This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Request for JSP 800 and associated documents relating to UK Rail Travel and First Class Exemptions'.


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
JSP 800 - Defence Movement and Transport 
Regulations 
 
Volume 3 
 
Movement of Materiel 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
JSP 800, Vol 3, Pt 1 (V4.0 Oct 18) 
 
JSP 800, Vol 3 – Movement of Materiel  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(V1.0 May 14) 

 
 
FOREWORD 
 
In supporting Defence, the Assistant Chief of Defence Staff (ACDS) Logistic Operations (Log Ops) 
is responsible for providing clear, timely and expert logistics direction and guidance in support of 
departmental plans, current and contingent operations. In addition, he is responsible for bringing 
coherence to the development of logistics policy; in order to maximise the freedom of action for 
operational commanders and to assure the E2E Logistics Enterprise.  
 
Joint Service Publication 800 (JSP 800) sets out the overarching policy for MOD Transportation 
(Movements and Transport (M&T)), to meet our statutory obligations and the directed policy of the 
Secretary of State (SofS) for Defence. The policy also contributes towards the assurance and 
delivery of the MOD’s duty of care, both to our own people and to the general public.  
 
This JSP provides direction on mandatory requirements (Part 1) and guidance on how this can be 
achieved (Part 2). Commanders and managers at all levels are to ensure compliance with the 
directives herein. Where questions exist as to the application of the directives, or guidance on 
individual circumstances is required, the assistance of specialist (i.e. Suitably Qualified and 
Experienced Personnel (SQEP)) Movements and Transport staff within the Chain of Command (Ch 
of Comd) is to be sought. 
 
 
Major General Angus Fay CB 
Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff (Logistic Operations) 
 
 

JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
PREFACE 
Joint Service Publication (JSP) 800 – Defence Movements and Transport Regulations lays down 
the regulations, standards and guidance for the safe conduct and management of Movement and 
Transport (M&T) activities across defence and is to be used by all members of the MOD, both 
military and Civil Service.  It does not replace legislative obligations and full reference is to be 
made to national and international regulation and legislation and where applicable host nation 
requirements.  Deliberately written in plain English, the publication avoids the use of 'legal jargon' 
but provides full references where applicable.    
M&T activities affect everyone within the MOD in some way, whether as a service provider seeking 
to ensure the cost-effective delivery of transport support, or as a customer using the resources 
made available.  The pace of change has increased dramatically in recent times, and this, 
combined with the increased use of contractors and changes to legislation has resulted in 
significant amendments to M&T policy, especially in areas involving health and safety.    
When conducting any M&T activity all personnel must give full consideration to:  
• 
the management of risk in order to create a safe working environment,   
• 
appropriate adjustments to procedures and working practises to take into account the 
working environment, complexity of the task and competence of the personnel involved,   
• 
the potential for injury to persons, damage to the environment and possible legal 
consequences which might result from actions conducted during the activity.    
Previously, JSP 800 comprised 8 volumes. Recent changes to the M&T policy have resulted in the 
structure shown below  Each volume of the JSP gives full contact details for the provision of 
guidance and additional information or assistance on the interpretation of any given part.    
Structure  
JSP 800 
Defence Movements & Transport Regulations 
Governance and Safety Assurance replaced by M & T 
Volume 1 
Defence Safety Authority 02 Regulations 
Volume 2 
Passenger Travel Instructions 
Volume 3 
Movement of Materiel 
 
Part 1 – Regulations and Defence Codes of Practice 
 
Part 2 – Policy 
 
Part 3 – Guidance 
Volume 4A 
Replaced by Dangerous Goods Manual 
Volume 4B 
Replaced by Dangerous Goods Manual 
Volume 5 
Road Transport Regulations 
Volume 6 
Container Management Regulations 
Volume 7 
Load Safety Regulations & Tie Down Schemes 
ii 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT 
JSP 800, Volume 3 Structure 
1. 
This Volume is published in 3 distinct parts: 
a.  
Part 1 – Movement of Materiel Regulations.  Part 1 details the MOD’s regulations 
concerning the movement of materiel.  The regulations in Part 1 are mandatory and full 
compliance is required.  The Defence Codes of Practice (DCoPs) have been transferred to 
the Movement and Transport Safety Regulator (MTSR) and can be found here. Part 1 
includes: 
(1)   The requirement to comply fully with national and international legislation. 
(2)   Roles and responsibilities of organisations involved in both the planning and 
execution of the movement of materiel. 
(3)   Requirements for the provision of movement information and all associated 
safety details. 
(4)   The employment of SQEP. 
b.  
Part 2 – Policy.  Part 2 provides the MOD rules for compliance with the regulations for 
the movement of materiel by all modes of transport.  To ensure pan defence standards, 
compliance with some elements of Part 2 is mandated, these can be identified by the use of 
“modal verbs” (Wil , Shal , Must) 
c.  
Part 3 – Guidance.  Part 3 provides guidance and information to assist users 
understand and achieve the minimum standards required for the movement of materiel. 
Points of Contact 
2. 
The author of this publication is: 
SO2 Mov Tpt 1  
Defence Logistics 
Neighbourhood 2, Larch 3B (#2317), MOD Abbey Wood, Bristol, BS34 8JH  
  
Tel: Mil: 9679 87460 or Civ: 030679 87460  
E-Mail: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx.  
 
3. 
Enquiries relating to the content of this JSP should be directed in the first instance through 
your HQ M&T staff prior to contacting the author. 
 
Amendments 
4. 
The JSP is reviewed on a regular basis for accuracy; any proposed amendments to this JSP 
should be submitted through the document Author.  This JSP is a live document and amendments 
to both the policy and the database may be published at any time in response to legislation, MOD 
policy and/or information which identifies the requirement for review.   
Copyright 
5. 
JSP 800, Vol 3 is protected by crown copyright and the intellectual property rights of this 
publication belong exclusively to the MOD.  Material or information contained in this publication can 
be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form, provided it is used for the 
purpose of furthering safety and environmental assurance. 
iii 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Status 
6. 
Any hard copies or remotely stored electronic copies of JSP 800, Vol 3 are uncontrolled.  
The master copy hosted on the Defence Logistics (Def Log) M&T website on the Defence Intranet 
will be updated whenever relevant changes to regulations or standards occur.   
Record of Changes 
7. 
The following changes have been made in the refreshed Vol 3, associated Leaflets (Lft) and 
Guidance Leaflets (GLft). A full list of all amendments contained within V4.0 can be found via the 
Defence Movements and Transport Policy Home Page. 
 
JSP 800 Vol 3 
Para 
Details of Change 
Contact details, organisation, references, customs procedures 
All (incl Lfts) 
All 
updated. 
Part 1 - Direction 
Foreword 
Updated. 
Minor amendments; improved consistency with MTSR 
Glossary 
 
definitions. 
DCoP 1 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
DCoP 2 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
DCoP 3 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
2017DIN06-024 (Container Weighing Verification) 
DCoP 4 
All 
incorporated into DCoP. Content transferred to MTSR. 
DCoP 5 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, Sec 2.3 

Appropriate training for vehicle marshallers added. 
43 
INCOTERMS – content deleted; superseded by Defence 
Pt 2, Sec 2.3 
Ann A 
Conditions. 
Pt 2, Sec 2.3.5 
22 – 26 
Weighing of Containers methods added. 
Ann A 
Ann B 
Movement by Container Planning Guidance added. Created 
Pt 2, Sec 2.3.5 
Ann C 
from JSP 800 Vol 6 Pt Ch 2, Ch 4 and Ch 7. 
Ann D 
Planning for Inland Waterway Movement placeholder 
Pt 2, Sec 2.3.6 
All 
removed. 
Ann A 
Ann B 
Execution of Movement by Container Guidance added. 
Pt 2, Sec 2.4.5 
Ann C 
Created from JSP 800 Vol 6 Pt Ch 2, Ch 4 and Ch 7. 
Ann D 
Execution of Inland Waterway Movement placeholder 
Pt 2, Sec 2.4.6 
All 
removed. 
Pt 2, Lft 2 
Various 
Revised process. 
Pt 2, Lft 4 
Various 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 5 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Movement of private shotguns / firearms policy added. STOP 
Pt 2, Lft 7 
Various 
PRESS (SP) 29-16 Recording of Weapons for Tpt 
incorporated. Lft revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 8 
Various 
Content reduced to limit duplication with DIN. 
Definition of Precious Consignments added. Reference to 
Pt 2, Lft 9 
3b 
attractive items removed. 
Pt, Lft 10 
29 
Amended Classified Mail guidance relating to SHOAC. 
Pt 2, Lft 11 
 
Content reduced to limit duplication with JSP 800 Vol 5. 
Pt 2, Lft 15 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 16 
All 
Revised 
Pt 2, Lft 17 
All 
Revised. 
iv 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Pt 2, Lft 18 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 19 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 20 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 21 
All 
Revised. 
Full update and expansion of customs procedures and 
Pt 2, Lft 22 
All 
guidance. 
Pt 2, Lft 24 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 25 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 26 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 27 
All 
Removed – duplication with DIN. 
Pt 2, Lft 28 
All 
Removed – duplication with DIN. 
Pt 2, Lft 29 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, Lft 30 
All 
Revised. 
Pt 2, GLft 2 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
SP 36-16 Special Handling Codes added; signatory 
Pt 2, GLft 3 
All 
requirements updated (SP 12-17); customs guidance updated; 
usage guidance updated. 
Added reference to Special Handling Codes (SP 36-16) now 
Pt 2, GLft 4 
All 
contained within GLft 3. Signatory requirements updated (SP 
12-17); usage guidance updated. 
Pt 2, GLft 5 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, GLt 7 
 
Minor amendment; NEM replaces NEQ. 
Pt 2, GLft 8 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, GLft10 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, GLft 11 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, GLft 13 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, GLft 14 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, GLft 15 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, GLft 16 
All 
Content transferred to MTSR. 
Pt 2, GLft 18 
All 
Fields added 
Pt 2, GLft 21 
All 
Fields added. 
 
 

JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
JSP 800, VOLUME 3 – MOVEMENT OF MATERIEL 
CONTENTS 
PART 1 – Regulations ..................................................................................................................... i 
Foreword ..................................................................................................................... i 
Preface ........................................................................................................................ ii 
Document Management ............................................................................................. iii 
Points of Contact ............................................................................................. iii 
Record of Changes ......................................................................................... iv 
Contents ..................................................................................................................... vi 
Section 1 – Introduction to the Regulations ............................................................................... 1.1-1 
Section 2 – Movement of Materiel Regulations ......................................................................... 1.2-1 
 
Annex A: Movement of Materiel Exemptions ........................................................ 1.2-A-1 
 
PART 2 – Policy........................................................................................................................ 2.1-1 
Section 1 – Movement of Materiel General ............................................................................... 2.1-1 
Section 2 – Movement Organisations ........................................................................................ 2.2-1 
 
Annex A: Controlling Movement Authorities ......................................................... 2.2-A-1 
Section 3 – Planning for Movement .......................................................................................... 2.3-1 
 
2.3.1: Planning for Road Movement ..................................................................... 2.3.1-1 
 
2.3.2: Planning for Rail Movement ....................................................................... 2.3.2-1 
 
2.3.3: Planning for Air Movement ......................................................................... 2.3.3-1 
 
2.3.4: Planning for Sea Movement ....................................................................... 2.3.4-1 
 
2.3.5: Planning for Container Movement .............................................................. 2.3.5-1 
 
Annex A: Movement by Container Planning Guidance ...................................... 2.3.5-A-1 
 
Annex B: Container Bidding Procedure for MOD Owned Containers ................ 2.3.5-B-1 
 
Annex C: Container Request Procedure for Contract Hire Containers ............. 2.3.5-C-1 
 
Annex D: ISO Container Booking Form ........................................................... 2.3.5-D-1 
Section 4 – Execution of Movement .......................................................................................... 2.4-1 
 
2.4.1: Execution of Road Movement .................................................................... 2.4.1-1 
 
2.4.2: Execution of Rail Movement....................................................................... 2.4.2-1 
 
2.4.3: Execution of Air Movement ........................................................................ 2.4.3-1 
 
2.4.4: Execution of Sea Movement ...................................................................... 2.4.4-1 
 
2.4.5: Execution of Container Movement ............................................................. 2.4.5-1 
 
Annex A: Execution of Movement by Container Guidance ................................ 2.4.5-A-1 
 
Annex B: Return of Empty MOD Containers ..................................................... 2.4.5-B-1 
 
Annex C: Return of Empty Civilian Leased Containers .................................... 2.4.5-C-1 
 
Annex D: Purchases and Write-Off Action ....................................................... 2.4.5-D-1 
Section 4 – Leaflets .................................................................................................................. 2.5-1 
 
PART 3 – Guidance .................................................................................................................. 3.1-1 
Section 1 – Guidance Leaflets .................................................................................................. 3.1-1 
 
 
vi 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
PART 1 
MOVEMENT OF MATERIEL REGULATIONS 
SECTION 1.1 – INTRODUCTION TO THE REGULATIONS 
Introduction 
1. 
This JSP is part of the suite of JSP 800 publications specific to all Movement and Transport 
(M&T) activity across Defence.  The overarching standards for governance and assurance for all 
M&T activity are contained in in Defence Safety Authority 02 Regulations.  
2. 
This JSP is applicable to all MOD personnel, MOD contractors and partners involved in the 
movement of materiel.  It defines the roles and responsibilities of those involved, planning factors 
which must be considered and standards by which the movement of materiel is to be executed.   
3. 
The term materiel applies to those items of inventory owned or leased/chartered by MOD, 
including aircraft, vehicles, boats, equipment, freight, food stuffs and rations, for the purpose of 
movement.  This JSP additionally includes animals and plants within the scope of materiel. 
4. 
The MOD has a legal duty to comply with national and international legislation and regulation 
for the transportation of materiel on all modes of military and commercial transport.  Furthermore, 
when conducting activities outside the UK, the MOD may need to comply with host nation 
legislation and regulation.  This JSP sets out the MOD regulations, codes of practice, policy and 
guidance for the movement of materiel by all modes of transport.   
5. 
To ensure pan defence standards, compliance with Part 1 is mandatory. 
Aim 
6. 
The aim of this JSP is to provide direction and guidance alongside the Defence Safety 
Authority 02 Regulations on: 
a.  
Compliance with legislation for the movement of materiel by all modes of transport. 
b.  
Roles and responsibilities of organisations involved in the planning, tasking and 
execution of the movement of materiel. 
c.  
Planning considerations for the movement of materiel. 
d.  
The execution of the movement of materiel. 
e.  
Standards by which movement activity should be conducted. 
Applicability and Scope 
7. 
The movement of materiel by any mode of transport is governed by national and international 
legislation.  This JSP does not replace legislative obligations and is to be used in conjunction with 
current relevant international and national publications.  It is applicable to all personnel involved in 
the movement and transport of MOD materiel, using either military or commercial transport assets 
and must be communicated to all personnel employed in the planning, tasking and/or execution of 
such activity.   
Exemptions from Legislation 
8. 
Compliance with the requirements of these Regulations is mandated by SofS.  However, as 
not all hazards encountered during the conduct of military operations can be fully mitigated, Duty 
Holder (DH) judgements may have to be made in the scenarios examined (related to the military 
role and capability requirement) and require the application of the As Low As Reasonably 
1.1-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Practicable (ALARP) principle.  Where a compliance assessment or a specific operational 
requirement1 exists and there is insufficient time for TLB to fully comply with MOD regulations, the 
appropriate DH may authorise an exemption to MOD specific requirements provided it can be 
demonstrated that the reduction of standards is managed by the appropriate suitably qualified and 
experienced person (SQEP).  Annex A to Part 1 provides an overview of the process for applying 
for dispensation or exemption  
9. 
Any case for an exemption to MOD specific regulation must be fully supported by a 
comprehensive risk management/safety case, which is to detail the duration of the exemption 
authorised.  In preparing and assessing the exemption case, the DH must engage with all 
appropriate Subject Matter Experts (SME) including Project Teams (PT), Lead User (where 
appropriate) and TLB Functional SME.  Guidance must be sought from MTSR. 
10.  Where the MOD has exemptions from legislation, these are recorded within the DLSR 
Exemptions Register.  If no such exemption is listed, the MOD remains responsible for achieving 
full compliance with national and international legislation and must demonstrate such compliance 
when demanded to do so, by the relevant authorities. 
Roles and Responsibilities 
11.  The following organisations have responsibilities for the safe conduct of movement and 
transport activities and for promoting compliance with Legislation and Regulations as outlined 
throughout this JSP: 
a.  
Movement and Transport Safety Regulator (MTSR).  The MTSR is responsible for: 
(1)   Interpretation of legislation and engagement with external regulators to seek 
exemption where appropriate. 
(2)   The development of Defence movement regulations and codes of practice. 
(3)   The conduct of audit, inspection in order to determine compliance and 
enforcement where appropriate. 
b.  
Top Level Budget (TLB) Holders.  TLB must ensure: 
(1)   Compliance with legislative and MOD regulatory requirements. 
(2)   The development, provision and use of accurate movement data.   
(3)   The provision of coherent, timely and expert movement plans and direction in 
support of departmental intent for routine, exercise and operational movement. 
(4)   The management of movement priorities. 
(5)   Safety and Environmental considerations when moving materiel by all modes of 
transport. 
(6)   The training and employment of SQEP across Defence activity. 
(7)   The employment of Defence standards when conducting movement operations. 
(8)   The management of contract support in order to ensure compliance with 
regulations and contract conditions. 
                                                                                                                                                            
