minor invasive procedures pose a risk of some 
harm and non-invasive procedures are unlikely to be harmful at all. These distinctions can also 
be applied to research with human participants that is not physically invasive.  
6.1   A non-invasive procedure in humans would be one where it was unlikely that anybody would 
find participating at all stressful, upsetting, disturbing or psychologically or socially harmful. 
Usually, this requires a short procedure, a topic not controversial, stigmatising or distressing, 
no deception or discomfort during the procedure and highly confidential data handling 
procedures. Truly non-invasive procedures require only the addressing of standard ethical 
issues, clear demonstration that they are non-invasive, and should generally be approved by 
School/ Subject ethics committees. 
6.2 
A minor invasive procedure, in contrast, might be stressful, upsetting, disturbing, or 
psychologically or socially harmful, but probable harm would be brief and limited in nature 
relative to the participants’ lives. For example, some participants will find somewhat invasive 
any procedure that involves any overt or implied element of personal appraisal, because they 
have concerns about doing things properly or appropriately. On the other hand, someone 
suffering from a serious illness might find an interview about it only mildly invasive, compared 
to the invasion and upset already associated with their clinical care. To judge research non-
invasive it is important to make a positive case that upset is highly unlikely and/or worth the 
benefits to participants and research. Minor invasive procedures additionally require the 
addressing of procedures to recognise and minimise upset should it occur and clear 
demonstration that the procedure is not major invasive. When the same or similar procedures 
have been used before at QMU, then these may be approved by the School/ Subject ethics 
procedures. Minor invasive procedures commonly used in the subject should be referred to 
the University Ethics Panel on first use at QMU and part of the application should document 
their common use in the subject beyond QMU.  

6.3   Major invasive procedures are those where some participants are likely to find participation 
stressful, disturbing, or psychologically or socially harmful, and probable harm could be 
protracted or severe. That only a small minority of participants may respond in this manner 
does not render the procedure minor invasive. In addition to requirements for minor and non-
invasive procedures, applications for ethical approval for major invasive techniques should 
explain how risks are to be minimised and how the research team is collectively competent to 
minimise and manage harm, should it occur. Major invasive procedures should be referred to 
the University Ethics Panel.
 
A research procedure being major invasive is a function of the nature of the participants, the 
research topic, the research procedures themselves and the competence of the research 
87 
 

team. Vulnerable participants, intimate, illegal, stigmatised or controversial research topics, 
protracted, demanding, physically stressful or tedious research procedures and a less 
competent team make it more likely that the procedure will be major invasive.  
6.4   The Panel delegates responsibility for approving non-invasive and established minor invasive 
research procedures to the Schools. As discussed above, these criteria are relative to (a) the 
participants, (b) the researchers and (c) the research topic. Significant changes in any of these 
should be referred to the Research Ethics Panel in the first instance. For example, that some 
staff commonly use a technique does not justify its use by a student not supervised by any 
staff member experienced in the technique. Another example is that the invasiveness of 
questionnaires or interviews is heavily topic-dependent.  
 
A reasonable principle is often that research procedures approved for vulnerable participants, 
less experienced researchers and more sensitive topics can often be conducted 
unproblematically with less vulnerable participants, more experienced researchers and less 
sensitive topics.  
 
It is the responsibility of the Head of Division or Subject Area Ethics Committee if applicable to 
keep an updated list of approved methods in that school or subject and to provide the 
University Ethics Panel with this list at least once a year. This list will include relevant 
information about any restrictions on this approval in terms of researchers, participants or 
topics. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
88 
 

Appendix 1 
Process for Obtaining Ethical Opinion at QMU-wide Research Ethics Panel level – guidance on 
deciding which committee (internal or external) should grant approval is available from 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
 
Applicant decides which 
Ethics Committee to submit to 
(See Figure 1)
If submitting to QMU REP
Applicant 
completes Ethical 
Approval Form 
Application returned
and attaches all 
 to applicant
relevant 
documentation
(For student projects) 
Application incomplete/
Application reviewed and 
inadequate/missing 
signed off by Project 
documentation
Supervisor
Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory
Application signed off by 
Head of Division for 
quality assurance
Unsatisfactory
Satisfactory
Application submitted to 
Secretary to Research
 Ethics Panel (REP) 
(xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx)
Unsatisfactory
Application 
normally reviewed 
by three reviewers
Amendments and/or 
Approval not 
Approval granted
more information 
granted
required
Major manageable
/resolvable
risks to
participants
/researchers
Major
Research begins
Applicant
Applicant
Minor
/institutions
responses
responds
unmanageable
issues
satisfactory
to REP
/unresolvable 
identified
risks to
participants
/researchers
Research
/institutions
completion
Convenor 
Changes to
decision
procedures,
Convenor
personnel or
decision 
reporting
to recommence
adverse events
Information
Submit Notification 
Submit Notification 
provided
of Research 
of Change to REP 
adequate
Completion to 
Secretary
REP Secretary
|More
Submit requested 
information
information to 
required
REP Secretary
 
89 
 

Appendix 2 
Research Ethics Panel Remit and Membership 
Remit 
To ensure that the research conducted in the University complies with appropriate ethical standards 
and to make recommendations to the Research Strategy as set out below. 
The Panel will have delegated authority to: 
a) 
determine the ethical propriety of such research projects as are referred to it; 
b) 
provide advice to researchers and supervisors on the ethical propriety of their research; 
c) 
review on a regular basis the University’s Guidelines on Ethics related to research; 
 
Membership 
Convener 
Nominee of the Research Strategy Committee 
Nominated 
Three academic representatives nominated from the academic staff of each School, 
who are actively involved in research 
Secretary 
To be appointed by the University Secretary  
Frequency 
Business is conducted virtually. Applications are circulated to reviewers following 
submission of all required documentation to xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
90 
 

Appendix 3 
Sample consent form and participant information sheet 
Participant Identification Number for this project: 
SAMPLE CONSENT FORM 
Title of Project: 
Name of Researcher:  
Please initial boxes. 
1.  I confirm that I have read the information sheet dated.................... (version............) for the 
above study. I have had the opportunity to consider the information, ask questions and have 
had these answered satisfactorily.  
2.  I understand that my participation is voluntary and that I am free to withdraw at any time 
without giving any reason, without my legal rights [or medical care – only  for healthcare 
studies] being affected.  
3.  (If appropriate) I understand that relevant sections of my medical notes and data collected 
during the study, may be looked at by individuals from [company name], from regulatory 
authorities or from the NHS Trust, where it is relevant to my taking part in this research. I give 
permission for these individuals to have access to my records.  
4.  (If appropriate) I understand that the information collected about me will be used to support 
other research in the future, and may be shared anonymously with other researchers. 
5.  (If appropriate) I agree to my General Practitioner being informed of my participation in the 
study. 
6.  (If appropriate) I agree for my blood/saliva/urine to be collected for this project. 
7.  (If appropriate) I agree to be video/audio recorded for this project.   
8.  I agree to take part in the above study. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name of Participant 
 
Date 
 
 
 
Signature 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name of Person   
 
Date 
 
 
 
Signature 
taking consent 
 
 
91 
 


 
 
SAMPLE PARTICIPANT INFORMATION SHEET 
Title of Study 
Invitation and brief summary 
 
My name is Sam Student and I am an undergraduate student from the School of xxxxxxxxxx 
at Queen Margaret University in Edinburgh.  As part of my degree programme, I am 
undertaking a research project for my Honours dissertation.  The title of my project is: 
xxxxxxxxxx 
This study will investigate / is about / is looking into xxxxxxxxxx. 
[If applicable: The findings of the project will be useful / valuable because xxxxxxxxxx.] 
[If applicable: This research is being funded by xxxxxxxxxx.] 
I am looking for volunteers to participate in the project.  There are no criteria (e.g. gender, 
age, or health) for being included or excluded – everyone is welcome to take part.  [If there 
are inclusion / exclusion criteria then these should be stated.

What’s involved? 
If you agree to participate in the study, you will be asked to xxxxxxxxxx.  There is a risk that 
xxxxxxxxxx / The researcher is not aware of any risks associated with xxxxxxxxxx.  The 
whole procedure should take no longer than xx minutes.  You will be free to withdraw from 
the study at any stage and you would not have to give a reason. 
What would taking part involve? 
[See document ‘QMU Guidance for participant information sheet’ for what details to include 
for this section.] 
[If applicable: Since your participation will involve you travelling to Queen Margaret 
University especially, you will be reimbursed for out-of-pocket expenses.] 
What are the possible benefits of taking part? 
[See document ‘QMU Guidance for participant information sheet’ for what details to include 
for this section.] 
What are the possible disadvantages and risks of taking part? 
92 
 

 
[See document ‘QMU Guidance for participant information sheet’ for what details to include 
for this section.] 
[Other supporting relevant information – Use suggested titles from document ‘QMU 
Guidance for participant information sheet’ ] 

[See document ‘QMU Guidance for participant information sheet’ for what details to include 
for this section.] 
All data will be anonymised as much as possible, but you may be identifiable from tape 
recordings of your voice / or xxxxxxxxxx.  Your name will be replaced with a participant 
number, and it will not be possible for you to be identified in any reporting of the data 
gathered. 
The results may be published in a journal or presented at a conference / or xxxxxxxxxx. 
If you would like to contact an independent person, who knows about this project but is not 
involved in it, you are welcome to contact Dr Chris Lecturer.  Her contact details are given 
below. 
If you have read and understood this information sheet, any questions you had have been 
answered, and you would like to be a participant in the study, please now see the consent 
form. 
 
 
Contact details of the researcher 
 
Name of researcher:  Sam Student 
 
Address: 
 
Undergraduate Student, Division, School 
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh 
 
 
 
Queen Margaret University Drive 
Musselburgh 
East Lothian  EH21 6UU 
 
Email / Telephone: 
xxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx / 0131 474 0000 
 
 
93 
 

Contact details of the independent adviser (note that the independent adviser cannot be a 
member of your supervisory team) 
Name of adviser: 
Dr Chris Lecturer 
 
Address: 
 
Post, Division, School 
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh 
 
 
 
Queen Margaret University Drive 
Musselburgh 
East Lothian  EH21 6UU 
 
Email / Telephone: 
xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx / 0131 474 0000 
 
 
 
Note: You should give only QMU (not home) contact details. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
94 
 

Appendix 4  
Restriction on Publication 
a)  Clauses which give the funder the right to restrict publication of results are sometimes 
sought by private companies who are intending to fund university research. They are also 
sometimes sought by government departments. Restrictions are usually (but not always) 
time limited and they may be more or less draconian in nature. For example, an agreement 
which requires the funder to provide written justification for turning down a request to 
publish obviously presents less of an obstacle than a right to veto in the absence of such a 
requirement. 
b)  The impact of a delay in publication will vary from one instance to another. In a rapidly 
developing field, a delay of two years might render the results out-of-date and therefore 
unpublishable. In another case, such a delay might have little effect on the publishability of 
the results. 
c)  The reasons behind demands for restrictions on publication include military security, 
commercial advantage and risks to third parties. Research on a communication system 
between fighter pilots might be an example of the first; the wish to have time to patent a 
walking aid might be an example of the second; reporting the opinions of a respondent who 
is thereby put in peril might be an example of the third. An instinct for secrecy on the part of 
a government department, or the desire to withhold neutral or adverse results on a product 
in order to sell off existing stock, would be examples of obviously insufficient (indeed 
illegitimate) reasons for restrictions. 
d)  Universities normally resist restrictions on publication, for reasons of principle and for 
material reasons. The principle is that of 'freedom of speech', or in this case freedom to 
publish. Universities have a historical and continuing role in asserting freedom of speech and 
the principle that academics have the right to reveal the results of their research to society 
at large. The material reasons concern the university's income, its reputation and the career 
opportunities of academic staff. The university derives income from the RAE. Publications 
contribute towards the RAE rating and loss of opportunity to publish can therefore impact 
fairly directly on income; also, publications significantly enhance opportunities to secure 
future research grants. Until research results are published, the research can make little 
contribution to the university's reputation; scandal as the result of revelations of 
controversial 'secret findings' would have negative effects on the university's reputation. 
Academic staff depend on publication for career advancement, so for the researchers 
themselves the ability to publish is crucial. 
e)  A further risk to researchers (and the institution) is that of being prevented from disclosing a 
discovery which has adverse implications for public safety or public health.  
f)  Special consideration is needed for research leading to a PhD or MSc award. The necessity 
for external involvement in the examination process may lead to a technical breach of an 
agreement on restriction on disclosure. In such cases, the agreement of all parties should be 
established, to ensure that the restrictions do not lead to a conflict with the requirement for 
adequate external scrutiny of theses. 
 
 
 
95 
 

QMU policy on restrictions on publication: 
  any research project proposal which contains a restriction on the researcher's freedom to 
publish must be considered at a meeting of the Research Ethics Panel, and the decision 
recorded in the minutes; 
  demands for restriction on publication should be resisted as far as possible; 
  the reasons behind a request for a restriction should be ascertained and an assessment of 
the justification for any restrictions should be assessed, along with an estimate of their 
practical effects; 
  due regard should be given to different effects of restrictions on different areas of research; 
  where restrictions are agreed, they should be precisely defined, including specification of 
beginning and end points of the time scale involved and the procedure and time scale for 
reaching a decision between funder and researcher on submission for publication; 
  where restrictions are agreed, the University should protect itself against the possibility of 
being legally restrained from disclosing results which ought urgently to be disclosed for the 
public good; 
  where restrictions are agreed, a level of funding which reflects their financial impact should 
be negotiated; 
  in the case of research leading to a post-graduate award, for which restrictions are agreed, 
the arrangements for external examination of the thesis should be agreed in advance; 
  QMU will not accept any contract which contains restrictions on publication which cannot be 
justified on ethical grounds. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
96 
 

link to page 99 link to page 99 13. EXAMINATION REGULATIONS 
 
Contents 

1.0 
Introduction 
2.0 
Rubric of Examination Papers 
3.0 
Conduct of Examinations 
4.0 
Arrangement of Examinations outwith the University  
5.0 
Instructions to candidates for examinations 
1.0 
INTRODUCTION 
 
This Section refers to all summative examinations that form part of a student’s assessment 
for an award or for determining progression. These regulations do not refer to class tests or 
other formative assessments. 
2.0 
RUBRIC OF EXAMINATION PAPERS 
 
The rubric on the front sheet of each examination paper will provide, in standard format, the 
following details: 
a)  name of institution 
b)  home Division 
c)  Programme(s) using this examination paper 
d)  level at which assessed 
e)  module / subject title 
f) 
module / subject code 
g)  examination title (if different from module / subject title) 
h)  academic session 
i) 
date of examination 
j) 
duration of examination (and indication of allocation of reading time) 
k)  instructions to candidates 
l) 
clear instructions as to the allocation of questions per answer book 
m)  paper setter 
3.0 
CONDUCT OF EXAMINATIONS 
 
3.1 
Examinations are conducted according to the published diet of examinations timetable.  The 
confirmed timetable will be published for each diet of examinations at least three weeks 
before the start of the diet and displayed on the University website. 
3.2 
An examination pack, containing the appropriate examination papers, script books and other 
materials, as well as a list of candidates eligible to take the examination, will be prepared by 
the Registry Examinations Officer, for collection by the Senior Invigilator thirty minutes 
before the start of the examination. 
3.4 
The responsibilities of candidates undertaking examinations offered by Queen Margaret 
University are detailed in Section 5 below 
97 
 

4.0 
ARRANGEMENT OF EXAMINATIONS OUTWITH THE UNIVERSITY  
 
4.1 
Except in cases of extreme difficulty, students are required to be available for every diet of 
examinations, including retrieval examinations. The following procedure is applicable to all 
students and all diets of examination. Requests for special arrangement of examinations 
outwith the University should be considered only if exceptional circumstances apply. Senate 
has agreed that being an international student (broadly defined to include an EU citizen 
domiciled at distance from the UK) may be considered as an exceptional circumstance. 
4.2 
The procedure for special arrangement of examinations to be held outwith the University is 
as follows: 
4.2.1 
Any request for an examination outwith the University requires to have the written approval 
of both the Programme Leader and the Head of Division/Dean of School: 
  Approved requests for examinations outwith the University should be forwarded in 
writing to the Registry Examinations Officer, who shall make all subsequent 
arrangements. The Registry Examinations Officer should normally be informed of any 
approved requests for special arrangements at the earliest opportunity and no less than 
six weeks 
before the relevant diet of examinations is due to take place. 
  Students are asked to nominate a local centre willing to undertake the examination and 
to conform to the University’s examination procedures and regulations, but this has to 
be confirmed as suitable by the Registry Examinations Officer. In addition, the Registry 
Examinations Officer will act as the official contact point for arrangements with the local 
centre and with the student. 
  Any examinations organised at a designated local centre should normally take place at 
the same date and time (GMT) as the same examination at the University. Where this is 
not possible, and there is a possibility of contact between students, Registry may require 
the relevant paper setter to set an alternative examination paper. 
  The Registry Examinations Officer will notify the student of all finalised arrangements in 
writing at least ten days before the scheduled date of the examination(s) in question.  
  There will be an administration charge made by the University (currently set at £75) 
which will normally be payable by the student.  This is intended to cover the costs of the 
arrangements.  Where Programme requirements (such as placements) necessitate such 
arrangements, this charge will be waived.  In addition, the local centre may make a 
further charge to cover any incurred costs, for which the student may be liable.  
 
4.3 
Further advice regarding the arrangement of examinations outwith the University is 
available from the Registry Examinations Officer. 
 
 
98 
 

5.0 
INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES FOR EXAMINATIONS 
5.1 
GENERAL 
 
5.1.1 
Candidates must ensure that they are aware of the published examinations timetable for 
both first and second diet examinations and their requirement to attend. 
 
5.1.2 
Candidates must notify any change of permanent address through the Student Portal. This is 
essential for mailing of assessment results (student academic transcript) and information 
about graduation. 
 
5.1.3 
Candidates must arrive at the examination venue at least 15 minutes before the published 
start time. The examination timetable (published on the Registry website) should be 
checked to confirm the location. 
 
5.1.4  Candidates must complete and sign the signature sheet and/or an attendance slip, as 
directed by the Senior Invigilator. 
 
5.1.5  A candidate who is unable to attend an examination because of illness, or another valid 
reason, must submit an extenuating circumstances form with relevant documentary 
evidence.  
 
5.1.6  A candidate who requires provision of additional examination arrangements must inform 
their Programme Leader as soon as possible and normally not later than four weeks before 
the first examination. 
 
5.1.7  Candidates are referred to the Programme Regulations for specific details relating to their 
Programme assessment procedures, and to the general Assessment Regulations. 
 
5.2 
LATE ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES 
 
5.2.1 
A candidate who arrives late will be admitted without question during the first half hour of 
an examination. 
 
5.2.2 
Admission after the first half hour may be allowed with the prior permission of the Senior 
Invigilator and the Registry Examinations Officer. 
 
5.2.3 
No extra time will normally be allowed to a candidate who arrives late for an examination 
session, unless extenuating circumstances are accepted by the Senior Invigilator and the 
Registry Examinations Officer. 
 
5.3 
CONDUCT IN THE EXAMINATION ROOM 
 
5.3.1 
Candidates must retain only authorised materials on their desks during each examination.  
All other belongings should be placed either at the front or the back of the room. The use of 
99 
 

hand held personal technology, including smartwatches, personal organisers, electronic 
dictionaries and mobile phones is not permitted. All mobile telephones must be switched off 
prior to entrance into the examination room and retained in candidates’ bags at the front of 
the examination room. The use of programmable calculators and those with text, symbolic 
or graphic capabilities is not permitted unless their use is expressly authorised by the 
examiners, as stated on the front cover of the examination paper. 
 
5.3.2 
Candidates are advised that they should complete the front cover(s) of examination answer 
book(s) before the start of the examination. Candidates should ensure that they have 
completed and sealed the fold-down edge to maintain anonymity. You must also ensure that 
your name is not shown anywhere else on the examination answer book. 
 
5.3.3 
Candidates should ensure that they have been issued with the correct question paper and 
note the duration of the examination. 
 
5.3.4 
Once the examination has started, communication or any other irregular practice is not 
allowed between candidates. 
 
5.3.5 
For the duration of reading time (where allocated this will normally last 5 minutes), 
candidates should not commence writing in the answer books, but may be permitted to 
write on the question paper (unless they are required to answer on this paper) or on scrap 
paper. The invigilator will instruct candidates when to commence writing in the answer 
books. 
 
5.3.6 
Questions on the content or presentation of the examination paper may only be asked 
during the specified reading time. The answer to any question asked will be repeated to all 
candidates taking the examination. 
 
5.3.7 
If a candidate wishes to attract the attention of the invigilator at any time during the 
examination s/he should do so by raising her/his hand. 
 
5.3.8 
No candidate should leave the examination room during the first 30 minutes or the last 15 
minutes of the examination, other than for personal reasons. Any candidate wishing to leave 
the examination room temporarily must be accompanied by the invigilator. 
 
5.3.9 
Candidates will be reminded of the time 30 minutes and 15 minutes before the end of the 
examination. 
 
5.3.10  A candidate who becomes ill during an examination must inform an invigilator who should 
record the details on the invigilators report.  Candidates should submit an extenuating 
circumstances form as soon as possible thereafter. 
 
 
100 
 

5.4 
END OF THE EXAMINATION 
 
5.4.1 
Candidates must obey the Senior Invigilator’s instructions either to remain in their seats 
until answer books are collected or to leave books on desks. 
 
5.4.2  All answer books and other relevant material to be submitted should be clearly marked with 
the candidate’s name. 
 
5.4.3  It is the candidate’s responsibility to ensure that all relevant material for marking is 
submitted to the invigilator. 
 
5.5 
PROCEDURES IN THE EVENT OF NETWORK DISRUPTION 
 
5.5.1  In the unlikely event of network disruption that affects an examination completed on a 
computer, the University will put in place alternative arrangements for the examination. The 
precise nature of these arrangements will be determined on a case by case basis. In all cases, 
the priority will be not to disadvantage students. 
 
5.5.2  In the event of network disruption, the examination will be handwritten, where possible and 
appropriate. Students with Individual Learning Plans who would normally use a computer to 
take an examination will be given the option of handwriting the examination. They will also 
be given extra time to complete the examination. Should this not be appropriate, attempts 
will be made to reschedule the examination.  
 
5.5.3  Should a network disruption coincide with an examination on the HUB, the examination will 
be rescheduled.  
 
5.5.4  Students are expected to check the University’s Facebook page and Twitter feeds for 
updates in the event of network disruption. Should there be a need to identify an alternative 
room for an examination affected by network disruption, physical signage at reception will 
provide details of the location. 
 
5.6 
PROCEDURES IN THE EVENT OF  AN EVACUATION DUE TO A FIRE ALARM ACTIVATION OR 
OTHER  EMERGENCY 

 
In the event of the fire alarms being activated and candidates for an exam being evacuated 
during an examination, the following action will be taken in line with QMU Fire Regulations: 
 
5.6.1   Invigilators will act as temporary fire wardens responsible for the orderly evacuation of the 
examination room.  
 
5.6.2 
Without delaying the evacuation of the candidates unduly, the candidates will be:  
 
a)  instructed to stop writing;  
b)  informed that the examination has been suspended and that further instructions will be 
given on re-admittance to the examination room; 
101 
 

c)  Informed that examination regulations still apply, and that candidates should not 
communicate with one another. 
d)  asked to check that her/his name is on at least one answer book;  
e)  instructed to evacuate the room, leaving question papers, answer books and personal 
       belongings in the examination room 
f)  asked to proceed as a group to the nearest the assembly point.  
 
5.6.3 
The invigilator will be the last person to leave the examination room and will record the time 
of the fire alarm activation and evacuation of the examination room. 
 
5.6.4 
Invigilators will return to the examination room when authorised by the Security Wardens and 
will re-admit the candidates.  
 
5.6.5   If the alarm is activated at a point up to two-thirds of the way into the published time provided 
for  the  examination, the  examination  will  re-start,  and  the  period  the  examination  will  be 
extended by the period of disruption.  
 
5.6.6 
If  the  alarm  is  activated  at  a  point  within  the  last  third  of  the  examination  period,  the 
examination will not be re-started.  The examiners will take the extenuating circumstances 
into account in determining the performance of candidates. 
 
5.6.7 
The period of disruption is from the time the alarm sounds until candidates are re-seated in 
the examination room.  Should the period of disruption extend beyond one hour, then the 
examination will be considered null and void, and rescheduled at a time to be notified by the 
Registry Examinations Officer.  
 
5.6.8.   On re-admittance to the examination venue, the Senior Invigilator will instruct candidates as 
to whether or not the examination will be re-started, or has been declared null and void [in 
line with paragraphs 9.6.6 and 9.6.7 above].  
 
5.6.9   The Senior Invigilator will record the disruption on the Senior Invigilator Report so that the 
examiners can be advised to take this into account when assessing performance.   
 
5.6.10   During the period of evacuation the Regulations for Examinations should be considered to 
be upheld until the examination is re-started or ended. Conversation between candidates 
may mean that the examination has to be rescheduled. 
 
 
 
 
102 
 

14. EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES 
GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS AND STAFF  
This document provides guidance to students and staff on the definition and consideration of claims 
for ‘extenuating circumstances’, and on the procedures for submitting a claim under these 
guidelines.  
This guidance should be read in conjunction with the QMU Academic Appeals Procedures and the 
section on ‘Assessment’ contained within the University Governance and Regulations Handbook. 
Copies of both are available at https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/  
1  
INTRODUCTION – SOME IMPORTANT PRINCIPLES  
The University’s procedures for the consideration of extenuating circumstances seek to ensure that 
all students are treated fairly, are not disadvantaged by circumstances beyond their control, and 
that the standards of the University’s awards are maintained.  
It is accepted that, from time to time, circumstances beyond a student’s control may affect her/his 
ability to undertake assessment on time, or may affect her/his performance in assessment. It is also 
recognised that assessment periods can be stressful. However, students need to be able to plan and 
manage their time and their workload, to meet deadlines, to cope with a certain level of stress, and 
to manage their University studies alongside other responsibilities in life.  
All students have a responsibility to manage their learning, revision and assessment activities 
throughout each semester or assessment period. It is essential that students plan carefully and 
manage workloads throughout this time, and do not leave too much coursework, learning, revision 
or similar activities to be undertaken late in the semester or assessment period. Similarly, when 
examinations are to be taken at the end of a semester or assessment period, students should 
conduct revision throughout the semester, and not limit it to the period shortly before sitting 
examinations.  
It is also essential to recognise that illnesses and difficult life events do occur, and that it is a normal 
part of life to have to manage these and continue with work or study.  
2  
WHAT WOULD BE ACCEPTED AS ‘EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES’?  
Extenuating circumstances are defined as:  
“circumstances beyond the student’s control which either prevent the student from submitting a 
piece of coursework or sitting an examination, or cause the student to perform less well in his or her 
coursework or examinations than he or she might otherwise have been expected to do (on the basis 
of other work).’ 

The term is used to describe those circumstances that cause exceptional interference with academic 
performance, and which are over and above the normal difficulties experienced in life. 
 
103 
 

In general, though not exclusively, extenuating circumstances will be of a medical or personal nature 
affecting the student for a period of time and/or during the assessment period. These are normally 
circumstances that have prevented the student from demonstrating, or acquiring, the skills, 
knowledge or competencies associated with a particular module(s). This would include 
circumstances preventing attendance at an examination, or adversely affecting performance at an 
examination, or preventing work from being submitted by the deadline set. Examples would include, 
but would not be limited to, illness, accident, or bereavement. 
The University does not normally consider medical certificates for long-standing controlled 
conditions, or self-limiting illness, as evidence in support of extenuating circumstances affecting 
performance. Students in this category would normally have had the benefit of experience, medical 
knowledge or help to control the condition or illness, and would normally have registered with the 
Disabled Student Coordinator, the Disability Adviser, and be working to an agreed Learning Plan. It 
follows that such students should contact the Disability Adviser at an early point so that these 
circumstances can be recorded and appropriate arrangements put in place, in line with QMU’s 
disability policy statement. Further information may be found in the Student Handbook and on the 
University’s website. 
The University normally disregards circumstances which students are expected to cope with as part 
of a properly managed workload, or as part of the normal issues and difficulties that arise as part of 
life. Circumstances which would not be acceptable are those where a student could reasonably have 
avoided the situation, or acted to limit the impact of the circumstances. 
The following are examples of circumstances which would NOT fall within the University’s definition 
of "extenuating circumstances": 
 
completing coursework too late and missing deadlines because of computer; difficulties, 
or transport difficulties; 
 
general pressure of work; 
 
normal work commitments on behalf of an employer; 
 
having more than one examination on the same day or on consecutive days (unless the 
student was already suffering from illness or injury) 
 
missing an examination due to misreading the timetable or oversleeping; 
 
losing work not backed up on computer disk, or failure of a floppy disk/CD Rom; 
 
theft of home computer – students are expected to make a back up copy of all work on, 
which should be stored separately from the computer. 
 
failure to make alternative travel plans when disruptions were advised in advance; 
 
a short-term problem or illness which has occurred during the year and which is deemed 
not to have had an overall effect on the student’s performance; 
104 
 

 
where extenuating circumstances have affected the student throughout their time at 
QMU [on the basis that it would be difficult to determine what her/his marks might have 
been like otherwise]; 
 
Insufficient computers/printers to do the work [a claim submitted upon this basis would 
not be supported on the grounds that it indicated lack of advance planning]. 
Failure of IT would be accepted only in limited circumstances. There may be occasions when, due to 
unforeseen circumstances, the University’s own computer/IT equipment is unavailable for use. If this 
happens students may request confirmation from Information Services of this, including the time 
period and the date(s) of its unavailability. However, it would be reasonable to expect a student to 
submit the latest draft of their work from a few days prior to the deadline to support their claim. 
3  
WHEN SHOULD A CLAIM FOR EXTENUATING CIRCUMSTANCES BE SUBMITTED? 
It is important that students report in advance any circumstances that they anticipate will affect 
their performance in assessment. 
Students who know that they will be unable to meet the deadline for coursework, or attend an 
examination – due to circumstances beyond their control – should submit a completed Extenuating 
Circumstances Claim form, along with supporting evidence, to their Programme Leader in good time, 
so that the potential implications can be considered. The Extenuating Circumstances Claim Form 
may be collected from the School Office or from the Examinations Officer, Registry. Alternatively, 
arrangements will be made to post or email a copy of the form where a student is unable to travel to 
the University for valid reason [e.g. illness, residence at a distance, work commitments]. 
In the case of coursework, a request for an extension should also be submitted if required, normally 
before and no later than the date the coursework assignment was due. 
The claim for extenuating circumstances will be considered at this stage by the Programme and 
Module Co-ordinator. If the circumstances are deemed valid and there is time to redeem the 
situation (e.g. through an extension to deadline for submission of coursework), the authority to 
agree this rests with the Programme Leader. 
It follows therefore, that the only claims for extenuating circumstances which can normally be 
considered after the assessment date – either the date of the examination or the deadline date for 
submission of coursework – are those where it can be demonstrated that the student was affected 
by an accident or sudden illness, or other circumstances which occurred on or immediately before 
the day in question and which were entirely beyond the student’s control. 
If it is not possible to redeem the situation [e.g. where the examination was part of a time-table diet 
of examinations], then the Programme Leader will advise the student concerned, and the claim for 
extenuating circumstances will be put forward to the relevant Board of Examiners [see section 
below]. 
It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that their claim is submitted to the Programme leader in 
sufficient time for the appropriate Board of Examiners, normally no later than one week before the 
105 
 

meeting of the Board of Examiners. The dates of the Boards of Examiners are available from the 
School Office, the Student Records section of the Registry and the Students’ Union. 
Failure to submit a form to the Programme Leader in advance of the Board of Examiners, without 
valid cause, will mean that the student may not subsequently appeal against their results on the 
grounds of extenuating circumstances. It is the student’s responsibility to explain fully the impact of 
extenuating circumstances on their work/performance. If this is not explained sufficiently, then the 
student may not subsequently appeal and ask the Board to consider additional information. 
4  
WHAT EVIDENCE SHOULD BE SUBMITTED WITH THE CLAIM 
A claim for extenuating circumstances must be submitted on the appropriate form. The form must 
be completed in full, and each module / mode of assessment affected must be recorded. The form 
should normally be submitted in person at the School Office, but may also be submitted by email or 
fax where the student is unable to travel to the University for valid reason [e.g. illness, residence at a 
distance, work commitments]. 
The claim form should be accompanied by supporting evidence, in writing, from an appropriate 
authority. A claim is unlikely to be upheld without appropriate supporting evidence. Individual 
circumstances will dictate the nature of the evidence required to support a claim. 
Normally, students should seek corroborating information from an independent person, 
organisation or support service that could provide verification. Acceptable supporting evidence 
would normally be an original (not photocopy) document written and signed by an appropriate third 
party, giving details of the circumstance, its duration, and, where possible, its impact. An appropriate 
third party would be one who knows the student in a professional capacity or one who can verify the 
circumstance from a position of authority (e.g. police officer, solicitor, GP, University Counsellor) and 
who is in a position to provide objective and impartial evidence. Letters from family members and 
fellow students are not normally accepted. In some circumstances, it may be appropriate for a 
member of the academic staff to provide a supporting statement. 
Dates of evidence must correspond with the extenuating circumstances detailed. 
If a student has missed an assignment through ill health, then the illness must coincide with the 
preparation, writing or deadline of that assessment. 
Students, who miss an examination or an invigilated test due to illness or are claiming to have been 
affected by medical problems during examination, should seek medical attention at the time of their 
illness where possible. In the case of an illness, which has directly affected the ability to attend or 
complete an assessment for a period between 1 and 5 days, the student should submit a self- 
certification form. For periods of illness lasting more than 5 days, the student should submit a 
medical certificate [see below]. 
Self certification is a formal declaration to confirm that the student suffered a short illness lasting 1 - 
5 consecutive days, and which was severe enough to prevent attendance at the University. Self 
certification may be accepted to support absence from lectures, classes and examinations. It is not 
normally accepted in respect of failure to complete coursework by its due date, as coursework 
106 
 

schedules normally allow more than five days - often a period of weeks - for the coursework to be 
completed. 
Self certification forms are available from the School Office. 
In periods of illness lasting more than 5 days, a medical certificate must be provided. The certificate 
must relate specifically to the dates and duration of the illness, contain a clear medical diagnosis or 
opinion and not merely report a student’s claim that they were unwell. 
Doctors are entitled to charge for any medical certificates or notes they provide, and may not always 
provide certificates for short periods of illness. A doctor’s note must be on headed paper and/or 
stamped by the surgery. 
Self certification and medical certification must normally be submitted within 7 days of the absence 
from an examination, lectures, classes or other learning activity. 
It is appreciated that there are occasions when it is not practically or emotionally possible to 
produce evidence at the time (e.g. close family bereavement, assault etc.). Programme Leaders and 
Boards of Examiners are aware of this, and may accept such claims without third party evidence. 
If a student has an extenuating circumstance of an unusually delicate or personal nature that they do 
not wish to document in detail, then the student may elect to discuss with his/her Personal 
Academic Tutor or Student Counsellor who will confirm to the Programme Leader that the student 
has submitted a valid claim. This will ensure that the Programme Leader can consider the claim 
without knowing all the details. 
5  
TO WHOM IS THE CLAIM SUBMITTED? 
The claim must normally be submitted in an envelope clearly marked Confidential and addressed to 
the Programme Leader. This applies where a claim is being lodged in advance of an examination or 
assignment, or [where the claim is in respect of failure to attend an examination, or in respect of 
diminished performance during an examination or in completing an assignment. 
While the Programme Leader will be responsible for assessing the student’s claim, the Programme 
Leader may consult the student’s Personal Academic Tutor, as it is recognised that students may 
approach their Personal Academic Tutor in the first instance for advice and support. 
In either case, the form is normally submitted by the student in person to the School Office. 
Alternatively, a student may post or email a copy of the form where the student is unable to travel 
to the University for valid reason [e.g. illness, residence at a distance, work commitments]. Copies of 
the form are available for download at the following website addresses:  
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/ or at https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-
university/quality/quality-a-z-index/ 

6  
WHAT MIGHT THE OUTCOME BE? 
A claim for extenuating circumstances submitted in advance of an assessment is not an alternative 
to undertaking the necessary assessment, but, if successful, will normally result in the student being 
107 
 

provided with an opportunity to undertake the assessment at a future date. The option remains for 
students to submit coursework up to one week after the published deadline date, without a claim 
for extenuating circumstances, on the basis that the maximum mark which can then be awarded is 
40% for undergraduate or 50% for postgraduate modules. 
Where a claim has been submitted after an assessment deadline, or where an examination has been 
missed, and there is no opportunity to redeem the situation [e.g. by an extension to a deadline] or 
where a claim is submitted on the basis of diminished performance in an exam or assessment, the 
Board of Examiners will come to a judgement. 
The Board of Examiners will try to ensure a fair result based on overall performance. It may take a 
number of actions. 
For example, if a student has missed an examination, and the Board of Examiners considers the 
reasons to be valid, it can treat the absence in a number of ways. 
Where the claim is in respect of diminished performance as a direct result of the extenuating 
circumstance, the Board will try to determine whether, and to what extent, extenuating 
circumstances have affected a student’s academic performance, and determine what action, if any, 
can be taken. In assessing the significance of extenuating circumstances Boards will normally take 
into account: 
 
the severity of the problem and the length of time involved; 
 
any supporting documentary evidence; 
 
whether all work in the same period appears to have been equally affected; 
 
whether it is possible to gauge the effect of the extenuating circumstances upon 
academic performance; 
 
whether achievement is consistent with past performance; 
 
the type of assessment affected, and how the student had to complete the work (i.e 
date when work set and deadline for submission). 
Boards of Examiners will not give extra marks because a student’s work has been affected by 
extenuating circumstances, nor will they amend marks from previous years of study, or annotate the 
statement of results/transcripts with comments about the existence of extenuating circumstances. 
The Board may decide that the student is given the opportunity to submit for further assessment in 
the module (or component of module) against which they have claimed extenuating circumstances. 
The Board may also decide not to uphold the claim on the basis that the student has not made a 
case, that the supporting evidence does not support the claim, or that the student had no good 
reason for not advising of the circumstances prior to the assessment or examination for which 
extenuating circumstances are sought. 
 
 
108 
 

7  
ACADEMIC APPEALS 
A student has the right to appeal against a decision of a Board of Examiners. 
The grounds for appeal are as follows: 
 
additional information is available that was not, and could not, reasonably have been 
made available to the Board at the time it made its original decision and which had it 
been available could have led the Board to making a different decision; 
 
there was a material irregularity in the procedures of the Board of Examiners or in the 
conduct of the assessment. 
A student may NOT appeal on grounds that: 
 
could have been considered by the Board of Examiners had notice been given prior to 
the meeting; and 
 
the student has no valid reason for having failed to give such notice. 
A claim for extenuating circumstances, which has been considered by the Board, may not be 
submitted again under the academic appeals procedures. If a claim for extenuating circumstances 
forms the basis of an academic appeal, the student will need to demonstrate why they did not 
follow the procedures for submitting a claim for extenuating circumstances in advance of the board 
of examiners. 
8  
FALSE CLAIMS 
The submission of a false claim may be regarded as an attempt to gain unfair advantage, which 
would be an academic offence and could be dealt with under the QMU Disciplinary Procedures. 
9  
DATA PROTECTION ACT 2018 
In submitting an extenuating circumstances form, students agree to the University holding this 
personal data for the purposes of processing their claim. The University will hold this data in 
accordance with its notification under the 2018 Data Protection Act. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
109 
 

15.   FITNESS TO PRACTISE POLICY 

Principles 
 
1.1  The University has a duty to the public to use its best endeavours to ensure that students and 
graduates of its professional healthcare programmes are fit to practise.   
 
1.2  In the context of this policy, fitness to practice has been interpreted to mean that a person has 
the skills, knowledge, character and health to undertake their professional role safely and 
effectively. 
 
1.3  The University seeks to promote entry to its healthcare programmes to as wide a range of 
individuals as possible, in so far as consistent with the above principle.  
 
1.4  The University will not discriminate on the grounds of health or of disability where it can be 
demonstrated that an applicant or student undertaking a healthcare programme is capable of 
practising safely and effectively without supervision.  
 
1.5  The University recognises that individuals in an early stage of their healthcare career need to 
be supported to develop a full understanding of the standards of professional conduct, 
performance and ethics that apply to the health profession which they are seeking to register.  
Fitness to Practise procedures should provide for support to students to enable them to learn 
from mistakes, but must also identify those who give cause for concern.  
 
1.6  Cases will be treated on an individual basis, and with due consideration for fairness and equity.   
 
1.7  The University will comply with its statutory duties in relation to Protection of Children and 
Vulnerable Adults, Rehabilitation of Offenders and Single Equality Legislation. 
 
1.8  References within these regulations to any University officer shall include his or her properly 
appointed nominee. 
 

Procedures for considering Fitness to Practise  
 
2.1  The University will seek information about character, health and disability prior to admitting 
students. Clear information about this will be published in the prospectus. 
 
2.2  In seeking information on character, the University will consider information provided in the 
character reference and will also seek information about criminal conviction or caution at the 
point of application.   
 
2.3  All students of the University are required to declare whether or not they have a conviction or 
caution as part of the annual student matriculation process.  Additionally, healthcare 
programmes may require students to self-certify annually their continuing fitness to practise.    
 
110 
 

2.4  Wherever possible, issues relating to fitness to practise will be dealt with as part of the 
University’s standard procedures, or at the programme level.  However, where a judgement is 
made that such consideration is not appropriate, there is provision for referral to the Fitness 
to Practise Panel.  The Panel will be convened on the advice of the University Secretary. The 
secretary to the panel will be appointed by the University Secretary. 
 
2.5  The Panel will consider cases relating to fitness to practise where a student or applicant’s 
fitness to practise may be affected due to factors, including, but not limited to: 
 
  A criminal conviction that is outwith the provisions of the Rehabilitation of Offenders 
Act 
  Allegations of unprofessional or unethical conduct including conduct outwith the 
University 
  A declared disability 
  A health condition with the potential to affect fitness to practise 
 
2.6  The Panel will have delegated authority to consider, and come to a judgement  
on: 
 
  the admission of students with criminal convictions, disabilities or health conditions 
that might affect fitness to practise; 
  continued progress of students for whom a criminal conviction is disclosed during the 
course of their programme; 
  continued progress of students who acquire a disability or potentially chronic health 
condition during the course of their programme; 
  continued progress of students who are found to have acted unprofessionally or 
unethically during the course of their programme. 
 
The Panel may also, as a result of its operation, identify and remit particular issues for 
discussion and/or review by the Student Experience Committee or School Academic Board as 
appropriate. 
 
2.7  Only suitably trained people will act as Panellists. A pool of potential Panellists will be 
maintained and regular training arranged.  
 
2.8  Membership of the Panel will be in line with professional body guidance and will include at 
least one person from the applicant or student’s intended registered profession. 
 
2.9  Records of the Panel’s proceedings will retained by the University Secretary and processed in 
line with Data Protection legislation. 
 
 
 
111 
 


Consideration of Fitness to Practise at the stage of admitting an applicant to a healthcare 
related programme 
 
 
Applicants declaring a disability 
 
3.1  The application will first be considered on its academic merits, in line with the University’s 
Admissions regulations.  
 
3.2  Where applicants meet the academic criteria, staff of the Admissions department will discuss 
with the Admissions Tutor whether the applicant’s support needs can be met.  
 
3.3  If additional support is identified as being likely to be required, the Admissions Tutor will 
discuss the application with the Academic Disabled Students Co-ordinator and the Disability 
Service.  
 
3.4  If there is any concern that the applicant’s support needs cannot be met, this must be 
discussed with the applicant.  In the majority of cases, it is expected that dialogue with the 
student will establish what adjustments can or cannot be made.  
 
3.5  More difficult cases will be referred to the Dean of School who should consult the University 
Secretary. The University Secretary will decide whether to refer the matter to the Fitness to 
Practise Panel.  
 
 
Criminal conviction or caution 
 
3.6  Where an applicant has declared a criminal conviction or caution, staff in the Admissions 
department will ask the applicant for further details about the conviction/caution and forward 
these to the Head of Admissions and Recruitment.  
 
3.7  The Head of Admissions and Recruitment will consult with the University Secretary to assess 
whether the conviction is one that would affect the applicant’s fitness to practise as defined 
the regulating body.  If the conviction is judged to have the potential to affect the applicant’s 
suitability for registration as set out in the professional body’s Code of Conduct or Code of 
Ethics, the University Secretary and Head of Admissions and Recruitment will discuss the 
matter with the Head of Division and Dean of School. Following the outcome of that discussion 
the University Secretary will decide whether to convene a Fitness to Practise Panel. Written 
records of the reasons for decisions will be retained. 
 
3.8  Where a caution or conviction is revealed through the Disclosure Scotland process or the PVG 
Scheme, the counter-signatory will consult the Head of Admissions and Recruitment, who will 
consult in line with provisions of paragraph 3.7 above. The University Secretary will judge 
whether the matter is referred to a Fitness to Practise Panel. 
 
3.9  In considering the matter, the Panel may consider: 
 
112 
 

  The number and nature of offences or misconduct 
  The seriousness of the offence or misconduct 
  When the offences or misconduct occurred 
  Any information provided by the applicant in mitigation 
  The applicant’s character and conduct since the offence occurred. 
 
3.10  The Health and Care Professions Council (“HCPC)  and the Nursing and Midwifery Council 
(“NMC”) produce standards of conduct, performance and ethics which provide information on 
behaviour of applicants and students that is likely to affect their admittance to the profession 
concerned as well as standards of proficiency for these professions.  The following, while not 
an exhaustive list, provides guidance on the type of behaviour that is likely to lead to an 
applicant or student being rejected or required to withdraw from a programme: 
 
  Violence 
  Abuse 
  Sexual misconduct 
  Supplying drugs illegally 
  Child pornography 
  Offences involving dishonesty 
  Offences that carried a prison sentence 
 
 
 
Decision not to admit 
 
3.11  In line with the principles and procedures set out above, a range of decisions may be taken in 
relation to admitting a candidate to a healthcare programme of the University, namely: 
 
  Admit the applicant 
  Admit the applicant, subject to provision of specified adjustments and / or support or 
conditions 
  Defer entry for one year (where this would provide additional information relevant to 
the decision making process) 
  Not admit the applicant 
 
3.12  An individual who has been the subject of a decision not to admit for reasons of fitness to 
practise may appeal that decision.   
 
3.13  Should an individual be admitted subject to conditions, the individual must comply with those 
conditions.  Should the student be in breach of those conditions at any point during their 
academic career, the student will be referred back to a Fitness to Practise Panel immediately. 
 
 
 
 
 
113 
 


Referral of issues relating to conduct on a programme of study 
 
4.1  All students of the University are subject to the jurisdiction of the Principal in respect of their 
studies and their conduct.  It is a condition of entry to the University that each student shall 
conform to the published rules and regulations. 
 
4.2  Students on healthcare programmes should be aware that their conduct outside the clinical 
environment, including their private lives, may have an impact on their fitness to practise, as 
set out in the requirements of the professional body governing their programme of study.  
Such requirements are designed to ensure that their behaviour justifies the trust that patients 
and the public place in their profession.    
 
4.3  A student may be referred to the University's Fitness to Practise procedure through a number 
of routes which include by a Programme Committee, by a Disciplinary Committee or directly 
following a complaint to the University Secretary.  Should a student be on placement or just 
about to go on placement when a matter is raised under this Section of the Fitness to Practise 
proceedings, the Head of Division may prevent or remove the student from placement with 
immediate effect if deemed appropriate. 
 
4.4  Where it is judged that the matter does not fall under the terms of the Regulations governing 
Discipline, but nevertheless constitutes a concern in terms of professional practice, the 
Programme Leader will be informed. Where possible allegations in this category will be dealt 
with by the Programme Leader. 
 
4.5  Where a Programme Committee has persistent concerns about a student’s conduct which 
have not been satisfactorily resolved at local level by the Programme Leader, the Programme 
Leader may ask the University Secretary to convene a Fitness to Practise Panel. 
 
4.6  A referral or an allegation of concern about conduct must be made in writing, signed by the 
complainant and submitted to the University Secretary.   
 
4.7  Anonymous allegations will not normally be considered. In considering the allegation, the 
University Secretary may withhold the identity of the individual making the allegation if 
maintenance of confidentiality is considered appropriate.  
 
4.8  Where the conduct that is the subject of the complaint would constitute a breach of the 
disciplinary code, the University Secretary will refer the allegation to the Principal.  The 
Principal may dismiss the allegation immediately if he or she believes that there is no case for 
the student to answer, or that it is for some other reason appropriate to do so.   
 
4.9  If the allegation is not dismissed, and the offence does not lead the Principal to suspend or 
exclude the student under the provisions outlined in section 4 of the University’s Regulations 
governing Discipline, the matter will be referred to the Dean of School.  The Dean of School 
will consult with the University Secretary on whether or not the matter should be dealt with 
114 
 

summarily or referred to a Disciplinary Committee or referred directly to a Fitness to Practise 
Panel.    
 
4.10  If the finding of the disciplinary procedure, either summary or Panel, is that the student has 
breached expected standards of conduct, including professional conduct, then the matter will 
be referred to a Fitness to Practise Panel. That will include those cases where it has been 
judged that there are mitigating factors, such as a diagnosed health condition.  
 
4.11  In those cases where the conduct reported as giving rise to concern is linked to a mental 
health condition, the case will normally be referred to the Fitness to Practise Panel as a health 
matter.  
 
4.12  Where a matter has been referred to a Fitness to Practise Panel, the Panel will be constituted 
as set out in Section 2 above.  The proceedings of the Panel will be governed by the 
procedures set out in Section 6 of this procedure. 
 
4.13  Legal representation will not be permitted at the Panel hearing.   
 
4.14  The standard of proof applied in considering the case will be the civil standard of proof, ie the 
balance of probabilities.  
 
4.15  A Fitness to Practise Panel has delegated authority to reach the following decisions, ie that:  
 
i) 
The student continues on the programme 
ii) 
The student continues on the programme but is cautioned, meaning that if any 
further fitness to practise issues arise in the following twelve months, the student 
will be dealt with for both matters 
iii)  The student continues on the programme subject to fulfilment of certain conditions 
as specified by the Panel (which conditions can include the requirement to attend 
specified courses or counselling if deemed appropriate) 
iv)  The student is required to suspend study to allow time for medical investigations 
(for cases where unacceptable behaviour is linked to a mental health condition) 
v) 
The student is required to suspend study for a period up to twelve months 
vi)  The student is advised to transfer to an alternative programme 
vii)  The student is asked to exit with an alternative award which does not permit the 
student to register with a regulatory body 
viii)  The student is required to withdraw 
 
4.16  Should the student not comply with any conditions specified under Section 4.15(iii) above, a 
further Fitness to Practise Panel may be convened immediately to review the case and impose 
any further conditions or reach a different decision as the Panel deems necessary. 
 
 
 
 
115 
 


Issues relating to health and physical ability on a programme of study 
 
5.1  In the context of this policy statement, the requirement for an individual to be in good health 
does not mean that they do not have a disability or health condition. Many disabled people 
and those with long term health conditions are able to practice safely with or without 
adjustments to support their professional practice.  
 
5.2  It is recognised too that a disability may emerge after admission to a programme, that an 
existing health condition may worsen or that a student on a programme may acquire a 
disability.  
 
5.3  In considering whether or not a disability has the potential to affect a student’s fitness to 
practise, the Programme Leader should first discuss the student’s individual needs with the 
student and the Academic Disabled Student Co-ordinator to explore what extra support may 
be required from both the University and/or placement providers. Students with suspected 
disabilities and/or specific learning difficulties will be advised to contact Student Services to 
arrange to meet the Disability Advisor for further assessment, for example  by an external 
agency e.g. Royal National Institute for the Blind or an Educational Psychologist. 
 
5.4  Where there is doubt about whether effective support can be provided by both the University 
and/or the placement provider, the matter will be discussed by the Programme Committee 
under Reserved Business. The Programme Committee may refer the case to the Fitness to 
Practise Panel, via the University Secretary.  
 
5.5  Health conditions may develop that affect fitness to practise. Short term conditions will be 
dealt with by the Programme Leader through the normal extenuating circumstances 
procedures. Where a student has missed periods of placement due to ill-health, the 
Programme Leader will discuss a revised programme of study with the student to allow him or 
her to catch up on missed work. In some cases, it may be necessary to defer study for up to a 
year. 
 
5.6  It is essential that students notify staff immediately should they contract a communicable 
disease. Normally, arrangements will be put in place in line with NHS, NMC or HCPC protocols. 
This will be discussed between the Programme Leader, student and placement supervisor. 
 
5.7  Mental health conditions may be short or long term. The primary responsibility of the 
University is to support the student to ensure the best chance of recovery. However, a 
decision may be taken that it is advisable to postpone periods of placement until the student’s 
condition has stabilised.  
 
5.8  While it is expected that the Programme Leader will attempt to support the student informally 
if possible, if it is judged that the student may not be safe to go on placement; or if a 
placement supervisor raises such a concern during placement, a referral will be made to the 
Fitness to Practise Panel. 
 
116 
 

5.9  In the interests of a student’s and/or patient safety, the University may act to suspend a 
student temporarily pending the outcome of Fitness to Practise proceedings in order to 
remove the student from placement or prevent him or her from starting a placement.  
 
5.10  If the Student Counsellor becomes aware that a student’s medical condition may pose a risk to 
patient safety the Programme Leader should be informed. The terms of the University’s 
Counselling service client confidentiality agreement will state clearly that this is a possibility. 
 
5.11  In all the above cases, the University may require independent medical reports and / or 
occupational health assessments. Students may be temporarily suspended while reports are 
sought. 
 
5.13  A Fitness to Practise Panel will not normally be convened until reports are available. However, 
where a student refuses to attend an occupational health assessment, the Panel may proceed 
on the basis that the student has refused to provide evidence of his or her fitness to practise. 
 
5.14  The following decisions are possible: 
 
i) 
The student continues on the programme 
ii) 
The student continues on the programme with suitable adjustments made to 
accommodate the student’s needs 
iii) 
The student continues on the programme under supervision with a time period set for 
review 
iv) 
The student is required to suspend study to allow time for a health condition to improve 
or to allow time for suitable arrangements to be put in place to accommodate the 
student’s needs 
v) 
The student is advised to transfer to an alternative programme 
vi) 
The student is asked to exit with an alternative award which does not permit the 
student to register with a regulatory body 
vii) 
The student is required to withdraw 
 

Fitness to Practise Panel 
 
6.1  A Fitness to Practise Panel may be convened to consider issues of health or character 
concerning an applicant to, or a student studying on, a healthcare programme leading to 
professional registration.  
 
6.2  The University Secretary will appoint the members of the Fitness to Practise Panel, and invite 
one of them to act as Convener. The University Secretary will appoint a secretary to the Panel 
and will arrange for a note of the proceedings to be taken. The Panel may seek advice from a 
qualified lawyer. 
 
6.3  The Panel will include at least one person from the profession to which the applicant or 
student is seeking professional registration.  
 
117 
 

6.4  Normally, a Panel would include the following: 
 
 
One senior academic member of staff (convener) 
 
One NMC or HCPC representative 
 
One non-academic member (patient or lay representative) 
 
Programme Leader/designated signatory for the professional outcome or a suitable 
substitute suggested by the Programme Leader 
   
 
6.5  The Panel will rely only on evidence presented at the hearing. If the hearing concerns a 
student who has previously been the subject of a disciplinary investigation in relation to the 
same matter, the confirmed report of that investigation shall be provided as evidence. 
 
6.6  The standard of proof will be the civil standard, i.e the balance of probabilities. If the members 
of the Panel cannot agree, the verdict of the Panel will be that of the majority of its members. 
In cases where the Panel is split evenly, the Convener shall have the casting vote. 
 
6.7  The Panel may ask for additional enquiries to be undertaken where it considers that this will 
aid its consideration of the case.  
 
6.8  If two or more students are involved in related misconduct, the Panel may at its discretion 
deal with their cases together. 
 
6.9  The evidence presented at the hearing will normally be written evidence which will be 
provided to the Panel no fewer than 7 days before the Panel is due to meet. The person who is 
the subject of the hearing will be advised of the date of the hearing no fewer than 14 days 
prior to the scheduled date of the hearing. She/he will be provided with copies of the 
documents being provided to the Panel, and will be invited to provide the Panel with any 
further information that he/she would wish the Panel to consider.  
 
6.10  The Panel will refuse to admit evidence that is in its opinion irrelevant to the matter under 
discussion. 
 
6.11  The Panel shall have power to adjourn a hearing to another date, as it thinks fit. 
 
6.12  At the termination of the proceedings, the Convener of the Panel will write a short report, 
summarising the discussion and setting out the Panel’s decision and reasoning. A copy of the 
report will be sent to the applicant/student and to the Principal.  
 
6.13  The Principal has the power to suspend the activity of the Fitness to Practise Panel at any time 
should he or she believe it appropriate to do so. 
 

Right of appeal 
 
7.1  An individual may appeal against the decision of a Fitness to Practise Panel.  
 
118 
 

7.2  An appeal must be made to the University Secretary within twenty-eight days of the 
conclusion of the proceedings. The appellant must set out in writing the grounds on which the 
appeal is based.   
 
7.3  There will be no entitlement to a rehearing of the case, which will be allowed only in 
exceptional circumstances.   
 
7.4  The appellant must submit the appeal in writing to the Principal, who will judge whether or 
not a prima facie case exists on the basis that: 
 
 
there has been demonstrably an irregularity in the Fitness to Practise procedure; 
 
evidence has become available that it was not reasonable to present during the original 
hearing. 
 
7.5  In the event that a re-hearing is judged appropriate, an appeal panel will be convened.  
 
7.6 
The University Secretary shall appoint an appeal panel and the appeal panel shall consist of 
members drawn from the following:- 
 
  the Deputy Principal (to act as Convener) 
  the Dean of School 
  a non-academic member 
  a senior NMC or HCPC representative  
 
The appeal panel shall conduct its proceedings according to the principles of natural justice in 
that it will it will seek to act fairly, no person may be a judge in his or her own case and the 
appellant shall have access to all the evidence used by the panel in reaching its decision. 
 
7.7 
The appellant shall have the right to appear before the appeal panel and to be accompanied 
by one other person of his or her choice. Representation external to the University will not be 
permitted in the context of this procedure.  
 
7.8 
The Convener of the Fitness to Practise Panel concerned with the case shall be invited, prior to 
the meeting, to submit to the appeal panel comments relevant to the case under discussion 
and may be invited to attend part or all of the meeting of the appeal panel at which the case is 
being considered. 
 
7.9 
Any person called to give evidence to the appeal panel will be given at least 72 hours’ notice 
of the time and place of the hearing. Copies of written submissions will also be made available 
to all parties prior to the hearing. 
 
7.10  In the event that the appellant is unable to attend the appeal panel due to illness, the meeting 
will be rescheduled.  
 
119 
 

7.11  The appeal panel shall meet, normally within one calendar month (excluding University 
vacations) of the referral from the Principal, and communicate its conclusions to appellant and 
the subject area concerned within one calendar month of its being convened.  The University 
Secretary will keep all parties informed of progress and will advise of any necessary extension 
of the timescale, for example, if an adjournment in the proceedings is necessary. 
 
7.12  The appeal panel hearing the appeal may overturn the finding of the original Fitness to 
Practise Panel.  In particular, a finding may be overturned in the light of new evidence; or 
where it is found that the original hearing was not conducted fairly; or where the finding was 
unreasonable in the light of the findings of fact.  The appeal panel may impose any additional 
sanction they deem necessary. 
 
7.13  The decision of the appeal panel shall be final within the University.  
 

Independent review 
 
8.1  The University’s internal procedures having been exhausted, an individual may seek review of 
his/her case by an independent person, the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman [SPSO].  
 
8.2  The Ombudsman is independent and her staff will advise whether or not the complaint is one 
that they can investigate. Normally the student will have to tell the Ombudsman about his/her 
complaint within 12 months of first knowing about the problem about which they are 
complaining, although the Ombudsman may look at complaints outside this limit if she thinks 
there is good reason to do so.  
 
8.3  There are some restrictions on what the Ombudsman can investigate. If the complaint is 
appropriate to her office and is investigated, the Ombudsman’s staff will send details of how 
this will be done. 
 
8.4  The complaint should be submitted in writing to the Ombudsman, and should include any 
relevant documents including correspondence with the University and the University’s 
response to the complaint. This can be sent to the Ombudsman without cost at the freepost 
address given below. A student may discuss the complaint with an Investigator at the SPSO 
before deciding to submit.  
 
8.5  The Scottish Public Services Ombudsman has an online complaint form accessible through the 
website although papers in support of the complaint would still have to be supplied to the 
Ombudsman by post or other means. The Scottish Public Services Ombudsman can also supply 
paper complaint forms direct to complainants. 
 
8.6  Further information may be accessed through the Scottish Public Services Ombudsman 
website or by calling her office for advice. Contact details are: 
 
Scottish Public Services Ombudsman, 4 Melville Street, Edinburgh, EH3 7NS 
 
120 
 

Freepost address 
Scottish Public Services Ombudsman 
Freepost EH641, Edinburgh, EH3 0BR 
 
Phone 0800 377 7330 
Fax 0800 377 7331: website www.scottishombudsman.org.uk 
e-mail enquiries to xxx@xxxx.xxx.xx 
Text: 0790 049 4372 
 
 
 
121 
 

16. FITNESS TO STUDY  
 
This policy is currently being finalised and will be available on the Quality website at: 
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/committees-regulations-policies-and-
procedures/regulations-policies-and-procedures/ 

 
 
122 
 

18. GENERAL ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS AND POLICY  
(including Grade Descriptors) 
 

IMPLEMENTATION ARRANGEMENTS:  REVISED ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS AND POLICY 
1. 
The following assessment regulations and policy were approved by Senate in July 2018 and 
will take effect from Academic Year 2018/19. 
 
2. 
Regulations 14.2, 14.3, 17.12, 18.2 and 18.4 will not apply to the following programmes in 
2018/19: 
BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography  
BSc (Hons) Dietetics  
BSc (Hons) Nursing  
BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy  
BSc (Hons) Podiatry  
BSc (Hons) Speech and Language Therapy  
BSc (Hons) Therapeutic Radiography  
DipHE in Hearing Aid Audiology  
MSc Art Psychotherapy (International)  
MSc Music Therapy  
MSc/PgDip Audiology (Pre-registration)  
MSc/PgDip Diagnostic Radiography (Pre-registration)  
MSc/PgDip Dietetics (Pre-registration)  
MSc/PgDip Occupational Therapy (Pre-registration)  
MSc/PgDip Speech and Language Therapy (Pre-registration)  
PgDip Person Centred Practice (professional pathways only)  
PgDip Radiotherapy & Oncology  
 
 
The programmes listed above will continue to follow the regulations dated August 2017 in 
terms of reassessments. Further discussions will take place over the course of Academic Year 
2018/19 to determine the feasibility and impact of introducing the regulations above. Any 
revisions to the regulations, arising from those discussions will be implemented from 
Academic Year 2019/20. 
 
3. 
The implementation of the revised regulations for collaborative programmes will be 
discussed with partners on an individual basis. The regulations may not be implemented for 
all collaborative programmes for the start of Academic Year 2018/19. 
 
123 
 

ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS AND POLICY 
  
PART A POLICY AND PRINCIPLES  
1.0 
General provision for assessment and awards 
2.0   Context  
3.0   Purpose of assessment  
4.0   Principles of assessment  
5.0   Fairness, reliability and validity of assessment  
6.0   Forms of assessment  
  
PART B AWARD REGULATIONS  
7.0   Marks, grades and levels of performance  
8.0   Award 
9.0   Decision on award classifications and distinctions in borderline cases (undergraduate degrees)  
10.0   Decision on distinctions in borderline cases (postgraduate degrees)  
11.0   Decision on an award in absence of complete assessment information  
12.0   Withdrawing from a module and transfer between modules 
13.0   Transcripts  
  
PART C ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS  
14.0   Terminology  
15.0  Programme specific regulations  
16.0   Assessment of a module  
17.0   Decisions on student progression  
18.0   Reassessment of a module  
19.0   Assessment of disabled students and of students whose first language is not English  
20.0   Penalties for word limits and late submission of assessment  
  
PART D RESPONSIBILITIES AND EXPECTATIONS  
21.0   Student responsibility in assessment  
22.0   Responsibility of other individuals and bodies in assessment  
23.0   Project supervision  
24.0   Academic dishonesty and plagiarism  
  
PART E APPENDICES  
Undergraduate Grade Marking Criteria  
Postgraduate Grade Marking Criteria  
 
 
124 
 

PART A POLICY AND PRINCIPLES 
1.0 

General provision for assessment and awards  
  
1.1 
The authority for approving programmes and granting awards rests with the Senate of Queen 
Margaret University. Senate is also responsible for maintaining the academic standards of 
these awards. One of the major mechanisms for the assurance of academic standards is the 
assessment of students. These regulations and policy provide the structure within which 
students shall be assessed and whereby their assessment contributes to the achievement of 
the award.  
  
1.2  
These regulations and policy shall govern all taught programmes which lead to a University 
award except where Senate shall determine otherwise.  
 
1.3 
Within the regulations and policy levels one, two, three and four refer to the full-time year of 
undergraduate study. SCQF levels refer to the academic level of study (for undergraduate 
programmes this is typically SCQF level 7 to 10 and for postgraduate programmes SCQF level 
11). Levels one, two, three and four do not map directly onto SCQF levels, but the following 
will apply to the majority of modules: 
 
Level one (first year of undergraduate study) 
SCQF level 7 
Level two (second year of undergraduate study) 
SCQF level 8 
Level three (third year of undergraduate study) 
SCQF level 9 
Level four (fourth year of undergraduate study) 
SCQF level 10 
Postgraduate 
SCQF level 11 
 
 
 For a part-time undergraduate student, a level typically spans more than a single academic 
year. 
 
1.4  
Each student is enrolled on a programme and is subject to the regulations of that 
programme, which in its turn is subject to the University’s overall regulations and policy.  
  
1.5  
Students are subject to registration periods which stipulate the minimum and maximum 
periods that they may be registered on a programme. These are detailed in the University’s 
Registration Regulations.     
 
1.6 
An award will be conferred upon satisfaction of the following conditions:  
 
  the candidate was a registered student of the University at the time of their assessment 
and has fulfilled all financial obligations to the University;  
  the candidate has completed a programme approved by the University as leading to the 
award being recommended;   
  the award has been recommended by a Board of Examiners convened, constituted and 
acting under regulations approved by Senate. 
 
125 
 

1.7 
Senate is the ultimate authority in the University for the ratification of academic decisions 
and may, in extreme circumstances, over-rule a Board of Examiners. It will normally refer 
matters of concern back to the Board of Examiners for reconsideration.   
 
1.8 
Acting within the above principles, a Board of Examiners will exercise its judgement in 
reaching decisions on individual candidates. It is responsible for interpreting the assessment 
regulations for the programme, in the light of the University's requirements and good 
practice in higher education and its academic judgement should not lightly be questioned or 
overturned.  
 
1.9 
Appeals by students against the decisions of Boards of Examiners shall be subject to 
University procedures and practices, as set out in section of the Governance and Regulations 
dealing with Academic Appeals and Student Complaints and published on the University’s 
Quality website.  
 
2.0  
Context  
  
2.1  
The Student Experience Strategy is the key strategy for the delivery of taught programmes of 
study at QMU and these assessment regulations and policy should be read in conjunction 
with that Strategy.  
 
2.2  
Assessment is integral to the design of programmes of study leading to the award of 
academic credit and to the award of degrees and diplomas. Programme content is specified 
through regulations governing Programme Development, Modification, Monitoring and 
Review.  
 
 
2.3  
Assessment is the process of forming a judgment about the quality and extent of learning in 
relation to the intended learning outcomes of a student’s programme of study. In view of 
the variety of programmes, it is recognised that there is a need for a variety of forms of 
assessment, which should reflect the aims of that programme of study and the mode of 
study. Whatever the type of assessment, it should be fair, valid, reliable, useful and 
transparent.  
 