1 Specific criteria from MOD requirements may be waived if, in the judgement of the appropriate DH or Delegated Officer, the 
operational risks or associated penalties outweigh the safety benefits (the Defence imperative). 
1.1-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
(9)   Implementation and management of a robust reporting, recording and 
investigation process for movement activity.   
(10)   The management of PT and procurement authorities in order to ensure 
compliance with legislation and regulations. 
c.  
Controlling Movement Authorities (CMA).  For the purpose of this JSP, all 
authorised personnel, departments, organisations or establishments who have a 
responsibility for the planning, control and/or execution of movement by any and all modes of 
transport, have been assumed under a single heading of Controlling Movement Authority 
(CMA).  Designated CMA at all levels, are responsible for: 
(1)   The command, control and communication of movement activity within their 
areas of responsibility, designated regional boundaries and for cross boundary 
communication with other CMA. 
(2)   Communicating the movement plan to all relevant stakeholders and directing 
compliance with all relevant standards. 
(3)   Tasking the appropriate SQEP and resource to execute movement in accordance 
with Regulations, Instructions and Standards. 
(4)   Reporting movement activity. 
(5)   Reporting movement non compliance.   
d.  
Consignor.  The consignor is responsible for ensuring the movement data provided is 
accurate and recorded on the appropriate documentation.  The consignor must provide the 
appropriate SQEP to assist with the load, restraint and unload of any materiel as required.  
As such the consignor is responsible for all aspects of the planning, preparation, packing, 
documentation and despatch of the consignment through to its final destination. 
e.  
Consignee.  The consignee must provide the appropriate SQEP to assist with the 
receipt and unload of any materiel as required.   
f.  
Movement Control.  Organisations and personnel employed to effect movement 
control must ensure: 
(1)   The appropriate planning and execution of control is put in place to effect all 
movement activity. 
(2)   Individuals employed at all movement nodes and points of movement activity are 
SQEP and fully conversant with the local and wider movement plan and intent. 
(3)   Changes to the movement plan are reported to the CMA. 
(4)   Reporting of movement activity to the relevant organisations. 
Definitions and Glossary 
12.  The terminology used throughout this document and a glossary of standard Movement terms 
is defined in JSP 800, Vol 3, Pt 1 and can be found at the following link. 
1.1-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
SECTION 1.2 – MOVEMENT OF MATERIEL REGULATIONS 
General 
1. 
The term materiel applies to those items of inventory owned or leased/chartered by MOD, 
including aircraft, vehicles, boats, equipment, freight, food stuffs and rations, for the purpose of 
movement.  This JSP additionally includes animals and plants within the scope of materiel.   
2. 
The global movement of materiel is necessary to support the activities of the UK Armed 
Forces.  As such activity will usually require various degrees of urgency, different modes of 
transportation and the transit of multiple transport nodes demand careful planning is essential to 
ensure materiel arrives at its destination in good order and as demanded. 
3. 
It is essential that in moving materiel, consideration is given to all of the associated legislative 
demands that control movement by all modes of transport, both nationally and internationally.  All 
individuals and organisations must be fully compliant with the minimum requirements for safe 
movement of materiel by all modes of transport, the provision of correct and accurate 
documentation and the appropriate marking and labelling of consignments.  Accurate records of 
any movement must be maintained for future reference.   
Movement Planning 
4. 
General.  Effective movement planning is critical to prevent problems or delays throughout 
the supply chain and the efficient use of resources.   
Planning Considerations 
5. 
Minimum Requirements.  Controlling Movement Authorities (CMA) must ensure that the 
movement of materiel is subject to detailed planning.  CMA must ensure that all relevant planning 
factors are taken into account; that full compliance with legislation is achieved and that the 
movement plan is effectively communicated.  As a  minimum, before the movement of materiel 
takes place, the planning and preparation process must ensure that: 
a.  
A safe environment is provided. 
b.  
Safe processes are in place. 
c.  
Effective management and control systems are established. 
d.  
Appropriate SQEP and resources are provided. 
All activity must be fully assessed with sufficient measures put in place to reduce identified risks to 
ALARP. 
6. 
SQEP.  Personnel employed to effect the movement of materiel, whether military, civilian or 
contracted from industry, must be SQEP for the duties they have been employed to undertake 
(DSA 02 Regulations DCoP 2 refers).  The different modes of transport and multimodal journeys, 
coupled with the complexities and myriad of materiel owned by MOD, demands that tasking 
authorities ensure the appropriate tasking and employment of SQEP in order to facilitate 
movement. 
7. 
Authority and Funding.  Applications for movement must only be submitted to the CMA 
once the appropriate authority has been issued and funding to cover the movement costs have 
been approved by the appropriate funding manager.   
8. 
Urgency of Need and Economy.  The tasking authority must make clear the urgency of 
need before the movement of any material takes place, in order for those planning the movement 
to consider all transport options and seek value for money. 
1.2-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
9. 
Can Consignee Accept (CCA) Action.  Applications for movement must only be submitted 
once the requesting authority has verified with the consignee, that the planned arrival of materiel at 
its final destination can be accepted.  CMAs with responsibility for the planning and tasking of 
resource to effect the movement of materiel are also responsible for communicating the movement 
plan, in order for all transit points on route to confirm that receipt and despatch of each 
consignment can be achieved.   
10.  Load Restraint Requirements.  Materiel must be moved safely and in accordance with the 
minimum standards of restraint for each and all modes of transport employed. JSP 800 Vol 7 
provides further detail. 
11.  Consignment Limitations.  The size, weight and design of a consignment (including 
associate packing cases or frames) will determine the method of movement options.  
Consideration must be given to the availability of all relevant resource required at all movement 
nodes, to facilitate receipt and despatch of each consignment. 
12.  Dangerous Goods (DG).  Materiel which by its nature, falls within the classification of DG 
must be documented, labelled and moved in accordance with Dangerous Goods Manual for the 
modes of transport employed. 
13.  Packaging, Labelling and Markings.  All materiel when subject to movement must be 
marked and labelled to meet the minimum standards required for movement and packed in order 
to prevent damage to the equipment, the transporters and the environment. 
14.  Security.  The security of the consignment must be fully compliant with National, Defence 
and/or local/temporary restrictions as published and communicated by the relevant authorities. 
15.  Biosecurity.  The movement of materiel across international borders must be compliant with 
all Biosecurity Regulations and standards.  Personnel involved in the planning of movement activity 
must make arrangements for Biosecurity to be achieved for all consignments. JSP 800 Vol 3 
Leaflet 25 provides the relevant policy. 
16.  Consignment Tracking.  The movement of materiel must be recorded and associated data 
retained, in order to identify all historical movement, refer to Defence Logistic Framework (DLF). 
17.  Import and Export Requirements.  All materiel deployed (exported) and recovered 
(imported) across international borders must be fully documented and correctly declared in line 
with HMRC procedures.  Failure to provide the correct level of information required to make a 
customs declaration, is a criminal offence.  Consignors must make the appropriate declarations in 
full to the relevant authorities. JSP 800 Vol 3 Leaflet 22 provides the relevant policy. 
18.  In-Transit Requirements.  Certain items of materiel may require special handling whilst in 
transit.  The consignor must communicate such requirements to the CMA in order for the 
appropriate planning and resources to be considered/allocated. 
19.  Consignment Condition.  The condition and structural integrity of the item to be moved 
(including packing cases or frames) must be assessed to be sufficiently robust and in accordance 
with the manufacturer’s original standards before any movement takes place.  Items of materiel 
that do not meet such standards or are clearly degraded beyond their original condition must be 
assessed by a SQEP to determine suitability for movement by the anticipated modes of transport. 
20.  Documentation.  All consignments must be accompanied by the relevant documentation as 
demanded by legislation, the carrier and MOD requirements. 
Movement Execution 
21.  Minimum Requirements.  As a  minimum, before the movement of materiel takes place, 
those tasked with executing the movement plan must ensure that: 
1.2-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
a.  
A safe environment is provided. 
b.  
Safe processes are in place. 
c.  
Effective management and control systems are established. 
d.  
Appropriate SQEP and resources are provided. 
All activity must be fully assessed with sufficient measures put in place to reduce identified risks to 
ALARP. 
22.  Dynamic Risk Assessments.  Notwithstanding the risk assessments for the activity or the 
environment concerned conducted during the planning and preparation phase, all nominated key 
appointments with responsibility for controlling movement activity must conduct dynamic risk 
assessments immediately prior to commencing the activity. Additionally, dynamic risk assessments 
should be considered whilst activity is being conducted in order to capture previously unidentified 
risks or hazards. 
23.  Environment
The movement of materiel must not present environmental pollution or 
damage through the transfer of disease, contamination or infestation.  For cross-border movement, 
all materiel must be cleaned before movement takes place and certified as such in accordance 
with national and international biosecurity policies and standards. 
24.  Defence Codes of Practice.  The processes of loading, restraining and unloading materiel 
must be safe, controlled and supervised.  Defence Codes of Practice (DCoP) have been 
developed and define the standard by which this activity must take place and are mandated for 
use.  DCoP for M&T activity are owned and now published by the MTSR as follows: 
a.  
DCoP No 1 – Movement of Materiel by Road. 
b.  
DCoP No 2 – Movement of Materiel by Rail. 
c.  
DCoP No 3 – Movement of Materiel by Air. 
d.  
DCoP No 4 – Movement of Materiel by Sea. 
e.  
DCoP No 5 – Movement of Materiel by Container. 
25.  Management and Control.  Personnel nominated with specific responsibilities must ensure 
that all movement activity is managed and conducted in a safe and controlled manner. 
26.  Movement Reporting.  The movement of materiel must be communicated through a clear 
reporting process, identified at the planning stage and undertaken by those organisations tasked to 
execute the movement plan, using clear and timely reports to the relevant CMA.   
1.2-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Annex A to  
JSP 800, Vol 3, Pt 1 

 
JSP 800, VOLUME 3 – MOVEMENT OF MATERIEL EXEMPTIONS 
1.  
This Annex is to be used as a guide to seeking exemption / dispensation from existing policy 
within JSP 800.  Should there be any doubt then the individual seeking the dispensation should 
seek advice through their Chain of Cmd.  
 
2.  
Definitions.  The following definitions are used:  
 
a. Exemption: Permanent permission to operate outside of policy, regulation or law.  
 
b. Dispensation:  Temporary permission to operate outside of policy, regulation or law for 
a set activity, bounded by the extent of the activity or by time.  
 
3.    Dispensations or exemptions will most likely fall into one of the following 3 categories:  
 
a. Legislative.  Permission to act outside of the UK law.  
 
b. Regulatory.  Permission to act outside of Defence Safety Authority (DSA) Safety and 
Environmental Protection regulations.  
 
c. Policy.  Permission to act outside of Defence Logistics policy.  
 
4.  
Legislative.  Dispensation or exemption to act outside the UK law cannot be granted from 
within Defence. Where a case for a legislative exemption is considered necessary it shall first be 
raised through the CoC legal process to MTSR for comment.         
 
5.  
Regulatory.  The DSA set Defence safety regulations and environmental protection that 
bound subsequent policy.  Should there be a perceived requirement to operate outside of Defence 
regulations advice and direction shall need to be sought from Movements and Transport Safety 
Regulator (MTSR) as per the procedures detailed in DLSR SOP1.  
 
6.  
Policy.  A requirement for dispensation or exemption from policy will ordinarily centre around 
entitlement and have no additional safety implications.  It is important to note that entitlement is 
often based on Corporate Government policy, rules and guidance; therefore, the relevant Civ Sec 
department (at unit or TLB level) must be consulted before progressing any case.    
 
a. Dispensation. For dispensation to operate outside of policy the Duty Holder construct is 
to be used and the Delivery Duty Holder (DDH) may permit such dispensation (assuming the 
requirements of Corporate Governance are satisfied).  
 
b. Exemption.  Should there be a perceived requirement for an exemption to policy then 
the relevant chain of command / TLB point of contact is to be consulted in the first instance.  They 
can then raise the issue with Def Log Mov & Tpt Pol.   
 
7.  
Further information can be sought from the reader’s M&T HQ staff, the author of this 
publication and the DSA’s MTSR. 
 
1.2-A-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
PART 2 
MOVEMENT OF MATERIEL – POLICY  
SECTION 2.1 – MOVEMENT OF MATERIEL GENERAL 
Introduction 
1. 
Part 2 provides the policy and procedures to achieve compliance with the Regulations at Part 
1.  To ensure pan defence standards, compliance with some elements of Part 2 is mandated; 
these can be identified by the use of the “modal verbs” will, shall and must. 
2. 
The successful movement of materiel will be measured by detailed planning, effective 
execution and the competence of those persons employed to facilitate such movement.   
3. 
Part 2 details the key organisations involved in the movement of materiel, their roles and 
responsibilities, the planning and execution factors that must be considered and specific policy in 
the form of Leaflets for common materiel movement activities.  
2.1-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 O 18) 

link to page 20  
SECTION 2.2 – MOVEMENT ORGANISATIONS 
Introduction 
1. 
The planning and execution of the movement of materiel within Defence is managed through 
command chains at all levels.  For the purpose of this JSP, all authorised personnel, departments, 
organisations or establishments who have a responsibility for the planning, control and/or 
execution of movement by any and all modes of transport, have been assumed under a single 
heading of Controlling Movement Authority (CMA). 
2. 
A list of the primary CMA can be found at Annex A to this Section.  It is important to note that 
the scope of authority for a CMA can vary from one organisation to another and indeed such 
authority may be delegated internally, down to the lowest level.  The CMA could have responsibility 
for: 
a.  
 The planning and execution of movement across multiple operational areas (JFC or 
FLC) 
b.  
The management of regional movement nodes (e.g. RAF Brize Norton or Sea 
Mounting Centre)  
c.  
Specific tasks (e.g. Railhead, loading point or unit lines).   
Irrespective of the extent of activity covered by the CMA or indeed the functional area delegated 
with CMA responsibility, the overarching requirement for the control, management and direction of 
movement activity must be clear, delegated and controlled.   
Strategic Controlling Movement Authorities  
3. 
The following organisations have responsibilities relating to the movement of materiel as 
outlined below. 
a.  
Joint Force Command (JFC).  Strategic overview of the movement intent and 
management of the joint movement environment and activity. 
(1)   Permanent Joint Headquarters (PJHQ).  As part of the Defence Crisis 
Management Organisation, PJHQ provide policy aware military advice to the MOD to 
inform the strategic commitment of UK forces to overseas Joint and Combined 
operations.  Additionally, when directed by CDS, PJHQ exercise Operational 
Command of UK forces assigned to overseas Joint and Combined operations.  In 
support of these operations, PJHQ J4 manage the end-to-end process of Mounting and 
Movements for all personnel and freight from initial mounting and deployment, through 
sustainment, to the eventual redeployment of personnel and equipment to the strategic 
base. 
(2)   Assistant Chief of the Defence Staff Logistic Operations (ACDS Log Ops).  
ACDS (Log Ops) must ensure: 
(a)   The provision of coherent, timely and expert logistics advice and direction 
in support of departmental plans and current and contingent operations. 
(b)   Coherence and consistency to the development of Defence logistics policy. 
(c)   The End to End (E2E) Logistics Process. 
b.  
Front Line Commands (FLC)
2.2-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
(1)   Navy.  Navy Command Headquarters (NCHQ) is the mounting headquarters for 
all Naval Service2 units deploying on operations and overseas exercises.  All 
movements’ activity is coordinated through the Movements Cell within the Land 
Logistics section of the Logistics and Infrastructure Division.  NCHQ Mov Ops & Plans 
are responsible for: 
(a)   The movement component of mounting Naval Service personnel and units 
from base locations to POE for joint operations and exercises.   
(b)   Movement, mounting and redeployment of overseas operations and 
exercises. 
(c)   Authority for Movements’ policy throughout the Naval Service. 
(d)   Movements’ governance and assurance. 
(2)   Army.  Army HQ through HQ Field Army, Support Branch is the mounting 
headquarters for Army units and is responsible for the movement component and 
delivery of logistic support required to enable Land Force Elements At Readiness 
(FE@R) and support the deployment, sustainment and recovery of Land FE on 
operations and exercises within the UK and overseas.  The delivery of Movements 
within the FLC is conducted as follows: 
(a)   Army HQ, Director Support, Log Sp is responsible for: 
(i)  
Dissemination of movements’ policy throughout the Command. 
(ii)   Movements’ governance and assurance. 
(b)   HQ Field Army, Support Branch, Log Mov is responsible for: 
(i)  
The movement component of mounting Army units from unit lines to 
POE for joint operations and exercises. 
(ii)   Movement, mounting and redeployment of overseas operations and 
exercises. 
(iii)   Tasking of Army movements resources in support of operations and 
overseas exercises. 
(c)   HQ Home Command, Regional Command is responsible for: 
(i)  
Acting as the National Movement Coordination Cell for visiting forces. 
(ii)   The movement component of mounting Army units from unit lines to 
Regional POE for joint operations and exercises. 
(3)   Air.  HQ Air is the mounting HQ for RAF units and is responsible for the 
movement component and delivery of logistic support required to enable RAF Force 
Elements At Readiness (FE@R) and support the deployment, sustainment and 
recovery of RAF FE on operations and exercises within the UK and overseas.  HQ Air 
retains full command of the RAF Air Mobility Force (AMF); however, as a strategic 
movements and AAR resource, allocation and tasking authority for the RAF AMF is 
vested in DSCOM.  A4 Ops is responsible for: 
                                                                                                                                                            
2 The Naval Service consists of the Royal Navy (RN), the Royal Marines (RM), the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA), the Royal Navy Reserve 
(RNR) and Royal Marines Reserve (RMR). 
2.2-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
(a)   The movement component of mounting RAF personnel and units from base 
locations to POE for joint operations and exercises.   
(b)   Movement, mounting and redeployment of overseas operations and 
exercises. 
(c)   Tasking of RAF movements resources in support of operations and 
overseas exercises. 
(d)   Dissemination of movements’ policy throughout the Command. 
(e)   Movements’ governance and assurance. 
c.  
Defence Equipment and Support (DE&S).  DE&S is responsible for: 
(1)   The delivery of transport solutions to effect military movement. 
(2)   Developing and communicating movement intent in order to promote safety and 
environmental regulations for national and international movement. 
(3)   The Defence lead for commercial activities. 
(4)   Establish enabling contracts to facilitate the movement of materiel. 
(5)   Ensure contractors are monitored to determine compliance.   
DE&S Functional Movements Responsibilities 
4. 
Joint Support Chain (JSC).  The JSC is the Defence controlled network of nodes 
comprising resources, activities and distribution options that focus on the rapid flow of information, 
services and materiel between end-users and the Strategic Base to generate, sustain and redeploy 
operational capability.  The end-to-end JSC stretches from requirements of operational 
commanders and FLC back to Industry and must satisfy both operational and non-operational 
requirements.  The Reverse Supply Chain (RSC) operates as a part of the JSC as the process by 
which surplus, repairable, damaged or waste materiel is returned for reallocation, reclamation, 
repair or disposal. 
5. 
Defence Support Chain Operations and Movements (DSCOM)
a.  
The primary roles of DSCOM Defence Movements (Def Mov) is to:  
(1)   Undertake strategic lift planning and provide strategic coupling bridges to support 
operations to task in-house strategic lift, such as 2 Gp Air Mobility Force (AMF) and the 
MOD RORO Fleet, and acquire commercial lift to meet shortfalls;  
(2)   Process, allocate and manage bids for the movement of MOD freight worldwide;  
(3)   Facilitate the provision of sea and air movement assets, including long-term 
charters, in support of exercises and maintenance of overseas garrisons.   
b.  
DSCOM Def Mov comprises the following departments: 
(1)   Air Freight Centre (AFC; Military).  As the CMA for all air freight flown from the 
UK, the AFC provides the tri-Service executive function for receiving, vetting and 
processing bids for the movement of equipment by air using RAF AMF aircraft.  The 
AFC also provides specialist advice for general cargo, DG and any special handling 
requests.   
2.2-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
(2)   Air Freight Centre (Commercial).  The section is responsible for booking 
equipment to scheduled commercial flights, or scheduled shipping routes through 
commercial freight forwarders under contract. 
(3)   Commercial Surface Movements (CSM).  CSM provides MOD access to a 
commercial surface freight service within the UK, to/from the UK and worldwide.  It 
exploits the use of enabling contracts (managed by Movements Support Services’ 
(MSS) Freight Contract Management Team) with commercial hauliers and freight 
forwarders.   
(4)   Sealift Operations.  Sealift Operations are responsible for the provision of 
suitable military and commercial sealift assets to meet customer requirements and the 
allocation of shipping space. 
(5)   Airlift Operations.  Airlift Operations tasks the RAF Air Mobility Force and 
oversees the allocation of military airlift for exercises and operations.  It also provides 
strategic airlift planning advice to MOD, PJHQ, Front Line Command and DE&S Project 
Teams.  It arranges for the airlift of UK military freight through international agencies 
and agreements, such as the Multinational Co-ordination Centre Europe (MCCE). The 
Air Enable (Civilian Charter) cell acquires commercial freight and passenger aircraft to 
meet requirements which exceed the capacity of the AMF and which cannot be 
satisfied via agreements with allied nations.   
6. 
Logistic Delivery Operating Centre (LDOC). The LDOC provides a vital link in the Joint 
Support Chain (JSC) and in the global supply and provision of commodities, through the 
employment of a commercial Delivery Partner (DP) as part of Logistics Commodities and Services 
Transformation (LCS(T)). The JSC (including the RSC) covers the E2E processes and activities 
necessary to receive materiel from trade and deliver it to end users in support of operational and 
non-operational commitments.  Further information can be located in Defence Logistic Framework 
(DLF) 
which gives authoritative policy and procedural direction for the operation of the JSC. 
7. 
Project Teams (PT).  PT are responsible for ensuring that all materiel is designed, 
developed and delivered compliant with all movement and transport standards. 
Defence Equipment Sales Authority  
8. 
Defence Equipment Sales Authority (DESA), formerly known as the Disposal Services 
Authority (DSA), has a delegated authority to dispose of all MOD surplus equipment in the UK and 
Overseas with the exception of Nuclear, Domestic waste and Infrastructure.  Further information on 
the DSA services can be found at the DSA website at the following link. Further information is also 
provided in Defence Logistic Framework (DLF) or by accessing the DE&S website at the following 
link. 
 