 
2.4 
In addition to its role in relation to the maintenance of academic standards, an equally 
important function of assessment is to develop effective student learning.  In this context, it 
is essential that assessment is both integrated into the learning experience and that it 
motivates the learner.  
  
3.0  
Purpose of assessment  
  
3.1  
Assessment satisfies a number of related requirements, namely that it:  
  
  is integrated with the process of student learning;  
  demonstrates that a student has achieved the learning outcomes for their programme 
of study;  
126 
 

  justifies the award of academic credit based on actual student achievement;  
  provides confidence in the maintenance of academic standards both internally and to 
external stakeholders;  
  supports the evaluation and enhancement of programme design and delivery;  
  provides meaningful feedback and feedforward to students on their performance on a 
programme of study which promotes learning and encourages reflection;  
  provides meaningful information to employers, Professional, Statutory and Regulatory 
Bodies and other organisations on the knowledge and competencies of a graduate;  
  supports the enhancement of programme design and programme delivery.  
  
3.2  
Additionally, assessment may be used as a diagnostic tool to determine the current 
knowledge and skills of a student and to assist in the formulation of a programme of future 
study.  
 
4.0  
Principles of assessment  
  
4.1  
Assessment regulations and policy establish a framework for the conduct of assessment 
across all taught programmes.   
  
4.2  
Assessment regulations and policy establish sound procedures for the advanced 
communication of assessment requirements (including assessment criteria), the submission, 
conduct of examinations, marking and moderation of assessments, the progression of 
students, the remediation of failure and the conduct of meetings of Boards of Examiners. 
The regulations and policy ensure that academic standards are maintained and that there is 
a retention schedule for copies of assessments and feedback on assessments.  
  
4.3  
Assessment regulations and policy are reviewed on a periodic basis to ensure that they 
remain fit for purpose.  
 
4.4  
As part of the procedures for the validation and review of awards, programme teams are 
required to develop an assessment strategy which demonstrates a close alignment with the 
full range of intended learning outcomes (including knowledge and understanding, 
intellectual skills, practical skills and transferable skills) and mode(s) of study of that 
programme, including the requirements of Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies.  
  
4.5  
Programme assessment strategies are designed to assess all intended learning outcomes but 
should reduce the extent of assessment to the minimum required to demonstrate the above 
and should avoid duplication.  
  
4.6  
QMU is committed to principles of best practice in assessment, as established by the QAA 
Quality Code, Chapter B6: Assessment of Students and the Recognition of Prior Learning, and 
any subsequent updates to that Chapter.   
  
127 
 

4.7  
QMU is committed to the principles of equality of opportunity. Assessment regulations and 
procedures are designed to actively promote equality of opportunity, and to be compliant 
with all relevant equality legislation.  
  
4.8  
QMU subscribes to the principle of anonymous marking. Anonymous marking shall be used 
in assessments wherever practicable. Proposals for exemption for modules that cannot be 
anonymously marked will be considered through the University’s validation and review 
process or committee structure as appropriate.  
 
4.9 
QMU supports the principles of the award of credit and of credit transfer, as specified by the 
SCQF, in all of its assessment procedures.  
 
4.10 
QMU supports the recognition of, and the award of credit for, prior accredited and 
experiential learning as set out in the University’s Guidance on Recognition of Prior Learning 
(RPL). 

 
4.11 
QMU recognises the need for transparency in the assessment of students.  
 
4.12 
QMU recognises the need for a detailed student transcript, in accordance with the European 
Diploma Supplement, as a means of communicating the achievement by a student.  
 
4.13 
All modules which are designed to lead to the award of academic credit are expressed in 
terms of learning outcomes that are capable of assessment and include details of the 
assessment and of the assessment criteria to be employed.  
 
4.14 
All modules which lead to the award of academic credit come under the purview of a Board 
of Examiners and are assigned, as appropriate, to an External Examiner.  
 
4.15 
The normal language of assessment is English, but exceptionally other languages may be 
used where this is described as part of the definitive document for a programme and, in 
these cases, the language of instruction and assessment will be clearly shown on the student 
transcript.  
 
4.16 
Module descriptors specify the format of assessment but, as a minimum requirement, QMU 
requires a student to submit a digital copy of all assessments, wherever this is practicable. 
This digital copy acts as the archive copy of that assessment.  
 
4.17 
Feedback  
 
Staff must make every effort to meet the QMU requirement of disseminating assessment 
marks and feedback to students within the following timeframe:  
  
  Undergraduate level one and two assessment: within a maximum of 20 working days of 
the assessment submission.  
128 
 

  Undergraduate level three and four assessment (with the exception of Honours projects 
and dissertations): within a maximum of 15 working days of the assessment submission.  
  Undergraduate Honours projects and dissertations: within a maximum of 20 working 
days of the assessment submission.  
  Postgraduate assessment: within a maximum of 20 working days of the assessment 
submission.  
  
Working days equates to Monday to Friday, excluding University closure days. The maximum 
of 15/20 working days includes all stages within the marking process and applies to all staff. 
Only in exceptional circumstances should staff exceed the 15/20 working days requirement. 
Where this occurs, students must be informed of the extension at least seven calendar days 
before the original deadline for receipt of feedback.      
  
QMU requires staff as a minimum to submit feedback and grading for each assessment 
component on an appropriate pro forma (except where appropriate alternatives are 
provided (e.g. audio feedback). This applies to coursework and examinations. Feedback on 
course work will normally be individual. A digital copy of this pro forma will act as the 
archive copy of the feedback and grade awarded for that assessmentPro formae are usually 
completed electronically and must be scanned instead, if handwritten. Standard feedback 
may be provided to the full cohort for an examination. However all students also have the 
right to request individual feedback from the Module Co-ordinator.    
 
4.18   A copy of student assessments and the related feedback pro formae will be kept during the 
time that a student is matriculated, or as specified by the University’s Records Retention 
Schedule.    
 
5.0 
Fairness, reliability and validity of assessment  
  
5.1  
Assessment can take many different forms, as dictated by the variety of programmes and 
learning outcomes but, in all cases it should be:  
  
  Fair, in that there should be equality of treatment across all programmes and that there 
should be a consistent approach to equality and diversity;  
  Valid, that is the assessment can be shown to be relevant to the intended learning 
outcomes;  
  Reliable, in that there should be consistency of processes and standards across the 
institution and that there should be comparability of both the volume and complexity of 
assessment in relation to credit and SCQF level;  
  Useful, in that it contributes to the knowledge and competencies and employability  of 
the learner;  
  Transparent, in that the requirements of the assessment in terms of intended learning 
outcomes and assessment criteria are made clear to the student.  
  
129 
 

5.2  
To maximise accuracy and fairness of assessment, programme teams are expected to follow 
the procedures for marking, moderation and blind double marking set out below. The terms 
‘marking’, ‘moderation’ and ‘blind double marking’ are defined as follows:  
  
Marking  
The process of assessing students’ work, taking into account QMU guidelines for assessment 
feedback and the relevant criteria/mark schemes as devised by programme and/or module 
teams.  
  
Moderation  
The process of confirming the consistency of the mark and feedback provided by the original 
marker(s).  
  
Blind double marking  
Marking conducted without access to marks, annotations or comments from any other 
marker. Both markers must use the relevant criteria and provide feedback to students in the 
agreed format.  
 
5.3 
Where there are differences between first and second markers, these should be resolved 
through a process of discussion and negotiation. On occasions where such differences 
cannot be resolved through this method, the case will be referred to a third marker. A single 
agreed mark is provided to the student as an outcome of the above procedures. 
 
5.4 
If appropriate, Examiners may adjust the raw marks attained by students in individual 
subjects, but the basis of the scaling must be reported to the Board of Examiners who will be 
asked to endorse the scaling.  
  
5.5 
All assessed work should have associated marking criteria. These guides to marking should 
be developed simultaneously with assessment instruments and, where practicable, be 
approved by the External Examiner. Sharing of approved marking criteria with students is a 
required feature of good practice. All feedback given to students should relate to the agreed 
marking criteria.  
  
5.6  
Internal moderation  
  
5.6.1  All elements of assessments for Honours projects and postgraduate dissertations (or 
equivalent) at SCQF levels 9, 10, 11and 12 must be blind double-marked for the whole 
cohort.   
 
5.6.2  All summative assessments for undergraduate and postgraduate programmes that are not 
blind-double marked must be moderated on a sampling basis as a means of verifying the 
accuracy of marking. The size of the sample to be moderated must be at least the square 
root of the total number of students (rounded to the nearest whole number) taking the 
assessment plus all borderline fails (those that are within 2% below the pass mark). The 
130 
 

sample should include a range of performance and the minimum size should be six pieces of 
assessed work.   
 
5.7  
External Examiner moderation  
  
5.7.1  A sample as outlined above will be reviewed by External Examiners for assessment leading 
to a named award.   
 
5.7.2  External Examiners will normally only be required to moderate samples for an individual 
module once per academic year. They will not normally be required to moderate samples for 
reassessments or multiple occurrences of the module provided the mode of assessment and 
marking team remain unchanged from the original assessment. The Board of Examiners will 
determine whether the External Examiner will be required to moderate additional samples 
for reassessment or an additional occurrence of the module. 
 
5.7.3  It is the responsibility of the Module Co-ordinator to select the sample to be reviewed by the 
External Examiner. This need not be the same sample used for internal moderation. 
 
5.7.4  Further information on External Examiner arrangements for collaborative programmes can 
be found in the Collaborations Manual.  
 
5.7.5  In circumstances where an External Examiner has concerns about the submitted marks for a 
sample of assessments, the External Examiner may not modify one or more marks of the 
sample group of students but must review the marks of the whole cohort. External 
Examiners may make recommendations only on the adjustment of marks.  It is the 
responsibility of the Programme Team to consider these recommendations and take a final 
decision on the student mark.  
 
5.8 
Responsibility for assessment 
 
5.8.1   In all cases Module Co-ordinators have responsibility for the conduct and quality control of 
assessment in their own module(s). Programme Leaders are deemed responsible for the 
quality of assessment across programmes and are accountable to the Head of Division 
through the Programme Committee. Deans of School have responsibility for assessment 
regulations and policy and staff development (as it affects assessment) within the 
parameters set by the University and any relevant Professional, Statutory and Regulatory 
Bodies. It is expected, however, that this responsibility will be delegated to Heads of 
Division.  
  
5.8.2   School Offices are responsible for the maintenance and retention of records of all 
provisional marks. The Student Records Office and the School Office under the direction of 
the Assistant Secretary, Registry and Academic Administration, will maintain a central 
archive of approved final marks.    
  
131 
 

6.0  
Forms of assessment  
  
6.1  
The form and balance of assessment for each module should be such as to provide the most 
accurate assessment of the student's achievement of the module's aims, objectives and 
learning outcomes. Assessment may be by end-of-module assessment; or by intermittent or 
periodic assessment undertaken during the course of the module.  
  
6.2  
The module descriptor specifies the relative assessment pattern, including weightings across 
components. The assessment pattern must be based on the intended learning outcomes of 
that module.  
  
6.3  
Normally assessment will relate to some or all of the learning outcomes of a single module.  
Where an assessment covers learning outcomes from two or more modules, this must be 
clearly described in the module descriptors and the method of attributing marks to each 
module should be clearly defined.  
  
6.4  
At the commencement of each module the Module Co-ordinator must advise the enrolled 
students of the form of the assessment and the timing of the components which make up 
the assessment. This will be consistent with the overall framework established for the 
programme’s assessment, as specified in the module descriptors.  
  
6.5  
At the start of each programme, Programme Leaders will refer students to the assessment 
regulations for the programme governing progression and award, and of any changes 
thereto.    
  
6.6   
The University operates a Student Attendance Policy which can be found at: 
 
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/committees-regulations-policies-and-
procedures/regulations-policies-and-procedures/ 
 
 Additional attendance and participation conditions may be in place for some programmes, 
but must be made clear to students. Implications of non-attendance in terms of eligibility to 
undertake assessments must also be made clear. These must be approved through the 
University’s validation and review process or committee structure as appropriate.  
 
132 
 

PART B AWARD REGULATIONS  
 
7.0  
Marks, grades and levels of performance   
  
7.1  
Assessment is primarily a matter of academic judgement, and the computational structure is 
designed to facilitate consistent judgements.   
 
The full range of marks should be used in accordance with the grade descriptors in Appendix E. 
 
7.2  
A student’s overall performance on an undergraduate module will be given marks within 
one of eight grades as follows:  
 
Grade 
Mark 
Corresponding level in an 
Honours degree classification 

A*  
80% - 100% 
first class  
A  
70% - 79.9% 
first class  
B  
60 – 69.9%  
upper second  
C  
50 – 59.9%  
lower second  
D  
40 – 49.9%  
third class  
E  
30 – 39.9%  
fail  
F  
20 – 29.9%  
fail  
G  
19.9% or below  
fail  
 
7.3  
A student’s overall performance on a postgraduate module will be given marks within one of 
eight grades as follows:  
  
Grade  
Mark  
Award classification  
A*  
80% - 100%  
distinction  
A  
70 – 79%  
distinction  
B  
60 – 69%  
merit  
C  
50 – 59%  
pass  
D  
40 – 49%  
fail  
E  
30 – 39%  
fail  
F  
20 – 29%  
fail  
G  
19% or below  
fail  
  
7.4  
These grades should be used in a consistent fashion at all levels of assessment whether it is 
judging a student’s overall performance; a cohort’s performance, a module grade, or a piece 
of assessed coursework.   
  
7.5  
The criteria for each of the grades above are listed in the Appendices.  
  
133 
 

7.6  
Normally subjects will be assessed using marks and grades. However, in exceptional 
circumstances subjects may be assessed using grades only.  This will be recorded in 
programme specific regulations.  
  
7.7  
If an undergraduate subject is assessed using a grade only, then the following  grade-to-mark 
conversion scheme shall be used for the purposes of computation:  
  
Grade  
A*  
A  
B  
C  
D  
E  
F  
G  
Mark  
85  
77  
65  
55  
45  
35  
25  
10  
  
7.8  
If a postgraduate subject is assessed using a grade only, then the following grade-to-mark 
conversion scheme shall be used for the purpose of computation.  
  
Grade  
A*   
A   
B   
C  
D   
E   
F   
G  
Mark  
85   
75   
65   
55   
45   
35   
25   
10   
  
In most cases, the mark is set at the midpoint of the band. However, the mark at Grade A* is 
limited to 85 to reflect the comparatively few marks likely to be awarded over 90%.   
  
8.0  
Award   
  
8.1  
To gain an undergraduate award, a student must normally be a registered student at the 
University for at least one academic year.  Minimum registration periods for postgraduate 
awards are set out in the University’s Registration Regulations.  
  
To qualify for the following awards the student must fulfil the subject specific 
requirements for the name of the award and also:  
 
Cert HE  
120 credit points of which a minimum of 100 are at SCQF level 7 
or higher  
Dip HE   
240 credit points of which a minimum of 100 are at SCQF level 8 
or higher 
Degree  
360 credit points of which a minimum of 100 are at SCQF level 9 
or higher  
Honours Degree  
480 credit points of which a minimum of 220 are at SCQF level 9 
and 10, including at least 100 at level 10 
Graduate Certificate 
60 credit points, at minimum of SCQF level 9 
Graduate Diploma  
120 credit points, at minimum of SCQF level 9  
Postgraduate Certificate   
60 credit points of which a minimum of 40 are at SCQF level 11 
and no credits below SCQF level 10 
Postgraduate Diploma  
120 credit points of which a minimum of 100 are at SCQF level 
11 and no credits below SCQF level 10 
Masters Degree  
 180 credit points of which a minimum of 160 are at SCQF level 
11 and no credits below SCQF level 10 
134 
 

  
Students may take credits from the SCQF level directly above or directly below subject to the 
guidance set out above and as defined in relevant documentation. 
 
Ten SCQF Credits are equivalent to five European Credits (ECTS) therefore 120  
SCQF credits equal 60 ECTS.  
 
8.2  
The classification of the award of the Degree with Honours will be based on the marks 
obtained in SCQF level 9 (20%) and SCQF level 10 (80%).  Weighted aggregate scores will be 
rounded to one decimal place. The classification will be based upon the average mark 
obtained by combining the weighted results of all modules studied at SCQF levels 9 and 10. 
Any modules undertaken below SCQF level 9 and any modules taken whilst on an exchange 
arrangement will not be counted towards the Honours calculation.  
 
Where a student has accumulated more than 120 credits at SCQF level 10, a maximum of 
120 credits will be counted at SCQF level 10 for the purpose of the Honours calculation. All 
core modules at SCQF level 10 will count towards the Honours classification. The optional 
modules in which the student achieved the highest marks will be included in the calculation 
of the Honours classification. Additional optional modules at SCQF level 10 with lower marks 
will be counted towards SCQF level 9. 
 
70 and above   
First Class  
≥60% and <70%  
Second Class: Upper division  
≥50% and <60%  
Second Class: Lower division  
≥40% and <50%  
 
Third Class  
  
8.3  
The award of an Ordinary Degree can include an award with distinction, in cases where the 
average mark for the 120 credits (or equivalent) at SCQF level 9 or above is 65% or higher. 
Any modules undertaken below SCQF level 9 and any modules taken whilst on an exchange 
arrangement will not be counted towards the distinction calculation. 
  
8.4  
The award of taught Masters Degrees and Postgraduate Diplomas may include an award 
with distinction or merit.  The award of Postgraduate Certificate is without distinction or 
merit.  
  
A distinction is granted automatically if the weighted average mark (each module being 
weighted in relation to its size) - is 70% or over.   
A merit is granted automatically if the weighted average mark (each module being weighted 
in relation to its size) - is 60% or over.   
 
Only modules undertaken at SCQF level 11 will be used in the calculation for distinction or 
merit. 
  
8.5  
When granted an award a student will automatically be de-registered and must reapply if 
they wish to proceed to a higher or different award.  
135 
 

  
8.6  
Where a student is admitted to the University at level four the classification will be based 
entirely on grades achieved during level four studies.  
  
8.7  
Where a student is admitted to a level and given additional credit at that level gained 
externally, the grades from that credit may contribute to the classification where the credit 
is at the appropriate SCQF level and where marks are available.  Otherwise the classification 
will be based on grades gained entirely within the University.  Any modules taken whilst on 
an exchange arrangement will not be counted towards the classification.  
 
9.0  
Decision on award classifications and distinctions in borderline cases (undergraduate 
degrees)  

  
9.1  
All weighted average marks falling 0.5 per cent or less below the classification or distinction 
boundary are automatically reclassified at the higher level.    
  
9.2  
All weighted average marks falling between 0.6 per cent and two percent below the 
classification or distinction boundary are deemed borderline cases.    
  
9.3 
For Honours degrees the final classification is determined by the marks across all SCQF level 
10 credits.  Borderline cases where any 60 or more credits (core or elective modules) are 
achieved in the classification above the boundary will be awarded the higher classification of 
degree.  
  
9.4  
For Ordinary degrees the final award is determined by the marks across SCQF level 9 credits.  
Borderline cases where any 60 or more credits (core or elective modules) are achieved in the 
distinction category (65% or above) will be awarded the degree with distinction.    
  
9.5  
Additional viva voce examinations involving the External Examiner should not be used in the 
consideration of borderline cases.  
 
10.0   Decision on distinctions in borderline cases (postgraduate degrees)  
  
10.1   All weighted average marks falling 0.5 per cent or less below the distinction/merit boundary 
are automatically reclassified at the higher level.    
  
10.2   All weighted average marks falling between 0.6 per cent and two percent below the 
distinction/merit boundary are deemed borderline cases. In these cases the award of 
distinction/merit is determined by consideration of marks across all SCQF level 11 credits 
contributing to the Programme.  
  
10.3   For standard 180 credit Masters programmes, borderline cases where 90 credits or more 
(core or elective modules) at SCQF level 11 are marked at 70% or above will be awarded the 
distinction.   
  
136 
 

  
For standard 180 credit Masters programmes, borderline cases where 90 credits or more 
(core or elective modules) at SCQF level 11 are marked at 60% or above will be awarded the 
merit.   
  
10.4   For standard 120 credit Postgraduate Diploma programmes, borderline cases where 60 
credits or more (core or elective modules) at SCQF level 11 are marked at 70% or above will 
be awarded the distinction.   
  
  
For standard 120 credit Postgraduate Diploma programmes, borderline cases where 60 
credits or more (core or elective modules) at SCQF level 11 are marked at 60% or above will 
be awarded the merit.   
  
10.5   For non-standard Postgraduate Diploma and Masters programmes, i.e. Postgraduate 
Diploma Programmes rated at more than 120 credits, or Masters programmes rated at more 
than 180 credits, borderline cases where 50% or more of the total credits at SCQF level 11 
are marked at 70% or above will be awarded the distinction. Exceptionally, programme 
specific regulations may be defined for such programmes, to be agreed at the point of 
validation or review.  
  
  
For non-standard Postgraduate Diploma and Masters Programmes, i.e. Postgraduate 
Diploma programmes rated at more than 120 credits, or Masters programmes rated at more 
than 180 credits, borderline cases where 50% or more of the total credits  at SCQF level 11 
are marked at 60% or above will be awarded the merit. Exceptionally, programme specific 
regulations may be defined for such programmes, to be agreed at the point of validation or 
review.  
  
10.6   Additional viva voce examinations involving the External Examiner should not be used in the 
consideration of borderline cases.   
  
11.0   Decision on an award in absence of complete assessment information  
  
11.1   Boards of Examiners have discretion to make an award in the absence of complete 
assessment information where it is established to the satisfaction of the Board of Examiners 
that:   
  
  such absence is due to a valid documented cause, which would include, but not be 
limited to, a student’s illness;  
  there is enough evidence of the student's achievement at the level at which they are 
being examined, which would normally equate to two thirds of the assessable work at 
that level, or evidence is subsequently obtained.  
  
Where Boards of Examiners use their discretion to make an award in the absence of 
complete assessment information, the justification for this action should be included in the 
minutes of the meeting.  
  
137 
 

Awards may be recommended with or without Honours or distinction as appropriate.  In 
order to reach such a decision the Board of Examiners may assess the candidate by any 
appropriate and reasonable means. Any such assessment will for the purpose of these 
regulations be deemed a first assessment.  
  
The Board of Examiners has a duty to gain as much information about the candidate’s ability 
and performance as possible before making decisions.  
  
Decisions made in the absence of complete information must aim to ensure consistency of 
standard and equality of opportunity for the student under consideration as compared with 
his/her peers. The student must not be put in a position of unfair advantage over other 
candidates for the award.  
  
12.0   Withdrawing from a module and transfer between modules 
  
12.1   A student withdrawing from a module up to the point at which 25% of the taught duration 
of the module has been delivered may provide the Module Co-ordinator with a written 
explanation of reasons for withdrawal.  If the Module Co-ordinator accepts these as valid 
reasons, the student will suffer no academic penalty, i.e. the withdrawal will not count as a 
fail.  The student will receive a transcript showing them as withdrawn and will receive no 
credit.  
  
12.2   A student withdrawing from a module after 25% of the taught duration will be recorded as a 
fail.  
 
12.3 
A student wishing to transfer from one elective module to another will normally be 
permitted to do so within the first 25% of the taught duration of the module subject to the 
consent of both Module Co-ordinators. Only exceptionally will students be permitted to 
transfer between elective modules after this period. 
 
13.1 
Transcripts  
  
13.1   The student’s assessment record or academic transcript shall specify for each module taken:   
 
  the title;   
  the credit points and the level; 
  the academic year in which most recently taken;  
  the grade and mark most recently obtained;  
  the name of the University together with, if appropriate, the name of any other 
institution sharing responsibility for the student’s programme of study or research;  
  the location of study;  
  the language of instruction/assessment;  
  decision on progress/award.  
  
138 
 

Academic transcripts are issued online following Boards of Examiners.  They are issued on 
secure paper to exiting students.  
  
The University’s transcript meets the requirements of the European Diploma Supplement.  
  
Guidance on European Credit Points is provided for all students receiving transcripts in the 
accompanying Guidance Notes.    
   
 

 
139 
 

PART C ASSESSMENT REGULATIONS  
 
14.0    Terminology  
  
For the purposes of these regulations the following definitions shall apply:  
  
14.1   Component   
A component is defined as an individual piece of assessment, for example an examination or 
an essay.  Some modules will have one assessment component only.  Others may have 
multiple components.  
  
14.2   Reassessment  
  
Reassessment means the opportunity to be reassessed in an assessment component which 
has been failed.  The timing of the reassessment is at the discretion of the Board of 
Examiners but must allow the student sufficient time to prepare. Normally reassessment (as 
a second attempt) happens within the same academic year or shortly thereafter.   
 
A student will be permitted a maximum of three attempts at any module. i.e. attempt one 
plus two reassessment attempts. Attempt three may be undertaken in the following 
academic year subject to progression regulations. 
  
14.3 

Condonement of a module 
Condonement of a module may occur where a student has not achieved a minimum pass 
mark in an undergraduate module at SCQF level 7 or SCQF level 8 and there are no 
programme specific assessment regulations that require the student to be reassessed. 
 
 
15.0   Programme specific regulations   
 
 
15.1   It is expected that programme specific regulations will be consistent with the  
University’s general assessment regulations.   
 
Programmes may only apply more specific regulations where it is an explicit requirement of 
a professional body or where an explicit justification has been given as part of the formal 
validation process . Any exceptions must be approved through the validation or committee 
approval process and be clearly recorded in the programme document or relevant module 
descriptor. 
 
Programme specific regulations for progression and award are written in the context of the 
University’s general assessment regulations; they should be interpreted in that context and, 
where they are silent, the University’s general assessment regulations are taken to apply.  
Programme specific regulations may cover the following points:  
  
  the requirements for passing a module;  
  modules which are not eligible for condonement 
  the requirements for progression;  
  the conditions and limits to the provision for reassessment of modules;  
140 
 

  the conditions and limits to the provision for repeating a level;  
  the conditions under which a student shall be required to withdraw from the 
programme.  
 
16.0   Assessment of a module  
 
 
16.1   To pass an undergraduate module, a student must obtain at least 40% overall, and at least 
30% in each component of assessment unless otherwise specified in the programme 
document or module descriptor.  To pass a postgraduate module, a student must obtain at 
least 50% overall, and at least 40% in each component of assessment unless otherwise 
specified in the programme document or module descriptor.  This regulation applies to the 
first attempt at the module only.  Regulations for reassessment of modules are detailed 
below and in 14.2 above.  
  
16.2   Where a student has achieved an overall mark of 40% or above (50% for postgraduate 
modules) but has fallen below the minimum permitted mark in an individual component, 
this will be shown as a qualifying fail on the academic transcript with a grade of Q.  
  
16.3   Where a student is reassessed in an undergraduate module at a second or third attempt, the 
maximum mark that can be achieved for the module is 40%.  Where a student is reassessed 
in a postgraduate module at a second or third attempt, the maximum mark that can be 
achieved for the module is 50%.   
 
The nature and extent of the failure will not affect the student’s right to be reassessed.    
 
17.0   Decisions on student progression  
  
17.1   Student progression from one level of the programme to the next is at the discretion of the 
Board of Examiners taking into account the student’s performance in all modules and the 
amount of academic credit accrued during the year.  
  
17.2  
The main Board of Examiners is responsible for determining:  
  
  whether the student remains in registration;  
  the conditions governing the student’s progression;   
 
  the award for which the student is eligible.  
  
17.3     Where there is a tiered system of Boards of Examiners, the Module Board will have the  
authority to moderate and confirm marks and grades for each of the modules for which it is 
responsible, and determine the form and timing of any reassessment offered.  The decision 
of the Module Board of Examiners may be overturned by the Progression/Award Board of 
Examiners following consideration of the full student profile.  
  
17.4.  Boards of Examiners may condone one failed 20 credit module per level at the first attempt 
for students at level one and level two (SCQF level 7 and 8) of an undergraduate 
141 
 

programme, provided that a minimum overall mark of at least 37% has been achieved in the 
failed module. The result will show as a condoned fail on the academic transcript and the 
student will be given credit for the module. Students who have failed more than 20 credits 
must undertake reassessments of all failed modules in the first instance. Once reassessment 
results are known, condonement may still be applied. 
 
Programme specific regulations may exempt some modules from eligibility for condonement. 
 
A condoned fail will not affect any subsequent module selections.  
 
17.5     Decisions on a student’s continued registration will be made at the end of each  
academic year, after reassessment results are known. The main Board of Examiners will take 
account of the following guidelines in making their decisions.  
  
17.6 
For undergraduate full-time students:  
 
a)  Pass modules rated to a total of 80 or more credits – continue in registration as a full-
time student  
 
Normally full-time students undertake 120 credits in an academic year.  Exceptionally, 
full-time students can take a maximum of 160 credits in any academic year.  This 
regulation is intended to support students carrying forward modules and not to 
facilitate completion of studies in a shorter time than the usual minimum period of 
registration or to allow students to undertake additional optional modules in an 
academic session.  
 
b)  Pass modules rated to more than 50 credits and less than 80 credits – continue in 
registration as a part-time student but may not register for modules rated at more than 
70 credits in the next year of study  
 
c)  Pass modules rated at 50 credits or less – required to discontinue registration  
 
17.7     A part-time student allowed to continue in registration, wishing to transfer to full-time  
study, will have her or his application considered by the programme’s admission tutor.  
Transfer is not at the student’s discretion.  
  
17.8      The only decisions available to the Board of Examiners on progress and award shall be:  
  
  Continue – passed all assessments  
  Required to be reassessed in the failed module(s) before continuing  
  Continue – but required to be reassessed in the failed/deferred module(s) in next 
academic year  
  Offered opportunity to repeat the entire level in next academic year before continuing  
  Offered opportunity to be reassessed in next academic year as a part-time student 
before continuing  
142 
 

  Continue in part time registration (applies to part-time students only)  
  No reassessment allowed – required to withdraw from course  
  Decision deferred – outstanding assessments as a first attempt  
  Decision deferred – outstanding reassessments  
  Progress to placement 
  Recommendation to Senate for specific awards  
  
17.9 
Undergraduate programmes of study are designed on four levels, normally corresponding   
with Scottish Credit and Qualifications Framework levels 7, 8, 9 and 10, with conceptual and 
material progression being designed into the structure from level to level.  Thus, it is 
expected that students will progress from level to level, and the structure of the programme 
and the timetables are developed accordingly.  Although the above regulations may allow a 
full-time student to stay in full-time registration albeit without a completed level of study, it 
may not be possible to construct a programme around the timetable available which is 
academically coherent and which makes best advantage of the student’s time. In most cases 
students will be expected and advised but not required to complete a level of study before 
progressing to the next level.  
  
17.10  Full-time undergraduate students may not normally proceed to level four study unless they    
are eligible for the award of an Ordinary Degree. Exceptionally, a student may be able to 
progress to level four study when falling short by only 20 credit points.  
 
17.11  A student may cease to be registered for a postgraduate award if he or she:  
  
a)  fails to register on any module in two successive semesters without prior approval 
(unless enrolled on a dissertation)  
b)  is granted the award of  PgCert, PgDip, MSc, MA, MBA, Executive Masters  or MFA  
c)  fails to have the dissertation proposal approved after two submissions  
d)  accumulates fails as specified in regulations 17.12 and 17.13  
e)  fails the dissertation on two attempts  
  
17.12  A postgraduate student will normally be permitted a reassessment attempt in up to two 
thirds of the taught modules on a programme. Should a student be unsuccessful at attempt 
two, they may be permitted a further reassessment attempt in a maximum of one third of 
the taught modules on a programme. Should a student breach these reassessment 
thresholds, they will be required to withdraw from the programme. A maximum of two 
attempts will be permitted for the Masters project/dissertation. 
  
17.13  Individual postgraduate programmes with a non-standard structure may define programme 
specific regulations under which a student may be required to withdraw. These regulations 
should be broadly in line with the above principle. Programme specific regulations defined to 
meet the requirements of Professional Statutory and Regulatory Bodies should be approved 
by the validation panel, or through the relevant committee.  
  
143 
 

18.0   Reassessment of a module   
  
18.1   Reassessment is permitted in order to allow a student to make good an initial failure.  This 
affords the student an opportunity to demonstrate the standard required to pass modules, 
and ultimately to gain an award.  A student who has passed a module at the first opportunity 
shall not be entitled to a further assessment in order to obtain a higher grade.  
  
18.2   The Board of Examiners may at its discretion allow an undergraduate student to be re-
assessed in up to 80 credits in any one academic year.  The Board of Examiners may at its 
discretion allow a postgraduate student to be re-assessed in up to two thirds of the taught 
modules on a programme as a second attempt, and one third as a third attempt.  
  
18.3    The Board of Examiners shall decide on the form of the reassessment (e.g. written 
examination, viva voce, or an additional assignment), taking into account the nature of the 
failed module and the nature of the failure. This may differ from the format of the first 
assessment and need not be the same for all students provided equity of experience is 
maintained.  The Board of Examiners can allow for full or partial reassessment of the 
components as appropriate. Reassessment can take the form of a reworking or a new 
assessment, as determined by the Board of Examiners.   
  
18.4   Normally, a student may not be given more than three attempts at any module.  
  
18.5   A candidate for reassessment is not entitled to be reassessed in components that are no 
longer part of the programme.  A Board of Examiners may, at its discretion, make such 
special arrangements as it deems suitable in cases where it is inappropriate for students to 
be reassessed in the same elements, or by the same methods as at the first attempt.  
  
18.6   All second attempt assessments shall normally take place before the commencement of the 
next session of the programme.  They should be late enough to allow the students time to 
prepare themselves, and to avoid overload of assessment shall normally take place in the 
summer/autumn. Students cannot request an extraordinary exam sitting. Third attempt 
assessments may be required to be undertaken in the following academic year. 
 
18.7   A student who is reassessed for a module failure in an undergraduate module, where there 
are no clear extenuating circumstances, shall be awarded no more than 40% on passing the 
reassessment.  A student who is reassessed for a module failure in a postgraduate module, 
where there are no clear extenuating circumstances, shall be awarded no more than 50% on 
passing the reassessment.  
  