2.2-4 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Annex A to 
JSP 800, Vol 3, Pt 2 

 
CONTROLLING MOVEMENT AUTHORITIES 
Ser 
Formation 
Subordinate Formations 
1. 
  NCHQ 
HQ 3 Cdo Bde RM 
2. 
  HQ Army  
HQ Field Army 
HQ Regional Command (through HQ Home Command) 
ARRC 
JHC 
HQ BFG 
HQ BATUS 
HQ BATUK 
HQ BATSUB 
HQ Brunei (incl HQ Nepal) 
HQ 104 Brigade (29 Regt RLC, 17 P&M Regt RLC & 162 
Regt RLC). 
3. 
  HQ Air  
PAMD Abu Dhabi 
PAMD Bahrain 
PAMD Calgary 
PAMD Dulles 
PAMD Hannover 
PAMD McCarran 
PAMD Nairobi 
4. 
  HQ JFC 
PJHQ 
British Forces South Atlantic Islands (BFSAI). 
British Forces Cyprus (BFC) 
Gibraltar Garrison 
All Current Joint Operations 
5. 
  DE&S 
DSCOM 
Logistic Services 
Logistic Commodities Services 
Logistic Services Transport 
6. 
  ACDS Log Ops 
 
2.2-A-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
SECTION 2.3 – PLANNING FOR MOVEMENT 
Introduction 
1. 
It is essential that effective movement planning and preparation takes place at the earliest 
opportunity in order to identify all relevant considerations.  The complexities associated with the 
multitude of Defence organisations and establishments, coupled with the intricacies of the supply 
chain process, demand that key factors must be identified and addressed if the movement of 
materiel from consignor to consignee is to be executed as planned. 
2. 
This section identifies the key planning factors attributable to most if not all occurrences 
where materiel is moved, either in support of operational, exercise or routine activity.  Furthermore, 
in addition to the overarching planning factors relevant to all movement, this section takes into 
consideration additional mode specific factors which must be considered in relation to the modes of 
transport employed. 
3. 
Leaflets to this Section relevant to the most common movement activities, contain specific 
standards that must be considered for the type of materiel or activity. 
Minimum Requirements 
4. 
Consignor organisations must ensure that the movement of materiel is subject to detailed 
planning.  They must ensure that all relevant factors are taken into account, that full compliance 
with legislation is achieved and that the movement plan is effectively communicated.  As a  
minimum, before the movement of materiel takes place, the planning and preparation process 
must ensure that: 
a.  
A safe environment is provided. 
b.  
Safe processes are in place. 
c.  
Effective management and control systems are established. 
d.  
Appropriate SQEP and resources are provided. 
Use of SQEP 
5. 
All movement planning must consider the employment of SQEP.  The CMA is responsible for 
directing key appointments to be employed in the relevant Movement Orders and Instructions.  
Nominated units conducting the activity must ensure all key personnel employed are SQEP. 
Further details are contained within the appropriate DCoP. 
6. 
Marshalling SQEP. Any individual tasked with marshalling vehicles onto vessels, rail flats or 
trailers are to be appropriately trained and current on the vehicle platform. Appropriate training is 
defined as below: 
a.  
Armoured and Protected Mobility Vehicles. Crew Commanders, Driver Maintainer 
Instructors and Vehicle Supply Specialist (VSS) that are trained and current on the platform 
are qualified to marshal the vehicle onto the vessel, rail flat or trailer. Crew Drivers are NOT 
trained to marshal vehicles. 
b.  
B Vehs. Personnel that are trained (attended the GS course) and current on the 
platform are qualified to marshal the vehicle onto the vessel, rail flat or trailer. 
c.  
C Vehs. Personnel that are trained and current on the platform are qualified to marshal 
the vehicle onto the vessel, rail flat or trailer. 
2.3-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Authority and Funding 
7. 
The authority to expend money on movements stems from Parliament which has to be 
satisfied that the monies which it allocates for this purpose are justified and are applied properly, 
economically and effectively.  To this end, it holds the MOD accountable through both the Defence 
Ministers and through the Permanent under Secretary of State who as Accounting Officer is 
directly accountable to Parliament as well as responsible to his Ministers.   
8. 
Financial authority for emerging operations will normally be identified to Ministers by the 
means of Ministerial Submissions that are submitted to authorise expenditure, at short notice, for 
the deployment of British Forces world-wide.  This money will normally be allocated from the 
Reserve, or costs will lie where they fall.   
9. 
Financial control associated with movements expenditure is exercised by the appropriate 
level budget manager on behalf of their Budget Holder and the Accounting Officer.  Consignors 
bidding for any movement to take place must ensure they have the appropriate financial authority 
approved before application for movements are submitted and that they seek the most economical 
means in line with the operational scenario. 
10.  Authority and funding associated with the movement of materiel for operational or exercise 
activity is approved on the Operational Commitments Plot (OCP) or Defence Exercise Programme 
(DXP).  The Force Element Table (FET) and subsequent Load Allocation Table (LAT) will allow 
FLC to develop internal programmes and issue Movement Instructions to those units deploying 
and this instruction will be the authority for all related subsequent movement to take place.   
11.  Authority and funding for the routine movement of materiel not associated with operations 
must be approved by budget holders in line with the designated movement process as directed by 
the CMA. An ‘Indicative Costings Enquiry’ can be submitted to DSCOM Plans 
12.  Treasury policy requires that the movement of non-MOD sponsored freight must not be in 
competition with commercial organisations.  Furthermore, where non-MOD sponsored freight is 
moved by Service means, unless clearly specified in the consignor’s MOD contract, carriage costs 
are to be charged at full cost rates.   
13.  Entitled Non-MOD Freight.  Freight sponsored by certain organisations are entitled to 
carriage using MOD resources on a repayment basis subject to the availability of space after 
service requirements have been met.  Such consignments must be registered by the CMA to 
ensure that invoices are issued at the rates advised by DSCOM Secretariat and to ensure a 
creditable audit trail.  Regulations for the movement of entitled non-MOD freight by service means 
is at Leaflet 18. 
14.  Indulgence Cargo.  The term Indulgence Freight covers the movement of non-entitled 
military equipment and personal effects belonging to eligible personnel that are entitled to be 
moved by MOD transport assets (at public expense) on a fill up basis only.  This will normally 
include personal effects over and above published entitlements or non-entitled military sporting 
equipment for overseas sports clubs.  Regulations for the movement of Indulgence Cargo are at 
Leaflet 21. 
Urgency of Need and Economy 
15.  Standard Priority System (SPS).  The principles of the SPS defined in Defence Logistic 
Framework (DLF) 
must be applied when considering the urgency of need.  While the demanding 
unit retains prime responsibility for selecting the Required Delivery Date (RDD) they may be 
required to justify their RDD selection in terms of urgency versus economy for both operational and 
non-operational demands. 
2.3-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
16.  Standard Priority Codes (SPC) and Supply Chain Pipeline Times (SCPT).  The SPS 
reflects the difference between Operational and non-Operational SPC and SCPT.  The matrices of 
SPC and SCPT are shown in Defence Logistic Framework (DLF). 
Can Consignee Accept (CCA) Procedures 
17.  CCA Procedure.  The consignor must carry out CCA procedures unless movement has 
been initiated by a CMA in which case the CMA initiating movement assumes responsibility.  This 
procedure ensures that no unnecessary delays or expenses are incurred whilst consignments are 
in transit and that supply chain pipeline times are met.  CCA procedure includes:  
a.  
Confirmation that the consignee is able to receive the consignment on the planned 
delivery date by the mode, method and configuration in which it is being moved. 
b.  
Confirmation that the CMA has made arrangements for the next and all subsequent 
transhipment points to receive and process the consignment in accordance with the 
movement plan. 
18.  Consignors or CMA requesting transport provision through military or civilian transport 
agencies are responsible for conducting CCA before the request for transport provision has been 
submitted. The consignor must add the consignees CCA number into the transport request which 
confirms receipt.  If the CCA is not annotated the transport request will be rejected. 
19.  The consignee or addressee receiving the CCA is responsible for responding to the 
Consignor to confirm whether the consignment can be received as planned. A CCA template is at 
Guidance Leaflet 7. 
Load Safety and Load Restraint 
20.  Methods and restraint requirements vary between the modes of transport and the materiel 
being moved.  Load restraint solutions must be so designed to meet the standards for the mode of 
transport employed.  Additionally, if consignments are to be moved by multimodal means, load 
restraint solutions should be designed to meet the minimum standards of the mode with the most 
stringent requirements. 
21.  MOD Load Safety Regulations and Tie Down Schemes (TDS) are contained in JSP 800, Vol 
7.
 
22.  Consignors must be given sufficient advanced notification of the movement plan if there is a 
requirement for them to have to bid for restraint equipment or materials necessary for the planned 
mode of transport. 
23.  All load restraint assemblies including pallets, flatracks, nets, chains and ratchet straps must 
meet legislative standards and be checked and maintained to ensure serviceability and be fit for 
purpose. Further guidance can be found at Defence Safety Authority Defence Safety Authority 
M&T Regulations 
(DCoP 10). 
24.  Abnormal Indivisible Loads (AIL) or Special Types General Order (STGO) are contained 
within JSP 800 Vol 3 Pt 2 Lft 11.  
Consignment Limitations 
25.  The CMA or consignor with visibility of the movement plan must take into consideration the 
size, weight, nature and special handling requirements for materiel being moved in order to prevent 
injury, unnecessary delay or damage to the consignment or environment.  The consignment, 
through its size, nature or weight will determine the available transport options, infrastructure 
requirements and whether compliance with national and international legislation for the entire 
journey can be achieved.   
2.3-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Desired Order of Arrival 
26.  The desired order of arrival for all materiel must be communicated by the CMA in order for 
the appropriate movement planning to take place. 
Dangerous Goods 
27.  The transport of DG is governed by international and national regulation and legislation and 
must be conducted in accordance with the appropriate modal regulations.  However, civilian 
legislation does not encapsulate all items and equipments classified as dangerous for carriage 
associated with military activities and the MOD will develop separate regulations.  In certain areas, 
the MOD will impose more stringent requirements to the carriage of certain natures to ensure 
appropriate levels of safety and security during transport. 
28.  The two principal documents associated with the transport of DG, which must be consulted 
as applicable, in addition to this publication are: 
a.  
JSP 515 – Hazardous Stores Information System, which provides the user with vital 
information on the identification and classification of the substance, item or equipment. 
b.  
Dangerous Goods Manual  – Formerly JSP 800 Vols 4A and 4B, which details the 
MOD’s Regulations and guidance on the preparation for, and transport of, DG by all modes. 
Packaging, Labelling and Markings 
29.  The consignor is responsible for ensuring consignments are packed, labelled and marked to 
meet standards described in Defence Logistic Framework (DLF).  Additionally, consignors must 
fully comply with the requirements of national and international legislation for the movements of DG 
in accordance with the Dangerous Goods Manual. 
Security 
30.  Classified Material.  Consignors must ensure that all of the conditions relevant to the 
movement of Protectively Marked Materiel (PMM) are met in full in accordance with JSP 440 
(Defence Manual of Security) and additional operational standards as appropriate.  Movement 
specific considerations designed to compliment JSP 440 are at JSP 800 Vol 3 Pt 2 Lft 6. 
31.  Attractive and Attractive to Criminal and Terrorist Organisations (ACTO) Materiel.  
Attractive and ACTO materiel are those items considered to be of immediate value to a terrorist or 
criminal organisation and as such are subject to more stringent transport arrangements.  The 
consignor must ensure all of the conditions relevant to the movement of attractive and ACTO are 
met in full in accordance with JSP 440.  Movement specific considerations which compliment JSP 
440 are at JSP 800 Vol 3 Pt 2 Lft 9. 
Biosecurity 
32.  The movement of all materiel, including its packaging and dunnage, across international 
borders is subject to the regulations for biosecurity.  The Senior Health Advisor (Army) Department 
is the MOD sponsor for biosecurity policy relating to the movement (export and import) of 
consignments of Service materiel and equipment worldwide.  The policy for compliance with 
biosecurity is at JSP 800 Vol 3 Pt Lft 25. 
Consignment Tracking/Asset Tracking 
33.  All materiel consigned for movement is to be tracked from as close to the point of origin to as 
close to the point of use, as the Defence Consignment Tracking (CT) systems’ availability allows.  
This includes items issued from an MOD inventory account and any item entering the JSC from an 
2.3-4 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 59  
external source (industry / contractor) at the Purple Gate3.   
34.  The policy, process and procedures for CT are contained in Defence Logistic Framework 
(DLF).
   
United Kingdom Border Agency (UKBA) Import and Export Legislation 
35.   The movement of materiel across international borders demands advance planning and 
special handling considerations in order that full compliance with customs and border regulations is 
achieved.  The movement of materiel must be coordinated and recorded in order so that the 
appropriate declarations can be made to the requesting border control agencies at the point of 
entry into the UK.  Specifically: 
a.  
The consignor despatching materiel from the UK must ensure that all legislative export 
conditions are met in full.   
b.  
The consignor despatching materiel from the overseas must ensure that all legislative 
import conditions are met in full. 
Movement specific considerations which compliment UKBA legislation are at JSP 800 Vol 3 Pt 2 
Lft 22.
 
In-Transit Requirements 
36.  Consignments of materiel being moved may demand special handling in transit in order to 
ensure compliance with legislation or regulations.  Examples include animal or plant movement or 
containers that require continuous electric power.  The Consignor is responsible for stipulating all 
In-Transit requirements when submitting the application for movement in order that the CMA can 
develop the appropriate movement plan.   
Consignment Condition 
37.  The consignor is responsible for ensuring the consignment being offered for movement is 
structurally sound for the modes of transport being employed and that it has been adequately 
packed, restrained and prepared for the anticipated journey conditions.  In addition to any internal 
restraint preventing the consignment from becoming damaged within its packaging, the outer 
package must be so designed to allow for sufficient restraint to be affixed to prevent the 
consignment from moving in transit.  DEFSTAN 00-003 provides the standards by which materiel 
and its associated packaging should be designed for movement by all modes.    
Documentation 
38.  The consignor is responsible for the completion and issue of all documentation necessary for 
the consignment to be moved.  Where multiple consignments are consolidated to one mode of 
transport, the CMA is responsible for consolidating all individual consignment documentation.  
Documentation specific to modes of transport employed are shown at Section 2.4.  
Movement Across International Borders 
39.  The procedures for the movement of materiel across international NATO borders are 
governed by transit agreements between NATO nations in accordance with NATO AMovP-2.  The 
procedures apply to both service vehicles and commercial vehicles carrying military cargo. Leaflet 
29 (Movement Across Continental Europe) and Leaflet 30 (Visiting Forces) provide further 
information and guidance.  
                                                                                                                                                            
3 The Purple Gate is the mechanism to ensure the regulation of materiel flow into the JSC for the support of operational theatres.   
2.3-5 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
40.  The procedures for the movement of materiel across international borders outside of NATO 
are governed by international transit agreements. A Harmonised System (HS) Code (commonly 
referred to as a Commodity Code) must be detailed on the F1380 when exporting to certain 
countries. JSP 916 (Part 1, Definitions, Commodity Code) provides guidance on how to complete 
the HS Code. Further guidance is also provided in Guidance Leaflet 3.  
Reciprocal Other Nations Arrangements 
41.  Reciprocal agreements exist to enable the MOD to use other nation’s movement resources 
when appropriate.  Requests to employ such reciprocal arrangements are only to be made by the 
designated CMA in the appropriate HQ to the relevant other nation.  Equally, requests from 
another Nation to use MOD movement resources are to be referred to the designated CMA in the 
appropriate HQ. 
42.  Details for establishing reciprocal arrangements for the cooperative and shared use of 
transportation resources are contained in AJP-4.4A – Allied Joint Movement and Transport 
Doctrine. 
43.  Reciprocal arrangements do not discount MOD consignors from compliance with all MOD 
standards for the planning and preparation of materiel before it is moved on other nations 
resources.  However, equal or higher standards may be demanded by the other nation before 
carriage is accepted and these must be identified and confirmed by the CMA as part of the 
reciprocal arrangement before carriage takes place.   
Selection of a Movements Mode  
44.  The transportation of materiel may be undertaken by either road, rail, ship, aircraft or 
container or any combination thereof.  When selecting the mode or modes of transport, 
consideration must be given to distance and duration in transit, budgetary implications and the 
ability to have the appropriate resource in place when required.  Each form of transport has its own 
advantages and disadvantages which are captured in the relevant modal sections.   
Multi Modal Considerations 
45.  The CMA must communicate the intent to utilise multi modal transport options to the 
consignor and all relevant trans-shipment points on route in order for the consignment to be 
packed, marked and documented in accordance with the appropriate transport conditions and to 
be compliant with transport legislation.  The movement planning must also accommodate the 
requirement for representation at the relevant trans-shipment points in order to facilitate movement 
from one mode to the other. 
Risk Assessments 
46.  Risk assessments must be conducted prior to movement activity taking place.  All risk 
assessments are to be completed in accordance with JSP 375.  Due consideration must be given 
to any additional safety requirements when one or more movement activity is being conducted 
simultaneously. 
Emergency Action Plan 
47.  Appropriate emergency action plans must be in place prior to any movement commencing.  
The emergency action plan must take into consideration (but not restricted to) those risks identified 
in the risk assessment and must ensure the relevant responses are available should the 
emergency action plan be implemented. 
2.3-6 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 78 link to page 21 link to page 59  
Leaflets 
48.  The movement of common types of materiel have been captured in individual leaflets listed 
in Section 2.5.  Where leaflets exist, they should be read in conjunction with the overarching 
planning and execution factors detailed in Section 2.3 and Section 2.4.
2.3-7 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 21 link to page 78  
SECTION 2.3.1 – PLANNING FOR ROAD MOVEMENT  
General   
1. 
In order for the effective movement of materiel by road to take place, all of the 
regulations listed at Part 1 and described in detail in Section 2.3 must be complied with in 
full.  
Additional planning considerations applicable to movement by road are contained in this 
section. 
2. 
The movement of a number of commodities of materiel have been captured in individual 
leaflets listed in Section 2.5.  Where leaflets exist, reference is made.   
3. 
Movement of material by road must be conducted in accordance with national and 
international legislation.  Any exemptions that MOD has from legislation are recorded at Part 1 of 
this JSP.   
4. 
DCoP No 1 – Movement by Road defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by road is to be conducted.  Specifically, the DCoP contains method 
statements which cater for key elements of road movement activity and the responsibilities of those 
involved in the process. 
Characteristics 
5. 
Road transport is by far the most common method for moving materiel, either as a single 
transport solution for end to end movement, or to facilitate the movement plan by connecting 
multiple modes of transport.  The main characteristic of road transport is its flexibility over all other 
modes of transport. 
6. 
Road movement is particularly suitable for fragile, sensitive or valuable items.  It can be 
economic over short and long distances and for relatively small quantities.  It is flexible in that 
loads can be taken directly from consignor to consignee without transhipment.   
Limitations 
7. 
Limitations to moving materiel by road are generally defined by the capacity of the road 
network, the capabilities and availability of the transport platforms employed and can be manpower 
intensive.   
Overarching Requirements 
8. 
For any movement by road to take place, the following minimum requirements must be 
catered for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment to prepare, load, restrain and unload the materiel 
being moved is provided. 
b.  
Military Load Supervisor (or civilian equivalent) is present to manage all loading 
activity. 
c.  
The consignments being moved by road are compatible with the road transport 
platforms.   
Additional Planning Considerations 
9. 
Those specific appointments essential for any movement by road to take place are detailed 
in DCoP No 1 at Part 1. 
2.3.1-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
10.  MOD Regulations specific to the management and use of road transport, driver’s hours, 
driver’s regulations, etc are contained in JSP 800, Vol 5. 
11.  To ensure that a suitable transport is tasked for the consignments of materiel to be moved, 
the consignor must provide a full and accurate description of the consignment to the CMA.  Failure 
to do so may result in the consignment being delayed or rejected for transport with subsequent 
costs falling to the consignor. 
12.  Vehicles being tasked to move materiel by road must be so designed to carry such loads.  
The CMA must fully declare the materiel to be moved so that the appropriate transport asset can 
be tasked for the activity. 
13.  Vehicles to be moved are to be prepared for transportation by road but must remain road 
worthy for safe use on the public highway until presented for loading. Appropriate provisions must 
be provided at each node for the movement and loading of non-runners. 
14.  Application of Restraint.  The provision of the correct type of restraint and their positioning 
and securing onto the securing points and rings on both the vehicle and transport platform are 
critical.  JSP 800, Vol 7 contains approved restraint solutions for commonly moved military 
equipment by road.  Ultimately however, the Transport Driver is responsible for taking receipt of 
the load prior to onward movement and may dictate their preferred restraint solution.   
Movement Options 
15.  Military Transport Options.  The military options described below are to be considered prior 
to considering the use of the commercial solution: 
a.  
Own Unit Transport (1st Line).  Appointed transport managers for fleets of military 
vehicles will have the authority and competence to task the most appropriate transport 
assets to undertake movement of materiel.   
b.  
Military Transport Organisations (2nd Line)4.  Special to role military units that 
possess the resource to undertake the movement of materiel utilising their own transport 
assets at the request of bidding units.   
c.  
Kuehne + Nagel Road Tpt Services (K+N).  K+N operate a distribution network to 
support the movement of materiel to and from depots in the UK and overseas.  There are 3 
distinct categories of materiel that K+N move and each category has variations in the method 
of movement: 
(1)   Dry Freight.  Items of stock held for issue including hazardous cargo UN Classes 
2 – 9, but excluding vehicles, bulk fuel and UN Class 1. 
(2)   Controlled Items.  Materiel that fall within the category of Section 5 of the 
Firearms Act or those classed as ATCO.  These items demand additional 
considerations including security, monitoring and bespoke movement plans. 
(3)   Munitions.  UN Class 1 which have unique properties that must be considered 
and accommodated when movement planning and execution takes place. Refer to the 
Dangerous Goods Manual. 
d.  
Heavy Lift Tasking Cell.  A process exists for the movement of abnormal and 
indivisible loads.  The transport used will be provided in the first instance by a military 
solution.  If the task cannot be fulfilled using military assets then the task will be passed to 
the CMA who will seek a commercial solution. 
                                                                                                                                                            
4 FLC and TLB will have internal procedures for tasking, controlling and managing their own transport platforms as well as defining the 
appropriate process for applying for movement to take place. 
2.3.1-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
e.  
Disposals.  Defence Equipment Sales Authority (DSA), formerly known as Disposal 
Services Authority, has a delegated authority to dispose of all MOD surplus equipment in the 
UK and Overseas with the exception of Nuclear, Domestic waste and Infrastructure.  Further 
information on the DSA services can be found at the DSA website at the following link. 
16.  Commercial Surface Movements (CSM).  Once a consignor has exhausted the use of all 
available military transport options, an application for commercially sourced transport solutions can 
be considered providing that the appropriate authority and sufficient funding is in place to support 
such an application.  DSCOM provides MOD access to a commercial surface freight service where 
it exploits the use of enabling contracts and activities with commercial hauliers and freight 
forwarders see Provision of a Multimodal UK & worldwide Commercial Surface Movements Service 
2018DIN04-109.
  Specific areas of provision offered under this commercial surface freight service 
include: 
a.  
A general surface freight road distribution service within the UK and destinations 
worldwide. 
b.  
A surface freight distribution service for the movement of MOD protectively marked 
materiel, UN Class 1 stores, weapons, weapon spares and firearms. 
c.  
A road freight distribution service for all vehicles including the provision of a driver 
service. 
d.  
Crane services. 
e.  
A service for the movement of Heavy Lift or Special Loads.   
f.  
A global freight transportation service providing worldwide coverage for all types of 
materiel. 
Application for Movement - UK and North West Europe (NWE)  
17.  Military Option.  Consignors applying for road transport movement to take place must do so 
using military Form FMT 1000 in accordance with single service procedures and regulations. 
18.  Freight Distribution.  Materiel bid for through the various IS applications will be moved by 
K+N.  The use of any spare capacity can be requested through one of the following: 
a.  
Dry Freight.  Application for the movement of dry freight is to be submitted to LEIDOS-
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx (MULTIUSER). 
b.  
Controlled Items.  Application for the movement of controlled items (Section 5) is to 
be submitted to xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx (MULTIUSER). 
c.  
Munitions.  Application for the movement of munitions is to be submitted to LEIDOS-
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx (MULTIUSER). 
19.  Commercial Surface Movement (CSM).  Application for any of the commercial services 
provided by DSCOM should be made using the DSCOM Request for Surface Movement Form 
(RCSM).  For further information refer to Provision of a Multimodal UK & worldwide Commercial 
Surface Movements Service 2018DIN04-109.
 
Application for Movement - Rest of the World (ROW)  
20.  Movement by road overseas excluding NWE will be authorised by the CMA and is laid down 
in local instructions.  Consignors are to contact their CMA for advice and guidance on the 
procedures to be adopted. 
2.3.1-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Movement Across NATO Borders 
21.  The procedures for surface movements across NATO borders are contained in NATO 
AMovP-2. 
 
2.3.1-4 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 21 link to page 78  
SECTION 2.3.2 – PLANNING FOR RAIL MOVEMENT 
General  
1. 
In order for the effective movement of materiel by rail to take place, all of the 
regulations listed at Part 1 and described in detail in Section 2.3 must be complied with in 
full.  
Additional planning considerations applicable to movement by rail are contained in this 
section. 
2. 
The movement of a number of commodities of materiel have been captured in individual 
leaflets listed in Section 2.5.  Where leaflets exist, reference is made.   
3. 
Movement of material by rail must be conducted in accordance with national and 
international legislation.  Any exemptions that MOD has from legislation are recorded at Part 1 of 
this JSP.   
4. 
DCoP No 2 – Movement by Rail defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by rail is to be conducted.  Specifically, the DCoP contains method 
statements which cater for key elements of rail movement activity and the responsibilities of those 
involved in the process. 
 
Characteristics 
5. 
The use of rail for certain commodities offers advantages of economy, safety and security 
Rail is the normal method for moving large, routine consignments between rail served locations 
and other rail served logistic nodes such as ports, where onward movement is anticipated and 
there is flexibility with staging consignments prior to despatch.   
Limitations 
6. 
Movement by rail is governed by the limitations of recognised rail gauges within which 
consignments must fit, both in the UK and overseas.  Movement by rail demands the appropriate 
infrastructure, handling equipment and loading/unloading capabilities if it is to be a valid 
transportation option. 
Overarching Requirements 
7. 
For any movement by rail to take place, the following minimum requirements must be 
catered for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment to prepare, load, restrain and unload the materiel 
being moved is provided. 
b.  
Military Rail Load Supervisor (or civilian equivalent) is present to manage all rail 
loading activity. 
c.  
The consignments being moved by rail have been cleared by the relevant rail authority 
for movement and are accepted by the rail company prior to any movement taking place. 
d.  
Where MOD has a responsibility for the provision of rolling stock and restraint 
equipment, it must be compliant with legislative requirements and maintained in accordance 
with the relevant equipment schedule. 
Additional Planning Considerations 
8. 
Those specific appointments essential for any movement by rail to take place are detailed in 
DCoP No 2 at Part 1. 
2.3.2-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
9. 
To ensure that suitable rolling stock is provided for the consignments of materiel to be 
moved, the consignor must provide a full and accurate description of the consignment to the CMA.  
Failure to do so may result in the consignment being delayed or rejected for transport with 
subsequent costs falling to the consignor. 
10.  The CMA must ensure that all relevant details for materiel being moved by rail are provided 
to the Rail Company in advance of the move in order for the appropriate clearances to be obtained 
for movement.   
11.  Materiel close to or at the limits of the relevant rail gauge for the proposed journey may 
demand inspection and trial before the rail company will accept it for movement. 
12.  Where vehicles are being moved by rail, the CMA must task the appropriate recovery assets 
at the point of loading and unloading to enable non runners to be moved. 
13.  Vehicles to be moved are to be prepared for transportation by rail but must remain road 
worthy for safe use on the public highway until presented for loading.  
Movement Options 
14.  Military Transport Options.  The MOD has a limited military rail network which is used to 
move materiel internally within military depots.  Additionally, MOD owns a fleet of rolling stock in 
the UK which is managed and maintained under a commercial contract.  The rolling stock consists 
of a number of wagons which are available for use over main lines in mainland UK.  These wagons 
are particularly suitable for certain vehicles and heavy equipment.   
15.  Commercial Transport Options.  Providing the appropriate authority and funding is in place 
the CMA is able to provide access to a Rail Freight Distribution Service.  The service available will 
be dependent on the country that movement is to take place in and what restrictions on movement 
are applicable.  Access to this service is achieved by exploiting the use of enabling contracts held 
by K+N RTS (Rail), Bicester.  The contracts provide for the movement of materiel by special and 
scheduled services between locations in the UK, to and from continental Europe and certain 
overseas locations.   
Application for Movement – UK & NWE 
16.  Operations and Exercises.  Force Elements (FE) deploying in accordance with FLC orders 
will be instructed to provide equipment tables in order that the overarching rail movement 
requirement can be calculated and the appropriate transport resources allocated by the CMA.  FLC 
are required to submit a FET/JFET to the CMA to allow for the appropriate resources to be 
identified. 
17.  Military Option.   
a.  
Applications for the movement of materiel internally to military rail served depots are 
managed through the relevant Depot standing orders.   
b.  
Applications for the movement of materiel externally from a military Depot to another 
location are submitted through K+N RTS (Rail), Bicester. 
18.  Commercial Option.  The application process is broken down geographically as follows: 
a.  
Internal UK and UK to Continental Europe.  Applications are to be submitted through 
DSCOM using the latest version of a DSCOM Freight Transport Acquisition Form which can 
be found at the following link a minimum of 5 working days prior to the required date of 
movement for both routine scheduled services between MOD rail-served locations or for rail 
movement outside of routine scheduled services.  Certain services attract additional lead 
2.3.2-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
times and further information is located at the DSCOM website which is accessed at the 
following link.   
b.  
NW Europe.  Applications for the movement are to be submitted in accordance with 
SO BFG 4300  using the latest version of the BFG Heavy Lift Requisition Form which is 
available from the following link.  Formed unit movement applications are to be submitted in 
accordance with Para 11 of this section.  Additional information can be obtained by 
accessing the BFG home page at the following link. 
19.  Application for Movement – Rest of the World (ROW).  Movement by rail overseas 
excluding NW Europe will be authorised by the CMA and the procedures are laid down in local 
instructions.  Consignors are to contact their CMA for advice and guidance on the procedures to be 
adopted. 
20.  Movement Across NATO Borders.  The procedures for the movement of materiel by rail 
across international NATO borders are governed by transit agreements between NATO nations in 
accordance with AMovP-2 and AMoVP-4.  The procedures apply to both service rolling stock and 
commercial rail carrying military cargo.   
Restraint Materials  
21.  Provision of Restraint Materials – UK.  Within UK, the CMA will direct as part of the 
movement plan who is responsible for the provision of all restraint equipment. 
22.  Provision of Restraint Materials – Germany.  The control of the issue, accounting and 
recovery of restraint materials is the responsibility of LCS, Dülmen.  HQ BFG is responsible for 
assessing the requirement for securing materials for each rail movement of vehicles and for the 
issue of written authority for the release of the requisite materials.  In Germany, chocks and chains 
are collected from LCS Dülmen under Loan Pool arrangements by units once authority has been 
given by HQ BFG.   
23.  Provision of Restraint Materials – ROW.  The CMA will direct as part of the movement plan 
who is responsible for the provision of all restraint equipment  
24.  Application of Restraint.  The provision of the correct type of chains/strops/laterals and 
their positioning and securing onto the securing points and rings on both the vehicle and rail flat 
are critical.  JSP 800 Vol 7 and the DB Sketch Book contain approved restraint solutions for 
commonly moved military equipment by rail in the UK and NW Europe.  Such schemes may also 
be transferable to other (ROW) locations.  Ultimately however the Rail Representative responsible 
for taking receipt of the train prior to onward movement will dictate their preferred restraint solution.  
As such all planning must be conducted in conjunction with the Rail Authorities. 
25.  Tools and Consumables.  The provision of hammers, crowbars and nails are a unit 
responsibility.   
2.3.2-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 21 link to page 78  
SECTION 2.3.3 – PLANNING FOR AIR MOVEMENT 
General  
1. 
In order for the effective movement of materiel by air to take place, all of the 
regulations listed at Part 1 and described in detail in Section 2.3 must be complied with in 
full
.  Additional planning considerations applicable to movement by air are contained in this 
section. 
2. 
The movement of a number of commodities of materiel have been captured in individual 
leaflets listed in Section 2.5.  Where leaflets exist, reference is made.   
3. 
Movement of material by air must be conducted in accordance with national and international 
legislation.  Any exemptions that MOD has from legislation are recorded at Part 1 of this JSP.   
4. 
DCoP No 3 – Movement by Air defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by air is to be conducted.  Specifically the DCoP contains method 
statements which cater for key elements of air movement activity and the responsibilities of those 
involved in the process. 
Characteristics 
5. 
Air Transport is by far the fastest method of moving materiel.  The main characteristics of air 
transport are speed, flexibility and the ability to operate from locations which are not accessible by 
other modes.  Both military and commercial assets can be utilised, depending on the operational 
situation, expectancy and cost.  Specialist heavy lift aircraft can be chartered to carry abnormal 
and specialist loads which are not transportable by any other means. 
Limitations 
6. 
Limitations to moving materiel by air are aircraft availability and capacity, weather conditions, 
aircraft handling aids, airfield location and over-flight permissions.  The classification, dimensions 
and weight of the material to be moved can also be a limiting factor. 
Overarching Requirements 
7. 
For any movement by air to take place, the following minimum requirements must be catered 
for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment to prepare, load, restrain and unload the materiel 
being moved is provided. 
b.  
The materiel does not exceed the capacity or design criteria of the aircraft platform. 
c.  
Provision of SQEP at the point of loading/unloading as required. 
Additional Planning Considerations 
8. 
Those specific appointments essential for any movement by air to take place are detailed in 
DCoP No 3 at Part 1. 
9. 
To ensure that suitable space is available on an aircraft for consignments, the consignor 
must provide a full and accurate description of the consignment to the CMA.  Failure to do so may 
result in the consignment being delayed or rejected for transport with subsequent costs falling to 
the consignor. 
10.  This document does not cover Troops in Fighting Trim (TIFT); procedures for TIFT are 
detailed in Dangerous Goods Manual. 
2.3.3-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
11.  Refuelling.  Vehicles are limited to the amount of fuel they can carry when being moved by 
air due to the stowage being proposed and anticipated conditions of travel.  The CMA must 
communicate the required standard to be achieved and if necessary put in place the appropriate 
facilities to provide or remove fuel from vehicles at the airhead. 
Movement Options 
12.  Military Transport Options.  The RAF Fixed Wing Air Mobility Force (AMF) is tasked to 
provide a tri-Service movements resource to support UK Defence requirements.  Routinely, the 
AMF provides worldwide airlift support for operations, exercises, scheduled activity and other 
tasks.  However, there may be some tasks beyond the capacity and availability of the AMF, and in 
these circumstances civilian charter or allied airlift may be utilised to meet these special demands. 
13.  Categories of Airlift.  RAF AMF tasking is divided into the following 5 main categories: 
a.  
Operations.  Operational airlift to support active military or humanitarian operations. 
b.  
Aircrew Training.  Training flights are allocated for aircrew conversion to type, 
including, route flying, the Tactical Air Transport role and continuation training.  Where 
possible, the route-training element of conversion will be accomplished on MOD routine airlift 
tasks.  Continuation training will embrace the development and maintenance of skills and 
qualifications. 
c.  
Exercises.  Exercise airlift will be allocated to support the deployment and recovery of 
personnel and equipment of all the Services engaged in operational training and exercises. 
d.  
Schedules.  Scheduled flights operate to a timetable to meet forecast administrative 
air movement requirements to and from overseas theatres. 
e.  
Special Airlift.  This category fulfils the requirement for all airlift not covered under 
Operational, Training, Exercise or Scheduled Airlift.  Examples include trials that require the 
use of AT/AAR aircraft and aeromedical flights. 
14.  Commercial Transport Options.  Once DSCOM has exhausted the opportunities for 
military airlift to undertake priority tasks, they will coordinate for commercial airlift to be sourced 
and provided for the relevant task.   
Applications for Air Movement – Individual Consignments 
15.  Consignors requiring the movement of materiel (including Operational and Exercise 
resupply) by air are to apply using RAF Form 1380 Air Way Bill regardless of whether military or 
commercial assets are to be tasked.   
16.  When a bid for movement of materiel by air has been accepted by the CMA and a suitable 
air outlet has been identified (Military or civilian), the CMA will issue call forward instructions 
detailing whether the materiel is to be delivered direct to the airhead or to report to a 
predetermined Movement Control Check Point (MCCP) location.   
Applications for Air Movement – Operational and Exercise Movement 
17.  Force elements (FE) deploying in accordance with FLC orders will be instructed to provide a 
Force Element Tables (FET) in order that the overarching air movement requirement can be 
calculated and the appropriate transport resources allocated by DSCOM. 
18.  All outbound UK operational air movement bids are processed by J4 Mov PJHQ and 
submitted to DSCOM in the form of a Joint Force Equipment Table (JFET).  This does not include 
helicopter movement. 
2.3.3-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
19.  For outbound helicopter moves the bidding procedures are dictated by DSCOM. 
20.  For Urgent Operational Requirement (UOR) equipment DSCOM Plans provides a Statement 
of Movement Requirement (SOMR) to DSCOM (Log Ops). 
21.  Operational Bids.  Airlift requirements to support Joint Operations are co-coordinated by 
PJHQ who submit a Desired Order of Arrival Staff Table (DOAST) to DSCOM.  To facilitate the 
production of a DOAST, units should bid in the directed format through their normal command 
chain to PJHQ J4 Movs.  For operations not controlled by PJHQ, units are to submit bids, in 
accordance with the normal format, through their FLC Operational Sponsor, to DSCOM Air 
Delivery.  The recognised FLC sponsors are: 
a.  
RN – Navy Command for attention SO2 N8 Ex. 
b.  
Army – HQ Fd Army for attention G3. 
c.  
RAF – HQ Air, A4 Con & Op Trg (3/5). 
d.  
SF – HQ DSF for attention SO2 Air. 
e.  
PJHQ bids through J4 Movs. 
22.  Exercise Bids.  The co-ordination of requests for airlift support for exercises is undertaken 
by DSCOM Air Delivery.  Sponsors must comply with the following procedures:   
a.  
MOD Defence Exercise Programme (DXP).  Details of exercises must be notified 
through exercise sponsors to Directorate of Joint Warfare (DJW) SO2 Ex at least 15 months 
in advance of the start of the exercise for inclusion in the DXP.  Exercises that do not appear 
in the DXP will not routinely attract airlift support. 
b.  
Bidding Procedure.  Inclusion in the DXP does not imply that an exercise will receive 
airlift support.  Units are to bid and confirm airlift support through their normal chain of 
command to their FLC exercise sponsors who are identified below: 
(1)   RN – Navy Comd for attention SO2 N8 Ex. 
(2)   Army – HQ Fd Army for attention G3. 
(3)   RAF – HQ Air for attention A4 Con & Op Trg (3/5). 
(4)   SF – HQ DSF for attention SO2 Air.   
(5)   PJHQ – J7 for attention SO1 J7 (Ex). 
23.  Application for Airlift.  Requests for airlift should follow the guidance at 2017DIN03-016. In 
addition, all FLC lift requirements should initially be identified through the Command Acquisition 
Suppot Plan (CASP) bid to DSCOM.  
24.  Sponsor Responsibilities.  Sponsors submit their respective provisional co-ordinated bids 
to DSCOM Air Delivery 3 – 4 months prior to the month of planned movement, for example, submit 
in Jan for movement in Apr.  Full justification is required for requests that deviate from RAF AMF 
main base operations to an alternative UK civil or military airfield.  Planned exercises that are not 
confirmed by a detailed airlift bid, irrespective of whether or not it appeared in the DXP, will not be 
considered by the Air Mobility Allocation Committee (AMAC). 
25.  Other Nations Aircraft.  The movement of materiel by aircraft operated by other Nations is 
controlled by DSCOM or the local CMA.  The application process for the movement of materiel is 
2.3.3-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
exactly the same as routine movement.  All requests are to be submitted to DSCOM or the local 
CMA who are responsible for the identification of possible airlift support from other Nations. 
26.  Airlift Priorities.  The bids are scheduled into the airlift programme according to the 
priorities listed at 2017DIN03-016.   
Restraint Equipment 
27.  In most instances all equipment used for the restraint of materiel on board aircraft is to be 
provided by the aircraft Loadmaster; in the case of RAF aircraft restraint equipment forms part of 
the aircraft Role Equipment.  However, where the TDS dictates that the consignor is to provide the 
restraint equipment this must be presented with the load iaw with the TDS. Where a consignment 
has been restrained in advance of being offered to the aircraft for loading, the appointed Load 
Supervisor will ensure such equipment meets the standards required for serviceability and 
capability for air movement. 
 