18.8   All reassessment results shall be based only upon performance in reassessments; no marks 
may be carried forward from a student’s first attempt at the assessments. To pass an 
undergraduate module at reassessment, a student must achieve at least 30% in each 
reassessed component and a weighted average of at least 40%. To pass a postgraduate 
module at reassessment, a student must achieve at least 40% in each reassessed component 
and a weighted average of at least 50%.   
144 
 

 
18.9   A student who has been absent from an assessment, or who has performed badly due to 
illness or other cause, shall be allowed to take the assessment, and it shall be treated as a 
first assessment, subject to the reason for absence or poor performance being acceptable to 
the Board of Examiners or the Extenuating Circumstances Panel.  
  
19.0   Assessment of students with a disability and of students whose first language is not 
English  
  
19.1   Students with a disability  
  
19.1.1   If, through disability, a student is unable to be assessed by the prescribed method for the 
module, reasonable adjustments (as agreed by the Academic Disabled Student Co-ordinator) 
will be detailed within an Individual Learning Plan.    
  
19.1.2   Arrangements for the assessment of students with a disability will be made prior to, or at the 
point of assessment.  Further allowance or compensation for disability will not be made in 
the marking of assessed work.  
  
19.1.3   Further information can be found about the Disability Service on the University’s website.  
 
19.2   Students whose first language is not English  
 
 
All students whose first language is not English will normally be permitted to use language-
only dictionaries in examinations.  Electronic dictionaries are not permitted (please refer to 
Exam Regulations section). No extra time will be allocated for students whose first language 
is not English.  
 
20.0   Penalties for word limits and late submission of assessment  
  
20.1   In each piece of written work where a word limit is identified, students are required to 
include and clearly state the total number of words used.  The number of words counted 
should include all the text, references and quotations used in the text, but should exclude 
abstracts, supplements to the text, diagrams, appendices, reference lists and bibliographies.  
 
20.2 
A piece of written work which exceeds the specified word limit by 10% or more will receive a 
maximum mark of 40% for undergraduate or 50% for postgraduate programmes.    
 
20.3   Any student who submits work to be assessed after the assessment submission date and 
time, without the prior agreement of the Programme Leader, or without good or agreed 
cause, will have marks deducted according to the following criteria:  
  
  if submitted, as a first attempt, after the deadline but up to and including six days after 
the deadline) a maximum mark of 40% can be achieved for undergraduate programmes 
and a maximum mark of 50% for postgraduate programmes  
145 
 

  if submitted, as a first attempt, seven days or more (including on the 7th day after the 
submission deadline) a mark of 0% will be awarded  
 
Example (first attempt)  
  
Friday 4pm submission  
Day 1  
Saturday 4pm  
A maximum mark of 40% can be achieved for 
undergraduate programmes and a maximum 
Day 2  
Sunday 4pm  
mark of 50% for postgraduate programmes  
  
Day 3  
Monday 4pm  
Day 4  
Tuesday 4pm  
Day 5  
Wednesday 4pm  
Day 6  
Thursday 4pm  
Any later than this   
A mark of 0% will be awarded  
 
  if submitted after the submission deadline in a second or third attempt assessment, a 
mark of 0% will be awarded. 
  
 
146 
 

PART D RESPONSIBILITIES AND EXPECTATIONS  
  
21.0   Student responsibility in assessment  
  
21.1   It is the responsibility of students to:  
  
  familiarise themselves with the regulations for their programme. Students should 
consult their Programme Handbook and/or their Academic Tutor;  
  recognise the role of assessment in the achievement and recognition of their learning;  
  familiarise themselves with the examination periods (both first attempt and 
reassessment and make themselves available for the examination period);  
  attend written examinations and observe the University’s Instruction to Candidates in 
Examinations (to be read out to students prior to the start of examinations). In brief, 
these require candidates to attend in good time, to bring their matriculation card, not to 
communicate with other candidates, not to cheat, not to disrupt the event, to complete 
the answer paper as instructed, not to bring into the hall any unauthorised material and 
not to remove any part of an answer paper from the hall;  
  attend all other types of assessment, for example, practical examinations, class tests and 
presentations;  
  submit all work for assessment in accordance with the requirements for their 
programme;  
  provide evidence, in advance of the Board of Examiners, of any extenuating 
circumstances. This evidence is normally written by an independent source such as a 
medical practitioner and should be forwarded to the School Office in the first instance. 
Students should be aware that Boards of Examiners will take account of all certificated 
or verified evidence submitted on behalf of students in their deliberations on individual 
performance.  
  
21.2 
If a student fails to attend examinations or submit work for assessment without good cause, 
the Board of Examiners has the authority to deem the student to have failed the 
assessments concerned.  
  
21.3 
Students are not permitted to substantially reproduce the same piece of course work for 
more than one assignment, except where they are explicitly required to do so by the 
assignment specification. 
 
21.4   If a student is found to have cheated, or attempted to gain an unfair advantage, the Board of 
Examiners, following a recommendation from the Dean or Disciplinary Panel, has authority 
to deem the student to have failed part or all of the assessment and to determine whether 
or not the student shall be permitted to be re-assessed. Students must ensure the proper 
acknowledgement of the borrowings from other sources, whether published or unpublished. 
Divisions should provide guidance on how such borrowings should be acknowledged in a 
manner appropriate to that discipline. 
 
147 
 

21.5 
Fraudulent practices such as copying, cheating, collusion, plagiarism (i.e. the presentation by 
an individual of another person’s ideas or work, in any medium, published or unpublished, as 
though they were their own) are serious academic offences and will incur appropriate 
penalties. Students must not submit work obtained from an essay bank or website essay 
writing service. Students are urged to seek advice from academic staff or the Effective 
Learning Service if in any doubt about the foregoing practices. All students are expected to 
seek clear guidance on the form and manner in which assessments are to be completed.  
 
21.6 
Serious cases of cheating and plagiarism will be referred for consideration through the 
University’s disciplinary procedure. Undertaking fraudulent practices can result in a student 
being required to leave the University.  
  
21.7 
QMU has a policy to use the TurnItIn UK plagiarism detection system, or other equivalent 
systems, to help students avoid plagiarism and improve their scholarship skills.  This service 
is available to all matriculated students at QMU.  Academic staff may submit student work to 
TurnItIn UK or another equivalent system.  
  
22.0   Responsibility of other individuals and bodies in assessment  
 
 
22.1   Senate, through its Student Experience Committee, has responsibility for:  
  
  the development of assessment regulations and policy;   
  monitoring the  use of these regulations and policy by the Schools;  
  periodically reviewing and revising these regulations and policy.  
  
22.2   The Deans of School have responsibility for ensuring that:   
 
  programmes within that School conform to these regulations and policy;  
  assessment processes are approved and reviewed;  
  assessment processes are secure;  
  through the annual monitoring process,  there is reflection on student performance in 
assessment and in relation to programme learning outcomes;  
  periodic review of assessment strategies are conducted;  
  staff are supported in the development of assessment strategies and practices;  
  students are involved in the evaluation of assessment strategies;  
  External Examiners are briefed on these regulations and policy;  
  issues arising through the implementation of these regulations and policy are conveyed 
to the Student Experience Committee.  
  
22.3   Programme Leaders have responsibility for:  
  
  assuring that academic standards are maintained through the effective use of this policy 
and its local implementation via the programme definitive document;  
  monitoring the outcomes of assessment and reporting these outcomes to the School.  
148 
 

 
Programme Leaders have delegated authority from Deans, and work in partnership with 
Heads of Division, to oversee the management of their programmes.  
  
22.4   Module Co-ordinators (with appropriate academic staff) have the responsibility for:  
  
  designing assessments that both conform to these regulations and policy and which 
assess the specified learning outcomes and which make reasonable adjustments to meet 
the needs of all learners;  
  ensuring that feedback is provided on student performance in relation to assessment 
outcomes;  
  providing feedback on summative assessment in accordance with the timescales 
specified in regulation 4.17. Staff should note that ‘working days’ equates to Monday to 
Friday, excluding University closure dates, i.e. part-time working or periods of annual 
leave should not result in an extension to the 15/20 working day maximum. The 
maximum of 15/20 working days includes all stages within the marking process (i.e. 
marking, cross-marking, collation of marks and feedback, sending marks and feedback to 
the School Office, dissemination of marks and feedback to students by the School Office) 
and applies to all staff, including Visiting Lecturers. 
  clearly specifying the date by which a student can expect to receive feedback on each 
summative assignment. This date must be communicated to the student at the same 
time as the assessment deadline. Where a student has been granted an extension, the 
timescale for receiving feedback will be adjusted accordingly. In exceptional 
circumstances, the original date communicated to students for receipt of feedback may 
be extended. Any such extension must be communicated to students at least seven days 
before the original deadline for receipt of feedback. 
  attending Boards of Examiners for the presentation of their module results. 
 
23.0   Project supervision  
 
23.1 
All project supervision meetings with undergraduate and taught postgraduate students must 
be documented, signed by both student and supervisor, and filed as a record of the 
supervisory process.  Documentation should include the date and duration of the meeting 
and a summary of the discussion. Arrangements for doctoral candidate supervision records 
are set out in the University’s PhD and Professional Doctorate Regulations. 
 
23.2 
The time allocated to supervision of Honours projects and dissertations should normally be 
no less than three hours and not more than five hours per student.  These minimum and 
maximum time allocations apply only to supervisory meetings with students and do not 
include time taken to read draft work. Guidance on the time allocation for postgraduate 
project and dissertation supervision is available in the relevant programme documentation. 
149 
 

 
23.3 
Early in the academic year all supervisors should hold an initial meeting with their 
supervisees to discuss key elements of the process, including expectations, regulations, 
terms of reference and operational procedures.  This meeting could be held as a joint 
meeting between a supervisor and all of his/her supervisees.  A record of all meetings 
between a student and their supervisor should be lodged in the student file at the time of 
submission of the project or dissertation.  
 
23.4 
Staff members should normally read and give feedback on one draft only and should not 
mark or re-write this work. 
 
24.0    Academic dishonesty and plagiarism  
  
24.1   Introduction  
 
 
24.1.1   The University’s degrees and other academic awards are given in recognition of the 
candidate’s achievement. Plagiarism is therefore, together with other forms of academic 
dishonesty such as personation, falsification of data, computer and calculation fraud, 
examination room cheating and bribery, considered an act of academic fraud and is an 
offence against University discipline.   
  
24.1.2   Plagiarism is defined as follows:  
  
The presentation by an individual of another person’s ideas or work (in any medium, 
published or unpublished) as though they were their own
.  
  
24.1.3   In the following circumstances academic collusion represents a form of plagiarism:   
  
Academic collusion is deemed to be unacceptable where it involves the unauthorised and 
unattributed collaboration of students or others work resulting in plagiarism, which is against 
University discipline.
  
  
24.1.4   QMU has a policy to use the TurnItIn UK plagiarism detection system, or other equivalent 
systems, to help students avoid plagiarism and improve their scholarship skills.  This service 
is available to all matriculated students at QMU.  QMU tutors may submit student work to 
TurnItIn UK, or another equivalent system.  
  
24.2   Referencing  
  
Students’ attention is drawn to the guide to referencing available at: 
http://libguides.qmu.ac.uk/referencing 
 
  
  
150 
 

24.3   Prevention  
  
24.3.1   All members of staff should explain to their students at the start of each session that 
plagiarism and academic fraud are unacceptable forms of cheating, which will be penalised 
severely. Such warnings should be repeated during the session and are especially necessary 
where dissertations, projects or coursework are substantial elements of the curriculum. 
Every opportunity should be taken to reinforce this message by incorporating it in published 
material such as Programme or scheme guides and, in the case of postdoctoral candidates, 
by its inclusion in the Research Degrees Code of Practice/Doctoral Student Handbooks (PhD 
and Professional Doctorate).  
  
24.3.2   These warnings should be accompanied by specific advice from Divisions about what 
constitutes plagiarism and academic fraud. For example, such advice should indicate where a 
particular discipline makes the distinction between legitimate and illegitimate use of 
acknowledged or unacknowledged sources; what is regarded as acceptable collaboration 
between students undertaking joint project work; and what is expected of a dissertation or 
thesis. Dissertations should clearly indicate whether it is an original contribution to 
knowledge or a critical survey of published material. Training students to make such 
distinctions is part of the academic process and should be formally and publicly 
acknowledged as such.  This is particularly significant since some of the cases arising stem 
from genuine ignorance on the part of the students who have never received guidance on 
how to acknowledge sources properly.  
  
24.3.3   Scrutiny of academic work should be sufficient to ensure that signs of plagiarism or 
unacceptable levels of co-operation, whether intentional or not, are detected at an early 
stage and brought to students’ attention through tutorial guidance and in some cases 
perhaps by written warning.  
  
24.3.4   Dissertation supervisors and other academic staff responsible for assessment and guidance 
should be aware of cultural relativities that may affect some students’ approach to 
referencing. In providing guidance, staff will be expected to acknowledge cultural differences 
and to exercise appropriate sensitivity.  
  
24.4   Identifying, reporting and investigating 
 
Procedures for identifying, reporting and investigating plagiarism are published separately in 
the University’s Plagiarism Policy.  
 
 
151 
 

PART E APPENDICES 
 
UNDERGRADUATE DESCRIPTORS  
 
Grade A* 80% and above 
 
Outstanding performance, exceptionally able – pass 
 
  Articulates an outstanding and comprehensive understanding of the question or problem 
  Includes all of the most relevant information and issues raised by the question 
  Demonstrates outstanding in-depth knowledge of appropriate reading through extensive 
references to texts, including journal articles 
  Shows outstanding originality in problem solving, critical thinking, analysis and evaluation 
  Presents outstanding arguments in a fluent and convincing manner. 
  Displays an outstanding ability to synthesise concepts, knowledge and theory 
  Shows in-depth awareness of value judgements and assumptions embodied in the question 
 
Grade A 70-79.9%  
Excellent performance – pass 
 

  Articulates an excellent understanding and interpretation of the question or problem 
  Includes most of the relevant information and issues raised by the question 
  Demonstrates an excellent in-depth knowledge of appropriate reading through references 
to texts, including journal articles 
  Shows originality in problem solving, critical thinking, analysis and evaluation 
  Shows an excellent  understanding of theoretical/conceptual issues 
  Presents excellent arguments in a balanced and coherent way 
  Demonstrates excellent ability to analyse issues raised, synthesise materials and evaluate 
evidence presented 
  Shows awareness of value judgements and assumptions embodied in the question 
 
Grade B 60-69.9%  
Very good performance – pass 
 

  Articulates a very good understanding and interpretation of the question or problem 
  Includes many of the most relevant information and issues raised by the question 
  Demonstrates a very good knowledge of appropriate reading through references to texts, 
including journal articles 
  Shows some elements of problem solving, critical thinking, analysis and evaluation 
  Shows consistent understanding of theoretical/conceptual issues 
  Present arguments in a balanced and coherent way 
  Demonstrates a very good  ability to analyse issues raised and evaluate evidence presented 
  Shows some awareness of value judgements and assumptions embodied in the question 
 
 
152 
 

Grade C 50-59.9%  
Good performance – pass 
 

  Articulates a good understanding and interpretation of the question or problem 
  Brings in several of the main points and issues raised by the question 
  Demonstrates a good  knowledge of appropriate reading through references to texts, 
including journal articles 
  Shows some elements of problem solving, critical thinking, analysis and evaluation, but not 
consistently applied 
  Shows good  understanding of some theoretical/conceptual issues 
  Presents most arguments reasonably clearly 
  Demonstrates a good ability to analyse issues raised and evaluate evidence presented 
  Shows good  awareness of value judgements and assumptions embodied in the question 
 
Grade D 40-49.9% 
Satisfactory Performance – pass 
 
  Articulates satisfactory but limited understanding and interpretation of the question or 
problem 
  Discusses some of the main points/issues raised by the question 
  Demonstrates satisfactory knowledge of appropriate reading through references to texts, 
including journal articles 
  Shows some satisfactory but inconsistent attempts to problem solve, analyse and evaluate 
  Shows partial understanding of theoretical/conceptual issues 
  Presents some arguments with some clarity 
  Demonstrates a satisfactory ability to analyse issues raised or evaluate evidence presented. 
  Shows satisfactory but limited awareness of value judgements and assumptions embodied in 
the question 
  Indicates that additional engagement may be required to sustain and enhance performance 
in subsequent modules and levels 
 
Grade E 30-39.9% 
 
Unsatisfactory performance - fail  
 

  Articulates very limited understanding of the question or problem set 
  Discusses few or none of the main points/issues raised by the question 
  Demonstrates insufficient knowledge of appropriate reading through references to 
academic texts, including journal articles 
  Shows narrow understanding of theoretical/conceptual issues 
  Includes arbitrary or inaccurate factual information 
  Presents arguments with little clarity 
  Demonstrates very limited ability to analyse issues raised or evaluate evidence presented 
  Shows limited awareness of value judgements and assumptions embodied in the question 
 
153 
 

 
Grade F 20-29.9%  
Unsatisfactory performance- fail  
 
  Articulates extremely limited or no understanding of the question or problem set 
  Discusses mostly marginal or irrelevant points 
  Demonstrates very limited or no knowledge of appropriate reading through references to 
academic texts, including journal articles 
  Shows very narrow understanding of theoretical/conceptual issues 
  Includes arbitrary or inaccurate factual information 
  Presents arguments with very little clarity, or presents no argument at all 
  Demonstrates little or no ability to analyse issues raised or evaluate evidence presented 
  Shows very limited or no awareness of value judgements and assumptions embodied in the 
question. 
 
Grade G < 20%  
Unsatisfactory performance or non-submission- Fail  
 

  Articulates little or no understanding of the question or problem set 
  Discusses only marginal or irrelevant points 
  Demonstrates virtually no knowledge of appropriate reading through references to 
academic texts, including journal articles 
  Shows very narrow or no understanding of theoretical/conceptual issues 
  Includes arbitrary or inaccurate factual information 
  Presents arguments with very little clarity, or presents no argument at all 
  Demonstrates virtually no ability to analyse issues raised or evaluate evidence presented 
  Shows very limited or no awareness of value judgements and assumptions embodied in the 
question 
 
 
 

 
154 
 

POSTGRADUATE DESCRIPTORS  
 
Grade A* 80%+  
Outstanding performance, exceptionally able – pass 
 

  Mastery of the specialist area that demonstrates exceptional insight and breadth of 
knowledge. 
  Exceptional comprehension of scholarly techniques and / or the research-base. 
  Presents extensive evidence of outstanding scholarship with exceptional critical analysis 
and consistent deep knowledge of the specialist and related areas. 
  Demonstrates outstanding awareness of and sensitivity to the limitations of evidence 
  Outstanding ability to challenge and develop existing theory and/or professional practice 
within the specialist area. 
  Demonstrates outstanding originality, creativity or innovation in the application of 
knowledge and / or practice 
  Demonstrates exceptional synthesis in development and inter-relationship between 
concepts, theories, policies and practice. 
  Displays outstanding potential to undertake research or be a leading practitioner within a 
specialist area. 
  Demonstrates exceptional ability in synthesising knowledge from different disciplines. 
  Outstanding ability to communicate knowledge (written, verbal, practical, visual) 
  Meets the learning outcomes of the module or assessment. 
 
Grade A 70- 79.9%  
Excellent performance [distinction mark is 70%] – pass 
 

  Mastery of the specialist area that demonstrates excellent insight and breadth of 
knowledge. 
  Excellent comprehension of scholarly techniques and / or the research-base. 
  Presents extensive evidence of excellent scholarship including critical analysis and deep 
knowledge of the specialist and related areas. 
  Demonstrates excellent awareness of and sensitivity to the limitations of evidence 
  Excellent ability to challenge existing theory and/or professional practice within the 
specialist area with some insight into potential developments. 
  Demonstrates excellent creativity or innovation in the application of knowledge and / or 
practice with potential originality 
  Demonstrates excellent synthesis in development and inter-relationship between 
concepts, theories, policies and practice. 
  Displays excellent potential to undertake research or be a leading practitioner within a 
specialist area. 
  Demonstrates excellent ability in synthesising knowledge from different disciplines. 
  Excellent ability to communicate knowledge (written, verbal, practical, visual) 
  Meets the learning outcomes of the module or assessment. 
 
155 
 

Grade B 60- 69.9%  
Very good performance [merit mark is 60-69.9%] – pass 
 

  Very good insight and breadth of knowledge in specialist area. 
  Very good comprehension of scholarly techniques and / or the research-base. 
  Presents evidence of very good scholarship including critical analysis and some depth of 
knowledge of the specialist and related areas. 
  Demonstrates very good awareness of and some sensitivity to the limitations of evidence 
  Very good ability to challenge existing theory and/or professional practice within the 
specialist area with some insight into potential developments. 
  Demonstrates some creativity or innovation in the application of knowledge and / or 
practice. 
  Demonstrates very good synthesis in development and inter-relationship between 
concepts, theories, policies and practice. 
  Displays some potential to undertake research or lead practice within a specialist area. 
  Demonstrates very good ability in synthesising knowledge from different disciplines. 
  Very good ability to communicate knowledge (written, verbal, practical) 
  Meets the learning outcomes of the module or assessment. 
 
Grade C 50- 59.9%  
Satisfactory performance – pass 
 

  Satisfactory insight and knowledge in specialist area. 
  Some comprehension of scholarly techniques and / or the research-base. 
  Presents some evidence of scholarship including critical analysis but lacking depth or 
critique in some areas.  
  Demonstrates some awareness of and some sensitivity to the limitations of evidence but 
these may not always be clearly articulated or understood 
  Presents existing theory or comments on practice within the specialist area but with 
unsubstantiated claims or limited insight into alternative perspectives. 
  Superficial understanding in the application of knowledge. 
  Limited synthesis in development and inter-relationship between concepts, theories, 
policies and practice. 
  Some ability to synthesise knowledge from different disciplines. 
  Satisfactory ability to communicate knowledge (written, verbal, practical) 
  Meets the learning outcomes of the module or assessment. 
 
Grade D 40-49.9%  
Unsatisfactory performance – fail 
 

  Unsatisfactory insight and knowledge in specialist area. 
  Insufficient evidence of scholarly techniques and / or knowledge of the research-base. 
  Lacks critical analysis or depth of argument in some areas.  
  Limited awareness of the evidence with muddled understanding 
156 
 

  Presents some theory or comments on practice but highly descriptive and uncritical with 
unsubstantiated claims. 
  Limited ability to apply knowledge. 
  Limited synthesis of concepts, theories, policies and practice. 
  Limited ability to synthesise knowledge from different disciplines. 
  Limited ability to communicate knowledge (written, verbal, practical) 
  Does not meet all the learning outcomes of the module or assessment. 
 
Grade E 30-39.9%  
Unsatisfactory performance - fail
  
 
  Unsatisfactory insight and knowledge in specialist area. 
  Lack of evidence of scholarly techniques and / or knowledge of the research-base. 
  Lack of critical analysis or depth of argument.  
  Lack of awareness of the evidence and muddled understanding 
  Presents little theory or limited comments on practice with highly descriptive and 
unsubstantiated claims. 
  Lack of ability to apply knowledge. 
  Lack of synthesis of concepts, theories, policies and practice. 
  Lack of ability to synthesise knowledge from different disciplines. 
  Lack of  ability to communicate knowledge (written, verbal, practical) 
  Does not meet all the learning outcomes of the module or assessment. 
 
Grade F 20-29.9%  
Unsatisfactory performance - fail
  
 
  Unsatisfactory insight or knowledge in specialist area. 
  No evidence of scholarly techniques with minimal knowledge of the evidence or the 
research-base. 
  Lack of analysis, depth of argument or attempts to apply knowledge.  
  Presents minimal relevant theory or relevant comments on practice. 
  Lack of attempt to synthesis concepts, theories, policies and practice. 
  Very poor ability to communicate knowledge (written, verbal, practical) 
  Does not meet the learning outcomes of the module or assessment. 
 
Grade G <20%  
Unsatisfactory performance and non-submission – fail 
 

  No insight or knowledge in specialist area. 
  No evidence of scholarly techniques or knowledge of the research-base. 
  No analysis or depth of argument.  
  No awareness or understanding of the evidence. 
  Presents no relevant theory or relevant comments on practice. 
  No attempt to apply knowledge. 
157 
 

  No attempt to synthesis concepts, theories, policies and practice. 
  No evidence of ability to synthesise knowledge from different disciplines. 
  Extremely poor ability to communicate knowledge (written, verbal, practical) 
  Does not meet the learning outcomes of the module or assessment. 
 
 
 
158 
 

18. HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY 
 
SECTION 1 - GENERAL STATEMENT OF POLICY 
 
It is the Policy of Queen Margaret University to protect and promote, so far as is reasonably 
practicable, the health, safety and welfare of all its employees, students, visitors and others who 
may be affected by its activities in accordance with the requirements of the Health and Safety at 
Work Act 1974. The University considers that good health and safety performance is a fundamental 
prerequisite if the University’s aims are to provide a first class working and teaching establishment. 
 
In particular, it is the intention of the University where it is reasonably practicable to ensure:- 
 
  The provision and maintenance of plant and systems of work which are, as far as is 
reasonably practicable, safe and free from risks to health by the careful identification, 
elimination or control of foreseeable hazards in the University Campus. This is seen as an 
essential part of offering quality education, training and research. 
  That safety is considered in planning all activities as well as in day-to-day work. 
  The provision of suitable information, instruction, training, equipment, safety devices and 
supervision to enable employees to perform their work safely and to understand the risks 
associated with their activities, the control measures in place and the actions to be taken in 
the event of an emergency or imminent danger. 
  The provision and maintenance of a safe, risk free working and learning environment, along 
with suitable welfare facilities. 
  That the University maintains a constant, continuing interest in all health and safety matters, 
and regularly consults with employees and students. 
  That all levels of Management and Supervision lead by example continually promoting safe 
and healthy working practices in full compliance with this policy. 
  All levels of Management and staff have responsibility for the health and safety of 
themselves and persons and facilities within their designated area of control. 
  The day to day management of health and safety at each location will be managed by the 
Senior Management Team and Executive Board in their respective areas. 
 
Guidance in support of the Policy Statement, detailing organisation, responsibility and arrangements 
is contained in sections 2, 3 and Appendix 1 of this Policy. 
 
The University recognises the fundamental principles of the Scottish Funding Council’s concept of 
the Safe Learner, and will envelop, support and promote their philosophy of ‘promoting risk 
education, awareness and the learning of health and safety’, especially in the preparation of ‘Young 
Persons’ to be safe and healthier workers. 
 
The Court and the Principal of the University fully support this Policy Document and will ensure its 
implementation and monitor its application. They will also ensure it is reviewed periodically or as 
required, bringing any necessary changes to the attention of all University employees and students. 
159 
 

SECTION 2 - RESPONSIBILITIES 
 
The responsibilities for safety parallel the general management structure of the University: each 
level of management is responsible for those below, and accountable to those above; to the extent 
that who has control, has responsibility. This is so that responsibility for ensuring high standards of 
health and safety performance remains with those who design, arrange or direct the work of the 
University, which will lead to the development of a thriving safety culture throughout the University. 
 
2.1 
The Court of Queen Margaret University 
 
 

The Court recognises that it has responsibility for health, safety and welfare matters. It will 
authorise and approve the Policy and support the efforts of the Principal and the Executive 
Board and managers in achieving policy objectives. 
 
2.2 

Principal/Vice Chancellor 
 
 
 
The Principal shall have ultimate responsibility for all operational activities within Queen 
Margaret University. This will include: providing and maintaining adequate workplace 
health, safety and welfare provisions and standards to safeguard all employees, students 
and others; such as visitors, contractors, neighbouring companies and the public at large. 
The Principal in conjunction with the Court is responsible for approving the Policy Document 
and will:- 
 
2.2.1 
Monitor the overall effectiveness of the Health and Safety Policy, ensuring the policy is 
reviewed at least annually and is revised where necessary. 
 
2.2.2  Ensure adequate resources are made available to comply with health and safety 
requirements. 
 
2.2.3  Delegate responsibilities both general and specific to appropriate staff as identified in the 
following sections, to ensure the above is effectively applied. The structure of health and 
safety responsibility is shown in the organisational chart at Appendix 1 to this policy. 
 
2.2.4  The Principal will ensure the implementation of this policy by active management and 
review of health and safety within the organisation. 
 
2.2.5  The Principal will actively promote good health and safety standards and set a good personal 
example. 
 
2.3 
Senior Managers – Deputy Principal, Deans, Directors 
 
Responsible to the Principal of Queen Margaret University for health and safety issues in 
terms of implementation, monitoring, and review of the policy. This line of management 
will:- 
 
160 
 

2.3.1 
Be responsible for the day to day health and safety management of all personnel and 
students within their areas of control.   
 
2.3.2 
Actively promote and encourage the development of a culture of health and safety 
awareness within their area of responsibility. 
 
2.3.3 
Make proper arrangements for the investigation, analysis and reporting of all notifiable 
accidents, incidents and near misses, with a view to preventing similar occurrences in the 
future. 
 
2.3.4 
Ensure regular health and safety inspections and any necessary remedial works identified 
are carried out where applicable. 
 
2.3.5 
Ensure managers/nominated employees carry out risk assessments, and where necessary, 
any remedial/preventative actions are completed. They should ensure that risk 
assessments are monitored and regularly reviewed when necessary. 
 
2.3.6 
Ensure safe systems of work are in place and adhered to by all employees and students. 
 
2.3.7 
Consult effectively with all employees under their control on health and safety matters. 
 
2.3.8 
Consider the health and safety implications of any materials, plant or equipment purchased 
by the department on behalf of the University, consulting with the Head of Estates and 
Facilities and/or the Health and Safety Advisor where necessary. 
 
2.3.9 
Set a good personal example on health and safety. 
 
 
In addition to the above Managers who are responsible for all aspects of the day to day 
management of the Campus shall:- 
 
2.3.10 
Ensure that any premises and equipment under their area of control are suitable, safe and 
without risks to health. 
 
2.3.11 
Appoint a Nominee(s) who will be responsible for the day to day management of their 
areas of control in their absence. 
 
2.3.12 
Ensure that regular fire and emergency practice drills are carried out each term and they 
are recorded, with the assistance of the Head of Estates and Facilities and the Health and 
Safety Advisor where applicable. 
 
2.4 
Line Managers 
 
  This level of management has responsibility for the day to day management of the health, 
safety and welfare of all personnel and students within their department/areas of control. 
161 
 

They are responsible for the effective implementation and achievement of this policy in 
their specific areas of control, Managers will:- 
 
2.4.1 
Ensure that the organisation of health and safety responsibility within the department is 
clearly defined and documented. 
 
2.4.2 
Where applicable ensure health and safety training and supervision of students is an 
indispensable element of departmental teaching. 
 
2.4.3 
Ensure that all employees, students, visitors and contractors are made aware of any 
hazards, safety rules and/or procedures which may be encountered within their areas of 
control, including the precautions to be taken against these hazards and procedures to be 
followed in the event of a fire or emergency situation.  
 
2.4.4 
Empower members of the departmental staff to act, to suspend or stop any departmental 
activity that is not being carried out correctly and which could cause harm to others or 
damage to property etc. 
 
2.4.5 
Appoint suitable person(s) to select, purchase and issue Personal Protective 
Equipment/Clothing ensuring the equipment/clothing is maintained or replaced as 
necessary. This will be recorded. 
 
2.4.6 
Enforce the wearing of Personal Protective Equipment/Clothing in designated areas where 
applicable. 
 
2.4.7 
Ensure all equipment, plant and substances used are suitable for the task; handled, stored 
and distributed correctly and kept in good working condition through regular inspection, 
maintenance and servicing where required. This records to be maintained. 
 
2.4.8 
Ensure all equipment, plant and substances are correctly disposed of with the appropriate 
documentation kept on file. 
 
2.4.9 
Assess the health and safety training needs of employees under their control and provide 
all necessary instruction, training, information and supervision as appropriate to enable 
employee duties to be conducted safely. This includes ensuring that procedures are in 
place for the induction of new employees and students.   
 
2.4.10 
Ensure all accidents, incidents and near misses are properly recorded and reported and 
that they are effectively investigated where applicable to ensure that suitable preventative 
measures are put in place to prevent reoccurrence. (Where appropriate with the assistance 
of the Health and Safety Advisor.) 
 
2.4.11 
Familiarise themselves with the guidance on accident reporting to make themselves aware 
of what is a reportable accident to the HSE (Health and Safety Executive), and ensure that 
such accidents are reported immediately via the Accident Reporting system. 
162 
 

2.4.12 
Enforce disciplinary procedures where appropriate when non-compliance with health and 
safety procedures have been identified. 
 
2.4.13 
Monitor and enforce the “Smoking Policy within their areas of responsibility. 
 
2.4.14 
Seek advice and guidance from the Health and Safety Advisor as appropriate on health and 
safety issues. 
 
2.4.15 
Ensure the needs of high risk/special needs workers and students (e.g. disabled, pregnant, 
lone workers, young/vulnerable persons, home workers) are assessed and adequate 
measures are taken to ensure their health, safety and welfare within their area of 
responsibility. 
 
2.4.16 
Ensure regular safety inspections are carried out and recorded within their area of 
responsibility where applicable. 
 
2.4.17 
Where applicable ensure safe systems of work are in place and adhered to by all. 
 
2.4.18 
Consult with employees under their control on health and safety matters and ensure that 
health and safety is a regular agenda item at departmental meetings. 
 
2.4.19 
Ensure all personnel they are responsible for complete the mandatory Workrite on-line 
training packages. 
 
2.4.20 
Promote a culture of health and safety awareness and set a good personal example on 
health and safety. 
 
2.4.21 
Consider the health and safety implications of any materials, plant or equipment purchased 
on behalf of the University. Consulting the Head of Estates and Facilities and/or the Health 
and Safety Advisor where applicable. 
 
2.4.22 
Nominate competent personnel to carry out suitable and sufficient risk assessments, which 
take account of all significant hazards inherent in the work/activities within their area of 
responsibility, ensuring they are recorded and any remedial requirements are addressed 
and acted upon. Also ensure the risk assessments database is maintained and that risk 
assessments are regularly monitored and reviewed as necessary. 
 
2.4.23 
Report to their immediate superior on a regular basis on the application and 
implementation of health and safety matters within areas under their control. 
 
2.4.24 
Nominate competent personnel within their area of control to train and act as fire 
marshals/wardens and evac chair operators.   
 
2.4.25 
Actively participate in fire drills, ensuring roll calls are carried out where applicable.  
 
163 
 

2.5 
All Employees 
 
 
All University employees are expected to comply with any health and safety arrangements 
that are in force within the University. Staff are under a legal obligation to take reasonable 
care for the health and safety of themselves and others. Anyone contravening these 
stipulations may be subject to University disciplinary proceedings. All employees must 
familiarise themselves with, and conform to the University Health and Safety Policy, and 
will: 
 
2.5.1 
Assist the University in fulfilling its health and safety obligations by taking reasonable care 
for the health and safety of themselves and others, who may be affected by their acts or 
omissions. 
 
2.5.2 
Promote a culture of health and safety awareness and set a good personal example on 
health and safety. 
 
2.5.3 
Observe all safety rules, codes of practice, safe systems of work or instructions devised for 
their health and safety. Co-operate fully with managers in the investigation of accidents, 
incidents and near misses and the management and implementation of health and safety 
within their working environment. 
 
2.5.4 
Work safely, and not remove any safety device or guard provided for the purpose of 
ensuring safety or interfere with or misuse anything provided in the interest of health and 
safety. 
 
2.5.5 
Report all hazards, potential dangers, accidents and damage that may occur in the course 
of their work to their Manager and the Health and Safety Advisor without delay and where 
applicable to the Facilities department. This should include all ‘near misses’. For all 
accidents resulting in injury, seek medical attention from a First Aider without delay. 
 
2.5.6 
Ensure that all safety/protective equipment is used/worn in the designated areas and that 
it is maintained as supplied and in line with manufacturer’s recommendation and 
appropriate training, reporting any defects to their Manager.  
 
2.5.7 
Make suitable suggestions and recommendations with regards to improvements in areas of 
health, safety and welfare, to their Manager, Safety Representative or the Health and 
Safety Advisor, and assist in the risk assessment process wherever reasonably practicable 
or necessary. 
 
2.5.8 
Adhere to and enforce the “Smoking” Policy within the University Campus’. 
 
2.5.9 
Use any designated walkways, avoiding traffic areas where possible. 
 
164 
 

2.5.10 
When bringing vehicles onto University property, adhere to and obey all speed limits, 
warning signs and other safety and traffic signs. At all times ensuring that vehicles are 
parked safely in designated parking spaces. 
 
2.5.11 
Ensure that their own areas of work are at all times kept clean, tidy and free from hazards 
that may cause poor posture, slips, trips or falls.   
 
2.5.12 
Actively participate in fire and emergency evacuations. 
 
2.5.13 
Take responsibility for any students, visitors or contractors etc., under their control, 
ensuring that they are made aware of the University’s fire and emergency evacuation 
procedures. If safe to do so escort students, visitors and contractors etc. (under their 
control), to the Fire Assembly Points during evacuations. 
 
2.5.14 
Upon hearing the fire alarm follow the fire guidance on evacuating the building safely. 
 
2.5.15 
Ensure that they complete the mandatory Workrite on-line training packages. 
 
2.6 

Students 
 
It is for the University and University Staff to ensure the health, safety and welfare of 
students. Students do however have a part to play, in particular they will:- 
 
2.6.1 
Follow any health and safety rules, which apply in their programme areas and in the 
University, and conduct themselves in a way that does not endanger themselves or others. 
 
2.6.2 
Ensure that where they are instructed to wear safety/protective equipment it is used and 
worn in the designated areas and that it is maintained as supplied and in line with 
manufacturer’s recommendation and appropriate training, reporting any defects to their 
lecturer.  
 
2.6.3 
Not misuse any equipment provided in the interest of health and safety, i.e. fire alarms, 
fire extinguishers, personal protective equipment. 
 
2.6.4 
Report all accidents, incidents or anything they consider may be a risk to health and safety 
to their programme lecturer or a member of staff. 
 
2.6.5 
Adhere to the Smoking Policy within the University Campus. 
 
2.6.6 
Use any designated walkways, avoiding traffic areas where possible. 
 
2.6.7 
When bringing vehicles onto University property, adhere to and obey all speed limits, 
warning signs and other safety and traffic signs. At all times ensuring that vehicles are 
parked safely in designated parking spaces. 
 
165 
 

2.6.8 
Students on professional programmes should be conversant and comply with the health 
and safety requirements of the relevant professional regulatory body. 
 
2.7 

Visitors, Contractors and Others 
 
2.7.1 
All visitors, contractors and others arriving on site are required to report to Reception 
where they will be required to sign in on arrival and out upon departure.   
 
2.7.2 
All visitors, contractors and others invited to or expected to work on University property 
are required to comply fully with both this University Policy and any other specific rules 
and conditions applicable to them throughout their period of engagement or visit. 
 
2.7.3 
On no account should any on-site work be conducted by a contractor, sub-contractor or 
self-employed person until they have received a copy of the University’s “Rules and 
Conditions for Contractors”. 
 
 
All visitors, contractors and others, whilst on University premises, shall: 
 
2.7.4 
Comply with all relevant health and safety legislation appropriate to their area of work 
activity/equipment/substances used and service provided. 
 
2.7.5 
Comply and co-operate fully with all instructions, safe working practices and guidance as 
supplied by the University and its management. 
 
2.7.6 
Ensure positive co-operation and co-ordination with the University providing any health 
and safety documentation or information requested. 
 
2.7.7 
Where applicable report to the Contract Manager, the Health and Safety Advisor  and 
Facilities Department any incident, accident, near miss or potentially dangerous situation, 
which could cause injury or ill health to persons or damage to property. 
 
2.7.8 
Ensure that any protective equipment identified as being required for the work activity is 
provided, used and enforced at all times. 
 
2.7.9 
Ensure sufficient information, instruction, training and supportive supervision as necessary 
is provided so that work and learning can be conducted in a safe and healthy manner, 
without risk to either University employees, students or others that may be affected. 
 
2.7.10 
Adhere to the Smoking Policy within the University Campus. 
 
2.7.11 
Use any designated walkways, avoiding traffic areas where possible. 
 
2.7.12 
When bringing vehicles onto University property, adhere to and obey all speed limits, 
warning signs and other safety and traffic signs. At all times ensuring that vehicles are 
parked safely in designated parking spaces. 
166 
 

Persons with Key Health and Safety Responsibilities 
2.8 
Health and Safety Advisor 
 
 
The Health and Safety Advisor has a key responsibility for supporting the development of a 
safe and healthy working environment and shall act as the ‘competent’ person for advising 
on health and safety matters to the University by:  
 
2.8.1 
Assisting with the co-ordination of health and safety support services whilst giving advice 
and guidance to all. In addition, assist management with the monitoring and review of 
health and safety performance and documentation. 
 
2.8.2 
Assisting the Principal in periodically reviewing and improving the Health and Safety Policy 
Document. 
 
2.8.3 
Assisting with the investigation of accidents, incidents and near misses, in addition to the 
preparation and maintenance of formal reports and records e.g. RIDDOR. 
 
2.8.4 
Assisting with the co-ordination, organisation and monitoring of relevant health and safety 
training, fire drills and emergency evacuation procedures and ensure records of these 
activities are kept. 
 
2.8.5 
Promoting and giving advice on safe working practices including equipment, protective 
clothing, plant and machinery. 
 
2.8.6 
Advising the Principal, Senior Managers, Line Managers and staff on Health and Safety. 
 
2.8.7 
Representing the University in dealings with the enforcing authority. 
 
2.8.8 
Assisting nominated employees in the completion of risk assessments and inspections. 
 
2.8.9 
Ensuring Fire Risk Assessments and Safety Audits are carried out when required. 
 
2.9 
Head of Estates and Facilities 
 
The Head of Estates and Facilities has a key role with regards to health and safety and will 
be responsible for the day to day maintenance of the Campus, and will:- 
 
2.9.1 
Ensure the safety and maintenance of building service systems, and site/building access 
and egress. 
 
2.9.2 
Select and vet the appointment of contractors used in the above operations to ensure 
competent and safe completion of work. 
 
167 
 

2.9.3 
Ensure that maintenance and repair work is carried out in a way which does not put 
employees, students, visitors or others at risk. 
 
2.9.4 
Ensure the completion of risk assessments, method statements and safe working 
procedures for works to be carried out by contractors they appoint and for staff under 
their control, reviewing them when required. 
 
2.9.5 
Where applicable, assist with the investigation of accidents, incidents and near misses, 
ensuring that reports are compiled and appropriate remedial actions are completed. 
 
2.9.6 
Where applicable, assist nominated employees in the completion of risk assessments and 
inspections. 
 
2.9.7 
Ensure effective emergency evacuation procedures are in place and that fire drills are 
carried out at least once per term and that these are recorded. 
 
2.9.8 
Ensure that statutory inspections are completed and recorded accordingly. 
 
2.10 
Electrical Duty Holder 
 
 
As the University appointed “authorised” person with specific responsibility for site 
electrical safety the Electrical Duty Holder (whether an employee or contractor) will:- 
 
2.10.1 
Take all reasonable steps and exercise due diligence in ensuring that all on-site electrical 
systems, fixed and portable tools or equipment are installed, operated and maintained in a 
safe condition and that suitable records are kept. 
 
2.10.2 
Ensure safe electrical working procedures and arrangements in line with legislative and 
University requirements, especially when working on or near live conductors. This includes 
the application of isolation procedures and permits to work for high-risk activities. 
 
2.10.3 
Co-operate with the University so far as is necessary to ensure that the duty placed upon 
them is adequately fulfilled. 
 
2.10.4 
Work strictly within their personal level of competence and in a manner that should not 
give rise to danger. Seek expert advice for issues outside of personal competency. Similarly, 
ensure that any person (electricians) working with them, or for them, are competent. 
 
2.10.5 
When using outside contractors for electrical work, ensure they are registered with an 
organisation which checks the work of its members, such as NICEIC. 
 
2.10.6 
Ensure that protective equipment is suitable, adequately maintained and properly used. 
 
2.10.7 
Ensure that statutory inspections such as 5 yearly fixed testing and annual PAT testing are 
carried out and that this is recorded. 
168 
 

2.11  
Information and Learning Services 
 
 
Information and Learning Services is responsible for IT within the University and will:- 
 
2.11.1 
Support the application of safe working procedures relating to the safe use and operation 
of Display Screen Equipment etc. 
 
2.11.2 
Ensure the safe operation, installation and maintenance of all on-site IT equipment  and 
multi-function devices using contractors where applicable. 
 
2.11.3 
Ensure all purchased IT equipment complies fully with all relevant legislation. 
 
2.11.4 
Assist with general ergonomic considerations when positioning and installing equipment. 
 
2.11.5 
Consult with the Facilities Department when planning work which may affect the buildings 
electrical systems or give rise to electrical hazards. 
 
2.11.6 
Ensure that employees under their control isolate (by disconnecting the power lead) and 
earth the equipment (due to stored energy in the circuit board) prior to working on it. 
 
2.11.7 
Ensure that all computer equipment is correctly disposed of in accordance with statutory 
requirements and that the appropriate documentation is kept. 
 
2.12 
Human Resources Department 
 
 
The Human Resources department will ensure:- 
 
2.12.1 
That accurate records are kept in relation to training, medical, and personnel matters. 
 
2.12.2 
That University HR policies comply with current Health and Safety legislation. 
 
2.12.3 
That all new employees are fully inducted with regards to health and safety policies and 
procedures. 
 
2.12.4 
That all employees complete the mandatory Workrite training courses which include 
Health and Safety, Fire Safety, Manual Handling and Display Screen Equipment. 
 
2.12.5 
That Managers carry out risk assessments for pregnant workers as soon as the University is 
made aware and that any remedial actions are completed, and that the assessments are 
regularly reviewed throughout the course of the pregnancy and upon return to work where 
applicable. 
 
 
 
 
169 
 

2.13 
Security 
 
2.13.1    The Senior Security Guard will act as Senior Fire Marshal and will co-ordinate any 
emergency evacuations from the building. In their absence the appointed nominee(s) from 
Security will take on this role. They will coordinate the activities of the Fire Team and First 
Aiders in the event of a fire or emergency evacuation of the Campus, and act as point of 
contact for the Emergency Services. They will also carry out the following: 
 
  Ensure the site is regularly checked for breaches in any fire precautions or requirements 
and arrange for these to be corrected as necessary. 
 
  Ensure that fire-fighting equipment is regularly inspected, maintained, and kept in its 
correct position. 
 
2.13.2    Ensure all visitors check/sign in at Reception upon arrival, and sign out on departure.   
 
2.13.3    Check Student and Staff ID badges where applicable. 
 
2.13.4    Conduct patrols of the University Campus where applicable. 
 
 
2.14 
Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens  
 
 
A suitable number of employees will be appointed and trained as fire marshals and fire 
wardens. In the event of an evacuation of the building becoming necessary fire marshals 
and fire wardens will have the following responsibilities.   
 
2.14.1 
Attend appropriate training course as necessary to fulfil duties of a fire marshal/warden. 
 
2.14.2 
If safe to do so assist employees, students and visitors from the building and check the area 
of the building for which they have responsibility, including toilets, storage areas etc., 
checking that the area is completely cleared where possible, ensuring they never put 
themselves at risk. 
 
2.14.3 
If safe to do so, close any windows or doors which are open when leaving the building. 
 
2.14.4 
Attack small fires with extinguisher provided, if safe to do so, and within their own 
capabilities as instructed through appropriate training sessions. 
 
2.14.5 
Proceed, without delay, to the nearest Fire Assembly Point, carry out roll calls where 
applicable and then report immediately to the Assembly Point Fire Marshal. 
 
For further details please refer to the University’s Fire Strategy. 
 
 
 
170 
 

2.15 
First Aiders and Appointed Persons 
 
 
A suitable number of employees will be appointed and trained as First Aiders and 
appointed persons, and their responsibilities will be to:- 
 
2.15.1 
Administer first aid treatment to those in need, in line with their training, and assist the 
emergency services if called upon to do so. 
 
2.15.2 
After treating the patient ensure the Accident/Incident form is completed without delay on 
the electronic form and then emailed to the Health and Safety Advisor. If using a paper 
version, they must ensure it is passed without delay to the Health and Safety Advisor to 
ensure it is recorded on the system. 
 
2.15.3 
All First Aiders must keep a log of first aid treatment/assistance given and a list of supplies 
used in their logbook. They must ensure that they arrange for the replacement of any 
items used from the first aid box. 
 
2.15.4 
Where hospital treatment is deemed necessary First Aiders are required to arrange for the 
patient to be taken to hospital and report back to the appropriate Manager and the Health 
and Safety Advisor on their condition. 
 
2.15.5 
For further details please refer to the guidance document for First Aiders. 
 
2.16 
Off-Site Workers 
 
 
Off Site workers, those engaged on work in premises not controlled by the University must 
exercise a particularly high level of self-discipline and safety awareness and will:- 
 
2.16.1 
Inform their Manager of any unsafe conditions, customer requests, working practices, 
accidents, incidents or near miss situations encountered. 
 
2.16.2 
Comply fully with the host employer’s policy/rules and conditions for safe working when 
working on non-University premises (in addition to University policy directions). 
 
2.16.3 
Whilst working at non University premises, ensure an understanding of the procedures for 
fire, serious or imminent danger and on-site hazards and precautions, in addition to being 
aware of the responsible person for Health and Safety on the site. 
 
2.16.4 
Where applicable carry out a risk assessment for the work activities to be undertaken by 
themselves. 
 
 
171 
 

2.17 
Young Person(s) 
 
 
The University has an especially high duty of care towards employees, who have reached 
school leaving age (around 16 years of age) but have not reached 18 years of age. The 
University will show a higher duty of care towards the ‘Young Person’, and emphasis will be 
on ensuring that the Young Person’s level of interpretation and understanding of their own 
responsibilities is in line with the requirements expected under law, and in regards to this 
policy. Young Persons shall:- 
 
2.17.1 
Comply with the requirements identified by any relevant ‘Young Persons’ risk assessments. 
 
2.17.2 
Comply fully with this Policy document and any other health and safety guidance given by 
their appointed manager or lecturer. 
 
2.17.3 
Whenever in doubt, stop the work/learning activity immediately and seek advice from 
their appointed line manager or lecturer. 
 
2.18 
Pregnant Employees and Students 
 
2.18.1 
In order for the University to fulfil its legal obligations and in line with individual’s legal 
obligations, any employee who knows they are pregnant should notify their Manager or HR 
Advisor as soon as possible. Students should advise their programme leader/lecturer as 
soon as possible. 
 
2.18.2 
Once notified, the University in conjunction with the pregnant employee/student will carry 
out an appropriate risk assessment of the employee’s/student’s tasks/activities to ensure 
she and her unborn child are not put at any unnecessary risk. 
 
2.19 
Lone Workers 
 
 
Lone Workers are classified as persons who are required to work by themselves without 
close or direct supervision. All such persons are required to ensure that they are 
conversant with the Lone Workers guidance. 
 
2.19.1 
Lone Workers will ensure that the area they are working within is safe and that they follow 
the instructions set out by the safe system of work or risk assessment. 
 
2.19.2 
An employee who in the course of their work is required to work alone must advise their 
manager if they have any health problems which could put them at risk. 
 
2.20 
Persons with Disabilities 
 
2.20.1 
In order for the University to fulfil its legal obligations and in line with individual’s legal 
obligations, any employee who has a disability are requested if they wish to do so,  to 
notify their Manager or HR Partner of the disability and advise if they would like an 
172 
 

assessment carried out to identify if they require any additional support whilst at work.. 
Students should advise the Disability Advisors in Student Services. 
 
2.20.2 
Once notified, the University in conjunction with the employee/student will carry out an 
appropriate assessment of the employee’s/student’s tasks/activities to ensure they are not 
put any unnecessary risk and any support identify during the assessment is implemented. 
 
SECTION 3 - GENERAL ARRANGEMENTS 
 
3.1 
  Health and Safety Management 
 
3.1.1 
The University has a Health and Safety Committee, which meets quarterly. Minutes of the 
Committee meetings are reviewed by the Executive Board and the University Court, and 
are made available on the staff Intranet. In addition, the Committee produces an annual 
report which is reviewed by the University Court. For further details please refer to the 
guidance on Consultation and Communications with staff and students.  
 
3.1.2 
Health and Safety is regularly reviewed on various University management meetings and 
team meetings. 
 
3.2 
Health and Safety Audit, Monitoring and Review 
 
3.2.1 
Health and Safety is regularly reviewed by the Audit Committee (please refer to terms of 
reference), by departmental managers and the Health and Safety Advisor. 
 
3.2.2 
Health and Safety inspections will be carried out at the appropriate intervals as and when 
required by an appointed person. 
 
3.3 
Risk Assessment 
 
3.3.1 
It is the responsibility of all senior managers to ensure that risk assessments are carried out 
by competent personnel within their areas of responsibility. Copies of completed risk 
assessments will be added to the risk assessment database. Risk Assessments will be 
reviewed at regular intervals, or if there has been any significant change in the 
work/learning activity or environment. 
 
3.3.2 
Display Screen Equipment Users and Home Workers will complete the Workrite on-line 
training and will then complete a self-assessment. 
 
3.3.3 
Out Based/Off Site Workers will carry out self-assessment on the appropriate forms. 
 
3.3.4 
Risk assessments will also be conducted for all student related out of University activities 
including educational and residential visits and work placements. Assessments will also be 
completed for students with special needs etc., for further details please refer to the 
relevant guidance. 
173 
 

 
3.3.5 
The risk assessment process will take into consideration the different age groups within the 
University, especially taking into consideration the higher duty of care required for Young 
Persons and the elderly and safeguarding policy and procedures. They will also consider 
the needs of high risk workers and persons with a disability. 
 
3.3.6 
For further details please refer to the guidance on Risk Assessment. 
 
3.4 
Health and Safety Induction 
 
3.4.1 
All new employees will receive appropriate induction from the Senior Manager or Line 
Manager regarding health and safety relevant to their area of employment, including 
instructions on the University’s fire and emergency procedures, accident reporting. Details 
of training provided will be recorded and made available on request. 
 
3.4.2 
New employees will also be provided with a copy of the Health and Safety Policy and any 
other policies or guidance relevant to their work by their line manager. 
 
3.4.3 
All new Students will receive appropriate induction regarding health and safety within their 
programme area to include fire and emergency procedures, accident reporting. Details of 
training provided will be recorded and made available on request. 
 
3.5 
Fire Safety Training 
 
3.5.1 
All employees are required to complete the mandatory Workrite fire safety training 
provided on the University Intranet.   
 
3.5.2 
Fire Extinguisher training will be provided at regular intervals when appropriate for 
nominated employees.  
 
3.5.3 
Procedures for fire evacuation will be regularly displayed in suitable locations throughout 
the University Campus and on the Health and Safety page on the University Intranet. 
 
3.5.4 
Practice evacuation drills will be carried out each term at the University Campus. 
 
3.6 
General Safety Training 
 
3.6.1 
All employees are required to complete the Workrite health and safety training provided 
on the University Intranet.  
 
174 
 

3.6.2 
Employees will receive basic health and safety guidance and training in the course of their 
employment, which will give them an appreciation of the fundamentals of good health and 
safety practices. 
 
3.6.3 
Training for employees who require specialist training to enable them to carry out their 
work safely and within the confinements of the law will receive this training in conjunction 
with their Manager and HR. 
 
3.7 
Accident Reporting and Investigation 
 
 
An accident is defined as any unplanned event that results in causing injury or ill health to 
people, damage to property or the environment 
 
3.7.1 
All accidents/incidents, however slight, must be reported, without delay, on the 
appropriate Accident/Incident report form on the Intranet or if this cannot be accessed 
then it should be reported on the accident form which is available from  Reception or 
Human Resources. A copy of the completed form should be sent to the Health and Safety 
Advisor.   
 
3.7.2 
Accidents will be investigated to the extent necessary to identify their underlying cause(s) 
and to enable these to be remedied. The primary responsibility for the investigation rests 
with the Senior Managers and/or Line Managers of the area in which the accident/incident 
occurred. The results of the investigation should be recorded on the accident/incident 
form, or on an accompanying report. 
 
3.7.3 
The University is under a legal obligation to report some accidents/incidents to the 
authorities, by telephone, immediately it becomes aware of them. Therefore staff should 
familiarise themselves with what is a reportable accident and ensure that these are 
reported as soon as possible to the Health and Safety Advisor. Staff must ensure that any 
serious accident/incident is recorded and where applicable take witness statements (taking 
photographs where possible). For these purposes a serious accident/incident can be 
considered to be any accident resulting in hospital treatment or an occurrence reportable 
under the ‘Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995’ 
(please refer to guidance on accident reporting).   
 
 
It is, therefore, important that all reportable accidents are reported without delay to 
ensure that this obligation can be met. If in doubt consult your Manager or the Health 
and Safety Advisor. 

 
3.7.4 
The Health and Safety Advisor will review all accident/incident forms and will carry out 
further investigations were deemed necessary. 
 
3.7.5 
For further details please refer to the guidance on Accident Reporting. 
 
 
 
175 
 

3.8 
Near Miss Reporting 
 
 
A ‘Near Miss’ is defined as an incident that has the potential to cause harm or damage 
even though no harm or damage is caused. 
 
3.8.1 
Near misses must be reported, without delay, on the Near Miss report form which is 
available on the University Intranet. If this cannot be accessed forms can be obtained from 
the Reception or Human Resources; the completed form should be sent to the Health and 
Safety Advisor. 
 
3.8.2 
Near Misses will be investigated to the extent necessary to identify their underlying 
cause(s) and to enable these to be remedied. The primary responsibility for the 
investigation rests with the Senior Managers or Line Managers of the area in which the 
near miss occurred. The results of the investigation should be recorded on the appropriate 
form or in an accompanying report. 
 
3.9 
Hazard Reporting 
 
 
A hazard is anything (article, substance or situation) with the potential to cause harm, 
injury to people or damage to the environment e.g. electricity, slippery floors, spillages, 
dangerous parts of machinery etc. The risk is the probability or likelihood of the hazard 
being realised and the severity of its consequences. 
 
3.9.1 
Any hazards identified must be reported immediately to the appropriate manager, 
Facilities Helpdesk or the Health and Safety Advisor either verbally or via email, to ensure 
that remedial action is taken. 
 
3.10 
First Aid 
 
3.10.1 
The University has appropriate First Aid provisions relevant to the work activity carried out 
and also the number of employees located on the site. First Aid boxes are located with 
Security and where applicable First Aiders, First Aid Appointed Persons and the First Aid 
room. 
 
3.10.2 
A duty rota for first aiders will be agreed and implemented. The duty first aiders will be 
provided with a radio and grab bag which they will collect from and sign for at Reception at 
the start of their session. 
 
3.10.3 
A regularly updated list of trained and qualified First Aiders and First Aid Appointed 
Persons will be held by the Receptionist showing the name, department and extension of 
the First Aider and who is on duty; this will also be available on the University Intranet. 
 
3.10.4 
First Aiders and Appointed Persons will re-sit their First Aid Qualification every three years 
with an approved training provider and will receive annual refresher training. 
 
176 
 

3.10.5 
First Aiders trained in the use of defibrillators will be provided with refresher training 
annually. 
 
3.11 
Occupational Health 
 
3.11.1 
The occupational environment and health of employees will be monitored where 
appropriate so as to ascertain that their well-being is not impaired by the working 
conditions. 
 
3.11.2 
The University’s Occupational Health provider will carry out routine referrals, health 
checks, assessments etc.   
 
3.11.3 
Managers wishing to refer employees to Occupational Health should contact HR to make 
an appointment. 
 
3.11.4 
The University offers the facility for employees who use Display Screen Equipment to have 
their eyes tested every twelve months with an approved Optician. Where employees are 
required to wear glasses that are DSE compliant they are entitled to receive a contribution 
from the University towards the cost of these glasses. Please refer to guidance on DSE. 
 
3.11.5 
The University has separate guidance for Health and Wellbeing and Infectious Diseases. 
 
3.11.6 
The University also provides employee support via an independent confidential Employee 
Assistance Programme. For further details contact the HR department.  
 
3.12 
Fire/Evacuation Warning Systems 
 
 
Fire Warning Systems will be tested weekly at each building. Details will be recorded and 
made available on request. Employees need take no action on these occasions unless the 
warning system continues beyond the test stage. Staff will familiarise themselves and their 
students as to the sound of the alarm(s) and when the system is scheduled to be tested at 
the building they are based at. 
 
3.13
 
Escape Routes 
 
3.13.1 
Escape routes will be regularly checked by an appointed person. 
 
3.13.2 
Employees should familiarise themselves with the escape routes and fire exits which are 
clearly marked within and around their working area and, outwith hours, they should 
satisfy themselves that their escape routes are unobstructed. 
 
 
 
177 
 

3.14 
Fire Extinguishers 
 
3.14.1 
Only employees trained in the use of fire extinguishers should attack small fires with the 
correct extinguisher provided, if safe to do so, and within their own capabilities as 
instructed through appropriate training sessions.   
 
3.14.2 
Fire Extinguisher training will be provided as and when required for nominated employees. 
 
3.14.3 
Fire extinguishers will be serviced annually by an approved contractor. This will be 
recorded and made available on request. 
 
3.14.4 
A member of the Security team will visually check the fire extinguishers once a month to 
ensure they are in situ, not damaged and are fully charged. This will be recorded and made 
available on request. 
 
3.14.5 
If fire extinguishers are used, damaged or missing the Facilities Helpdesk should be 
contacted to ensure a replacement is provided. 
 
3.15 
Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens 
 
3.15.1 
Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens have been appointed to co-ordinate evacuation efforts in 
the event of an emergency arising. 
 
3.15.2 
A regularly updated list of trained Fire Marshals and Fire Wardens will be held by the 
Health and Safety Advisor and Support Services Supervisor showing the Fire 
Marshal’s/Warden’s name, department and extension. This will also be available at 
Reception and on the University Intranet. 
 
3.16 
Smoking 
 
3.16.1 
Smoking is not permitted in any of the University Buildings. 
 
3.16.2 
Designated smoking area(s) have been provided and accordingly signposted. Smoking is 
not allowed in any other areas of the University grounds. 
 
3.16.3 
For further information and guidance please refer to the Smoking Policy. 
 
3.17 
Advice and Consultancy 
 
3.17.1 
The Health and Safety Advisor will act as the University’s competent person on health and 
safety matters. 
 
3.17.2 
Where other outside health and safety consultancy or specialist advice is required, this 
should be done in conjunction with Human Resources and the Health and Safety Advisor 
where applicable. 
178 
 

3.18 
Safe Systems of Work 
 
3.18.1 
Formal safe systems of work will be developed and published by managers, with the 
assistance of the Health and Safety Advisor where applicable, to cover potentially 
hazardous/dangerous operations in areas under their control.   
 
3.18.2 
Managers will be responsible for ensuring that work is carried out in accordance with these 
safe systems. 
 
3.19 
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 
 
3.19.1 
PPE will be freely issued to employees as required, along with the appropriate level of 
training in its use. This will be recorded and made available on request. 
   
3.19.2 
Managers will ensure that the correct personal protective equipment is available to 
employees, that it is kept in a good condition and replaced as necessary.   
 
3.19.3 
Managers and employees will ensure that the appropriate personal protective equipment is 
worn. 
 
3.19.4 
Where students are required to wear PPE as a part of their programme activity, lecturers will 
ensure that the PPE is appropriate for the activity and that it is worn correctly by the student 
within the designated area. 
 
3.20 
Waste Disposal 
 
3.20.1 
All waste will be disposed of in accordance with the Duty of Care imposed by the 
Environmental Protection Act and the appropriate Waste Regulations. 
 
3.20.2 
Waste will be removed by registered, approved and competent contractors. 
 
3.20.3 
Copies of transfer notes will be retained by the department arranging the disposal of the 
waste to which the transfer note refers for a period of at least 3 years. 
 
3.21 
Housekeeping and Storage 
 
3.21.1 
Managers will ensure that good housekeeping practices are maintained within areas of 
their responsibility. 
 
3.21.2 
All material, whatever its location, will be stored in such a way as not to cause a hazard or 
harm to any employee, student or visitor, in line with the manufacturer’s guidelines/data 
sheets where appropriate. 
 
 
 
179 
 

3.22 
Restricted Access 
 
3.22.1 
All areas of high risk e.g. boiler and plant rooms, must be appropriately identified to 
prohibit unauthorised entry. 
 
3.22.2 
Areas identified as restricted access must be adhered to at all times, and only those 
persons authorised may enter these areas. 
 
3.23 
Fluids and Gases under Pressure 
 
3.23.1 
All pipe work i.e. water (hot and cold), compressed air, and gas must be identified and clearly 
marked. 
 
3.23.2 
Pipe work containing water (hot and cold), compressed air, and gas must be isolated and 
drained before any work is undertaken. 
 
3.23.3 
Compressed gases must be used and stored as laid down in the manufacturer's guidelines 
and current legislation. 
 
3.24 
Electrical Equipment  
 
3.24.1 
Employees who purchase portable electrical equipment will ensure it is suitable for the task 
and conforms to current British or E.U standards and should be ‘CE Marked’. All equipment 
must be submitted for logging, inspection and testing before it is put into service within their 
school/department and where applicable with the facilities department. 
 
3.24.2 
Periodic inspection and testing of the electrical installation will be carried out in accordance 
with the requirements of the Institute of Electrical Engineers Wiring Regulations 17th edition 
by appointed contractors. 
 
3.24.3 
An appointed contractor will carry out a periodic inspection and testing of Portable Electric 
Equipment. 
 
3.24.4 
All portable electrical appliances need to be checked before they are used in the building. 
Staff and students should ensure that if they bring electric equipment such as laptops into 
the building that they are in a suitable safe conditions, Facilities Services should be contacted 
if  there  is  any  doubt  with  regards  to  the  suitable  of  any  electrical  equipment.  There  are 
facilities  in  the  main  atrium  tiers  and  LRC  computer  space  for  staff  and  students  to 
plug laptops in if they need charging etc., whilst at the University.  
 
3.24.5 
Floor sockets in seminar rooms, offices and other areas are not for general use. The use of 
the sockets inside the floor-boxes can present a health & safety hazard i.e. if used 
incorrectly can become a tripping hazard causing injury to individuals and badly damaging 
the floor box. If you need to plug a laptop or other electrical device in when using a 
classroom and there is not a wall mounted socket in a suitable safe place please contact 
180 
 

Facilities Services to assist you, please do not use a floor box. Seminar room control desks 
are provided with a socket outlet for laptop use when connecting to the AV system for 
presentation purposes. They are not to be used for charging laptops or mobile phone 
devices. If in doubt please contact Facilities Services for clarification.  
 
3.25 
Machinery and Equipment 
 
3.25.1 
Employees should only use machinery or equipment for which they have been trained and 
must do so in accordance with the manufacturer's guidelines and any formal safe system of 
work and/or procedures in place or experiments. 
 
3.25.2 
Machinery designed to be used in conjunction with any guard must not be operated unless 
that guard is in place.   
 
3.25.3 
All guards, interlocks and other safety devices will be checked by the user of the equipment 
and/or the room technician prior to its use. 
 
3.25.4 
Where machinery and equipment is required to be inspected, serviced or maintained under 
statutory/legislative  this  must  be  done  by  a  nominated  insurer/contractor.  Where 
machinery  and  equipment  does  not  fall  within  this  requirement,  where  applicable  a 
programme should be put in place to ensure that they are inspected, serviced or maintained 
within an agreed timescale. 
 
3.25.5 
User of machinery and equipment will ensure that daily safety checks are carried out 
before use and these checks are recorded. 
 
3.25.6 
Only competent and qualified personnel should operate ride on machinery. All drivers shall 
only be permitted to drive such equipment if they have been selected, trained and 
authorised to do so. 
 
3.26 
Substances Hazardous to Health 
 
3.26.1 
Managers whose departments purchase hazardous substances will ensure that a Material 
Safety Data sheet is obtained from the manufacturer or supplier for the product prior to first 
purchase.  A copy should be  retained on file  in the department. (If any doubt  exists  as to 
whether  the  product  is  classified  as  hazardous  please  contact  the  Manufacturer  or  the 
Health and Safety Advisor for guidance.) 
 