2.3.3-4 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 21 link to page 78  
SECTION 2.3.4 – PLANNING FOR SEA MOVEMENT 
General  
1. 
In order for the effective movement of materiel by sea to take place, all of the 
regulations listed at Part 1 and described in detail in Section 2.3 must be complied with in 
full
.  Additional planning considerations applicable to movement by sea are contained in this 
section. 
2. 
The movement of a number of commodities of materiel have been captured in individual 
leaflets listed in Section 2.5.  Where leaflets exist, reference is made.   
3. 
Movement of material by sea must be conducted in accordance with national and 
international legislation.  Any exemptions that MOD has from legislation are recorded at Part 1 of 
this JSP.   
4. 
DCoP No 4 – Movement by Sea defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by sea is to be conducted.  Specifically the DCoP contains method 
statements which cater for key elements of sea movement activity and the responsibilities of those 
involved in the process.   
Characteristics 
5. 
Movement of material by sea can be transported over any distance, provided suitable 
shipping and port facilities are available.  Large quantities of heavy and bulky loads can be 
transported by sea.  It is a cheaper modal option when considering the quantities that can be 
carried per ship; however handling costs can often increase the overall cost significantly, 
particularly when port facilities and handling incur additional charges.   
Limitations 
6. 
Sea movement is much slower than other modes of transport and at some point will directly 
interface with other transport modes in order for the materiel to reach its final destination.  As a 
consequence, materiel being moved by sea and through sea ports can be subject to delay as a 
result of being transferred between different modes of transport.   
Overarching Requirements  
7. 
For any movement by sea to take place, the following minimum requirements must be 
catered for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment with controlled access and appropriate capacity to 
prepare, load and unload the materiel being moved. 
b.  
The materiel does not exceed the capacity or design criteria of the vessel. 
c.  
Provision of appropriate SQEP and materiel handling equipment at the point of 
loading/unloading as required to complete the entire task. 
Additional Planning Considerations 
8. 
Those personnel with specific appointments essential for any movement by sea to take place 
are detailed in DCoP No 4 at Part 1. 
9. 
To ensure that a suitable shipping space is available for the consignments of materiel to be 
moved, the consignor must provide a full and accurate description of the consignment to the CMA.  
Failure to do so may result in the consignment being delayed or rejected for transport with 
subsequent costs falling to the consignor. 
2.3.4-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
10.  The primary UK SPOD is the commercially run Sea Mounting Centre at Marchwood, 
Southampton.  All movement of materiel through the SMC will be coordinated by the SMC to the 
relevant units and CMAs. 
11.  Requests to use any other port should be annotated on the application for movement with 
the appropriate supporting detail. 
12.  Port Task Group (PTG).  The CMA will determine whether a PTG is to be established for 
materiel being moved through a commercial port and issue the relevant orders to the unit tasked to 
run the PTG.  The PTG is responsible for: 
a.  
Working with the Port authority to establish real estate, traffic circuits and procedures 
for moving military materiel through the port. 
b.  
Developing safe systems of work in line with the port Site Safety Manager. 
c.  
Coordinating all movement activity through the Port to the satisfaction of the Port, 
relevant other government departments and the CMA. 
d.  
Controlling the Reception, Staging and Onward Integration (RSOI) of all military 
movement. 
e.  
Reporting movement and key occurrences. 
f.  
Ensuring the appropriate supervisors and SQEP are available and tasked to facilitate 
all military movement. 
g.  
Prepare for despatch and receive all military cargo and documentation to and from 
shipping. 
13.  Weighing of Vehicles and Containers.  The Merchant Shipping Regulations 1988 (No 
1275) demands that all vehicles are to be weighed prior to being loaded.  Additionally, containers 
should be check-weighed before being accepted for movement by sea.  The CMA is responsible 
for ensuring compliance with the requirement for weighing vehicles and containers and presenting 
the relevant weighbridge certificates when demanded to do so. Details regarding the acceptable 
weighing methods for containers moving by sea are contained within JSP 800 Vol 3 Pt DCoP 4 
paras 22 – 26. 
14.  Handling Limitations.  CMAs must be aware of any handling limitations for materiel being 
moved by sea and plan accordingly.  It must not be assumed that the facilities and capabilities for 
handling and moving materiel are automatically available at either end of the sea voyage and the 
CMA must utilise the CCA procedure to ensure end to end movement is achievable.   
15.  Refuelling.  Some vehicles may be limited to the amount of fuel they can carry when being 
moved by sea due to the location and stowage being proposed for sea movement.  The CMA must 
communicate the required standard to be achieved and if necessary, put in place the appropriate 
facilities to provide or remove fuel from vehicles at the port. 
Movement Options  
16.  The movement of materiel by sea can vary from the requirement to transport a formation or 
group to the movement of a single item.  This may consist of a whole ship consignment, part 
charter or space allocated on a commercial sailing.  The sponsor must ensure that the appropriate 
authority and funding is in place prior to applying for movement.  The following options are not 
listed in priority order and the most suitable choice is to be made to satisfy the necessity and the 
overarching requirements laid down in Para 7 of this section 
2.3.4-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
17.  Military Transport Options
a.  
Military Owned or Operated Vessels.  Shipping space for the movement of materiel 
may be provided by HM Ships, MOD RORO, Naval Armaments Vessels (NAV), Royal Fleet 
Auxiliary (RFA) and AD Vessels of the RLC fleet. 
b.  
Full or Part Charter.  The movement of materiel on a full or part charter vessel is done 
under contract and will consist of the commercial leasing of a vessel for the exclusive use of 
the MOD or space on a vessel.  Where the requirement exists this will include Shipping 
Taken up from Trade (STUFT). 
c.  
Reciprocal Arrangements with Other Nations.  The movement of materiel by sea on 
vessels operated by other Nations is co-ordinated by the Sealift Operations cell, DSCOM.  
The cell liaises with the Movement Co-ordination Centre Europe (MCCE) for the movement 
of UK freight on allied nations’ strategic transport assets and conducts sealift crisis planning. 
18.  Commercial Transport Options
a.  
Liner Service.  DSCOM Commercial Surface Movement can provide a Door to Door 
solution to Sealift requirements through access to global Liner Service Shipping.  The Global 
Freight Transportation Service (GFTS) service is often the most cost-effective solution for the 
movement of ISO containers, but can extend to other cargo. Further information on the Liner 
Service is available at Provision of a Multimodal UK & worldwide Commercial Surface 
Movements (CSM) Service 2018DIN04-109.
 
Applications for Sea Movement – Individual Consignments 
19.  Application for Shipping Space.  Consignors requiring the movement of materiel (including 
Operational and Exercise resupply) by sea are to apply using T998H.  It is a mandatory 
requirement for customs that the UIN and an estimated Cost of Goods are completed.  Full 
instructions for completion of a T998H are located in Guidance Leaflet 6.   
20.  Call Forward Instruction (CFI).  When a bid for materiel has been processed by the CMA 
and a suitable outlet has been identified, the CMA will issue call forward instructions detailing the 
report point, date and time for the materiel to be delivered. 
21.  Scheduled Shipping.  For planned voyages, with the exception of the Falkland Island 
Resupply Sailing (FIRS), consignors must submit shipping bids through the chain of command at 
the earliest opportunity by contacting DSCOM Sea Lift Ops (DESDSCOM-
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx)
 as follows: 
a.  
Operational and Routine Sustainment – DG.  Bids are to be submitted on a T998H 
or Cargo Load List (CLL) supported by a F/Mov 1042 Dangerous Goods Note (DGN) a 
Minimum of 6 weeks prior to the requirement for all material consisting of Class 1-9 DG. 
b.  
Operational and Routine Sustainment – Non DG (Including Indulgence Cargo).  
Applications are to be submitted on a T998H or CLL a minimum of 4 weeks prior to the 
requirement. 
22.  Falkland Islands Resupply Sailing (FIRS).  DSCOM Sealift Ops is the CMA responsible for 
the provision of vessels to undertake the FIRS.  There are up to 10 sailings per annum in support 
of British Forces South Atlantic Islands (BFSAI) and the vessel calls at Ascension Island (ASI) and 
East Cove Military Port (ECMP) in the FI.  The vessel is also used by commercial customers, on a 
repayment basis, in support of the FI Government (FIG).  Where possible all freight should be 
containerised in 20 ft ISO containers.   
23.  The Commercial FIRS Shipping Bids.  Bids for FIRS cargo should be submitted in 
accordance with the notice periods outlined in Para 20 as follows:   
2.3.4-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
a.  
Southbound Cargo.  DSCOM and DHL staff manage, control and coordinate all 
southbound FIRS cargo.  Bids should be submitted on a T998H to DSCOM Sealift Ops 
(xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx) or for commercial non military cargo to DHL 
(xxxxxxx.xxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx).   
b.  
Northbound Cargo.  BFSAI 460 Tp RLC staff manage, control and coordinate all 
northbound FIRS cargo.  Bids should be submitted to 460 Tp by T998H (BFSAI-
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xx).
 
24.  Liner Service.  Commercial surface freight applications are to be submitted on a DSCOM 
Request for Commercial Movements Form in accordance with the latest DIN. 
25.  Indulgence Cargo.  Application for Indulgence Cargo must be submitted on the T998H and 
include the POC and for vehicles, the vehicle chassis number.  The bidding process and specific 
consignment procedures for movement of materiel are detailed within 2017DIN03-016. 
Applications for Sea Movement – Collective Movement 
26.  Operations.  FLC are required to submit a FET or Cargo Load List (CLL) to PJHQ who will 
compile a JFET for submission to DSCOM.  
27.  Exercises.  Force elements (FE) deploying in accordance with FLC orders will be instructed 
to provide a FET or Cargo Load List (CLL) to DSCOM.   
28.  Applications for Sea Movement.  All applications for shipping must include complete 
details in support of the requirement; in order to facilitate vessel allocation.  Sealift bids are 
prioritised in accordance with 2017DIN03-016 and are to include the information detailed in 
Guidance Leaflet 1 as a minimum. In addition, all FLC lift requirements should initially be identified 
through the Command Acquisition Suppot Plan (CASP) bid to DSCOM. 
a.  
Applications for shipping space for exercise materiel are processed by FLC and 
submitted to DSCOM Sealift Operations in the form of a FET a minimum of 4 weeks in 
advance of the sailing date. 
b.  
Applications for shipping space for operational materiel are processed by J4 Mov 
PJHQ and submitted to DSCOM (Log Operations) in the form of a JFET a minimum of 4 
weeks in advance of the sailing date.   
c.  
Applications for shipping space for Urgent Operational Requirement (UOR) or Urgent 
Defence Requirement (UDR) materiel are submitted to DSCOM (Log Plans) who will provide 
a Statement of Movement Requirement (SOMR) to DSCOM (Log Ops) when the requirement 
is known.   
29.  Military and Commercial Shipping.  The Sealift Operations cell, DSCOM programmes and 
tasks the MOD Roll-on/Roll-off (RORO) fleet and also acquires and tasks charter shipping on 
behalf of MOD, working closely with DSCOM Commercial staffs throughout the process.   
30.  Shipping Programme Bids.  Applicants should submit shipping bids through the chain of 
command at the earliest opportunity by contacting DSCOM Sea Lift Ops (DESDSCOM-
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx) 
.  The minimum information required is described as a template 
at 2017DIN03-016.  The Sealift Programme covers the next 3 months in detail and 12 months in 
outline.  Customers are encouraged to contact Sealift Ops as soon as they are aware of a 
requirement to enable coordination of the movement request into the overall programme.  Any bid 
requiring an additional port call to be added to the programme should be received at least three 
months in advance of the month of movement. 
31.  Specialist Tasks.  The following specialist tasks are to be notified to DSCOM Sea Lift Ops a 
minimum of 3 months before the requirement. 
2.3.4-4 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
a.  
Routine Movement of Operational Tasks and Deployments.  A JFET is to be 
submitted to DSCOM Sea Lift Ops via PJHQ or FLC. 
b.  
Exercise Deployments.  Cargo Load List (CLL) is to be submitted to DSCOM Sea Lift 
Ops via FLC. 
c.  
Project Team Procurement Tasks.  Project Teams are to submit an Application for 
Shipping Space (T998H) to DSCOM Sealift Operations.  An example of this document and 
the instructions for completion are located at Guidance Leaflet 6.   
Other Nations Sealift Assets 
32.  Application for use of Other Nations Sealift.  The application process for the movement of 
materiel is exactly the same as routine movement.  All requests are to be submitted to DSCOM or 
through the local CMA. 
Restraint Equipment 
33.  All equipment used for the restraint of materiel on ships is to be provided by the ships Chief 
Officer.  Where a consignment has been restrained in advance of being offered to the vessel for 
loading, the consignor must ensure such equipment meets the standards required for serviceability 
and capability. 
 
2.3.4-5 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 21 link to page 78  
SECTION 2.3.5 – PLANNING FOR CONTAINER MOVEMENT 
General  
1. 
In order for the effective movement of materiel by container to take place, all of the 
regulations listed at Part 1, and described in detail in Section 2.3 must be complied with in 
full

2. 
The movement of a number of commodities of materiel have been captured in individual 
leaflets listed in Section 2.5.  Where leaflets exist, reference is made.   
3. 
Movement of material by container must be conducted in accordance with national and 
international legislation.  Any exemptions that MOD has from legislation are recorded in the DLSR 
Exemptions Register.   
4. 
DCoP No 5 – Movement by Container defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by container is to be conducted.  Specifically the DCoP contains 
method statements which cater for key elements of container movement activity and the 
responsibilities of those involved in the process.   
5. 
MOD-owner containers must be used unless the operational imperative outweighs the cost 
effectiveness of doing so. Any ISO containers sourced outside of MOD held assets should be 
leased unless the period of continued use or the purpose for which they are leased makes 
ownership more cost effective. A Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) will need to be carried out if large 
quantities are to be leased, especially when providing support to operations. Contracts placed for 
the lease of containers should be made in such a manner as to allow the subsequent procurement 
of the container if the nature or period of use of the container changes and it becomes clear that 
ownership is more cost effective than continued lease. 
6. 
The inspection, maintenance, modification and repair of ISO containers must comply with all 
extant legislation in order to ensure retention of the ISO status. Further information can be found in 
JSP 800, Vol 6, Part 2 Chapter 6. Defence Containers used to carry goods are to be certified as 
safe to do so under the Convention for Safe Containers and must carry a CSC Safety Approval 
Plate. 
Characteristics 
7. 
The use of ISO containers can be cost effective, efficient and reduce the demands on the 
supply chain by being transferable across all modes of transport with little or no secondary 
handling.  As a result of the consignment being packed and sealed inside an ISO container and not 
opened until it reaches its final destination, a level of protection and security is provided for the 
contents whilst in transit.   
Limitations 
8. 
The contents and weight of ISO containers may restrict those modes of transport to be used 
and the ability of the consignor or consignee to accept and handle the loaded container may be 
limited.  Once loaded, the contents will be subject to the conditions of travel and it is unlikely that 
any damage or disruption to the original load will be understood until the container has arrived at 
its final destination.  
Overarching Requirements 
9. 
For any movement by ISO container to take place, the following minimum requirements must 
be catered for: 
a.  
A qualified Cargo Transport Unit (CTU) Load Supervisor is employed to manage all 
container loading and unloading activity. The CTU Load Supervisor course is delivered by 
2.3.5-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
The Defence Movements Training Squadron at Brize Norton. Applications for attendance are 
to be bid via the DMTS Courses Clerk on 95461 6048. The CTU Supervisors Course 
syllabus is based on the IMO/ILO/UNECE Code of Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport 
Units (CTU Code). 
b.  
The container is serviceable, certified as such and suitable for the task. 
c.  
The maximum weight of the contents does not exceed the payload limits of the 
container. 
d.  
The load is evenly distributed throughout the container and the load centre of gravity is 
kept as low as possible to achieve maximum stability. 
e.  
The items comprising of the total load should be evenly spread to achieve minimum 
height and be arranged to form a uniform whole so that no excessive stress is applied to 
whatever restraining devices are used. 
f.  
Contents of loaded ISO containers must be packaged and restrained in accordance 
with current military and civil safety regulations including International Standards for 
Packaging and Marking (ISPN) for all packaging/restraint material.  ISO containers for 
transportation by sea or air are to comply with the respective additional international 
regulatory requirements. 
g.  
Weighing of Containers.  The SOLAS VI Regulation 2 amendment requires the 
verification of the gross mass of packed containers is legally enforced from the 1 Jul 16.  This 
international convention prescribes 2 methods by which the shipper may obtain the verified 
gross mass which are summarised below. Full details regarding the acceptable weighing 
methods for containers moving by sea are contained within JSP 800 Vol 3 DCoP 4 paras 22 
– 26. 
 
(1)   Method 1.  Weighing the packed container using calibrated and certified 
weighing equipment. 
 
(2)   Method 2.  Weighing all packages and cargo items, including the mass of pallets, 
dunnage and other securing material to be packed in the container and adding the tare 
mass of the container to the sum of the single massed, using a certified method 
approved by the UK competent authority, that is the Maritime and Coastguard Agency 
(MCA) or its authorised body.  This method can only be used by approved site 
locations, details of accredited sites are held by the respective FLC. 
 
Additional Planning Considerations 
10.  Those specific appointments essential for any movement by container to take place are 
detailed in DCoP No 5 at Part 1. ISO Containers used by the MOD must be accounted for, marked 
and tracked in accordance with standard supply chain procedures and NATO policy.  
11.  Load restraint for materiel being moved by container must be compatible with the modes of 
transport being used.  For example, containers being moved by air must have loads restrained to 
meet the minimum restraint requirements for air movement. 
12.  Container Pre-Stack.  A Container pre-stack should be conducted prior to any container 
being loaded in order to ensure the proposed load is compatible with the container dimensions and 
that maximum use is made of the container carrying capacity.  Container pre-stacks also determine 
the amount and types of containers required if multiple loads are planned. 
2.3.5-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
13.  Seals.  All loaded containers are to be sealed and seal numbers are to be annotated on all 
container paperwork.  The contents of the container will determine the type of seal to be used but 
as a minimum, seals must conform to International Standard ISO 17712:2010 (Freight Containers 
– mechanical seals). 
14.  Weight Restrictions Apply When Using ISO Containers.  The following must be applied 
when loading ISO Containers:  
a.  
Demountable Rack Offload and Pickup System (DROPS).  The maximum weight 
that the DROPS Medium Mobility Load Carrier (MMLC) and DROPS Improved Medium 
Mobility Load Carrier (IMMLC) system can self-load is 16.5 tonne including the weight of the 
flatrack.  The weight of the empty container and flatrack reduce the net weight that can be 
stuffed into an ISO container to a maximum of 12,500 Kg.   
b.  
Enhanced Palletised Load System (EPLS).  The maximum weight that the EPLS 
system can self-load is 15.0 tons including the weight of the flatrack.  It also has the 
capability to handle containers unassisted.  If the container has been loaded onto a flatrack 
maximum permissible weight that can be stuffed into an ISO container is 11,000 Kg if the 
container is loaded without a flatrack maximum permissible stuffed weight is 12,500 Kg.   
c.  
Non DROPS.  In many countries the weight restrictions imposed on road semi-trailers 
will limit the amount of cargo which can be loaded into containers when carried on a single 
semi-trailer.  For example, the following maximum limitations apply to a 38-tonne road train:  
All up weight of loaded road train  
38,000 Kg  
Weight of tractor  
8,200 Kg  
Weight of trailer  
6,000 Kg (approx)  
Weight of two empty containers  
4,120 Kg (approx)  
Tare Weight of train (B+C+D)  
18,320 Kg 
 
Table 1: Weight Restrictions 
 
The Table shows that each container may only be loaded with an average maximum of 9,840 
Kg of cargo, well below the normal maximum weight for such containers.  The maximum all 
up weight road train limit will vary from country to country.   
d.  
Enhanced Palletised Load system (EPLS).  EPLS is fitted with a Container Handling 
Unit (CHU) frame that enables it to load and unload containers without assistance from CHE.  
There is no requirement to preload the container onto a flatrack for transportation.   
e.  
Intermodal Rail.  Containers destined to be transported by rail can be loaded to their 
maximum plated weight provided that there is suitable CHE at either end of the journey.  
However, if the container is to be moved forward of the railhead planners are to operate 
within the DROPS/EPLS weight limit.   
f.  
Air Transport.  Weight limitations for containers being moved by air must be published 
in the movement instruction in conjunction with the capabilities of the assigned aircraft. 
15.  Container Handling Equipment.  There will be a requirement for depot and unit Container 
Handling Equipment (CHE) to support the movement of containers and for specialised Mechanical 
Handling Equipment (MHE) to load and un-load containers.  The following is a list of current in-
service CHE and MHE used when moving ISO Containers:  
2.3.5-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
a.  
Palletised Load Systems (PLS).  The MOD has a limited intermodal system with 
DROPS and EPLS which can handle containers by either mounting them on a GP FR or by 
the use of a Container Handling Unit (CHU).  If containers are to be transported on a GP FR 
a container handler is required to lift the container onto the FR.  Payloads for the container 
are detailed in Para 2a above.  There are three types of PLS variants:  
(1)   DROPS Medium Mobility Load Carrier (MMLC).  There are approximately 
1,100 MMLC vehicles currently in service.  They can only transport containers that 
have been loaded onto a GP Flatrack, NSN 3990-99-739-2212 or Converted A to GP 
Flatrack, NSN 3990-99-725-9707.  The vehicle cannot be used with a Container 
Handling Unit (CHU). 
(2)   The Improved Medium Mobility Load Carrier (IMMLC).  There are 
approximately 350 vehicles currently in service.  They can only transport containers 
that have been loaded onto a GP Flatrack, NSN 3990-99-739-2212 or Converted A to 
GP Flatrack, NSN 3990-99-725-9707.  The vehicle cannot be used with a Container 
Handling Unit (CHU).   
(3)   Enhanced Palletised Load System (EPLS).  There are approximately 180 MAN 
SV EPLS currently in service.  The vehicle is fitted with a CHU frame as part of the 
vehicle’s CES which can be mounted onto the LHS hook that will permit the vehicle to 
load, unload and transport containers that are not Flatrack based.  Containers mounted 
on flatracks are handled identically to the DROPS system but at a reduced payload see 
Para 2b above Note: the Converted A to GP Flatrack NSN 3990-99-725-9707 is 
prohibited for use with the EPLS.   
16.  Cranes.  Heavy cranes with a lifting capacity of 55 tonnes are used in military ports in UK, 
Cyprus and the Falklands; these can easily handle both 20' and 40' containers.     
17.  Rough Terrain Container Handlers (RTCH).  RTCH are modified civilian pattern vehicles 
with improved mobility.     
Movement Options 
18.  The requirement for the Management and Use of Containers within MOD is contained in JSP 
800, Vol 6 
and this Vol.  Logistic Services (LS) at Bicester is the focal point for the management, 
control, maintenance and provision of MOD owned and commercially leased containers of varying 
sizes, types and capacities.   
19.  Overseas Container Managers must be appointed to control all container stocks and 
movement for operations, exercises or home base locations.   
Application for Containers 
20.  Individual and Routine Movement.  Providing the appropriate authority and funding is in 
place the consignor is to apply for MOD and Lease-Hire container(s) as follows: 
a.  
Army units through the following to DCMS for all containers:  
(1)   UK –HQ Regional Command, MCC Aldershot.   
(2)   Germany – 69 MC Sqn, 29 Regt RLC.   
(3)   Other Areas – Local Movement Authority.   
b.  
RAF units bid either direct or when directed, via HQ Air to DCMS.   
2.3.5-4 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
c.  
Navy Command (RM units) bid through Navy Command Headquarters (NCHQ) Land 
Logs Mov Cell to DCMS.   
d.  
Navy Command (RN and RFA ships/units) bid direct to DCMS.   
e.  
All other units and establishments are to bid direct to DCMS  
21.  TLB are to forward all bids for MOD and Lease-Hire containers to:  
DCMS Bicester  
Logistic Commodities and Services  
Logistic Services  
 
DCMS  
Bicester International Freight Terminal  
Gravenhill  
Bicester  
Oxfordshire  
OX26 6JP  
 
Bicester Military: 94240 3110/3093 Fax: 94240 3112  
Bicester Civil: 01869 257110 / 01869 257093 Fax: 01869 257112  
Email: xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx.   
 
22.  DCMS is responsible for the provision of containers (less Liner Service). On receipt of the 
ISO Container Booking Form (see Annex C) DCMS will allocate a DCMS Booking Reference to be 
used by units when collecting containers from depots or requesting commercial transport provided 
by the Army Div/Dist or by DSCOM. Containers or commercial transport will not be provided unless 
a DCMS Booking Reference is quoted. 
23.  Liner Service Containers.  The provision of Shippers Own Containers to be used on a Liner 
Service can be facilitated by DSCOM upon request. Bidding for these containers should be aligned 
with the bidding for transport, (see Para 33). Delivery and collection of Liner Service containers is 
arranged by the contractor 
24.  Formed Unit Movement.  Providing the appropriate authority and funding is in place the 
consignor is to apply for container(s) through the Controlling Movements Authority using a FET or 
JFET format.  Once the FET/JFET has been checked for accuracy and eligibility the CMA is to 
forward it to LS Bicester for action. 
Applications for Movements  
25.  In many cases units have the ability to collect their containers from depots and should do so, 
alternatively transport can be provided, commercially, under single service arrangements. DSCOM 
will only provide transport for containers if requested to do so. 
26.  The following single service transport bidding procedures are to be followed: 
a.  
Army units are to bid for transport through HQ Regional Command. 
b.  
Navy Command (RM units) are to bid for transport through NCHQ Land Logs Mov Cell 
to DSCOM. 
c.  
RAF units are to bid for transport through A4 Ops, HQ Air to DSCOM. 
d.  
Navy Command (RN and RFA ships/units) are to bid for transport direct to DSCOM. 
e.  
All other units and establishments are to bid for transport direct to DSCOM. 
2.3.5-5 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
27.  All bids to DSCOM for the transportation of containers are to be sent to the following: 
Commercial Surface Movements 
Freight Operations 
DSCOM, Mail point #3351 
MOD Abbey Wood 
Bristol 
BS34 8JH 
 
Fax: 01179 138946 
Restraint Equipment 
28.  Consignors loading containers are responsible for the provision of the appropriate restraint 
equipment for the load being moved and in accordance with the modes of transport being used to 
move the container.   
Annexes: 
A. Movement by Container Planning Guidance. 
B. Container Bidding Procedure for MOD Owned Containers. 
C. Container Request for Contract Hire Containers. 
D. ISO Container Booking Form. 
 
 
 
 
2.3.5-6 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Annex A to  
JSP 800, Vol 3, Pt 2.3.5 

 
MOVEMENT BY CONTAINER PLANNING GUIDANCE 
Introduction 
1. 
This Annex is to be used as a guide to planning the effective movement of materiel using 
containers. All of the regulations listed at Part 1, and described in detail in Section 2.3 must be 
complied with in full. 
2. 
Whilst acknowledging the advantage of using 40’ ISO containers for strategic movement, the 
challenges of handling and carriage associated with their use precludes their routine deployment 
forward of the Rear Support Area/Ship Point of Embarkation/Air Point of Embarkation/Main 
Operating Base/Forward Operating Base. Routinely 20’ ISO containers are to be deployed forward. 
3. 
Container requirements must be considered at the earliest possible stage in the planning 
process to ensure that sufficient assets are available when required. Factors that affect container 
availability include:  
a. 
Stock Holdings. The MOD holds a limited number of certain specialist ISO containers, 
for example Full Side Access (FSA). 
   
b. 
Manufacturing Lead Time. Fabrication of even the simplest container takes time and 
is subject to numerous external pressures such as international demand for raw materials. 
   
c. 
Pre-Positioning. This is particularly important for stocks imported from overseas 
where availability of suitable shipping space must be considered in addition to the voyage 
time. 
   
d. 
Commercial Pressures. Container availability is subject to seasonal demand from 
industry (e.g. there is a high demand for refrigerated containers at Christmas). 
 
e. 
Alliance Demands. The demands of alliance members (most notably the USA) must 
not be underestimated and can have a significant impact on the availability of ISO containers 
during the preparation phase of large deployments. 
 
Types of Containers 
4. 
There is a vast range of equipment that falls under the generic term ‘ISO Container’. ISO 
containers range in size from 10' to 45' in length and from flat platforms through half-height and the 
standard 8' 6" to the ‘high-cube’ at 9' 6" high. Within those size parameters they can be configured 
as open-topped, open-sided, curtain-sided, enclosed, collapsible, insulated, refrigerated, tanks, 
etc. The door arrangements can vary from end-opening to doors on all sides or any combination of 
both. 
5. 
There are 8 main groups of container within which there are many5 variations and systems. 
These are: 
                                                                                                                                                            
5 Further details of the various types of container available can be found in the IMO/ILO/UNECE Code of 
Practice for Packing of Cargo Transport Units (CTU Code).  
2.3.5-A-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
 
Ser 
Type 
Description 
An enclosed container has a metal skin of either steel or alloy 
completely covering the container. Access is either by side or by 
1. 
Enclosed Containers 
end doors which, when closed, are watertight and capable of 
being sealed. 
Open containers include many variations, some having ridged 
walls, others having slatted sides which are removable. All of this 
2. 
Open Containers 
type are capable of being loaded from the top and are covered by 
either a canvas or plastic cover. 
3. 
Tank Containers 
For bulk liquids or compressed gases. 
4. 
Dry Bulk Containers 
For gravity discharge and pressure discharge (i.e. for grain). 
These have fold down ends and can be stacked and interlocked. 
5. 
Flat Rack Containers 
Higher payload due to more cubic capacity and are able to carry 
over height and over width loads.  
Essentially flats without superstructure, and consequently do not 
6. 
Platform Containers 
belong in a fully automated container system since they cannot 
be top lifted when loaded. 
Refrigerated containers (‘reefers’) are widely used for the 
7. 
Refrigerated Containers movement of perishable and other goods that need controlled 
environments 
8. 
Special Containers 
These include cattle and thermal types. 
 
Table 1: Types of ISO Containers 
 
6. 
There are many types of specialist containers available on the commercial market but the 
quantities and costs vary according to market demand. The differing ranges of ISO freight 
containers have individual merits depending on the circumstance of use. When deciding on which 
type of ISO container is best for a specific task Demanders are to take advice from the DCMS in 
Bicester. A summary of MOD owned containers with key dimensions are below.6 
                                                                                                                                                            
66 All FSA variants now included in single description; all 20’ end loading ISO are under BX2; All RF screened variants are under RFS. 
2.3.5-A-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
 
 
Max 
Internal 
External  Internal  External 
Door 
Internal 
Tare 
Max 
Payload 
Width 
Width 
Length 
Length 
Height 
Height 
Weight 
Payload 
DROPS 
(mm) 
(mm) 
(mm) 
(mm) 
(mm) 
(mm) 
(kg) 
Civ (kg) 
(kg) 
BK20  20’ Bulk 
2,366 
2,438 
5,838 
6,058 
2,235 
2,374 
2,450 
28,030 
14,500 
20’ End 
BX2 
Loading Dry 
2,352 
2,438 
5,900 
6,058 
2,280 
2,386 
2,240 
21,760 
14,500 
Freight 
40’ End 
BX4 
Loading Dry 
2,350 
2,438 
12,044 
12,191 
2,287 
2,346 
3,980 
26,500 
14,500 
Freight 
20’ Diesel 
DE20 
2,209 
2,438 
4,800 
6,058 
2,140 
2,222 
3,289 
22,111 
14,500 
Electric Reefer 
20’ Flatrack 
FC2 
2,387 
2,438 
5,908 
6,058 
N/A 
2,320 
2,845 
22,555 
14,500 
Collapsible 
20’ Full Side 
2,083/ 
FSA 
2,280 
2,438 
5,897 
6,058 
2,278 
3,500 
20,500 
14,500 
Access 
2,381* 
GE10  Generator 
N/A 
678 
N/A 
2184 
N/A 
N/A 
950 
N/A 
14,500 
HH20  20’ Half Height 2,227 
2,438 
5,912 
6,058 
1,060 
1,060 
2,586 
21,414 
14,500 
I20 
20’ Insulated  2,352 
2,438 
5,900 
6,058 
2,280 
2,386 
2,240 
21,760 
14,500 
OS20  20’ Open Side  2,309 
2,438 
5,897 
6,058 
2,003 
2,258 
2,931 
22,469 
14,500 
OT2 
20’ Open Top  2,346 
2,438 
5,905 
6,058 
2,277 
2,317 
2,300 
21,700 
14,500 
RF20  20’ Reefer 
2,209 
2,438 
5,346 
6,058 
2,140 
2,222 
3,289 
22,111 
14,500 
20’ RF 
RFS 
2,340 
2,438 
5,860 
6,058 
2,105 
2,190 
2,300 
18,020 
14,500 
Screened 
20’ Side 
SD20 
2,352 
2,438 
5,897 
6,058 
2,280 
2,386 
2,240 
21,760 
14,500 
Loading 
VB2/ 
20’ Ventilated  2,346 
2,438 
5,900 
6,058 
2,276 
2,384 
2,295 
21,705 
14,500 
BV2 
 
Table 2: Summary of MOD-Owned Containers 
 
Refrigerated Containers (Reefers) 
 
7. 
Reefers are used to move and store temperature sensitive or perishable items. They are 
sophisticated and expensive items of equipment and are easily damaged if not operated correctly. 
Good husbandry and maintenance is essential if operating failures and large repair bills are to be 
avoided; repair bills can be high and typically run into thousands of pounds. Guidance on their use 
is given below:  
 
a. 
Pre-Planning. Before a reefer is ordered, it is important to assess the size, volume and 
weight of the stock to be moved so that sufficient reefers are ordered. It is also essential that 
the temperature range required is known so that the containers can be pre-set to operating 
temperatures before delivery to the user. There must be suitable on-site power sources and 
staff capable of operating the equipment safely. 
   
b. 
Designated Responsible Officer (DRO). Every ship or unit using refrigerated 
containers is to appoint a DRO who is to implement and supervise good husbandry. The 
DRO will be required to explain any excessive damage to internal and external surfaces and 
to refrigeration units. 
 
c. 
Temperature Control. It is important to ensure that doors are not left open for long 
periods, especially in hot weather as this puts an unnecessary strain on the compressors and 
2.3.5-A-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
can lead to the icing of condensing tubes and fans. This in turn can lead to costly damage to 
motors or other components and the loss or spoiling of the stores. Some reefers are fitted 
with a micro-switch which switches the compressor off when the doors are opened. This 
switch must NOT be overridden without the authority of the DRO. 
   
d. 
Internal Air Circulation. Reefers operate by the free circulation of cooled air within the 
container. It is essential that neither the load nor any packing materials block the air 
circulation grill at the top of the container at the far end from the doors and that the floor air 
ducts are kept clean and free. 
   
e. 
Food and Medical Supplies. Where food/medical supplies are stored or transported in 
reefers they must comply with the relevant regulations. Care must be taken to avoid potential 
'hot' spots within the reefer due to poor air circulation. 
 
CHACONS and MINICONS 
 
8. 
Maritime units use CHACON and MINICON for lay apart storage for HM Ships and RFA 
shipping in port and also as additional upper deck storage facilities. Neither the CHACON nor the 
MINICON conform to ISO standards. 
a.  
CHACON. The CHACON is a wooden logistic container approximately Length 2,210 
mm, Width 1,600 mm, Height 2,010 mm capable of holding up to 4 tonnes. 
b.  
MINICON. The MINICON is a steel logistic container approximately Depth 1,721 mm, 
Width 2,014 mm, Height 1,960 mm capable of holding up to 4 tonnes 
9. 
Bidding. Base Ported HM Ships and RFA shipping wishing to obtain MINICON and 
CHACON should bid to the relevant Navel Base Waterfront Services Organisation or contact 
FLEET LOG OPS. 
Tricon / Quadcon 
10.  To meet the demands of providing a rapid and efficient method of storage and transportation 
in volumes less than those of a 20’ ISO container, a versatile mini-container has been developed 
for use by the US Armed Forces. These mini-containers can be configured so that 3 units (Tricon) 
or 4 units (Quadcon) can be secured together and produce the same footprint as a standard 20’ 
ISO container. 
11.  When grouped together as a Tricon / Quadcon the mini-containers have the same logistic 
versatility as a standard 20’ ISO container and can be shipped as such by military and commercial 
means. When separated into individual units each part can be handled by standard MHE and 
provide a wide range of options for storage, capital equipment housing and mobile shipping. A 
summary of the dimensions of the Tricon and Quadcon system are given below. 
2.3.5-A-4 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
 
Dimensions 
Tricon 
Quadcon 
External Length 
2,438 mm 
1,457 mm 
External Width 
1,968 mm 
 
External Height 
2,438 mm 
2,082 mm 
Internal Length 
2,299 mm 
1,419 mm 
Internal Width 
1,882 mm 
 
Internal Height 
2,284 mm 
1,889 mm 
Door Opening Width 
1,870 mm 
1,362 kg 
Door Opening Height 
2,164 mm 
1,791 mm 
Max Gross Weight 
6,759 kg 
5,080 kg 
Tare Weight 
1,160 kg 
800 kg 
Payload Weight 
5,579 kg 
4,280kg 
Internal Volume 
9.86 m3 
6.11m3 
Fork Pocket – Height 
115 mm 
 
Fork Pocket – Width 
356 mm 
 
Fork Pocket - Centres 
902 mm 
 
 
Table 3: Summary of Tricon / Quadcon Dimensions 
 
ISO Container Identity 
 
12.  There are various types of markings which identify ISO Containers, these are: 
a.  
BIC Code. BIC stands for ‘Bureau international Des Containers et du Transport 
Intermodal’. The BIC Code is held in the Official Register of Internationally Protected ISO 
Alpha Codes for identification of container owners. 
b.  
Container Number/Prefix Letters. The container number is made up from 4 figures 
(The BIC Code), 6 numbers and a check digit. 
c.  
Type Codes. The type codes which are usually found below the container number 
consist of 4 alphanumeric characters. The first 2 will state the length and height of the 
container and the second 2 will state the type (e.g. 22G1 – Denotes a 20’ x 8’ 6” Enclosed 
general purpose container with passive vents at the upper part of cargo space). 
d.  
CSC Plate. The International Convention for Safe Containers (CSC) plate also called 
the CSC Safety Approval Plate is located on the end door of the ISO Container. The 
information displayed is as below: 
(1)   The country of approval and approval reference. 
(2)   The month and year of manufacture. 
(3)   The manufacturer’s identification number of the container. 
(4)   The maximum operating gross weight in kg and lbs. 
(5)   The allowable stacking weight in kg and lbs. 
(6)   The end-wall strength. 
(7)   The Periodic Examination Scheme (PES) date of next inspection or Approved 
Continuous Examination Programme (ACEP) code. 
2.3.5-A-5 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Quantity and Type Required 
13.  When assessing the type and quantities of containers required consideration should be given 
to the length of time a container will be required and what its likely usage will be. DCMS will 
provide advice as required and have contracts in place to facilitate the following options: 
a.  
Used 20’ ISO End Loaders. Used 20’ containers can be purchased cheaply and could 
be considered for use as ‘one trip’ containers but should stil  be accounted for. Purchase of 
used containers should be considered for long term operational tasks such as storage, 
shelter or force protection. 
b.  
Leased Containers. Generally, attracting low rental costs, leased containers are 
considered most cost effective if used for short-term movement tasks. If left in theatre for a 
long time (or lost) they become less cost effective and incur considerable unnecessary 
expense. Ultimately the container may have to be purchased from the owner at an overall 
cost (Lease and Purchase) that potentially will be in excess of its value. 
c.  
Lease/Purchase Containers. An alternative to either buying used containers or 
leasing is the lease/purchase contract. A slightly higher daily charge is incurred but if the 
container is required for longer than anticipated (or is lost or damaged beyond economic 
repair) it can be purchased at a much lower price. This type of contract provides a degree of 
insurance when the length of time the container will be required is uncertain. 
14.  To assist managers when planning container numbers and load configurations, in support of 
the role of the CTU Supervisor, JSP 800, Vol 3, Guidance Leaflet 2 has been produced which 
illustrates best practices and certain load configurations available when stuffing ISO containers 
 