3.26.2 
Substances identified as hazardous should not be used until a CoSHH risk assessment has 
been carried out, and appropriate training and information has been provided. 
 
3.26.3 
Managers will be responsible for ensuring that this information is brought to the attention 
of  employees  required  to  use,  handle  or  transport  the  substance,  and  that  the 
recommended safety precautions are followed. 
 
181 
 

3.26.4 
It  will  be  the  duty  of  all  employees  who  use/handle/transport  hazardous  substances  to 
ensure that they comply with the safety requirements outlined in the above documents and 
in any formal safe system of work in place. 
 
3.26.5 
Substances should be kept in their original containers with the correct label clearly visible. 
When the need arises for a substance to be transferred from one container to another, the 
new container should be suitable and clearly labelled with details of its contents. 
 
3.26.6 
Managers are required to keep an up to date inventory of all substances held or used within 
their departments. 
 
3.26.7 
For further details please refer to the guidance on Control of Substances Hazardous to Health 
(CoSHH). 
 
3.27 
Visitors, Contractors and Others 
 
3.27.1 
The person responsible for receiving visitors to site/or the Receptionist will ensure that the 
visitor enters their details in the visitors’ book. 
 
3.27.2 
The appropriate member of staff, or their deputy, where applicable will escort the visitor(s) 
from reception to their office or meeting room. Known and approved Visitors, Contractors 
or Suppliers are permitted unaccompanied access after an appropriate member of staff has 
received them into the building. 
 
3.27.3 
When leaving the  premises where applicable visitors must  be  escorted back  to reception 
where the staff member/receptionist should ensure that departure details are entered into 
the visitors’ book. 
 
3.27.4 
Employees are responsible for the health, safety and welfare of their visitor(s) whilst on site, 
therefore they should ensure that their visitor(s) are made aware of:- 
 
  University’s emergency evacuation procedures. 
  The location of fire routes, fire exits and assembly point(s). 
  Any hazards they may encounter during their stay. 
  Any safety rules they must follow if they need to carry out work on site. 
 
3.27.5 
In the event of an evacuation from the premises the staff members responsible for visitors 
must ensure that they are escorted to a fire assembly point, if safe to do so. If the visitor is 
missing then the Senior Fire Marshal should be made aware of this. 
 
 
 
182 
 

3.28 
Vehicles, Mobile Phones and in-vehicle technology 
 
3.28.1 
All employees driving vehicles on University business must have a valid UK driving licence 
and must exercise proper control of the vehicle at all times, please refer to the QMU 
Driving Policy. 
 
3.28.2 
You must exercise proper control of your vehicle at all times. You must not use a hand-held 
mobile phone, or similar device, when driving except to call 999 or 112 in a genuine 
emergency when it is unsafe or impractical to stop. Never use a hand-held microphone 
when driving. Using hands-free equipment is also likely to distract your attention from the 
road. It is far safer not to use any telephone while you are driving - find a safe place to stop 
first or use the voicemail facility and listen to messages later1. 
 
3.28.3 
There is a danger of driver distraction being caused by in-vehicle systems such as satellite 
navigation systems, congestion warning systems, PCs, multi-media, etc. You must exercise 
proper control of your vehicle at all times. Do not rely on driver assistance systems such as 
cruise control or lane departure warnings. They are available to assist but you should not 
reduce your concentration levels. Do not be distracted by maps or screen-based 
information (such as navigation or vehicle management systems) while driving or riding. If 
necessary find a safe place to stop1. 
 
3.28.4 
Mobile Phones should not be used when undertaking a task which has been identified as 
high risk, due to their distracting nature. 
 
3.29 
Workplace Transport 
 
 
It is the University’s aim to ensure a safe vehicle and driver environment, as appropriate 
across its campuses. In particular, the University where reasonably practicable will ensure:- 
 
3.29.1 
That there are adequate management controls in place to carry out suitable and sufficient 
assessments for all vehicle operation types, that control measures are put in place where 
required and that these are continually monitored and reviewed in order to minimise or 
where possible eliminate foreseeable transport related hazards in the workplace. 
 
3.29.2 
That suitable arrangements are in place for the safe operation of vehicles, specifically those 
related to the separation of vehicles and pedestrians. In addition, campuses should be 
appropriately laid out in respect of internal traffic routes, warning signage, parking for 
various vehicle types, pedestrian routes, lighting, traffic control etc. 
 
3.29.3 
Pedestrians use any designated walkways, avoiding traffic areas where possible. 
 
                                                           
1 Refer to Highway Code 
183 
 

3.29.4 
Persons bringing vehicles onto University property adhere to and obey all speed limits, 
warning signs and other safety and traffic signs, at all times ensuring that vehicles are 
parked safely in designated parking spaces. 
 
3.29.5 
That all drivers of University vehicles are adequately trained (i.e. have completed the 
MIDAS training course), licensed, authorised, physically fit and generally competent to 
carry out their driving duties. 
 
3.29.6 
That all vehicles purchased by the University are properly specified prior to purchase and 
adequately maintained and insured afterwards. 
 
3.30 
Legionella 
 
3.30.1 
The Head of Estates and Facilities will ensure that a suitable and sufficient assessment will 
be completed to identify and assess the risk of exposure to legionella bacteria from work, 
learning, leisure activities and water systems on the premises and any necessary 
precautionary measures, control measures and procedures are implemented where 
applicable. 
 
3.30.2 
The assessment will be regularly reviewed, and will also be reviewed when there is reason 
to believe that the original assessment may no longer be valid.  
 
3.31 
Young Person(s) 
 
 
Young Person(s) will be provided with a higher level of training, information and 
supervision taking into account their inexperience, lack of awareness of existing and 
potential risks and their immaturity. A Risk Assessment will be completed for 
activities/tasks carried out by young persons. 
 
3.32 
Pregnant Employees and Students 
 
3.32.1 
An Expectant Mothers’ risk assessment will be completed once the employee/student has 
advised the University that they are pregnant. The risk assessment will be reviewed at 
appropriate intervals throughout the pregnancy and upon their return to work/learning 
after their maternity leave. 
 
3.32.2 
Facilities will be made available for pregnant employees/students if they are feeling unwell 
or need to rest. 
 
3.33 
  Lone Workers 
 
3.33.1 
The Lone Workers Guidance should be reviewed whenever there is an occasion that an 
employee may have to work alone and a risk assessment produced. From the risk 
assessment a Safe System of Work should be implemented. The system should include 
184 
 

checks on the lone worker at regular intervals either by telephone, email or other 
appropriate means. 
 
3.33.2 
Employees with known health problems should be assessed before being allowed to work 
alone. 
 
3.34 
Abrasive Wheel Operators 
 
 
Only competent employees should operate abrasive wheels. Employees should hold the 
appropriate qualification for dressing or replacing abrasive wheels. These employees will 
be responsible for:- 
 
3.34.1 
The correct selection, storage, setting and periodic redressing of abrasive wheels. 
 
3.34.2 
The secure mounting of machinery and guarding.   
 
3.35 
Welfare Facilities 
 
 
The following facilities are provided for the welfare of employees and students:- 
 
 Drinking Water 
 Rest area for eating away from the workstation/classrooms 
 Facilities for changing clothing where required 
 Storage facility for work and personal clothes where required 
 Sanitary Conveniences  
 Washing Facilities 
 
3.36 
Intoxicants and Drug Abuse 
 
3.36.1 
The University may refuse admission to the premises to any employees or students where 
there is reasonable suspicion that they are incapable of performing their duties/studies as 
a result of intoxicants or drugs. 
 
3.36.2 
If an employee’s doctor has prescribed drugs which may influence their ability to perform 
their duties, then they are required to register this with their Line Manager or the HR 
department. The employee may be required to undertake an Occupational Health 
assessment. 
 
3.36.3 
For further guidance please refer to the University’s Policy on Substances and Alcohol 
Misuse. 
 
 
 
185 
 

3.37 
Working at Height  
 
3.37.1 
Working at Height is defined as work in any place where a person could fall from a distance 
which is liable to cause personal injury.   
 
3.37.2 
Where working at height cannot be avoided a risk assessment should be completed on the 
activity to be undertaken, the equipment to be used and the ability of the individual(s) 
carrying out the task.  A safe system of work should then be implemented and adhered to. 
 
3.37.3 
Roof Access – No access is permitted to any roof area without the authorisation and 
agreement of the Facilities Manager who will agree a “Safe System of Work” and will issue 
a Permit to Work. 
 
3.38 
Display Screen Equipment (DSE) 
 
3.38.1 
All employees who use display screen equipment will be required to complete the 
Workrite DSE training provided on the University Intranet. 
 
3.38.2 
After completing the training employees will be required to complete the self-assessment, 
which is provided on the University Intranet. 
 
3.38.3 
For further details please refer to the guidance on Display Screen Equipment. 
 
3.39 
Manual Handling Operations 
 
3.39.1 
All Employees will be required to complete the Workrite manual handling training which is 
provided on the University Intranet. 
 
3.39.2 
The University will provide appropriate mechanical handling equipment to reduce or 
eliminate risks where possible. 
 
3.39.3 
For further details please refer to the guidance on Manual Handling. 
 
3.40 
Hot Work Operations 
 
 
The definition of hot work at the University is a temporary operation with a tool at such a 
high temperature that could create a fire, irrespective of whether the work is done by an 
employee or by a contractor. Examples are: welding, brazing, soldering, ‘hot’ cutting (e.g. 
Oxy-Acetylene Cutting) or grinding. 
 
3.40.1 
Only trained competent personnel are permitted to carry out ‘Hot Work’.   
 
3.40.2 
Hot-works carried out by Contractors will be done so under the control of a Permit to Work 
issued by the Facilities Department. 
 
186 
 

3.41 
Issue of Health and Safety Policy to Employees 
 
3.41.1 
All employees will be provided with an electronic copy Health and Safety Policy, and are 
required to read it.  
 
3.41.2 
The Health and Safety Policy is available on the University Webpage and also the staff 
Intranet. 
 
3.42 
Specific Work related Health and Safety Guidance 
 
3.42.1 
The University will produce separate guidance for the following areas: 
 
 
Accident and Incident Reporting 
 
Control of Substances Hazardous to Health 
 
Consultation and Communications with Staff and Students 
 
Control of Contractors 
 
Construction Work 
 
Display Screen Equipment 
 
Electrical Safety 
 
Fire 
 
First Aid 
 
Infectious Diseases 
 
Manual Handling Operations 
 
Risk Assessment 
 
Safety In Staff and Student Inductions 
 
Violence and Violent Incidents 
 
Work Placements for Students 
 
 
The above guidance will be available on the University Intranet. 
 
 
 
 
187 
 

19. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 
Intellectual Property Policy and Regulations 
Note that this policy is currently under review. An abbreviated interim policy is presented here for 
reference. This sets out the University’s key principles in relation to Intellectual Property. 
Preamble 
Intellectual Property is an asset that may have commercial value. The University has a responsibility 
to ensure that it is managed effectively and wishes to encourage the promotion, protection and 
commercial exploitation of Intellectual Property created or developed by staff and/or students 
whether or not in collaboration with external organisations, to the mutual benefit of the inventors, 
the University and (if any) external collaborating organisations. 
It is the University's policy that: 
1.  
the product of work carried out with the benefit of the University environment (which 
includes facilities, resources, expertise and intellectual assets) constitutes intellectual property 
that should be owned, protected and used by the University for the general good of the whole 
University community 
2. 
 the University should make provision to recognise and reward persons who: 
a. create work within the University that may have commercial value or 
b. bring into the University for its benefit already created work which they own 
3.  
the University should not infringe the rights of others who own and control Intellectual 
Property. 
4.  
the University should meet its obligations to the funders of research including where required 
the management and exploitation of the results of the research. 
The following regulations are designed to implement the policy by allowing the University to acquire, 
protect and use the Intellectual Property (IP) generated within the University environment, to 
recognise and reward the creators of IP and to avoid infringement of third party IP rights. 
1.  
Responsibility 
1.1.   Each Dean of School is responsible for ensuring that all staff within that School have an up-to-
date copy of this policy. Each Dean of School must also ensure that every student within 
his/her School is made aware of the IP Policy and their main provisions. 
1.2.   A copy of the IP Policy will also be held by Human Resources to inform each new member of 
staff when he/she joins the University. 
1.3.   The Research Strategy Committee will keep under regular review the effectiveness of the 
means of informing staff and students about the provisions of the IP Policy. 
 
188 
 

2.  
Coverage of the Policy  
2.1.   This policy covers IP in all material concerning any of the University's activities whether 
research, consultancy, academic, professional or other including IP created using University 
facilities and resources. For the avoidance of doubt, the University owns IP if:  
2.1.1. the IP was created by a person then employed by the University in circumstances where 
the law presumes ownership to the employer, or  
2.1.2. the IP owner has in writing assigned his/her rights to the University  
2.2. This policy covers all persons:  
2.2.1. bound by the University's regulations in general by virtue of their employment or  
2.2.2. under a contract (such as a contract for services or a student contract) binding the 
signatories to abide by this policy or  
2.2.3. otherwise agreeing to abide by this policy specifically (which agreement may be by 
written contract or by conduct or by verbal indication).  
3.  
Exceptions to the Regulations  
3.1.   IP created by undergraduate students and taught postgraduate students is exempt save 
where the University specifically negotiates and agrees otherwise (for example in relation to 
final year projects, projects involving 3rd parties and work requiring use of pre-existing 
University-owned IP).  
3.2.   Research students will be asked to disclose any relevant IP, which they or their employer (if 
relevant) owns to enable their supervisor to determine whether an assignment or licence 
agreement is needed. Unless otherwise agreed in writing between the postgraduate student 
and the University, the University claims ownership of all IP arising from their studies 
(excluding thesis copyright). An inventor's revenue-share agreement may be negotiated in the 
event of commercial exploitation of arising IP.  
3.3.   Generally, scholarly works produced solely in the furtherance of an academic career, being 
articles in journals, papers for conferences, study notes not used to deliver teaching and books 
not commissioned by the University, are not subject to this policy.  
3.4.   The University will consider any particular case raised by those exempt from the policy. This 
would be subject to verifying the factual basis of generation and ownership and to agreeing a 
share in the value of any successful exploitation. The Legal Adviser will be pleased, where 
practicable, to provide support and guidance in the shape of information, contacts and 
examples but on a strict "no liability" basis and on the understanding that any individual IP-
owner would always be best served by taking independent advice on their own position  
3.5.   Where those exempt from the policy jointly generate IP with staff an agreement between the 
University and those exempt may be sought to determine if and how the IP may be exploited 
and how the value of any successful exploitation would be shared. It should be noted that in 
189 
 

this case neither the University nor the exempt person may exploit the joint IP without the 
agreement of the other party.  
4. 
 Responsibility to identify and protect IP (including duty of confidentiality)  
 
When undertaking University work from which IP may be expected to arise all persons bound 
by this policy must:  
4.1.   keep the nature of and matters relating to IP confidential until the fact and manner of 
disclosure is agreed with the University.  
4.2.   assist in protecting the University's rights to the IP by keeping suitable records of 
creation wherever possible. 
5.  
Disclosure 
 
All persons bound by this policy are responsible to the University for disclosing to their Dean 
of School or Head of Department at the outset of the work or as soon as they become aware 
of it: 
5.1. any potentially exploitable IP arising from their work 
5.2. the ownership by a third party of any IP referred to or used for their work 
5.3. any use to be made of existing University IP during their work 
5.4. any IP which they themselves own which is proposed to be used by the University 
6.  
Non-Disclosure Agreements (NDAs) 
6.1.   In general, the principal output of research and commercialisation is publication and 
dissemination of information and knowledge. However, there are some instances where 
confidentiality may be a requirement or should be considered , as follows: 
  through existing research and commercialisation agreements, you may have a duty 
not to disclose any or part of your present or past research and commercialisation 
to a third party; 
  there may be an opportunity to transfer confidential research and 
commercialisation results to industry and commerce; 
  you have made an invention which could be patentable [it is not possible to patent 
an invention which has been made available to the public (whether in the UK or 
elsewhere) by written or oral description, by use or in any other way]. 
6.2.   NDAs are frequently used to outline the relationship between the University and a company, 
when the University discloses secret information to a company, and vice versa. The parties are 
referred to as the receiving party and the disclosing party. 
6.3.   These are necessary when you wish to disclose confidential information to a company during 
discussions which may lead to research collaboration or the licensing of intellectual property. 
Keeping information confidential until it can be protected, e.g. by patents, is often essential in 
190 
 

establishing links with industry. It is far harder to encourage a company to fund research or to 
license technology if the company has no privileged or exclusive access to the research results. 
7. 
 Securing the University's rights in relation to use of IP 
 
All persons bound by this policy must co-operate with the University to ensure all of the 
following: 
7.1.   that project/work outcome is, wherever possible, owned by, assigned to or licensed for the 
University's use and/or commercialisation on adequate and advantageous terms; 
7.2.   that those terms are agreed and made clear in any bid or proposal or collaboration document 
relating to the project/work prior to the commencement of the work; 
7.3.  before the start of any collaboration with 3rd parties who are not bound by this policy 
(including students, visiting academics as well as other universities and companies) from 
which IP may arise or for which University IP may be used or disclosed that appropriate 
agreements are secured for the University relating to confidentiality and IP issues; 
7.4.   that the University may procure from the individual or third party owner or controller of any 
IP referred to or used for their work within the University an appropriate licence, assignment 
or consent for the University's use of the IP at the outset of the work to avoid infringement; 
7.5.   that no work is conducted for the benefit of or using material owned by a third party before 
the terms of ownership and use of project/work outcome are agreed; 
7.6.   that the University's ownership is asserted in relation to trademarks and its copyright interest 
in paper or electronic materials. 
8.  
Reward for creation 
8.1.   The University shall consider reward for and adjudication between creators to which all 
persons bound by this policy shall have the right to apply, whether as individuals or as a team, 
where they can warrant and demonstrate their creation of IP which has been of value to the 
University. Persons offered a reward under this system shall execute a formal agreement to 
enshrine the terms of the reward and their obligations. 
8.2.   Where IP is generated jointly by staff, or by staff and undergraduates or postgraduates, they 
are each responsible for informing the University of their individual contributions to its 
generation. For the purposes of distribution of compensation or reward in respect of IP 
generated jointly among staff it shall be their responsibility to agree their pro rata shares and 
to inform the University in writing by completion of the University Invention Disclosure Form. 
Where there is no agreement the University shall make an initial ruling. 
9.  
Notification of Infringement 
9.1.   Any person bound by this policy must alert their line manager immediately on suspecting or 
becoming aware of an infringement of IP rights being either: 
9.1.1. infringement of IP rights owned by the University, or 
191 
 

9.1.2. the University's infringement of IP rights owned by a third party. 
9.2.   In the case of actual or suspected infringement of third party IP rights, any person bound by 
this policy must comply with the instructions of the University in order to minimise the impact 
and extent of the infringement. Any action will be entirely at the discretion of the University. 
10.   Applications to use the University's materials 
10.1.  The University is willing to consider requests from its staff and students for a licence to use 
specific IP owned by the University for their use although the terms and decision to grant any 
such licence is wholly a matter of discretion for the University 
10.2.  Applications for a licence under paragraph 9.1 should be made in writing to the University 
Secretary who shall within 20 working days of receipt give either an initial ruling or reasons for 
not so doing together with an indication of process (e.g. further information required, 
reference to another person/body for decision or opinion) including where a right of appeal 
would lie. 
11.   Disputes 
 
Any person disputing the coverage, administration or effect of this policy must address their 
concern in writing in the first instance to the University Secretary, who shall within 20 working 
days of receipt give either an initial ruling or reasons for not so doing together with an 
indication of process (e.g. further information required, reference to another person/body for 
decision or opinion) including where a right of appeal would lie. 
12.   On leaving the University 
 
Persons bound by this policy shall continue to acknowledge and attribute the University's IP 
rights created during the period of their employment or other contractual obligation at the 
University in a clear manner and to avoid misleading future employers or collaborators or 
other material third parties as to the interests in the IP concerned. 
13.   Breach of the Policy 
13.1.  Breach of this policy is a disciplinary matter for University staff and students under the normal 
procedures. 
13.2.  The University shall consider all avenues available to it, including legal action by injunction or 
for damages or otherwise, in respect of persons bound by this policy acting in breach of them. 
14. 
Amendments to the Policy 
 
This policy may only be amended through recommendations submitted for approval by the 
Research Strategy Committee (or equivalent). 
 
 
192 
 

List of Appendices 
Appendix A - Brief guide to Intellectual Property Rights 
Appendix B - Guidance on Copyright in programme materials 
Appendix C - Guidance on Copyright in programme materials (including E-Learning) 
 
 
 
193 
 

Brief Guide to Intellectual Property Rights 
 
 
 
 
 
Appendix A 
(for guidance on copyright in programme materials see Appendix B) 
1. 
What is intellectual property? Intellectual Property (IP) is the term used for any inventive 
product of the human mind i.e. all IP has a human creator, although the wider question of 
whether something occurring in nature (DNA for example) can be claimed as IP is not certain. 
IP can either be tangible such as a physical work of art or intangible such as a scientific 
process. 
 
An internationally accepted definition of intellectual property is as follows: 
 
“The rights relating to: literary, artistic and scientific works; the performance of performing 
artists, phonograms and broadcasts; inventions in all fields of human endeavour; scientific 
discoveries industrial designs; trademarks; service marks and commercial names and 
designations; and all other property rights resulting from intellectual property in the 
industrial, scientific and artistic fields.” (World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) 
1967) 
 
Intellectual Property Rights can be split into two categories background and foreground and 
these are defined as follows: 
 
"Background Intellectual Property": means all and any Intellectual Property (excluding the 
Foreground Intellectual Property) belonging to either Party as at the Commencement Date or 
developed independently by either Party during the course of the Project which is not 
included in the definition of Foreground Intellectual Property. 
 
“Foreground Intellectual Property": means all and any Intellectual Property created or 
developed in the course of and relating to the Project including but not limited to copyright in 
the reports. 
2. 
How is IP used? The ownership and control of IP is expressed in terms of IP rights (IPR) such as 
copyright. The system of ownership and licensing means that a right to use IP can be distinct 
from the ownership of that IP; for example the author of a novel can license a film company to 
make a film of the book. Obviously, the IP owner usually wants to be paid for allowing 
someone else (the licensee) to use the IP. 
3.  
Who is the owner of IP in law? Generally the creator of IP is its legal owner (often described as 
the "first owner"). From the University's point of view, the most important exception to this is 
the general rule that IP is owned by a person's employer where the IP is created as part of, or 
through the auspices of, the person's employment. 
 
Ownership rights can be assigned by the first owner; this assignment is often made, for 
example, as a condition of a researcher's funding (i.e. the funder is prepared to pay for the 
research provided that ownership of any IP is assigned from the researcher to the funder). 
4.  
How is ownership of IP protected? Legally recognised IPR can arise automatically, as with 
copyright, or can arise through registration, as with patents. Other rights are capable of 
194 
 

enforcement either as unregistered or registered rights, as with design rights. It is beyond the 
scope of this guide to analyse the difference in enforcing unregistered and registered rights. 
 
Where there is no legally recognised right of ownership in a particular type of inventive or 
creative asset, the only way to protect the value of the ownership is to keep the nature of the 
asset secret. This means that trading with or discussing the asset must be done under terms of 
strict confidence, usually emphasised by the parties entering into a formal confidentiality 
agreement. For example, there is no legally recognised way of protecting "know-how" so it is 
prudent to disclose valuable know-how only when the person to whom it is disclosed has been 
placed under an obligation of confidence. The law recognises obligations of confidence and 
offers remedies for a breached obligation. 
 
Even where a legally recognised system of protection exists for a type of IP, some owners still 
choose to rely on secrecy rather than take advantage of protection offered where, as with a 
patent, disclosure is a condition of the protection. Once IP is disclosed, the "keeping it secret" 
option has gone. 
5.  
Summary of the main classes of IPR 
 
Patent: Relevant to new and improved products and processes that are capable of industrial 
application. A registered patent provides a time-defined (up to 20 years) geographically 
defined monopoly right to exploit a new commercially valuable invention or process. The basis 
of the permission to exploit is that the invention's working is disclosed, although as noted in 4. 
above, patenting is not possible if there has been ANY prior disclosure of the invention 
(governed by the Patents Act 1977). 
 
Copyright: Copyright is a means of protecting a person’s intellectual property by ensuring that 
other people do not copy or adapt the material. Copyright protection comes into being when 
the material is created. A copyright statement is not required in order for a work to be 
covered by copyright – if there is no copyright statement this does not mean that no copyright 
is held. All kinds of items and mediums are protected by copyright, even electronic resources 
including: 
 
Literary Works - any original written work e.g. novels, poetry, letters, directories, the lyrics of 
musical works, - web pages, email messages, news bulletins etc. are all examples of literary 
works protected by copyright. Computer programs are also protected as literary works 
 
Dramatic Works - dramatic works are distinguished from literary works by the inclusion of 
spoken words, or described actions. 
 
Artistic Works - includes photographs, sculptures, maps, plans etc. All pictures, images, logos 
and other graphics on the Web will be protected as artistic works. 
  
Sound Recordings - all sound recordings are protected by copyright. 
 
Films - moving images and video clips are protected as films. In some media e.g. web pages, 
films, there may be many different copyrights for the text, pictures and sounds. 
195 
 

 
This time-limited (varies between 25 and 70 years according to the material) right arises 
automatically on the physical creation (not the idea) of software, original literary, dramatic, 
artistic or musical work, and in recorded (e.g. film) or published (e.g. layout) derivations. Use 
of the © mark and owner's name and date is the internationally recognised way of alerting 
the public to the copyright ownership but the protection (the right to preventing unauthorised 
copying) exists regardless. (governed by the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988). 
 
Copyright may be assigned to a third party, but until that point or until a licence is agreed it 
remains the property of the creator, unless s/he creates the work 'in the course of his/her 
employment', in which case it is the property of the employer. 
 
 
196 
 

 
Appendix B provides guidance on copyright in programme materials including courseware. 
 
Moral rights: In addition, all European countries (including the UK) recognise an author's 
moral rights. There are four - paternity, integrity, false attribution and privacy. These rights 
relate to the reputation or standing of the creator in the eyes of fellow human beings. To 
infringe a moral right involves denigrating or harming the author's reputation. The right of 
paternity has to be asserted in writing: it is the right to be identified as the author of the work. 
The right of integrity means the copyright owner has the right to object to derogatory 
treatment of his/her work. Basically, this means changing it in any way without permission. 
Moral rights can be waived: by this, the author chooses not to exercise the rights - or they can 
be bequeathed. They cannot be assigned. 
 
Performing rights: Creators of copyright works have the right to protect the physical form in 
which those works are created - words on the page, pigment on a canvas, or the clay or metal 
of a sculpture. Performers such as actors, musicians and dancers also enjoy protection of their 
performance, especially when recorded on film, video, tape, CD, or in other form. Performing 
rights may affect the multimedia elements of online courseware, as well as the creator's 
copyright in the material itself.  
 
Database Right: This time-limited (15 years) right arises without registration to protect the 
compilers of non-original information from losing the benefit of their work through 
unauthorised copying or re-use. (governed by the Copyright and Rights in Databases 
Regulations 1997).  
 
Industrial Designs: Designs for product appearance – of the whole or part of a product 
resulting from the features of the lines, contours, colours, shape, texture and/or materials of 
the product itself and/or its ornamentation. There is automatic time-limited (15 years) 
protection (the right to prevent unauthorised copying) for unregistered designs, provided 
authorship can be proved, under the Copyright Designs and Patents Act 1988. This design right 
covers functional shape or configuration.  
 
On registration under the Registered Designs Act 1949, the designer of the new pattern or 
shape which has aesthetic appeal (can be 2 or 3 dimensional) acquires a monopoly right of 
exploitation for 25 years.  
 
Domain Names: Registering a domain name for internet use gives a monopoly right for use. 
(Registered with bodies like ICANN and NOMINET)  
 
Trade Marks: Trade marks for brand identity – of goods and services allowing distinctions to 
be made between different traders. Registering a trademark under the TradeMarks Act 1994 
gives a monopoly right for the use of graphically distinct trading identification signs. 
Unregistered trademarks have some protection through court actions against "passing off" 
(piracy), provided that their use has not lapsed for a period of 5 years.  
 
Some of the main problem areas for IP creators and owners:  
 
incorporating background IP which belongs to someone else  
 
joint ownership (where there is more than one creator)  
197 
 

 
proving the date of creation (e.g. where two inventors contest priority over the same 
invention/discovery)  
 
failing to define/prove what was created  
 
inadvertent disclosure  
 
 
 
 
198 
 

Guidance on Copyright in programme materials (including E-Learning)   
Appendix C 
This appendix provides guidance on establishing and protecting copyright in programme materials 
including content in 'courseware' developed for distance learning. 
1.  
Background 
1.1   The distribution of content in any form involves questions of intellectual property. The 
interests of both the creators of content in programme materials and the users of content 
need to be met. These guidelines focus largely on creators' needs, whether within or outside 
the University, and attempt to establish principles of good practice for all. 
2.  
Courseware 
2.1   Courseware may be distributed as print on paper, but it is anticipated that it is more likely to 
be distributed in digital form, either on the internet or (more probably) on the 
Intranet/Extranet. 
2.2   Queen Margaret University is a service organisation that delivers education. The development 
of courseware is an essential adjunct to the service provided, but is not an end in itself. 
2.3   In this context, it is essential that the University can develop and maintain courseware to the 
highest international standards. The University must be confident that it either controls or has 
authority to use all the intellectual property rights that are necessary for it to be able to 
achieve this aim. 
2.4   At the same time, the University has no wish to curtail the academic freedom of its staff to 
publish within the framework of scholarly communication. These guidelines are intended to 
strike an appropriate balance between the needs and rights of the University and the needs 
and rights of the individual members of staff. 
2.5   This draft policy document has been prepared in accordance with the University's Contract of 
Employment with members of its staff. 
3. 
Challenges of convergence, interdependence and re-use 
3.1   Courseware has till now largely focused on conventional print on paper format and mainly on 
the use of text and graphics. Different IPR issues arise the further we move into a digital and 
online environment. These issues include performing rights, moral rights, and rights in 
applicable software. IPR issues affect text, graphics, still and moving images, music, sound 
recordings, multimedia, and other copyright forms. 
3.2   Convergence between different media types - text, pictures, audio-visual, software - produces 
an environment in which rights management becomes potentially complex. This complexity 
increases as the content becomes more interdependent - and more difficult to deconstruct 
into its constituent parts. 
199 
 

3.3   Multiple formats and multiple delivery mechanisms mean that copyright may subsist in a wide 
variety of elements owned by many different individuals. Identification of rights ownership is 
a key part of the process of developing courseware. 
3.4   Courseware may have a long lifetime, and be subject to constant revision. The need to re-use 
and re-edit courseware may outlast the tenure of any individual member of staff. The 
University must continue to have the necessary rights to re-use the material. 
4.  
Content specifically commissioned to be included in courseware 
4.1   For content commissioned from members of academic staff in the normal course of their 
duties for inclusion in courseware, the University will depend on Clause 16.4 of the 
University's Contract of Employment and on Clause 11 of the Copyright Designs and Patents 
Act (CDPA) 1988 (works produced in the course of employment). All IPRs will belong to the 
University. 
4.2   Although under Clause 79 (3) (a) of CDPA 1988 it is clear that the author's moral rights do not 
apply to works produced in the course of employment, nevertheless the University will so far 
as is practicable identify the original author(s) of all items of courseware. 
4.3   For works commissioned from a member of staff which is to be produced outside the normal 
course of their duties, or from someone who is not a member a staff, the University will use a 
form of contract which makes it clear that all IPRs in the work belong to the University and 
that all moral rights are waived. 
4.4   The University will in principle always be prepared on request to licence re-use of such 
content developed by an author in other contexts. The University reserves the right to refuse 
such a licence for the reuse of the same content in courseware developed for a subsequent 
employer (in competition with the University). This should not be seen as implying that the 
University is claiming any rights over the ideas contained in the courseware - simply over their 
precise mode of organisation and expression. 
5.  
Copyright - Extract from the academic contract of employment 
5.1   Subject to the following provisions, the University and you acknowledge sections 11 and 215 
of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. 
5.2   All records, documents and other papers (including copies and summaries thereof) which 
pertain to the finance and administration of the University and which are made or acquired by 
you in the course of your employment shall be the property of the University. The copyright in 
all such original records, documents and papers shall at all times belong to the University. 
5.3   The copyright in any work of design compiled, edited or otherwise brought into existence by 
you as a 'scholarly work' produced in furtherance of your professional career shall belong to 
you, 'scholarly work' includes items such as books, contributions to books, articles and 
conference papers, and shall be construed in the light of the common understanding of the 
phrase in higher education. 
200 
 

5.4   The copyright in any material produced by you for your personal use and reference, including 
as an aid to teaching shall belong to you. 
5.5   However, the copyright in programme materials produced by you in the course of your 
employment for the purposes of the curriculum of a programme run by the University and 
produced, used or disseminated by the University shall belong to the University, as well as the 
outcomes from research specifically funded and supported by the University. 
5.6   The above sub-clauses (3) - (5) shall apply except where agreement to the contrary is reached 
by you and the University. Where a case arises, or it is thought that a case may arise, where 
such agreement to the contrary may be necessary, or where it may be expedient to reach a 
specific agreement as to the application of the above sub-clauses to the particular facts of the 
case, the matter should be taken up between you and your Dean of School. By way of 
example, this sub-clause would apply where any question of assignment of copyright or of 
joint copyright may arise. 
6.  
Rights owned by third parties 
6.1   The University respects the Intellectual Property Rights of third parties, and staff should at all 
times respect them. 
6.2   If content for courseware is taken from any source where the ownership of the IPRs belongs 
to someone other than a member of the University's staff or the University itself, it should 
always be assumed that it is necessary to obtain a licence to use that content, whether or not 
payment is to be made. 
6.3 
The responsibility for ensuring that such licences are obtained lies with the member of staff 
who has been commissioned to develop the specific piece of courseware. If that member of 
staff has any doubts about whether a licence is required, they should consult the Learning 
Resource Centre.  
6.4   Licences for use of third party material should be obtained on behalf of the University not on 
behalf of the individual member of staff, using a form of licence that can be provided by the 
Learning Resource Centre.  
6.5   It is unlikely that third parties will grant rights to the University that are sufficiently broad to 
allow repeated or perpetual re-use of material. Applications should specify the use for which 
rights are being sought. Individuals should be careful to ensure that applications for re-use, 
when required, are made promptly and accurately.  
6.6   Licences for use of third party material will normally require that licensees adhere to the rights 
owner's moral rights of paternity and integrity. This means the author must be fully credited, 
and that editorial or other changes must be approved by the third party.  
6.7   Licences from third parties will often require payment for any substantial use of their 
copyright material, and they are free to ask for whatever they think their material is worth. 
The Learning Resource Centre should be consulted.  
201 
 

6.8   Staff should not expect the process of permission clearance to be instantaneous or even 
prompt: the process can take weeks rather than days.  
6.9   The University's membership of HERON [Higher Education Resources Online] may provide help 
with permissions clearance in some cases. HERON is a copyright and digitisation service.  
7. 
 Policy and practice to protect QMU material  
7.1 
New material produced specifically for use in the University (whether courseware or in any 
other form) is itself subject to copyright protection, and members of staff must play their part 
in ensuring the University's IPR interests are protected as far as possible.  
7.2   Contents or title pages, metadata or other descriptions of such material should carry a 
copyright line which reads "© 2006 Queen Margaret University. This material is protected by 
copyright and may not be copied, re-used, downloaded, or otherwise appropriated, except in 
accordance with terms or exceptions of the 1988 Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, or with 
licences issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency, without the express permission of the 
University. Applications for permission should be made in the first instance to the University 
Secretary, Queen Margaret University".  
7.3   Securing and protecting the copyright of material generated in any form (whether 
conventional print, CD-ROM, or online) by the University will remain a long-term commitment 
on the part of all academic staff.  
7.4   Misuse or apparent infringements of University copyright material by third parties should be 
notified immediately to the University Secretary. This document provides guidance to 
students and staff on the definition and consideration of claims for ‘extenuating 
circumstances’, and on the procedures for submitting a claim under these guidelines.  
 