2.3.5-A-6 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 


 
 
                                                                                                 ANNEX B TO  
JSP 800, VOL 3, PT 2.3.5 
 
CONTAINER BIDDING PROCEDURE FOR MOD OWNED CONTAINERS 
 
2.3.5-B-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
ANNEX C TO  
JSP 800, VOL 3, PT 2.3.5 

 
CONTAINER REQUEST PROCEDURE FOR CONTRACT HIRE CONTAINERS 
START
DCMS
Unit
Unit send written request to DCMS
Are Military 
YES
Containers to 
NO
be used? 
DCMS contact Leasing company to 
determine where the container is to 
be sourced
DCMS get confirmation and pick up 
Reference from Depot
DCMS confirm with unit Military 
Containers are to be used & confirm 
DCMS arrange on hire inspection if 
job No & collection location
required
Is Unit 
Unit to arrange 
Is Unit 
Transport 
NO
Transport with 
NO
Transport 
available?
DSCOM
available?
YES
YES
Arrange Date & Time for collection 
DCMS pass details from Leasing 
from DCMS Bicester
company to enable unit to pick up
Containers picked up, Hire charges 
Unit driver to sign DCMS Port Ops 
begin
sheet on collection
DCMS receive confirmation of 
Container Serial numbers
DCMS amend DCMS II Database to 
reflect new customer and Container 
DCMS update DCMS II Database
location
Container in use
END STATE
2.3.5-C-1               JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 
 

 
ANNEX D TO  
JSP 800, VOL 3, PT 2.3.5 

 
ISO CONTAINER BOOKING FORM 
 
General Details 
Budget UIN:  
IAC:  
Op/Ex name: 
 
Bidding UIN:  
RAC: 
 
Consignor Details 
Establishment 
 
Point of contact 
Name:                                          Tel No:                             Fax:   
Full delivery address 
 
for container(s) 
 
 
Name:  
 
Tel No:                                       Fax. No. 
Working hours 
Point of contact 
Type and quantity of 
 
Container(s) required 
Required delivery date  From  
Estimated Return Date:  
for container(s) 
Craneage 
 
arrangements 
T998H / DGN / SSN 
serial number (if 
 
available) 
Haz cat and UN serial 
 
No.  
(if applicable) 
Special instructions 
 
Justification/Usage 
 
Consignee Details 
Name 
 
Point of contact (if known) 
Tel No:                                       Fax: 
 
Delivery address 
 
Required delivery date 
 
Special instructions 
 
 
Name:   
 
 
 
 Rank:  
 
  
 
Signature:  
 
Unit:  
 
DATE:  
 
 
 
 
TEL NO: 
 
 
2.3.5-D-1               JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 
 

link to page 11  
SECTION 2.4 – EXECUTION OF MOVEMENT  
Introduction 
1. 
The execution of movement brings to a conclusion all of the planning and preparation factors 
that make up the movement plan and commences when physical movement occurs for the first 
time.  Those SQEP tasked as part of the movement plan and under the coordination of the relevant 
CMA, are responsible for delivering movement as planned using a combination of available 
resources, experience, qualifications and delegated authority.   
Minimum Requirements 
2. 
The movement planning and preparation will have taken into consideration all of the relevant 
factors to prepare for movement with the relevant CMA giving orders for the conduct of the activity.  
As a minimum, before the movement of materiel takes place, the planning and preparation process 
must have ensured that: 
a.  
A Safe Environment has Been Identified.  The location(s) selected for the movement 
activity to take place must be managed and controlled.  Prior to any movement activity 
commencing, all nominated SQEP with responsibility for the control and supervision of 
activity or elements of the overall movement plan, must ensure they have a safe 
environment.  In addition to acknowledging the site risk assessments, dynamic risk 
assessments7 must be conducted prior to activity commencing.  Those personnel controlling 
the activity must satisfy themselves that they fully understand the surrounding environment 
and have a plan to control their part of the movement activity. 
b.  
Safe Processes are in Place.  There are likely to be multiple processes in operation 
when the movement plan is executed and all processes must be synchronised so that they 
are compatible.  The movement of materiel involves transport operations and personnel, 
operating concurrently, potentially in harsh environments, and it is essential that the Person 
In Charge (PIC) and all relevant supervisors have satisfied themselves that control of the 
processes can be maintained. 
c.  
Effective Management and Control Systems are Established.  The size and nature 
of movement operations will vary with each task.  The CMA will direct those key 
responsibilities to be provided and task formations as appropriate.  Those nominated to 
supervise movement activity, irrespective of rank or grade must be SQEP to carry out the 
task.  Equally, once nominated, such supervisors must have the authority of the CMA to 
allow them to control and manage such tasks and this authority should be clearly defined in 
all relevant movement plan orders.  Those key appointments nominated by the CMA do not 
absolve units or personnel participating in the movement plan from individual responsibilities 
for the control and management of themselves, their subordinates or those temporarily 
assigned to assist with executing the plan. 
d.  
Appropriate SQEP and Resources are Nominated.  It is essential if a safe 
environment with safe processes is to be managed and controlled, that SQEP are appointed 
to undertake all of the responsibilities when moving materiel.  This includes but is not limited 
to appointments such as drivers, operators, supervisors, specialists, marshallers, packers, 
work parties and those in a position of authority and responsibility. Appropriate training for 
the marshalling of vehicles onto vessels, rail flats or trainers is defined in Sec 2.3, para 6. 
All activity must be fully assessed by the PIC with sufficient measures put in place to reduce 
identified risks to ALARP. 
3. 
Defence Code of Practice (DCoP).  In accordance with Part 1, Section 1.2, Para 24, the 
DCoP defines the standards by which movement operations must be conducted. 
                                                                                                                                                            
7 JSP 375 refers. 
2.4-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
4. 
Dynamic Risk Assessments.  In addition to understanding and managing those risks 
identified through planning and preparation for the environments being used and activities being 
undertaken, Dynamic Risk assessments must be completed by those Supervisors responsible for 
managing activity.  Dynamic Risk assessments must be completed as close to the start of the 
activity and repeated whenever there is a possibility that the environment may have changed.  
Additionally, dynamic risk assessments should be considered whilst activity is being conducted in 
order to capture previously unidentified risks or hazards. 
5. 
Safety Briefs.  Those appointments with responsibility for site, task and/or activity related to 
the movement plan are all responsible for providing the relevant safety briefs to all personnel in the 
environment where the activity is taking place.  Safety briefs must be delivered before any activity 
commences and must consider dynamic risk assessments in addition to all other risks identified.  
In addition to safety considerations for the site, including emergency action plans, the brief must 
cover how the activity is to be conducted, by whom and with emphasis on the control, processes 
and safety aspects required by the relevant supervisors.   
6. 
Movement Control.  Movement must only take place when the relevant supervisor or 
appointed person has given authority for it to do so.  Movement must be controlled so that all 
activity is managed, regulations and planning factors are adhered to and the conduct of movement 
falls within the scope of the movement plan.  The CMA will instigate movement through a Call 
Forward process, commensurate with the environment and the plan, to the next point of 
movement.  Thereafter, Movement Control will supervise the movement process in order to ensure 
the relevant materiel moves in the right order, to the correct destination by the modes of transport 
planned.   
7. 
Checklists.  Checklists to aid supervisors with the key elements of responsibility for the 
activity they are controlling are in the relevant modal section.  However, checklists must only be 
used as an aid to supervising tasks and are by no means exhaustive in content. 
8. 
Security.  In accordance with JSP 440 the consignor must ensure the correct security 
measures are in place for the duration of the loading or unloading operation. 
9. 
Protective Personal Equipment (PPE).  As a minimum, the PIC should ensure that 
appropriate PPE is issued, worn and is fit for purpose.   
10.  Documentation.  The accurate and timely completion and distribution of the correct 
documentation as identified in the movement plan, is essential to facilitate the movement process.  
Documentation must be completed to record all of those items being moved and sufficient copies 
of all documentation must be readily available to those authorities throughout the movement 
process who are entitled to have access to it.   
Movement Reporting  
11.  On completion of any movement activity movement reporting relevant to the despatch and/or 
receipt of materiel must be conducted to allow the CMA visibility of how the movement plan is 
developing.  Specifically, movement reporting must acknowledge: 
a.  
Changes to the movement plan. 
b.  
Reduction or increases in the planned load with reasons. 
c.  
Actual load details. 
d.  
Actual timings. 
e.  
Any relevant remarks. 
2.4-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
Movement reporting templates vary between modes of transport.  Examples of reporting templates 
are shown in the respective modal sections.   
Rejected Consignments  
12.  When a consignment of materiel is rejected for movement, the relevant CMA or Freight 
Forwarder (if contracted), must notify the consignor to explain the reason(s) for the rejection and 
provide available courses of action.  The consignor is responsible for coordinating the appropriate 
action to rectify the reasons for rejection and making all necessary arrangements to present the 
consignment of materiel in accordance with the revised movement plan. 
Right to Refuse the Load 
13.   A carrier or an agent acting on behalf of the carrier has the right to refuse carriage of any 
load if they believe that the load presented does not conform to the minimum standards for 
carriage.   
Loss, Damage and Non-Delivery 
14.  Materiel Loss is a discrepancy between materiel accounted and reported as being 
despatched and the subsequent receipt and accounting of materiel at the next point in the supply 
chain.  Losses of materiel are serious and must be investigated in order to determine the reason 
for the loss and whether any remedial action needs to be taken to the movement process.  Further 
information is available in the Defence Logistic Framework (DLF). 
15.  Materiel Damaged in transit must be acknowledged at the point of damage and reported to 
the CMA before further movement takes place.  Should the CMA determine that the damaged 
materiel can proceed as intended, all subsequent bills of lading are to be annotated with a 
description of the damage.  The CMA at the point where damage occurred is responsible for 
gathering all relevant details of the damage, how it occurred and providing such information to the 
appropriate HQ. 
16.  Materiel not delivered in accordance with the movement plan should be reported by the 
Consignee to the CMA in order for formal investigations to take place.  The CMA is responsible for 
communicating the non delivery to those involved in the movement plan in order to locate the 
consignment.  A review should be conducted to identify whether non delivery is as a result of 
previous movement.  Once the CMA has exhausted all possible avenues of investigation and the 
materiel has not been located, they are to instigate materiel loss procedures.   
Reporting of Unsafe Practice  
17.  All personnel employed in the process of loading, restraint and unloading materiel are 
responsible for informing the PIC or Loading Supervisor of any unsafe practice that they observe or 
anticipate.  The PIC or Loading Supervisor must subsequently react to such concerns and take the 
appropriate action to ensure such safety concerns are addressed, rectified and reported through 
the chain of command in order to prevent any reoccurrence.   
Non-Compliance 
18.  Individuals, organisations or any competent persons involved in the movements process are 
to identify, correct (where possible) and report all incidents of non-compliance with policy in order 
to prevent injuries or fatalities, damage to equipment, major property or environmental damage, 
delay to operations or delay to the supply chain process. 
19.  Arrangements must be in place to ensure that the PIC is made aware of any M&T activity 
accidents/incidents occurring within their area of responsibility and that these details are reported 
to the appropriate TLB Incident Notification Cell.   
2.4-3 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
20.  TLB must ensure that all non-compliance incidents are investigated as appropriate, to 
ascertain the cause/causes of the non-compliance.  TLB must monitor non-compliance, analyse 
trends, identify causes and ensure that learning accounts are implemented and undertake 
measures to review and amend procedures/processes in order to prevent further non-compliance 
and ensure a culture of continuous improvement is developed and maintained.  The TLB must 
inform MTSR immediately of any accident/incidents occurring during conduct of M&T activity which 
is subject to external investigation (e.g. HSE) and provide copies of any Prohibition or 
Improvement Notice issued. 
21.  TLB Duty Holders must ensure that non-compliance reports and learning accounts are used 
to ensure that an informed, collective agreement is reached with all stakeholders (pan-TLB) with 
regards to how future episodes of non-compliance are addressed and lessons learned. 
2.4-4 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 59  
SECTION 2.4.1 – EXECUTION OF ROAD MOVEMENT  
Introduction 
1. 
The information contained in this section is specific to the loading, restraint and unloading of 
materiel to and from road transport platforms.  This Section is designed to be used in 
conjunction with the overarching Movement Execution Regulations at Section 2.4 
and 
relates specifically to Road Movement operations
.   
Overarching Requirements  
2. 
For any movement by road to take place, the following minimum requirements must be 
catered for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment with controlled access to prepare, load, restrain and 
unload the materiel being moved. 
b.  
The materiel must not exceed the capacity or design criteria of the transport platform. 
c.  
Provision of appropriate SQEP at the point of loading/unloading as required to 
complete the entire task. 
3. 
DCoP No 1 – Movement by Road defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
loading, restraint and unloading of materiel by road is to be conducted.  The DCoP contains 
method statements which define the standards by which activity must be conducted and the roles 
and responsibilities of those involved in the process.   
4. 
The Method Statements incorporated into DCoP No 1 are: 
a.  
The Loading of Vehicles. 
b.  
Winching Operations. 
c.  
Unloading Vehicles. 
d.  
Loading and Unloading ISO Containers. 
e.  
Loading and Unloading Loose Freight. 
Documentation 
5. 
The following documentation is to be used (as applicable) for the movement of materiel by 
road:  
a.  
Packing List.  The Consignor is responsible for completing a Packing List of all items 
being moved, regardless of whether they are loose, palletised, boxed, netted or wrapped.   
b.  
Freight Movement Note (FMN) MOD F 1142/1142A.  Materiel is to be consigned 
using MOD F 1142/1142A for consignments moved by military or commercial transport.  
Instructions for completion are available on the inside cover of the document pad.   
c.  
Dangerous Goods Note (DGN) F Mov 1042.  Materiel that falls within the definition of 
DG must be moved in accordance with Dangerous Goods Manual.  Consignors must ensure 
F Mov 1042 is raised for all items/packages classed as DG.   
d.  
Documentation Variations.  The CMA responsible for overseas locations where there 
are variations to road movement documentation is responsible for communicating the 
documentation requirements and standards to all relevant stakeholders. 
2.4.1-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
e.  
Tie Down Scheme (TDS).  TDS are to be provided as applicable in accordance with 
JSP 800, Vol 7. 
f.  
Customs Documentation.  The Consignor is required to ensure the appropriate 
Customs Documentation is provided for the entire journey in accordance with the current 
HMRC policy and Host Nation legislation.  Leaflet 22 refers.   
6. 
Checklists.  A Checklist to aid supervisors with the key elements of responsibility for road 
movement operations is at Guidance Leaflet 8.  Checklists must only be used as an aid to 
supervising tasks and are by no means exhaustive in content. 
Reporting 
7. 
Traffic Despatch Advice (TDA).  A Traffic Despatch Advice (TDA) must be sent by the 
consignor once the consignment has been despatched, to all relevant addressees. 
 
2.4.1-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 59  
SECTION 2.4.2 – EXECUTION OF RAIL MOVEMENT  
Introduction 
1. 
The information contained in this section is specific to the loading, restraint and unloading of 
materiel to and from rail rolling stock platforms.  This Section is designed to be used in 
conjunction with the overarching Movement Execution Regulations at Section 2.4 
and 
relates specifically to Rail Movement operations
.   
Overarching Requirements  
2. 
For any movement by road to take place, the following minimum requirements must be 
catered for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment with controlled access to prepare, load, restrain and 
unload the materiel being moved. 
b.  
The materiel does not exceed the capacity or design criteria of the rolling stock and 
falls within all relevant rail gauges for the route being used. 
c.  
Provision of appropriate SQEP at the point of loading/unloading as required to 
complete the entire task. 
3. 
DCoP No 2 – Movement by Rail defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by rail is to be conducted.  Specifically the DCoP contains method 
statements which cater for key elements of rail movement activity and the responsibilities of those 
involved in the process.   
4. 
The Method Statements incorporated into DCoP No 2 are: 
a.  
Loading military Vehicles. 
b.  
Unloading military vehicles. 
c.  
Loading and unloading of ISO Containers. 
d.  
Loading and Unloading of Loose Freight. 
Documentation 
5. 
The following documentation is to be used (as applicable) for the movement of materiel by 
rail:  
a.  
Packing List.  The Consignor is responsible for completing a Packing List of all items 
being moved, regardless of whether they are loose, palletised, boxed, netted or wrapped.   
b.  
Freight Movement Note (FMN) – MOD F 1142/1142A.  Materiel is to be documented 
using FMN MOD F 1142/1142A for consignments moved by rail in the UK.  Instructions for 
completion are available on the inside cover of the document pad.   
c.  
Military Freight Warrant – BFG Form 347.  The BFG F 347 is to be produced for all 
rail consignments in Germany including the return of empty roiling stock.  This document is to 
be completed by the CMA. 
d.  
Car Manifest (Nachweisung).  When more than one rail wagon of materiel is being 
moved in Germany, a Car Manifest (Nachweisung) is to be raised by the CMA and the BFG 
F 347 is to be annotated as such. 
2.4.2-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
e.  
Dangerous Goods.  Materiel that falls within the definition of DG must be moved in 
accordance with Dangerous Goods Manual.  Consignors must ensure all applicable DG 
documentation is raised for all items/packages classed as DG to be moved.   
f.  
Documentation Variations.  The CMA responsible for overseas locations where there 
are variations to rail movement documentation is responsible for communicating the 
documentation requirements and standards to all relevant stakeholders. 
g.  
Tie Down Schemes (TDS).  TDS are to be provided as applicable in accordance with 
JSP 800, Vol 7 or the DB Sketch Book. 
h.  
Customs Documentation.  The Consignor is required to ensure the appropriate 
Customs Documentation is provided for the entire journey in accordance with the current 
HMRC policy and Host Nation legislation.  Leaflet 22 to Part 2 refers.   
6. 
Checklists.  A Checklist to aid supervisors with the key elements of responsibility for rail 
movement operations is at Guidance Leaflet 5.  Checklists must only be used as an aid to 
supervising tasks and are by no means exhaustive in content

Reporting 
7. 
Traffic Despatch Advice (TDA).  A Traffic Despatch Advice (TDA) must be sent by the 
consignor once the consignment has been despatched, to all relevant addressees. 
2.4.2-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 59  
SECTION 2.4.3 – EXECUTION OF AIR MOVEMENT  
Introduction 
1. 
The information contained in this section is specific to the loading, restraint and unloading of 
materiel to and from aircraft platforms.  This section is designed to be used in conjunction with 
the overarching Movement Execution Regulations at Section 2.4 
and relates specifically to 
Air Movement operations
.   
Overarching Requirements  
2. 
For any movement by air to take place, the following minimum requirements must be catered 
for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment with controlled access to prepare, load, restrain and 
unload the materiel being moved. 
b.  
The materiel does not exceed the capacity or design criteria of the transport platform. 
c.  
Provision of appropriate SQEP at the point of loading/unloading as required to 
complete the entire task. 
3. 
DCoP No 3 – Movement by Air defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by air is to be conducted.  Specifically the DCoP contains method 
statements which cater for key elements of air movement activity and the responsibilities of those 
involved in the process.   
4. 
The Method Statements incorporated into DCoP No 3 are: 
a.  
Loading military Vehicles and Freight. 
b.  
Winching Operations. 
c.  
Unloading military vehicles and Freight. 
Documentation 
5. 
The following documentation is to be used (as applicable) for the movement of materiel by 
air:  
a.  
Packing List.  The Consignor is responsible for completing a Packing List of all items 
being moved, regardless of whether they are loose, palletised, boxed, netted or wrapped.   
b.  
F1380 - Air Waybill.  The F1380 is used to identify MOD sponsored cargo that may be 
required to travel by air on the following occasions: 
(1)   All MOD cargo exported from the UK (including Service sponsored indulgence 
cargo), whether carried in RAF, charter or commercial aircraft 
(2)   All MOD cargo imported into the UK when it has been previously exported duty 
and tax paid. 
(3)   Dangerous Goods iaw Dangerous Goods Manual / IATA DGRs and is 
accompanied by a F569 Shippers Declaration for Dangerous Goods.   
(4)   HM Forces Mail. 
(5)   Personal effects of Service and MOD civilian personnel. 
2.4.3-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
(6)   Cargo originating from other Government departments. 
(7)   Cargo sponsored by the MOD and belonging to civilian welfare organisations. 
(8)   Cargo sponsored by the MOD and owned by commercial organisations  
c.  
F/Mov 569 Shippers Declaration for Dangerous Goods.  Materiel that falls within the 
definition of DG must be moved in accordance with Dangerous Goods Manual and/or IATA 
Dangerous Goods Regulations.  Consignors must ensure F/Mov 569 is raised for all 
items/packages classed as DG.   
d.  
RAF 1256C - RAF Cargo Manifest.  The 1256C is to be raised by the AMS/unit at the 
departure airfield and used for all manually manifested aircraft, including those flights 
designated as resupply to operations and exercises. 
e.  
F Mov 238/A - Air Load Manifest (Non Dangerous Goods) Ops/Exercise.  The 
F/Mov238/ F/Mov 238A are to be raised by the unit being moved when ordered to do so by 
the CMA.  The manifest is used to record all General Cargo being moved by air on 
operations and exercises. 
f.  
F Mov 239/A - Air Load Manifest (Dangerous Goods) Ops/Exercises.  This form is 
to be raised by the unit being moved when ordered to do so by the CMA.  The manifest is 
used to record all dangerous Goods being moved by air on operations and exercises.   
g.  
RAF 1258 - Emergency Response to Aircraft Captain – Dangerous Goods.  The F 
1258 form provides formal written notification to the operating captain (NOTOC) of all DG 
loaded to the aircraft. 
h.  
RAF 7533 - Notification to Aircraft Captain.  The F 7533 is used in conjunction with 
F1380 Air Waybill to record the transfer of responsibility for any item that demands special 
handling and formal transfer of custody and responsibility from one person to another.  
Leaflet 9 Refers. 
i.  
Tie Down Schemes (TDS).  TDS are to be provided in accordance with JSP 800, Vol 
or the relevant air platform Air Publication (AP). 
j.  
Documentation Variations.  The CMA responsible for overseas locations where there 
are variations to air movement documentation is responsible for communicating the 
documentation requirements and standards to all relevant stakeholders. 
k.  
Customs Documentation.  The Consignor is required to ensure the appropriate 
Customs Documentation is provided for the entire journey in accordance with the current 
HMRC policy and Host Nation legislation.  Leaflet 22 refers. 
Air Movement Reporting 
6. 
A Departure Message must be sent by the CMA once the consignment has been 
despatched, to all relevant addressees.   
7. 
A Delay Message must be sent by the CMA when an aircraft has been delayed from planned 
departure time by more than 20 minutes, to all relevant addressees.   
 
2.4.3-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 59  
SECTION 2.4.4 – EXECUTION OF SEA MOVEMENT  
Introduction  
1. 
The information contained in this section is specific to the loading, restraint and 
unloading of materiel to and from ships.  This section is designed to be used in 
conjunction with the overarching Movement Execution Regulations at Section 2.4 
and 
relates specifically to Sea Movement operations
.   
Overarching Requirements  
2. 
For any movement by sea to take place, the following minimum requirements must be 
catered for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment with controlled access to prepare, load, restrain 
and unload the materiel being moved. 
b.  
The materiel does not exceed the capacity or design criteria of the ship. 
c.  
Provision of appropriate SQEP at the point of loading/unloading as required to 
complete the entire task. 
3. 
DCoP No 4 – Movement by Sea defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by sea is to be conducted.  Specifically the DCoP contains method 
statements which cater for key elements of sea movement activity and the responsibilities of 
those involved in the process.   
4. 
The Method Statements incorporated into DCoP No 4 are: 
a.  
Loading vehicles to ships. 
b.  
Unloading vehicles from ships. 
c.  
Loading freight to ships. 
d.  
Unloading freight from ships. 
e.  
Loading containers to ships. 
f.  
Unloading containers from ships. 
Documentation 
5. 
The following documentation is to be used (as applicable) for the movement of materiel 
by sea:  
a.  
Packing List.  The Consignor is responsible for completing a Packing List of all 
items being moved, regardless of whether they are loose, palletised, boxed, netted or 
wrapped.   
b.  
Freight Movement Note MOD F 1142/1142A.  Each individual piece of cargo 
must be accompanied by an MOD F 1142 unless FLC instructions specify otherwise.  
Instructions for completion are available on the inside cover of the document pad.   
c.  
Dangerous Goods.  Materiel that falls within the definition of DG must be moved 
in accordance with Dangerous Goods Manual and/or IMDG.   
d.  
Gas Free Certificates.  Gas free certificates are required for bulk fuel carrying 
vehicles that are declared as empty.  Certificates are only acceptable from a competent 
organisation that is approved to carry out this task.   
2.4.4-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
e.  
Cargo & Stowage Report (C&SR).  The C&SR is used as ships manifest of all 
cargo stowed to the vessel.  This includes vehicles, trailers, ISO containers (Non 
Dangerous Goods & Dangerous Goods).  The C&SR will be collated at the point of 
loading by the CMA.  Electronic spreadsheets are commonly developed for the C&SR 
but MOD paper stocks are also held as AFW 5184 – Cargo and Stowage Report. 
f.  
Report Cargo Not Shipped.  This document accompanies the Cargo & Stowage 
Report and is raised when cargo allocated to the vessel is not shipped.  The reason for 
non-loading must be explained in the Report.  Electronic spreadsheets are commonly 
developed for the Cargo not shipped but MOD paper stocks are also held as AFW 5185 
– Cargo not Shipped 
g.  
SITPRO Standard Shipping Note (SSN) (Commercial Use, Indulgence/Maint 
only)
h.  
Mov Ops 171/79 – Vehicle List & Shipper’s Declaration.  Vehicle manifest 
which is to include vehicle/trailer registration numbers, designation, laden weight (metric) 
and outline the description of vehicle/trailer load.   
i.  
Documentation Variations.  The CMA responsible for overseas locations where 
there are variations to sea movement documentation is responsible for communicating 
the documentation requirements and standards to all relevant stakeholders. 
j.  
Customs Documentation.  The Consignor is required to ensure the appropriate 
Customs Documentation is provided for the entire journey in accordance with the current 
HMRC policy and Host Nation legislation.  Leaflet 22 refers. 
6. 
Checklists.  A Checklist to aid supervisors with the key elements of responsibility for 
sea movement operations is at Guidance Leaflet 10.  Checklists must only be used as an aid 
to supervising tasks and are by no means exhaustive in content. 
7. 
A Sail Vice must be sent by the CMA once the consignment has been despatched, to all 
relevant addressees.   
2.4.4-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

link to page 59  
SECTION 2.4.5 - EXECUTION OF CONTAINER MOVEMENT  
Introduction  
1. 
The information contained in this section is specific to the loading, restraint and unloading of 
materiel to and from ISO Containers.  This section is designed to be used in conjunction with 
the overarching Movement Execution Regulations at Section 2.4 
and relates specifically to 
ISO Container Movement operations
.   
Overarching Requirements  
2. 
For any movement by container to take place, the following minimum requirements must be 
catered for: 
a.  
A safe and managed environment with controlled access to prepare, load and unload 
the materiel being moved. 
b.  
The materiel does not exceed the capacity or design criteria of the transport platform. 
c.  
Provision of appropriate SQEP at the point of loading/unloading as required to 
complete the entire task. 
d.  
Pre-use serviceability inspection should be conducted by the user unit prior to stuffing 
iaw the CTU Supervisor’s check sheet at Guidance Leaflet 11. 
3. 
DCoP No 5 – Movement by Container defines the minimum Defence standards by which the 
process of moving materiel by sea is to be conducted.  Specifically the DCoP contains method 
statements which cater for key elements of sea movement activity and the responsibilities of those 
involved in the process.   
4. 
The Method Statements incorporated into DCoP No 5 are: 
a.  
Loading vehicles to containers. 
b.  
Unloading vehicles from containers. 
c.  
Loading freight to containers. 
d.  
Unloading freight from containers. 
Container Marking 
5. 
Containers should not be marked in any way unless specifically directed in the Operational 
Mounting Instruction. When marking containers, including flags and unit emblems, the following 
should be taken into consideration: 
a.  
Security. Any marking identifying the container as belonging to the MOD or containing 
MOD equipment compromises the security of the load. 
b.  
MOD Owned Containers. MOD owned containers have a 0.5m black square painted 
on the door and sides, any unit marking is to remain within this square. 
c.  
Lease Hire. Markings on lease hire containers are to be kept to the absolute minimum 
in order to reduce the cost of refurbishment when off-hired. 
Consignment Tracking / Asset Management 
6. 
It is imperative for ISO container managers to maintain a global check on the location of all 
Defence containers. All containers within Defence are to be tracked from as close to the point of 
2.4.5-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
origin to as close to the point of use as the Defence Consignment Tracking (CT) systems’ 
availability allows. 
7. 
The policy, process and procedures for CT are contained in the ‘Dispatch Process’ of the 
Defence Logistics Framework (DLF). 
Container Documentation 
 
8. 
The following documentation is to be used for ISO container movement as appropriate:  
a.  
Packing List.  The Consignor is responsible for completing a Packing List of all items 
being moved, regardless of whether they are loose, palletised, boxed, netted or wrapped.   
b.  
Freight Movement Note (FMN) MOD F 1142/1142A.  ISO containers are to be 
documented using FMN MOD F 1142/1142A for consignments moved by military or 
commercial modes of surface transport.  Instructions for completion are available on the 
inside cover of the document pad.  The full container number (4 letter prefix and 7 digit 
number) and the seal number are to be entered on the FMN by the consignor to allow 
tracking through the movements system to the consignee.   
c.  
Dangerous Goods.  Materiel that falls within the definition of DG must be moved in 
accordance with Dangerous Goods Manual.   
d.  
Tie Down Scheme (TDS).  TDS are to be provided as applicable in accordance with 
JSP 800, Vol 7. 
e.  
Documentation Variations.  The CMA responsible for overseas locations where there 
are variations to container movement documentation is responsible for communicating the 
documentation requirements and standards to all relevant stakeholders. 
f.  
Customs Documentation.  The Consignor is required to ensure the appropriate 
Customs Documentation is provided for the entire journey in accordance with the current 
HMRC policy and Host Nation legislation.  Leaflet 22 refers. 
9. 
Checklists.  A Checklist to aid supervisors with the key elements of responsibility for 
container movement operations is at Guidance Leaflet 11.  Checklists must only be used as an aid 
to supervising tasks and are by no means exhaustive in content. 
Container Movement Reporting 
10.  A Traffic Despatch Advice (TDA) must be sent by the consignor once the consignment has 
been despatched, to all relevant addressees. 
 
Annexes: 
A. Execution of Movement by Container Guidance. 
B. Return of Empty MOD Containers. 
C. Return of Empty Civilian Leased Containers. 
D. Purchases and Write-Off Action. 
 
2.4.5-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
ANNEX A TO  
JSP 800, VOL 3, PT 2.4.5 

 
EXECUTION OF MOVEMENT BY CONTAINER GUIDANCE 
 
Procedures for Return of ISO Containers 
1. 
Once containers have been unloaded in unit lines DCMS will nominate the depot to which 
empty containers are to be returned. Units wishing to return containers are to liaise with DCMS, 
however DSCOM transport will not be provided unless a Request for Commercial Surface 
Movements is submitted quoting the DCMS Booking Reference. Shipper’s own containers moved 
by liner service are to be returned to the shipping line or shipping line’s agent as soon as possible 
after unloading8. 
2. 
Flowcharts illustrating the Return processes are at Annex B – MOD Containers, and Annex C 
– Civilian Containers. 
3. 
Inter Unit Transfers.  When ISO containers are transferred between units both the losing 
and gaining units must ensure that ISO containers are accounted for in accordance with Part 2 
(Fundamentals of Materiel Accounting) of the Supply Capability – CONUSE document available 
from the DLF. DCMS must be informed immediately an ISO is transferred to ensure the location 
and paying budget UIN are updated on the DCMS database. The losing unit is to inform DCMS of 
when an ISO is transferred, to which Unit it is being transferred to and the Budget UIN liable for 
paying leasing charges. The gaining unit is to inform DCMS that their Budget Holder is willing to 
accept the charges for the ISO containers. 
4. 
Purchases and Write Off Action.  There is currently no central funding for the purchase of 
new MOD containers to either refurbish existing stocks or increase holdings. Containers purchased 
against a Unit/Station UIN remain the property of that Unit/Station but they are still to be registered 
on the DCMS database. There may though be occasions when Units/Organisations request to 
purchase an ISO the most common are: 
a. 
Beyond Economical Repair (BER). The ISO container has been inspected and is no 
longer a viable option to repair. BER ISO containers can only be used for static storage and 
are not to be used as a transportation medium. Door plates should be removed and the ISO 
should have a placard stating ‘Static Storage Only’ affixed to the door. 
b. 
Long Term Usage. The Unit has identified a requirement for long term use. This is 
usually in excess of a 2 year requirement and the hire cost exceeds the purchase value. 
c. 
Lost. The ISO has been lost and its location is not known. Usually where accounting 
for the ISO has not been correctly carried out and the UIN is still paying hire charges. 
d. 
Total Loss. The ISO Container is no longer fit for use as an ISO container and all 
References, CSC Plate and Identification Numbers are removed. Containers on hire that are 
declared as total loses are purchased at the Depreciated Value (DV) price as stated in the 
contract. 
e. 
Gifting. The ISO is being given away to another Country, Force or Unit. In this instance 
the ISO is purchased and then gifted to them for use as their own. 
f. 
Modification. The ISO as standard requires modification to complement the task or 
job. 
                                                                                                                                                            
8 Shipper’s own containers must be returned as quickly as possible as they incur significant demurrage 
charges; if necessary cargo must be transhipped to facilitate the quick return of the liner container. 
2.4.5-A-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
5. 
In all instances the purchasing of an ISO container for MOD use must be conducted through 
DCMS, and consideration given to the hidden costs involved in the hiring of ISO containers as 
there may well be transportation costs and possible repair charges raised against the UIN. 
6. 
Once the ISO has been purchased the paying UIN will take responsibility for the collection 
and disposal of the ISO container. All ISO purchased become the responsibility of the holding unit. 
A flowchart for the procedure can be found at Annex D. 
 
2.4.5-A-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
ANNEX B TO  
JSP
 800, VOL 3, PT 2.4.5 
 
RETURN OF EMPTY MOD CONTAINERS 
 
START - Unit want to return a 
DCMS
MOD owned container 
Unit
Contractor
Is unit 
YES
transport 
NO
available?
Arrange date & time for delivery to 
Unit to arrange transport with 
the Bicester International Freight 
DSCOM
Terminal (BIFT)
Container returned to DCMS
Container offloaded checked for 
cleanliness by DCMS
Container inspected by DCMS
Is the 
DCMS complete MOD 
container 
YES
Form 817 & AFG8800
damaged?
Can the repair be 
NO
completed at 
DCMS?
NO
YES
DCMS place in the Available stack
DCMS send container 
Contractor carries out 
to contractor for repair
repair on site
DCMS update DCMS II Database
Container repaired
END STATE
 
2.4.5-B-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
ANNEX C TO  
JSP 800, VOL 3, PT 2.4.5 

 
RETURN OF EMPTY CIVILIAN LEASED CONTAINERS 
START – DCMS receive container 
DCMS
number & Identify Leasing Company 
Unit
Lease 
DCMS contact Leasing Company to 
Company
obtain Resttitution details
Is transport 
Unit to arrange transport with 
YES
NO
available
DSCOM
DCMS pass Resttitution details to 
unit for Re-delivery
Container returned to Civilian Depot
Container inspected by Lease 
Company & Hire charges cease
Is the
Container Depot raise Invoice for 
NO
Container 
YES
repairs & pass to DCMS for 
damaged?
authorisation
Repairs authorised or surveyor 
tasked by DCMS to undertake an 
independent inspection
Repairs carried out & bills raised by 
DCMS update DCMS II Database
contractor
END STATE
 
2.4.5-C-1               JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 
 


 
ANNEX D TO  
JSP 800, VOL 3, PT 2.4.5 

 
PURCHASES AND WRITE-OFF ACTION 
 
Depreciated Value 
requested by DCMS 

2.4.5-D-1               JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4 Oct 18) 
 

 
 
SECTION 2.5 – LEAFLETS 
Introduction to Leaflets 
1. 
In order to cater for the common subjects relating the movement of materiel, individual 
leaflets have been developed to encompass all related policy  and sign post the reader to other 
relevant standards or recognised points of contact. 
2. 
All leaflets are to be read in conjunction with Parts 1 and 2 of this publication.  Part 1 
defines the legislative standards that must be achieved and Part 2 provides details on how 
the standards are achieved across Defence

3. 
The following Movement Leaflets have been developed: 
Leaflet 
Title 
1.   
Instructions for Cargo not Shipped 
2.   
Lost and Found Items 
3.   
Amphibious Movement 
4.   
Repatriation of the Deceased 
5.   
Damaged Vehicles, Aircraft and Equipment* 
6.   
Classified Material 
7.   
Weapons and Weapon Systems 
8.   
Operational Memorabilia and War Trophies 
9.   
Precious and Attractive to Criminal and Terrorist Organisations 
10. 
 
Mail 
11. 
 
Abnormal Indivisible Loads (AIL) And Special Types General Order (STGO) 
12. 
 
Temperature Controlled Items 
13. 
 
Food and ORP 
14. 
 
Medical Supplies 
15. 
 
Animals 
16. 
 
Plants 
17. 
 
Unit Moves 
18. 
 
Entitled, Non-MOD Freight 
19. 
 
Bonded Stores and Goods 
20. 
 
Personal Effects/Individual Moves 
21. 
 
Indulgence Freight 
22. 
 
Customs Procedures for Movement of Materiel 
23. 
 
Channel Tunnel 
2.5-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
24. 
 
Gate Guardians and Memorials 
25. 
 
Biosecurity 
26. 
 
MCCP 
27. 
 
Sealift Allocation by Priority 
28. 
 
Airlift Allocation by Priority 
29. 
 
Movement Across Continental Europe  
30. 
 
Road Movement Clearance Process for all Visiting Forces in the UK 
 
*Content owned and provided by MTSR. 
 
 
2.5-2 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

 
PART 3 
MOVEMENT OF MATERIEL – GUIDANCE 
Guidance Leaflets 
1. 
The following Movement Guidance Leaflets have been developed: 
Leaflet 
Title 
1.   
Sea Application Shipping Template 
2.   
Illustrated Hints on Container Loading* 
3.   
RAF Form 1380 Air Way Bill 
4.   
Movements Form 238 
5.   
Rail Loading Supervisor Checklist* 
6.   
Movement by Sea Documentation - T998H Completion Notes 
7.   
CCA Procedure Template 
8.   
Road Movement Checklist* 
9.   
Removed 
10.   
Sea Loading-Unloading Check List* 
11.   
Container Checklist* 
12.   
Removed 
13.   
Generic Rail Risk Assessment* 
14.   
Generic PIC Railhead Briefing Points* 
15.   
Generic Rail Loading Supervisor Railhead Briefing Points* 
16.   
Rail Loading Supervisor Risk Assessment* 
17.   
Traffic Despatch Advice (TDA) 
18.   
Sail Vice 
19.   
Spare 
20.   
Chalk Delay Message 
21.   
Chalk Departure Message 
 
*Content owned and provided by MTSR. 
3.1-1 
JSP 800, Vol 3 (V4.0 Oct 18) 

Document Outline