 
202 
 

20.  
LEARNING RESOURCE CENTRE (LRC) REGULATIONS  
 
1  

Introduction 
1.1  
The LRC Regulations have been endorsed by University Senate for the benefit of all 
users.  
 
1.2  
Please read these regulations carefully, as ignorance of them cannot be accepted as an 
excuse for non-observance.  
 
1.3  
The LRC Regulations are supported by the University Code of Conduct and the “Acceptable 
use of information and communication technology and electronic resources at Queen 
Margaret University” Policy. 
 
1.4  
For the purpose of these Regulations, "the LRC" means Learning Resource Centre 
(incorporating the Library) within Queen Margaret University. Also for the purpose of these 
Regulations the term 'Head of Learning Services' refers to the Head of Learning Services or 
any other member of LRC staff acting on behalf of the Head of Learning Services.  
 
1.5  
For the purpose of these regulations "QMU Smart Card" refers to the student 
matriculation card or for staff, the staff card.  
 
2.   
Use of the Learning Resource Centre 
 
2.1  
Use of Queen Margaret University LRC is free and available to all. Borrowing rights are 
available to the following:  
 
•  Members of the University Court during their term of office  
•  All University staff  
•  All matriculated University students and researchers  
•  Students of other institutions as specified by reciprocal agreements and by the Head of 
Learning Services.  
•  University collaborative partners 
•  External members, of such categories and subject to such conditions and fees as the 
Head of Learning Services may determine  
 
2.2 
Conditions of use, borrowing privileges, and access to electronic and audio-visual 
resources are dependent on the category under which the user is registered with the LRC.  
 
2.3 
Members of the public, who are not registered as external members, may freely use 
the LRC for consultation and reference only. Members of the public may access some 
electronic resources on designated terminals, as prescribed by the licence agreement 
for the individual resource.  
 
2.4 
Use of the LRC, or access to its facilities, implies an undertaking to observe these 
Regulations.  
203 
 

3
Regulation of Borrowing 
 
3.1 
Users must produce a valid QMU Smart Card whenever they wish to borrow.  
3.2 
QMU Smart Cards are not transferable.  
3.3 
No items may be removed from the LRC without first being formally issued as a loan. Any 
removal or attempted removal of an item without complying with this procedure 
constitutes an offence and renders the user liable to disciplinary action. 
3.4 
Users will be held responsible for all items issued on their QMU Smart Card until they are 
returned to the LRC and duly discharged.  
 
3.5 
Books and other items of LRC stock which have been issued on a QMU Smart Card may not 
be transferred from one LRC user to another. 
 
3.6 
Current loan periods must be observed at all times, and items returned by the date and 
time specified. 
 
3.7 
It is the responsibility of the user to return all items by dates and times specified. Reminder 
notices are a courtesy, not an entitlement (see Appendix 1). 
 
3.8 
Email will be the standard means by which communications from the LRC are delivered. 
Email will only be sent to a QMU email address. 
 
3.9 
When returning items, these must be discharged at the Self Service facility or handed to a 
member of LRC staff during staffed hours. Users returning LRC materials, issued on their 
QMU Smart Card, must not leave them unattended in the LRC, whether at the LRC Service 
Desk, or anywhere else in the LRC. LRC materials remain the responsibility of the user until 
they are duly discharged and it is the responsibility of the user to check the screen and 
make sure that items are discharged from their record. 
 
3.10 
Fines are levied on all users for the late return of items. Users who fail to return items will 
be invoiced for the accumulated fines, the cost of replacement and an administration 
charge. Users who have such an 'account' on their QMU Smart Card will have their 
borrowing privileges suspended until all accounts are cleared to the satisfaction of the 
Head of Learning Services.  
 
3.11 
University users who are in debt to the LRC, due to non-payment of fines or through failure 
to clear accounts on their LRC record, by the end of their programme may have their 
degree certificate withheld and/or will not be allowed to graduate.  
 
3.12 
If not required by other users, most items may be renewed for a further period. Items can 
be renewed at the Self Service facility, in person at the Service Desk, by telephone or 
electronically via the LRC online catalogue. Please note that, under the Data Protection Act, 
204 
 

telephone renewals can only be carried out by the person who originally borrowed the 
items.  
 
3.13 
A reservation or 'hold' may be placed on most items that are currently on loan. Users will 
be notified when the item becomes available and it will be held for 'pickup' for 7 days.  
 
3.14 
Users will be notified if any item issued on their QMU Smart Card is required by another 
user. These items will no longer be eligible for renewal and must be returned by the date 
and time specified.  
 
3.15 
Any user who fails to return a book, knowing that it is in demand, may be required to pay 
the costs of replacing it and will be liable to suspension of further borrowing privileges.  
 
3.16 
Lost or stolen QMU Smart Cards must be reported to Security and to the LRC immediately. 
There is a £20 charge for the replacement of lost cards. 
 
4.       
Conduct 
 
4.1 
The LRC Regulations are supported by the University Code of Conduct. In line with the 
General Principles of the University Code of Conduct, all LRC staff are empowered to 
enforce the Code of Conduct for the duties and operation of LRC facilities and services, and 
are entitled to be treated with courtesy and respect, when discharging these duties.  
 
4.2 
Users must comply with the provisions of any relevant legislation e.g. laws relating to 
intellectual property rights including copyright, data protection; and also any licence 
agreements between the University and a third party e.g. the Shibboleth authentication 
system, which govern the use of software and access to data. 
 
4.3 
Users should carry their QMU Smart Card with them at all times and be prepared to show 
this identification at the request of LRC staff. Failure to produce a valid QMU Smart Card 
may result in the user being asked to leave the LRC.  
 
4.4 
For health and safety reasons, children under 12 will only be admitted to the LRC if they 
are kept under the close supervision of an adult. 
 
4.5 
Silence in areas designated as Silent or Quiet Study Areas must be observed. Mobile 
phones and other devices must be switched to silent in these areas. 
 
4.6 
LRC staff are empowered to remove unattended bags to the LRC Workroom. Users will 
be able to reclaim such property from the LRC Service Desk. 
 
4.7 
Damage or defacement of books and other items of LRC stock is prohibited. Any damage 
to, or loss of, LRC materials must be made good to the satisfaction of the Head of 
Learning Services.  
 
205 
 

4.8 
Any defect or damage to a book or other item should be reported immediately to the 
LRC Service Desk.  
 
4.9 
Users should report any accident, theft or other incident to a member of LRC staff 
immediately.  
 
4.10 
It is the responsibility of the owners of mains-powered equipment e.g. laptops, to have 
it tested for electrical safety, and their use is conditional upon the owners' acceptance 
of responsibility for damage to University property caused by their equipment. No floor 
boxes are to be used, only the designated extension units provided by the University. 
The University accepts no responsibility for such equipment or for data stored. 
 
4.11 
The University accepts no responsibility for loss or theft of, or damage to, 
personal belongings left anywhere in the LRC.  
 
4.12 
No book or other item of LRC stock may be removed from the LRC unless it has been 
issued via the Self Service facility or at Service Desk.  
 
4.13 
The LRC has electronic security systems to prevent the unauthorised removal of LRC 
materials. Users must comply with the requirements of their operation.  
 
4.14 
LRC staff can ask that bags, briefcases and all other containers be opened, to check for 
LRC materials being taken out of the LRC, whether or not the security system has been 
activated.  
 
4.15 
Users must leave the LRC immediately on hearing the fire alarm or when required to do so 
in any emergency. LRC users must comply with directions given by Fire Wardens and Fire 
Marshals. 
 
5.  
Inter-Library Loans 
 
 
An item borrowed from another Library will be subject to the conditions imposed by the 
lending library.  
 

Copyright and Licences 
 
6.1  
Any photocopying, or scanning, of material or downloading of electronic data must 
comply with the appropriate copyright legislation, and/or appropriate University or LRC 
licence agreements.  
 
6.2  
Some audio-visual materials, software and data are licensed for educational use only; 
unless otherwise indicated, they may not be copied or used for commercial purposes. The 
licensing terms and conditions of some software may mean that it is unavailable to external 
members and other categories of users.  
 
206 
 

7.  
Breach of LRC Regulations 
 
7.1  
The University views very seriously any abuse or misuse of the LRC facilities or 
services. Any abuse of the LRC facilities or services may be dealt with under the 
appropriate University Regulations Governing Discipline.  
 
7.2  
In terms of paragraph 1.4 of the University Regulations Governing Discipline, the LRC 
Management Team are empowered to deal with minor breaches of the LRC 
Regulations. Serious breaches will be dealt with under the University Regulations 
Governing Discipline.  
 
7.3  
Any LRC user found to be in breach of LRC Regulations will be asked, in the first instance, to 
show their QMU Smart Card. Details of the person and the offence will be recorded for 
future consultation, in accordance with the Data Protection Act.  
 
7.4  
In the case of any breach of LRC Regulations, the Head of Learning Services is authorised 
to suspend the LRC privileges of any user, for a period which could continue in force up 
to 3 months after which the breach occurred, and also to impose any other appropriate 
penalties. Any action taken under this Regulation will be reported summarily to, and 
taken in agreement with, the appropriate Head of School.  
 
7.5  
External members who commit a major breach of LRC Regulations will have 
their membership cancelled and will forfeit fees paid to the University. Re-
admission to membership will be at the discretion of the Head of Learning 
Services. 
 
 
 
207 
 

LRC Regulations: 
Appendix 1 Overdue reminder notification and Accounts  
 
Please note that all overdue returns will incur a fine. The current fine rates are displayed on the 
Library webpages. Overdue notices, for University users, will be sent by email to QMU mailboxes. 
Overdue notices for other users, external to the University, will be sent via email or through the post 
to their home address.  
 
1.1 
Overdue Reminder notices for 21-Day and 7-Day Loans 
 
7 days after expiry of loan: First overdue notice will be sent. 
21 days after expiry of loan: Second overdue notice sent.  
 
Failure to return or renew the items, where allowed, results in an account being placed on 
the user's LRC record and borrowing privileges suspended. An account notice will be duly 
dispatched for the replacement cost of any overdue items plus an administration cost. 
 
1.2  
Overdue 1-Day Loans and DVDs. Overdue 1-day loan materials and DVDs are charged at a 
higher rate of fines. 
 
Failure to return 1-day loans or DVDs on time is seen as a serious abuse of the LRC service. 
Overdue notifications and accounts will be sent to users as outlined in 1.1 above. 
 
1.3  
Overdue Inter-Library Loans. An item borrowed from another Library through the Inter-
Library Loan service will be subject to the conditions imposed by the lending Library. This 
may ultimately result in the LRC user being invoiced for the replacement cost of the item, 
plus any administration fee in accordance with the lending library's own regulations.  
The LRC may also impose a fine in the event of late returns.  
 
1.4  
Accounts. All users will be sent accounts for LRC items that are 21 days or more overdue. 
The University may take further steps to recover items which become seriously overdue. 
Users must return the item(s), pay any fines due (where applicable to the category of 
user), and pay an administration cost to clear the account.  
 
If any item(s), issued on a QMU Smart Card have been lost or stolen, the user must pay the 
replacement cost of the item(s), any fines (where applicable) and the administration cost. If 
the item(s) are subsequently found, the replacement cost only will be refunded 
 
 
208 
 

21. PROFESSIONAL DOCTORATE REGULATIONS 
 
These regulations can be found in full on the Quality website at: 
https://www.qmu.ac.uk/about-the-university/quality/ 
 
 
209 
 

link to page 215 link to page 217 link to page 218 link to page 220 link to page 220 22. 
REGISTRATION  
 
Contents 

1.0 
Matriculation 
2.0 
Declaration of criminal convictions 
3.0 
Recognition of prior learning 
4.0 
Registration 
5.0 
Continuation of registration 
6.0 
Change of study programme 
7.0 
Change of study programme – postgraduate study 
8.0 
Attendance 
9.0 
Associate students 
 

MATRICULATION 
 
1.1 
Matriculation is the process of registering with the University as a student. Students must 
register for each academic year of their programme, i.e. they must matriculate annually. 
 
1.2   To be permitted to matriculate, students must produce: 
 
a)  originals of certificates passed and on the basis of which, admission to the University is 
being sought; 
 
b)  evidence of financial support, e.g. a letter of award  confirmation from the Students' Award 
Agency for Scotland, from a Local Education Authority, or from a sponsor. Students are 
expected to have a reasonable expectation of financial support to allow them to complete 
their programme. 
 
1.3   Any false or materially misleading statement made in a student's application for entry to the 
University, or through the annual matriculation process, may result in that student being 
required to leave the University. 
 
2. 
DECLARATION OF CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS 
 
2.1 
To safeguard the welfare of staff, students, visitors and the general public, Queen Margaret 
University will scrutinise any criminal convictions declared on the part of applicants for entry 
or by matriculating students.  
 
2.2 
Continuing students will be required to declare, as part of on-line matriculation, whether they 
have had any criminal conviction in the last 12 months. In the event of a positive response, the 
process set out in 2.3 below will be followed.  
 
 
NOTE: Any student who is subsequently found to have falsified his/her self declaration will be 
subject to disciplinary action.  
 
2.3 
Where an applicant or a matriculating student has declared a criminal conviction, identified 
staff of the University Secretary’s Group will contact the applicant or student to ascertain the 
nature of the conviction, requesting further information, including the nature of the 
conviction, date of conviction, nature of sentence etc. The Head of Admissions and 
210 
 

Recruitment, the relevant School Manager and the relevant Head of Division will review this 
information and carry out a risk assessment using an established classification taken from the 
Health and Care Professions Council. The following criteria will be considered:  
 
  Programme requirements  
  Potential risk to other students and staff  
  Responsibilities to employers and the public  
  The rights of the individual and entitlement to rehabilitation  
 
 
Serious cases may also be referred to the Dean for academic consideration.  
 
2.4 
The University Secretary will consider the recommendation from the risk assessment and will 
make a decision on admittance to, or continuation on, a programme.  
 
2.5   Students will not be permitted to commence placements until the investigation into the 
criminal conviction has concluded. 
 
2.6 
Any appeal against a decision in this matter will be conducted through the established 
University procedures. In certain circumstances, the institution may have to refer cases to the 
relevant statutory body.  
 
2.7 
All Professionally qualifying programmes at QMU have a requirement for students to      be 
screened through the Protection of Vulnerable Groups (PVG) process, via Disclosure 
Scotland.  The Protecting Vulnerable Groups (PVG) Scheme delivers on the provisions outlined 
in the Protection of Vulnerable Groups (PVG) (Scotland) Act 2007.  
 
 
Below is a list of the QMU programmes which require a Disclosure Scotland check. The type of 
check will be determined on application and will be undertaken after an offer to study at the 
University has been made.  
 
BSc (Hons) Podiatry 
BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy 
BSc (Hons) Diagnostic Radiography 
BSc (Hons) Therapeutic Radiography 
BSc (Hons) Occupational Therapy 
BSc (Hons) Speech and Language Therapy 
BSc (Hons) Dietetics 
BSc (Hons) Nursing 
DipHE in Hearing Aid Audiology 
MSc/PgDip Dietetics (Pre-registration) 
MSc/PgDip Occupational Therapy (Pre-registration) 
MSc/PgDip Physiotherapy (Pre-registration) 
MSc/PgDip Speech and Language Therapy (Pre-registration) 
MSc/PgDip Audiology (Pre-registration) 
MSc/PgDip Diagnostic Radiography (Pre-registration) 
PgDip Radiotherapy & Oncology 
MSc Art Psychotherapy (International) 
MSc Music Therapy 
MSc Person Centred Practice (professional pathways only) 
 
 
211 
 

 
BA (Hons) Drama and Performance/ Theatre and Film Studies students may also require a PVG 
Scheme Record for working with Children, depending on their specialism/dissertation 
projects. These are normally applied for during the second year of study (for specialisms) or 
third year for Honours projects. 
 
 
BSc (Hons) Physical Activity, Health & Wellbeing students may also require a PVG Scheme 
Record for working with Children, depending on their placement experience, and this will be 
advised by the Programme Leader when required. 
 
 
At the time of writing (September 2017), the standard fee is £59. If an applicant is already a 
PVG member (for both Children and Adult) then the update fee is £18. 
 
2.8 
International and EU students 
 
 
International and European Union applicants and students are required to provide 
comparable information in English from their own country. While it is recognised that the 
process is likely to be difficult, depending on nationality, students are nevertheless asked to 
investigate the availability of alternative forms of evidence of their personal record. In the 
normal course of events, students will be required to apply for “Standard Disclosure” before 
entry to a programme. The existence of a criminal record itself does not mean that a student 
is unable to join a programme, but admission to particular programmes may be precluded by 
certain types of convictions.   
 

RECOGNITION OF PRIOR LEARNING (RPL) 
 
3.1    Individual students may be admitted to an advanced stage of a programme, provided that 
they have demonstrably reached the same general standard of educational development as 
achieved through earlier level(s) of the programme. There should also be a reasonable 
probability that prospective students will complete the programme successfully within its 
normal duration. Where other studies are used as the basis for selection, the Programme 
Leader or Admissions Tutor will have discretion to determine if it is necessary for each 
component in the omitted level(s) of the programme to be shown to have been covered. 
 
3.2   Where admission to a level has been granted, students may further apply for specific credits 
as set out below. However, any credit approved under RPL and based on a specific episode of 
prior learning can be used only once on any programme of study. 
 
3.3 
The Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) describes the use of prior learning, either as  
 
a formative tool as part of personal development or as a summative tool for the award of 
credit. The learning may have taken place either as part of a formal educational course or as 
part of an informal life or work experience outside formal educational settings. This 
acknowledges that there may be a stage of discussion, reflection and formative assignments, 
prior to any formal application for the accreditation of prior learning. 
 
3.4 
The Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) refers to the process whereby students are  
 
awarded credit towards an award on the basis of previous learning, which may be either 
certificated learning or experiential learning.  
 
3.5 
APL can be used either as a means of demonstrating the achievement of entry level  
 
or for gaining credit that can be transferred as either general or specific credit towards a 
programme of study. 
212 
 

3.6   The application will be assessed by the University in terms of its:  
 
  authenticity - that the applicant actually completed what is claimed.  
  directness - that the learning was specific and can be identified and categorised. 
  sufficiency - that learning reached a level to allow the applicant to fulfil the learning 
outcomes of the programme. 
  currency - that the learning is sufficiently recent to allow the applicant to fulfil learning 
outcomes of the programme.  Where experience from some time previously is referred to 
in a substantial way, e.g. more than five years has elapsed, the application will be assessed 
to determine whether the applicant has kept up to date with recent developments in the 
intended field of study. 
 
3.7 
The Accreditation of Prior Certificated Learning (APCL) refers to the recognition of  
 
prior learning gained from a formal course that has been previously assessed and/or 
accredited at higher education level. 
 
3.8 
The Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) refers to the process of  
 
assessing and credit-rating learning achieved outside formal education settings.  
 
3.9 
The minimum credit that can be awarded is 5 credits in the case of undergraduate  
 
Programmes, and 7.5 credits for postgraduate programmes. For the purpose of awarding 
credit, smaller volumes of learning may be incorporated into a single summative assessment 
submitted for the award of credit. 
 
3.10  The University will grant specific credit to students by matching evidence provided by  
 
the student which demonstrates that they have fulfilled the learning outcomes of specified 
full modules in a validated programme on which they are registered.   Students given specific 
credit for a module will then be exempted from this module and prohibited from undertaking 
a similar module. 
 
3.11  Students may possess general credit awarded by other institutions for previous  
studies.  Part of these studies may be specifically recognised and given specific credit towards 
a programme of the University on the basis that they meet the requirements of a Queen 
Margaret University award.  
 
3.12  The level and volume of general credit should be assessed based on the relevant  
 
level descriptors of the SCQF. Although  the volume of credit is not a simple mathematical 
judgement, one credit point is approximately equivalent to 10 hours of learning, including all 
learning activities, application through work based activity, reflection and assessment. 
 
3.13  Students may be exempted from attendance in respect of part of a module where they  
 
can demonstrate prior learning of some but not all of the learning outcomes of that module. 
In such circumstances, students will be summatively assessed against the learning outcomes 
of the full module. 
 
3.14  The only exception is where a programme option or elective exists.  Specific credit  
 
can be given on the basis of previous learning without precise matching of module learning 
outcomes, provided that students achieve the overall outcomes for an award. 
 
3.15  The student’s claim for credit for a specific module may be assessed in a number of  
 
possible ways, and in the following order of preference. The student can: 
213 
 

  provide evidence of passing an equivalent module elsewhere; 
  undertake the normal module assessment; 
  undertake an oral examination;  
  undertake another form of assessment, e.g. a challenge essay; 
  complete an approved learning contract; 
  submit a portfolio of evidence. 
 
3.16    Where credit is awarded, it should be for evidence of the achievement of learning arising from 
the experience and not for the experience alone. 
 
3.17   A student’s claim for credit for a specific module should be assessed by the same staff member 
who would normally assess performance on that module, unless that member of staff has 
previously acted as academic advisor to the student. 
 
3.18  The record of the assessment of prior learning should be open to independent scrutiny by the 
same external examiners who assess performance on the specific modules or academic 
award.  The evidence submitted by students of prior experiential learning in support of a claim 
must be available for scrutiny by external examiners.  Boards of Examiners should be notified 
of those credits on student transcripts arising from APL. 
 
3.19  At least 50 per cent of the level at which a student enters a programme must be completed at 
Queen Margaret University in order to gain an award from the University.  Classification of 
awards may make use of grades given for prior learning: for APCL, those grades are those 
given by the institution where the prior learning was accredited (adjusted to allow for 
differences in marking criteria); for APEL, those grades may be given by Queen Margaret 
University.  
 
3.20  As part of its programme review and annual monitoring processes, QMU may require 
programme teams to monitor, review and report on their use of the policies and procedures 
for APL. 
 
3.21  An approved learning contract may be used by a student to gain credit, based on an agreed 
piece of current independent learning. The credit gained may be general or specific. Learning 
contracts may be incorporated into individual or independent study modules. 
 
3.22  Where a learning contract is used for the award of specific credit, the contract should indicate 
how the specific learning outcomes of the module(s) are to be demonstrated. 
 
3.23  Where a learning contract is used for general credit, the choice of learning outcomes, together 
with the volume and level of credit should be made with reference to the SCQF framework.  
 
3.24  A learning contract should include statements of: the level and volume of credit, the aims and 
learning outcomes, a plan of activities, details of evidence to be submitted by the student 
(report, essay, video, portfolio etc.), a marking scheme and a time plan.  
 
3.25  The contract should be dated and signed by the student, the lecturer supervising the student 
and the programme leader (plus the representative of any external body in the case of work-
based learning). A copy of the learning contract, together with the student work and marking 
sheet, should be made available to the External Examiner. 
 
214 
 

3.26  Boards of Examiners should be made aware of any marks/grades arising from learning 
contracts. 
 
3.27  General credit may be awarded to students who can demonstrate learning through their 
fulfilment of a formal representative role in QMU, such as that of a student representative, or 
as a participant in a programme planning committee or review / validation event.  
 
3.28  In order to gain credit for a representative role, students must agree a learning contract with 
the relevant Programme Leader or Head of Division and completed in accordance with section 
3.21-3.26 above. 
 
4. 
REGISTRATION 
 
4.1 
The maximum time for which a student may be registered on an undergraduate programme 
shall be two years longer than the planned duration of the programme, except in the case of a 
programme of one year's planned duration, when the total maximum period of registration 
shall be two years. Any extensions to undergraduate and postgraduate programmes will be 
subject to approval by the Assistant Secretary (Registry and Academic Administration). 
 
4.2 
The minimum and maximum registration periods for standard taught postgraduate 
programmes are as follows: 
 
Programme 
Maximum period for 
Minimum period for completion 
completion 
Masters 
FT 
4 calendar years 
1 calendar year 
NFT 
7 calendar years 
2½  calendar years 
PgDip 
FT 
3 calendar years 
1 calendar year 
NFT 
5 calendar years 
2 calendar years 
PgCert 
FT 
2 calendar years 
1 semester  
NFT 
4 calendar years* 
1 calendar year  
 
 
* For example, if modules run in Semester 2 only and student takes one module a year, or if 
modules run in alternate years. 
 
 
However the Professional PgDips may take between 12 and 24 months depending on the 
requirements of the programme. Therefore suggested periods are: 
 
Programme 
Maximum period for 
Minimum period for 
completion 
completion 
Professional 
FT 
5 calendar years 
2 calendar years 
Masters 
NFT 
7 calendar years 
4 calendar years 
Professional PgDip  FT 
4 calendar years 
18-24 months 
NFT 
6 calendar years 
3 calendar years 
Professional 
FT 
18 months 
3 months 
Dissertation  NFT 
3 years 
1 year 
 
Principles: Students are allowed 1 year out and then 1 further year to complete. 
No programme may take longer than 7 years in total. 
Students should refer to the individual Programme Specification for details. 
215 
 

4.3 
A student's registration shall lapse if it is no longer possible for him/her to obtain an award 
within the maximum period of registration. The fact that the student has not yet completed 
the maximum period of registration shall not, in itself, entitle him/her to remain registered. 
 
4.4 
An award may be conferred subsequent to the expiry of the period of registration. 
 
4.5 
A student may apply for deferment of study either prior to entry, or after commencement of 
studies. Application should be made to the Programme Leader. 
 
4.6 
Once a student commences studies, deferment of studies will be permitted only where it 
remains possible for the student to obtain the relevant award within the maximum period of 
registration (see paragraph 4.1). 
 
4.7 
Only in exceptional circumstances will a student be permitted to re-enrol on the programme. 
This includes students who have been required, or have chosen, to withdraw from a 
programme, and who have not been granted a deferment of study.  Students who have 
voluntarily withdrawn may be re-admitted for a higher award through the University's normal 
admissions procedures. Students who have been required to withdraw may be re-admitted 
through the University's normal admissions procedures a minimum of one year after the 
decision of the Boards of Examiners. Students who indicate that they wish to exit with an 
Ordinary degree should apply directly to the Head of Division if they subsequently wish to 
proceed to an Honours degree. 
 
4.8 
Where the period of deferment of study begins during a level for which fees have been paid, 
no refund of such fees will normally be made. 
 
5. 
CONTINUATION OF REGISTRATION 
 
5.1 
Full-time undergraduate students are expected to register on modules rated to a total of 120 
Scottish degree credits in any academic year. They may with the agreement of the Programme 
Leader register on modules rated to a total of 100, 110, 130, 140 credits in one academic year. 
In exceptional circumstances, the Board of Examiners may recommend registration on up to 
160 credit points in cases where a student is required to carry forward modules. Further, with 
the additional agreement of the funding body, they may register on modules rated to a total 
of 80 or 90 credits. Students registering on modules rated to a total of 70 credits or fewer will 
for all purposes be considered as part-time students. 
 
5.2 
The selection of an individual programme of study is the ultimate responsibility of the student 
subject to: 
 
  the rules determining pre-requisites and co-requisites for modules; 
  the availability each year of modules, and their time-tabling; 
  the advice provided by staff. 
 
5.3 
The choice of a student's programme of study is determined by the regulations set out in the 
programme definitive document in terms of the compulsory modules and the pre-requisites. 
Boards of Examiners may advise on, but may not determine, a student's subsequent 
programme of study. 
 
216 
 

5.4 
A part-time student allowed to continue in registration and wishing to transfer to full-time 
study will have her or his application considered by the programme's Admissions Tutor. 
Transfer is not at the student's discretion. 
 
6. 
CHANGE OF STUDY PROGRAMME  
 
6.1 
Students may change their agreed programme of study. Such change requires the approval of 
the Programme Leader(s) and Module Co-ordinators.  This acts as a check that the student has 
a good reason for the change, the revised programme is still coherent, the necessary 
prerequisite qualifications are fulfilled, and that the registration period is still within the 
minimum and maximum allowed period.  
 
6.2 
If a student withdraws from a module before 25% of the taught duration has elapsed, he or 
she will be treated as never having been on the module.  No fee will be charged. 
 
6.3 
If a student wishes to withdraw from a module after 25% of the taught duration has elapsed 
he or she will be treated as having registered on the module and will be charged a fee. 
 
6.4 
A student withdrawing from a module after 25% of the taught duration has elapsed may 
provide the module co-ordinator with a written explanation of reasons for withdrawal.  If the 
module co-ordinator accepts these as valid extenuating circumstances, the student will suffer 
no academic penalty, i.e. the withdrawal will not count as a fail. The student will receive a 
transcript showing them as withdrawn and will receive no credit. 
 
6.5 
A student withdrawing from a module after 25% of the taught duration without providing 
evidence of extenuating circumstances will be recorded as a fail. 
 
6.6 
A student wishing to transfer from one elective module to another will normally be permitted 
to do so within the first 25% of the taught duration of the module subject to the consent of 
both Module Co-ordinators. Only exceptionally will students be permitted to transfer between 
elective modules after this period. 
 
6.7 
For the purpose of these regulations the term "module" is understood to cover all integrally 
assessed programme components, whether designed in a modular format or not, i.e. it includes 
projects and placements where these are assessed.   
 
6.8 
Applications from students wishing to follow a programme of study leading to a general award 
of MSc, MA, MBA, MFA, PgDip or PgCert will be vetted by the School Academic Board or by the 
Programme  Committee  to  ensure  that  the  chosen  programme  exhibits  relevance,  academic 
coherence, and has the  potential to lead to a dissertation in an area suitable to the  level of 
award, appropriate to the interests and expertise of staff. 
 
7. 
CHOICE OF STUDY PROGRAMME – POSTGRADUATE STUDY 
 
7.1 
Within the regulations set down for the Masters Programme overall and for particular awards, 
it is intended that the student will choose her/his own programme. 
 
7.2 
A  student's  choice  of  dissertation  is  subject  to  the  agreement  of  the  Programme 
Committee/Subject Area Panel and the dissertation supervisor. This agreement is given on the 
authority of the School Academic Board. 
 
217 
 

7.3 
The specific agreement of the School Academic Board is needed by a student who designs a 
study programme which is undefined in subject area content and which leads to the award of a 
general Masters degree (MFA, MSc or MA).  
 
7.4 
It is expected that students will choose programmes and modes of study appropriate to their 
own particular needs.  Students may register on individual modules without necessarily being 
required to register for an award, and they will be eligible for assessment and for an academic 
transcript of performance on the individual modules.   
 
8. 
ATTENDANCE 
 
8.1 
Undergraduate full time students are expected to register on 120 credits, in any one academic 
year. (See 5.1 above for further detail and exceptions.) 
 
8.2 
Undergraduate students studying 70 credits or less, or equivalent, will be governed by such of 
the University regulations as affect part time students. 
 
8.3 
Students are expected to attend all timetabled events associated with their programme of 
study and must comply with the requirements of the University Student Attendance Policy. 
 
8.4 
Individual programmes may require a more detailed attendance policy.  Attendance 
requirements for the satisfaction of a professional or registration body and on any modules 
should be clearly identified in the programme's student handbook.  Programme attendance 
policies should be developed in consultation with module co-ordinators, where modules are 
accessed by students from various programmes.  Students must acknowledge all attendance 
policies. 
 
9. 
ASSOCIATE STUDENTS 
 
9.1 
Students may be admitted to a module or modules or to a part of a programme as an 
Associate Student, without registering for an award. As with all other students their 
matriculation is undertaken by the University Secretary’s Group. 
 
9.2 
Where associate students are supplementary to an existing class and can be taught without 
the need for additional resources, approval for their admission will normally be given by the 
Head of Division responsible for the modules for which the students wish to register. 
However, where the number of associate students registered on a particular module is large, a 
special arrangement covering fees and additional resources for teaching and defined access to 
facilities on campus should be negotiated and agreed by the Dean of School.  Such 
arrangements will apply where a separate class is provided or where special provision is made 
for teaching off-campus. 
 
9.3 
It will normally be the responsibility of the module co-ordinator to ensure that associate 
students fulfil the pre-requisites of any module on which they are registered. 
 
9.4 
Associate students will follow the same curriculum and, if they wish to be assessed, they will 
be assessed in the same way as (and usually together with) students taking the module who 
are registered for an award. The same Board of Examiners shall, at the same meeting, 
consider the results of all students assessed for a given module. The grades achieved in the 
assessment will be recorded and students will be eligible for an academic transcript. 
 
218 
 

9.5 
Associate students have access to the same appeals, disciplinary and complaints procedures 
as other students. 
 
9.6 
The standard of the teaching will be assessed through the use of QMU teaching staff and the 
QMU Board of Examiners.  Should students use facilities in another establishment, the 
Programme Leader responsible for the module in QMU should lodge an affirmation with the 
Division of Governance and Quality Enhancement to the effect that the conditions and 
facilities are conducive to the proper pursuit of the module. 
 
9.7 
Associate students will normally be charged the fee for the module taken or a pro-rata fee in 
relation to the portion of a programme being followed, and have access to all the University 
facilities. 
 
9.8   A student can study as an ‘associate student’ for a maximum period of 2 years, or for 2 
modules. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
219 
 

23.   SMOKING POLICY 
 
1. 
Introduction 
 
 
Queen Margaret University aims to ensure the health, safety and welfare of its employees, 
students and visitors to its campus and to raise environmental standards. The purpose of this 
Policy is to ensure that all employees, students and visitors to the University are aware of its 
position on smoking.  
 
2. 
Principles 
 
Smoking is damaging to health and harmful to the environment. The University aims to 
provide a smoke-free environment for employees, students and visitors. 
 
The University as an employer has a duty to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the 
health, safety and welfare at work of all its employees under the Health and Safety at Work 
Act 1974. It has a duty to do all that is reasonably practicable to provide and maintain a 
working and learning environment that is safe for all, without risk to health and is adequate as 
regards facilities and arrangements for their welfare at work. It also has a duty to control the 
risks to people not in its employment which arise from the operation of its business. The 
University shall protect non-smokers from the risks to health from passive smoking and 
protect all users of the University’s premises and property from increased risk of fire. 
Reducing the number of potential sources of ignition can only assist in achieving this goal. 
 
 
As of the 26 May 2006 smoking was prohibited in all workplaces, in terms of the Smoking, 
Health and Social Care (Scotland) Act 2005. 
 
 
The law prohibits smoking in certain public places which are ‘wholly or substantially enclosed’, 
including the majority of workplaces. It is an offence to smoke in no smoking premises or to 
knowingly permit smoking in no smoking premises. The University faces a fixed penalty fine of 
£200 for allowing anyone to smoke on the premises and individuals can face a personal fine of 
£50 for smoking. Failure to pay or repeated offences can result in prosecution and a fine of 
£2,500. Vehicles used for business purposes are also be affected by the law.   
 
 
For the purpose of clarity the use of e-cigarettes is included in the definition of smoking 
 
3. 
Objectives 
 
 
This Policy has been developed with the following objectives in mind:- 
 
i. 
To protect all employees, students and visitors from exposure to second-hand smoke; 
ii. 
To assist compliance with the Smoking Health and Social Care (Scotland) Act 2005; 
iii. 
To reduce the risk of fire within the University; 
iv. 
To reflect a renewed emphasis on fire risk assessment in respect of potential harm 
caused by fire in the workplace as per the Fire (Scotland) Act 2005. 
220 
 

4. 
Scope 
 
 
This Policy applies to all employees, students and visitors to the University. 
 
5. 
Restriction on Smoking 
 
Smoking is only permitted within the designated smoking area.  
Smoking is prohibited in all other areas of the University and for the avoidance of doubt 
includes such areas as: 
 
  Within buildings 
  University Square 
  10 metres of any QMU building, 
  Paths, decking  and grassed areas within the University grounds 
  The car park 
  University vehicles 
 
6.  Breaches 
 
Persistent breaches of this Policy by staff and students could result in a disciplinary offence and 
may amount to misconduct in terms of the University’s disciplinary policy which could render 
the employee/student liable to a disciplinary. 
 
Any breaches of the policy by employees and students will be dealt with in accordance with the 
University’s disciplinary policy and procedures. 
 
Visitors in breach of this policy will be asked to leave the campus. 
 
7.  Further Information 
 
You can find more about smoking and obtain support if you are trying to give up from: 
 
  Your local GP 
  The Public Health Department and or your local NHS boards 
  Smokeline 0800 848484, this is a freephone counselling service provided to give help and 
advice to smokers who are trying to give up, or your can look on their web page 
http://www.canstopsmoking.com 
 
N.B. It is important to note that failure to comply with the Smoking, Health and Social Care 
(Scotland) Act 2005 is a criminal offence. Any individual in breach of the Act, including 
employees, students and visitors may be liable to a fixed penalty fine. Such fines are imposed by 
Environmental Health Officers who may conduct spot checks on the University premises. 
221 
 

24. STUDENT ATTENDANCE POLICY 
 
Introduction  
 
Providing  a  student  experience  of  the  highest  possible  quality  is  a  priority  for  Queen  Margaret 
University.  Promoting  and  encouraging  student  engagement  with  all  aspects  of  their  learning 
experience is a key aspect of this. This policy has been developed to provide a supportive learning 
environment of which student attendance is one aspect of overall engagement. The University needs 
to  be  able  to  record  the  attendance  of  students  at  timetabled  teaching  sessions  for  the  following 
reasons:  
 
a.  To aid the retention of students by allowing early identification of those students at risk and 
allow timely interventions to be made in terms of academic and personal support.  
 
b.  To comply with the requirements of the UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) under our Tier 4 
licence that requires us to record the attendance accurately of those students subject to visa 
restrictions so that an attendance return can be made within specified timescales required by 
the agency.  
 
c.  To  comply  with  the  requirements  of  the  Student  Awards  Agency  for  Scotland  (SAAS)  who 
require attendance confirmations to be made on a regular basis for those students who are in 
receipt of SAAS financial support. 
 
d.  To  enable  timely  notifications  of  withdrawals  and  deferrals  to  external  stakeholders  (e.g. 
UKVI, SAAS).  
 
e.  To meet the demand placed on the University to report absences to employers, Professional 
Statutory  Bodies,  or  other  sponsors  where  they  are  funding/partially  funding  programme 
tuition fees.  
 
Key Principles  
 
a.  Students are active participants in their learning experience and must take responsibility for 
achieving their potential through successful completion of each stage of their studies.  
 
b.  Recording attendance can provide an indication of student commitment, motivation and 
highlight any difficulties which need to be addressed.  
 
c.  Student welfare is a priority for Queen Margaret University. Schools will ensure that 
effective mechanisms are in place to both identify students considered to be at risk and 
offer appropriate academic and pastoral support and guidance. This may include advising 
students of alternative options for successful completion of their studies.  
 
d.  Regular attendance and academic achievement are closely linked. Students who regularly 
attend classes are more likely to enjoy a rewarding experience in which core skills and 
abilities, such as team-working, are developed.  
 
222 
 

e.  Attendance is a key component in student retention, progression and achievement.  
 
f.  Attendance develops attributes for employability – e.g. timekeeping, professional behaviour 
and responsibility  
 
g.  The University has a dual duty of care for Tier4 sponsored students in terms of providing 
appropriate support to international students studying here in the UK and fulfilling the 
reporting requirements of our UKVI licence.  
 
Student Responsibilities  
 
Students are responsible for:  
 
a.  Attending all timetabled learning/teaching sessions associated with their programme of study 
and ensuring they have their attendance recorded by swiping their student card against the 
card reader outside the relevant room. 
 
b.  Notifying in advance (e.g. using the Student Absence Form within the Portal) that they expect 
to  be  absent  from  timetabled  classes.  Reasons  may  include  authorised  absence  involving 
representation at University events or Students’ Union related activities. (Please see Appendix 
1 – Absence Policy) 
  
c.  Notifying any unforeseen absences from classes as soon as practically possible. 
  
d.  For absences lasting more than 5 days, submitting a medical certificate to the School Office 
(or other relevant evidence).  
 
e.  Ensuring that they check their Queen Margaret University email account on a regular basis for 
any formal notifications/communications.  
 
f.  Ensuring that they maintain up-to-date contact details via the Student Portal.  
 
g.  Making full use of any support mechanisms within the University which may help facilitate 
successful  completion of their  programme  e.g.  Personal  Academic  Tutor,  Student  Services, 
Effective Learning Service, Stay on Course 
 
Academic Staff Responsibilities 
 
Academic staff are responsible for:  
 
a.  Reminding students of the importance of attendance at learning and teaching sessions 
through induction and longitudinal induction activities.  
 
b.  Signposting ‘at risk’ students to support services available within the School or University 
e.g. the student’s Personal Academic Tutor, Student Services, Stay on Course, Effective 
Learning Service or International Office.  
 
 
 
 
223 
 

Programme Leaders, Personal Academic Tutors and School Manager Responsibilities  
 
Programme Leaders, Personal Academic Tutors and School Managers are responsible for ensuring 
that:  
 
a.  Regular reviews are taken of attendance/absence data and communications are made to ‘at 
risk’ students in a timely manner.  
 
b.  Appropriate systems are in place at School level for students to provide notification of planned 
absences or report any unexpected absences.  
 
c.  Authorised periods of absence should not exceed 4 weeks in total across the academic year. 
Students  who  request  extended  absence  beyond  4  weeks  may  be  required  to  defer  their 
studies. Any requests for extended periods of absence will be subject to Programme Leader 
approval and will depend on the nature of the programme delivery.  
 
d.  Data is reviewed for patterns of non-attendance and where appropriate referring students to 
their Personal Academic Tutor for discussions on reasons for pattern.  
 
e.  Students  are  informed  in  writing  of  the  importance  of  regular  attendance  at  learning  and 
teaching  sessions,  and  through  Programme  Handbooks  of  any  approved  programme  or 
module specific attendance requirements.  
 
f.  All students have access to a Personal Academic Tutor.  
 
g.  There are regular reviews of students’ progress on their programme, including attendance, 
completion  of  assessment  requirements  and  academic  achievement,  and  that  appropriate 
action is taken either to help students achieve their academic aims or, where students are 
failing to engage with the programme, provide appropriate guidance.  
 
h.  Students  are advised of the  support available to them, whether provided by the  School or 
central support.  
 
i.  In the case of the absence of a member of teaching staff, students are informed at the earliest 
opportunity of the alternative arrangements for the class.  
 
j.  Review the absence notification lists provided by the Administrator, and alert them to any 
students who may have provided confidential information to the Programme Leader or PAT 
as a reason for their absence.  
 
Action taken due to unsatisfactory attendance – Full-time and Part-time Undergraduate 
 

a.  A green-amber-red system is utilised in assessing the attendance percentage of each student.  
 
b.  Check  points  will  take  into  consideration  a  3  week  period  of  attendance  and  reviewed  in 
Academic Weeks 5, 8 and 11 in Semester 1; Weeks 22, 25, 28 in Semester 2.  
 
c.  The attendance percentage for each student calculated at these check points will align with 
either  a  green,  amber  or  red  communication.  The  PAT  and/or  Programme  Leader  will  be 
alerted  to  student  with  potential  attendance  concerns  and  students  will  be  contacted 
depending on the severity of their apparent non-attendance. In particular: 
224 
 

 
o  Green – mild lapse of attendance. Students falling into this category will be sent a 
communication recommending that they speak to their PAT, Stay on Course, or other 
source of pastoral support, if they deem this necessary or helpful.  
 
o  Amber - more serious lapse of attendance. Students falling into this category will be 
sent a communication directing them to speak to their PAT, and recommending other 
alternative sources of support.  
 
o  Red – Serious lapse in attendance. Students falling into this category will be sent a 
communication requiring that they speak to their PAT; they will be referred directly 
to Stay on Course and be required to improve their attendance before the next check 
point or be at risk of withdrawal. 
 
o  Students falling below any of these categories (i.e. those students who have 5% or 
less attendance) at the first check point will be investigated to ascertain their overall 
engagement.  This  will  include  looking  into  their  Hub  access,  their  contact  with 
Academic Staff, etc. If there is no satisfactory reason for their non-attendance, they 
will be withdrawn at that stage.   
 
o  Level 4  students will not  be  contacted  unless  this  is specifically  requested  by  their 
Programme Leader or PAT.  
 
o  Conversely,  beginning  study  on  a  new  Programme  is  a  crucial  time  for  students 
adjusting to University; this is particularly true for new Undergraduate students. As 
such, particular attention is paid to these students during their initial weeks at QMU. 
These students will be subject to additional weekly attendance reviews in the run up 
to the first check point. 
 
d.  Registry will inform relevant stakeholders of the student withdrawal. 
 
e.  Student IT accounts and Smartcards will be deactivated at this point.  
 
f.  All relevant communications and notes relating to attendance concerns must be maintained 
within the student’s record.  
 
Action taken due to unsatisfactory attendance –Taught Postgraduate 
 
Postgraduate students are required to register their attendance by swiping their student card against 
the card reader outside the relevant room of each timetabled teaching session. While the same check-
point  system  will  apply  to  Postgraduate  students,  they  will  only  be  communicated  with  if  their 
Programme Leader (PL) or Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) feels that this is necessary for the purpose 
of highlighting continued non-attendance. In some cases, students may be invited to attend a meeting 
to  discuss  their  attendance  with  either  their  PAT  or  PL,  and  will  be  offered  a  range  of  support 
mechanisms  to  help  them  return  to  the  expected  level  of  attendance.  As  with  Undergraduate 
students, extremely low or continued non-attendance and a failure to engage with communications 
or any other aspect of their Taught Programme may result in withdrawal from the institution.  
 
 
 
 
225 
 

 
Programme Specific Requirements  
 
Due  to  the  diversity  of  programmes  delivered  at  QMU,  there  will  be  a  number  of 
Professional/Statutory  body  requirements  with  respect  to  attendance.  Where  programmes  must 
conform  to  such  requirements,  these  should  be  clearly  communicated  to  students.  Where 
programmes implement their own timeframes, these must not be longer than the timeframes detailed 
within this policy.  
 
Tier 4 Sponsored Students  
 
In addition to attending classes, International Students who do not have indefinite leave to remain 
within the UK (e.g. on a Tier 4 student visa) must attend on a monthly basis, sign-in sessions at the 
Registry Information Point, during which a student’s contact details and address will be confirmed. 
When considering an application for a CAS extension, or a CAS in cases where international students 
with a non-Tier 4 visa wishes to switch to Tier 4, a student’s attendance record may be taken into 
account when a decision is made about whether a CAS will be issued or not.  
 
Placement Activities 
 
 
Students who undertake a placement as part of their programme are responsible for ensuring that 
their  attendance  matches  the  requirements  of  the  placement  provider.  Placement  providers  will 
inform the University if a student is failing to maintain a good attendance record, which may lead to 
the students being withdrawn from the placement activity and potentially from their programme of 
study. Additionally, Professional Bodies may specify requirements for placement attendance which 
must  be  adhered  to.  Any  Professional  Body  requirements  will  be  detailed  in  the  relevant  Student 
Programme Handbook.  
 
Formal Examinations and Coursework  
 
Students  are  expected  to  attend  all  necessary  formal  examinations  and  submit  coursework  by 
published submission dates. Students who fail to attend a scheduled formal examination or submit a 
piece  of  coursework  (where  no  approved  extension  has  been  granted),  will  be  marked  as  a  non-
submission.  
 
Student Fraud  
 
Student must only record themselves as present at a learning/teaching session. Where students are 
identified as having fraudulently recorded the attendance of another student in their absence, then 
both parties will be subject to the University’s student discipline procedure.  
 
Appeals Process 
 
Any  student  who  has  been  required  to  withdraw  due  to  non-attendance  is  entitled  to  appeal  the 
decision through the normal University academic appeals procedure. Students who wish to appeal 
must do so within 21 days of receiving notification of withdrawal.  
 
updated August 2018 
 
 
 

226 
 

25. STUDENT ABSENCE POLICY  
 
This Policy on Student Absence applies to all undergraduate and postgraduate taught students. The 
University considers student welfare as a priority and recognises the importance of a student’s health 
and wellbeing in relation to their academic progression and wider university experience. This policy 
has been developed to provide clear guidance on student absence with a view to reduce the impact 
of absence on academic study.  
 
1. 
Definitions  
 
1.1 

Students are absent if: 
 
a. 
they do not attend a teaching session that is on their personalised timetable 
b. 
they do not attend an examination 
c. 
they do not attend any part of a placement 
d. 
they  do  not  attend  planned  activity  relating  to  the  learning  experiences  of  the  module,  for 
example fieldtrips, site visits, rehearsals and conferences. 
 
1.2 

 A  Teaching  Session  is  any  timetabled  learning  and  teaching  session.  It  includes  lectures, 
seminars, practical and computer workshops. 
 
1.3 
Notified Absence. The reasons for absence can include the following: 
a.  Illness 
b.  Personal (including Compassionate Leave) 
c.  Sport 
d.  Adverse Weather 
e.  Study Leave 
 
1.4 
Unauthorised Absence is where the reason for non-attendance is unknown. 
 
1.5 

A Self-Certified Absence is a period of absence that is no longer than seven consecutive days2, 
excluding periods of assessment or examinations. No supporting documentation is required. 
 
 
2. 
Attendance Requirements 
 
 
The Attendance Policy states the University’s attendance requirements.  
 
 
                                                           
2 Seven consecutive days includes weekends (for example Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday and 
Tuesday) 
227 
 

 
2.1.  Students are responsible for: 
 

a. 
Attending all timetabled learning/teaching sessions associated with their programme of 
study and ensuring they have their attendance recorded. 
b. 
Notifying absence in advance using the automated on-line absence form in the Student 
Portal. Reasons may include authorised absence involving representation at University 
events or Students’ Union related activities. 
c. 
Notifying any unforeseen absences from classes as soon as practically possible using the 
automated on-line absence form in the Student Portal. Notification of absence will only 
be recorded up to 5 working days after the last date of absence. 
d. 
For  absences  lasting  more  than  5  working  days,  attach  a  medical  certificate  to  the 
automated on-line absence form in the Student Portal. 
 
2.2.  In relation to Formal Examinations and Coursework the following applies: 
 
a. 
Students  are  expected  to  attend  all  necessary  formal  examinations  and  submit 
coursework by published submission dates. 
b. 
Students  who  fail  to  attend  a  scheduled  formal  examination  or  submit  a  piece  of 
coursework (where no approved extension has been granted), will be marked as a non-
submission. 
 
2.3.  Programme Specific Requirements 
 
a. 
Due  to  the  diversity  of  programmes  delivered  at  QMU,  there  will  be  a  number  of 
Professional/Statutory body requirements with respect to attendance. 
b. 
Where  programmes  must  conform  to  such  requirements,  these  should  be  clearly 
communicated to students.  
 
2.4.  Placement Activities 
 
a. 
Students  who  undertake  a  placement  as  part  of  their  programme  are  responsible  for 
ensuring  that  their  attendance  matches  the  requirements  of  the  placement  provider. 
Placement providers will inform the University if a student is failing to maintain a good 
attendance record, which may lead to the students being withdrawn from the placement 
activity and potentially from their programme of study. 
b. 
Professional Bodies may specify requirements for placement attendance which must be 
adhered to. Any Professional Body requirements will be detailed in the relevant Student 
Programme Handbook. 
 
3. 
Notification of Absences 
 
3.1.  Students  must  provide  notification  of  their  absence  using  the  automated  on-line  Student 
Absence Form in the Student Portal and provide evidence where necessary, as detailed below: 
228 
 

a.  Absent for a period of more than seven consecutive days, a Medical Certificate3 or other 
appropriate documentation4 must be provided. 
b.  Absent 
for 
less 
than 
seven 
consecutive 
days 
covering 
periods 
of 
assessments/examinations,  a  Medical  Certificate5  or  other  appropriate  documentation6 
must be provided.   
c.  Absent  for  less than seven consecutive days  and teaching events have  been missed, the 
student can self-certify the absence. 
 
3.2.  Planned Absence 
 
a. 
The notification of absence should be provided in advance where the absence is planned, 
for  example  to  attend  a  funeral  or  represent  the  University  in  an  official  event. 
Notification of absence will only be recorded up to 5 working days after the last date of 
absence. 
b. 
The student is expected to complete the automated on-line Student Absence Form in the 
Student Portal; this will be forwarded to the Programme Leader.  
 
3.3.  Unexpected Absence 
 
a. 
Where  advance  notification  is  not  possible,  for  example  in  the  event  of  illness,  it  is 
expected  that  the  student  will  inform  the  University  as  soon  as  practically  possible. 
Notification of absence will only be recorded up to 5 working days after the last date of 
absence. 
b. 
Where the University does not receive notification of the reason for unexpected absence 
then the absence will be recorded within the attendance monitoring process and may 
trigger a notification to be sent as detailed in the attendance policy. 
 
3.4.  Absence from Placement 
 
a. 
Students  must  inform  both  the  Placement  provider  contact  and  the  University  of  any 
absences whilst on placement. 
b. 
There  are  a  number  of  programme  specific  requirements  regarding  placement  hours, 
some  programmes  require  hours  to  be  made  up  at  another  time.  Please  refer  to  the 
relevant programme handbook.   
 
4.  Recording of Absences 
 
4.1.  Student absences will be logged within the Student Record System.  
 
                                                           
3 Students should note that, in accordance with guidance from the Scottish Executive Health Department, medical practitioners 
may charge a fee for the provision of medical certificates. 
4Appropriate documentation includes, a medical report, a note from a hospital, a formal notification of a hospital or clinic 
appointment, evidence from a member of staff who was alerted to the circumstances at the time, a letter from the student 
counsellor or other professional that the student consulted during the period when difficulties occurred or a note from the police. 
5 See 2 above. 
6 See 3 above. 
229 
 

4.2.  Approved absence will be recorded as authorised with one of the following reasons:  
a.  Illness 
b.  Personal (including Compassionate Leave) 
c.  Sport 
d.  Adverse Weather 
e.  Study Leave 
 
4.3.  The  absence  is  recorded  as  unauthorised  where  there  is  no  advanced  notification or known 
reason.   
 
4.4.  The  attendance  monitoring  system  will  log  any  absence  from  a  scheduled  teaching/learning 
event and record this in the student record system as an unauthorised absence.  
 
4.5.  Absence whilst on placement will be logged by the placement provider and the University. The 
placement provider will send notification of the total attendance hours to the University for 
logging.   
 
4.6.  A record of Placement Hours, including any absence, will be held electronically in the placement 
database and a hard copy in the Student File. 
 
5. 
Periods of Absence 
 
5.1.  Student  absence  will  be  monitored  as  part  of  the  attendance  monitoring  process.  When 
minimum  attendance  requirements  are  breached,  as  stated  in  the  attendance  policy,  the 
student  will  receive  correspondence  from  the  University  highlighting  their  absence  and  any 
necessary action required. 
 
5.2.  Authorised periods of absence should not exceed 4 weeks in total across the academic year. 
Students  who  request  extended  absence  beyond  4  weeks  may  be  required  to  defer  their 
studies. Any requests for extended periods of absence  will be  subject  to Programme Leader 
approval and will depend on the nature of the programme delivery. 
 
5.3.  The  student  has  the  responsibility  to  contact  the  appropriate  staff  members  (usually  the 
Module Coordinator) as soon as possible to determine: 
 
a.  If there are any alternative arrangements to compensate for missed work or assessment 
b.  If any remedial work is required 
 
5.4.  Patterns of absence will be reviewed by the Personal Academic Tutor (PAT) and Programme 
Leader,  as  stated  in  the  Attendance  Policy.  Students  who  have  breached  the  minimum 
attendance  levels  will be  asked to meet with their PAT or Programme Leader to discuss the 
absences. 
 
 
230 
 

6. 
Support Available 
 
 
The University understands that students may benefit from support and guidance to help them 
deal with any issues contributing to low level of attendance. There are a number of support 
services available to assist students. 
 
6.1.  Effective  Learning  Service  (ELS)  provides  guidance  and  support  for  all  students  wishing  to 
develop their study and learning skills. 
 
6.2.  Personal Academic Tutors (PATs) will act as a facilitator and ‘mentor’ to the student whilst at 
the  University,  encouraging  the  student  to  optimise  their  learning  opportunities.  The  PAT  is 
expected to refer students to other appropriate agencies and fully trained staff either within 
the University or elsewhere for support and resolution of issues of concern. 
 
6.3.  The School Office is responsible for supporting staff and students, administering programmes 
of study, placements, and clinics.  
 
6.4.  Student  Services  is a professional support department  working to ensure students have  the 
information,  advice,  guidance  and  opportunities  necessary  to  support  their  successful 
experience and achievement whilst studying at QMU.  
 
a. 
Counsellor,  xxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
b. 
Student Finance Adviser, xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
c. 
Disability Adviser, xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
d. 
Jobshop Co-ordinator - xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
e. 
Wellbeing Adviser xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
 
6.5.  The  Students'  Union  is  a  volunteer  lead  organisation  specialising  in  enhancing  the  student 
experience providing advice and support, xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
 
6.6.  Thinking of Leaving? If you are considering transferring to another programme, taking a year 
out or perhaps leaving university altogether, it is very important that you are able to understand 
and consider all of your options before you make a decision. Information is available on the 
following website https://www.qmu.ac.uk/current-students/thinking-of-leaving/ 
 
 
May 2014 
Updated January 2016 
Updated September 2017 
 
 
231 
 

26. STUDENT DEBT RECOVERY PROCEDURE 
 
Introduction 
 
This procedure relates to all fees and charges payable to the University by current and former 
students for the use of its facilities and the provision of its services. This includes monies owed in 
respect of tuition, accommodation, assessment, graduation, library and other miscellaneous fees 
and charges. 
 
The University will at all times seek to be sympathetic to, and understanding of, each individual 
student’s financial circumstances. However, to enable the University to do so, students must engage 
in dialogue with officers of the University if financial difficulties are being experienced. Students who 
are experiencing financial difficulties may seek help and advice from the Students’ Union or from 
Student Services at xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
 
Action to enforce settlement of debt for outstanding fees and charges will be taken in respect of all 
current and former students who have failed to engage with the University to find a solution to any 
outstanding debt, or who have failed to honour agreements to pay. 
 
Student Tuition Fees  
 
  Tuition fees are due at the start of the programme. Tuition fee payment options are as follows:-        
 
(i)     in full on commencement of study (or earlier).  
(ii)     by 8 monthly direct debit payments, normally from October to May (incl). 
(iii)     by 8 monthly debit/credit card recurring payment from October to May (incl). 
(iv)     in full 21 days from the date of invoice 
 
 
If for any reason the amount of fees is not known at the time of commencement of study, 
payment is due in full 21 days from the date of invoice, or by direct debit/recurring payments 
provided payments are completed by May. 
 
All returning students are reminded that they must set-up a new direct debit/recurring 
payment arrangement for each Academic Year. 
 
  Tuition fees may be paid by direct debit or recurring payment instalments over a maximum of 
eight months from the commencement of the programme. For students commencing 
programmes at the start of the academic year, instalment payments will normally be due from 
October to May inclusive. Late direct debit/recurring payment  arrangements still require all 
payments to be completed by May. For students who commence programmes at other points 
during the academic year, details of payment dates will be advised. Failure to keep direct 
debit/recurring  payments continuing will result in the remaining balance being due for 
immediate payment.   
 
232 
 

  Self-funding students who have a net tuition fee amount payable of £9,000 or more are eligible 
for a 5% discount on the fee payable, provided they settle in full prior to 31 October or within 7 
days from the date of invoice, whichever is the later. The discount will be calculated at 5% of the 
net fee payable (i.e. after any scholarship). 
 
  A debt is deemed overdue when at the expiry of 21 days from the date of invoice, no payment 
has been received in full nor have direct debit/recurring payment  arrangements been put in 
place.   
 
  When a tuition fee debt becomes overdue, Finance staff will instigate a series of actions as 
follows : 
 
(i) 
1st reminder letter asking the student to contact the Finance Office immediately to pay the 
fee due or to make arrangements to pay. 
 
(ii) 
if there is no response to the 1st reminder letter within 7 days of issue, a 2nd reminder 
letter is sent giving the student 7 days to contact the Finance Office. 
 
(iii)  if there is no response to the 2nd reminder within the 7 days provided for response, the 
student’s Smartcard will be deactivated, thus removing the student’s ability to access the 
building and its facilities/services. 
 
(iv) 
at the same time as the Smartcard is deactivated, a third letter, headed FINAL DEMAND 
will be sent, advising the student that their Smartcard has been deactivated and that 
failure to contact the Finance Office within a further 7 days will result in the debt being 
referred to a debt recovery agency (which incurs additional recovery charges that will be 
charged to the student). Where a student’s debt requires to be sent to a debt recovery 
agency, the student may be required to withdraw from their programme. 
 
(v) 
Should a direct debit/recurring payment be cancelled prior to the expiry date or no 
payment received on the due date, the full remaining debt becomes immediately due. 
Smartcards will be disabled after 7 days  until the debt is either (a) paid in full or (b) 
alternative payment arrangements put in place. After a further 7 days if the debt remains 
unpaid or no alternative arrangements have been put in place the full debt will be passed 
to our Debt Collectors for action. 
 
  It should be noted that academic tutors are not empowered to vary fees nor to agree payment 
schedules with students on behalf of the university. All questions regarding payment of fees must 
be addressed to the Finance Office in the first instance. 

 
  As the main object of the reminder letters is to make contact with the student, in addition to 
these hard copy reminder letters, Finance staff will also send e-mail reminders and/or text 
messages and will also attempt to make telephone contact with the student as appropriate. The 
University reserves the right to use all contact details provided by the student. It is the 
responsibility of students to ensure that the University is provided with current contact details. 
233 
 

Student Accommodation Fees 
 
Accommodation fee deposits are payable when reserving the room. 
 
Payment options for accommodation fees are as follows:- 
 
(i) 
   in full on arrival, or at any time prior to arrival; 
(ii) 
   1st Semester on or before arrival, with 2nd Semester by first week in January; 
(iii) 
   by 8 monthly direct debit payments from October to May (incl); 
(iv)        by 8 monthly debit/credit card recurring payments October to May (incl). 
 
An accommodation debt is deemed overdue when, at the expiry of 21 days from the date of invoice, 
no payment has been received, either in full or for the first semester, or no direct debit/recurring 
payment  has been set-up.   
 
When an accommodation debt becomes overdue, Finance staff will instigate a series of actions as 
follows: 
 
(i) 
1st reminder letter asking the student to contact the Finance Office immediately to pay the 
fee due or to make arrangements to pay. 
 
(ii) 
If there is no response to the 1st reminder letter within 7 days of issue, a 2nd reminder letter 
is sent giving the student 7 days to contact Finance. 
 
(iii) 
If there is no response to the 2nd reminder a letter will be issued to the student’s Guarantor 
requesting the money be paid immediately. The student will also receive a FINAL DEMAND 
and may be served notice to vacate their room, in accordance with the provisions of the 
lease agreement. 
 
(iv) 
If no response is received to the final demand or from the guarantor, the debt will be 
referred to a debt recovery agency. 
 
(v) 
Should a direct debit/recurring payment be cancelled prior to the expiry date or no payment 
received on the due date, the full remaining debt becomes immediately due.   
 
(vi) 
Guarantors will be written to after 7 days  requesting the balance to be paid in full. After a 
further 7 days if the debt remains unpaid or no alternative arrangements have been put in 
place the full debt will be passed to our Debt Collectors for action 
   
Accommodation deposits will be used to off-set any room damages and/or existing debts. 
 
 

 
234 
 

Other debts 
 
Other debts include (but are not restricted to) Library debts and fines, late payment charges, sports 
membership fees, assessment fees and graduation fees. Similar procedures relating to the issuing of 
reminders and, ultimately if necessary, referral to a debt recovery agency, will apply to these types 
of debt. 
 
Student Progression and Graduation 
 
No student will be allowed to progress to the next year of his or her programme nor be allowed to 
attend any Graduation Ceremony if they have any outstanding tuition fee debt to the University. 
This is in accordance with the Student Regulations. Also in accordance with the Student Loan 
Company regulations, loan cheques are not able to be released for the following year’s loan until the 
student has matriculated (i.e. all prior year tuition fee debts have been settled). 
 
Director of Operations and Finance 
April 2010  
(Updated July 2012) 
 
 
235 
 

27. SUBMISSION PROCEDURES  
Submissions 
The following procedure applies to the submission by students of work for assessment or re-
assessment. 
 
You are required to submit one electronic copy of all assessment and reassessment work.  The 
electronic copy should be submitted through the Assignment Dropbox in the module site on 
HUB@QMU.  Any alternative submission arrangements will be communicated to you by the module 
co-ordinator.   
 
Hard copies of assessments will be required for dissertations, artefacts and group based work. The 
hard copy should be submitted to the designated School submission box (located opposite the 
School Office reception desk) and should be accompanied by a cover sheet (which can be found on 
the QMU Student Portal).  
 
Submissions must be received on or before the required deadline. The date and time of your 
electronic copy submission will be used to ensure your work is submitted on time.  
  
 

 
236 
 

28.  WITHDRAWAL & DEFERRAL 
 
How to Withdraw 
 
If you decide to leave, you will need to complete a withdrawal form. This is used to formally record 
your withdrawal and update your student record. The date of withdrawal is recorded as the date the 
form is submitted. This can be important if you receive any funding for your programme or pay any 
fees.  
 
You can complete the form electronically and return it to xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx. Remember 
to save a copy of the form on your computer first before filling it in. 
 
A member of staff of the Registry will then update your student record. The Programme Leader, the 
School Office and any other relevant departments are notified.  
 
Take a Break from Study (Deferral)  
 
Students can submit a request to defer their studies. This means leaving the programme and 
returning at a later date, normally the start of the next academic year. Deferrals must be approved 
by the Programme Leader and are normally granted for a maximum period of 12 months.  
 
If you decide to apply for a deferral you should read the Student Deferral Procedure and discuss your 
request with your Programme Leader. Once you have done this, you should complete the Deferral 
Request Form.
 Remember to save a copy of the form on your computer first before filling it in. 
 
If you have any questions about the withdrawal or deferral process you can also contact the Thinking 
of Leaving team. 

  
 
237