This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Brexit preparedness reports'.

link to page 3 link to page 5 link to page 11 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 12 link to page 14 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 20 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 28 link to page 29 link to page 30 link to page 30 link to page 33 link to page 34 link to page 34 link to page 35 link to page 37 link to page 39 link to page 39 link to page 40 link to page 41 link to page 43 link to page 43 link to page 44 link to page 44
The Potential Impact of Britain leaving the 
European Union (EU) on the Dover District 
 
 
 
1.  Background ............................................................................................................................ 3 
2.  Key Messages / Summary ..................................................................................................... 5 
3.  Transport and Infrastructure ................................................................................................. 11 
Port of Dover ........................................................................................................................... 11 
Borders and Customs .............................................................................................................. 12 
Roads ...................................................................................................................................... 12 
Port Health and Imported Food Controls .................................................................................. 14 
4.  Local Economy and Workforce ............................................................................................. 17 
Economic Growth: GDP & GVA ............................................................................................... 17 
Economic Growth: Sector Specific Impacts.............................................................................. 20 
Jobs in the district .................................................................................................................... 23 
EU citizens living in the Dover district ...................................................................................... 24 
Migration and access to skills .................................................................................................. 28 
Rural Economy ........................................................................................................................ 29 
Local Business Readiness ....................................................................................................... 30 
5.  Tourism ................................................................................................................................ 30 
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee ........................................................................... 33 
6.  Funding ................................................................................................................................ 34 
EU Funding Overview .............................................................................................................. 34 
EU Structural Funding ............................................................................................................. 35 
Future Funding Arrangements ................................................................................................. 37 
Financial Impacts for local government .................................................................................... 39 
7.  EU Legislation ...................................................................................................................... 39 
Repatriation of EU powers ....................................................................................................... 40 
Legislative Impacts for Local Government ............................................................................... 41 
8.  Impact on other areas .......................................................................................................... 43 
Higher Education ..................................................................................................................... 43 
Healthcare ............................................................................................................................... 44 
Policing .................................................................................................................................... 44 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   1 
 

link to page 45 link to page 46 link to page 46 link to page 47 link to page 47 link to page 48 Appendix 1: Brexit Negotiations Timeline .................................................................................... 45 
Appendix 2: Assessing the Impact of Brexit ................................................................................. 46 
Local Government Association (LGA) ...................................................................................... 46 
Chartered Institute of Public Finance Accountants (CIPFA) ..................................................... 47 
Centre for European Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University ......................................... 47 
Ready on Day One: Meeting the Brexit Borders challenge ...................................................... 48 
 
 
 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   2 
 

This paper looks at the possible impact of a British withdrawal from the European Union (EU) 
–  or Brexit -  to services that we deliver and the wider Dover district. There are still many 
uncertainties but Brexit will  have a significant impact on local government, creating 
opportunities to do things differently, but also challenges that will need to be addressed.  
 
There is a considerable amount of information and analysis available on the Parliament 
website and other sources on the impact of Brexit. This paper attempts to draw this 
information together on a local level.    
 
1. 
Background 
 
1.1 
On 23 June 2016,  the United Kingdom (UK) voted on the question: "Should the United 
Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?" The result 
of the referendum was that 17.4 million people (51.9% of the total) voted to leave the EU, and 
16.1 million (48.1%) voted to remain. In the Dover district 62.2% voted to leave and 37.8% to 
remain in the EU.  
 
EU Referendum Result, June 2016  
Percentage share of the vote across the  
UK and in the Dover District 
100
80
60
Yes - Remain
40
No - Leave
62.2 
48.1 
51.9 
20
37.8 
0
UK
Dover District
 
 
 
Source: The Electoral Commission1 
 
1.2 
Under Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union, any State withdrawing from the EU must 
formally notify the European Council of its intention. The UK triggered Article 50 on 29th March 
2017, meaning that the UK will currently leave the EU no later than April 2019. 
 
1.3 
Article 50 also provides for a two-year period following notification, within which the two sides 
are to reach agreement on the withdrawal arrangements, while taking account of the 
framework for their future relationship. This two-year period can be extended by mutual 
consent. The UK can leave without an agreement but all parties have said that they would like 
to see an ‘orderly withdrawal’.   
 
1.4 
A 'soft' or 'hard' Brexit refers to the closeness of the UK's relationship with the EU post-Brexit. 
There is no strict definition of either. A  "hard" Brexit could involve the UK refusing to 
compromise on issues like the free movement of people even if it meant leaving the single 
market or having to give up securing a free trade deal. At the other end of the scale, a "soft" 
Brexit might follow a similar path to Norway, which is a member of the single market and has 
to accept the free movement of people as a result of that. 
                                                           
1 Electoral Commission. Online at https://www.electoralcommission.org.uk/find-information-by-subject/elections-and-
referendums/past-elections-and-referendums/eu-referendum/electorate-and-count-information 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   3 
 

1.5 
Key developments in the negotiation process:  
 
1.5.1  The unveiling of eight ‘Brexit Bills’ including EU (Withdrawal);  Customs;  Trade; 
Immigration; Fisheries; and Agriculture Bills2. These have been followed by a series of 
policy papers, including:  

A White Paper on the EU (Withdrawal) Bill3  which outlined plans to transfer EU 
legislation into the UK statute, subject to review by Ministers using ‘Henry VIII powers’ 
to amend secondary legislation without an Act of Parliament. 

White Papers on the Trade & Customs Bills’4  outlining  the  potential contingency 
arrangements in the event of no deal, and the announcement of £3bn, in the Autumn 
Budget, for Brexit contingency planning5. We are unaware how the government will be 
allocating this funding.  Given the urgent need for infrastructure in the district and 
county to enable a smooth transition, we need to seek clarification around this.   

A series of position and future partnership papers on a range of issues including EU & 
UK citizens’ rights, foreign policy, defence and development and collaboration on 
science and innovation6. 

The announcement of a consultation on the UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF), the 
proposed domestic successor to the European Structural and Infrastructure Funds7.  
 
1.5.2  The European Council8 adopted guidelines for phase two of the Brexit negotiations in 
December 2017 and new negotiating directives in January 2018. Phase two -  on a 
transition  /  implementation period,  which will start the day after the UK leave the EU 
and end in December 2020, started in February 2018. During the transition period, the 
UK will not be a Member State but will continue to apply EU law. 
 
1.5.3  New guidelines were adopted in March 2018 on the framework for the UK’s future 
relations with the EU. These are intended to be adopted as a ‘political declaration’ 
attached to the Withdrawal Agreement. Detailed provisions on the future EU-UK 
relationship will be set out in a separate agreement (or agreements) which will take 
effect after the UK has left the EU9.  
 
1.5.4  The UK-EU negotiations are continuing ahead of the EU leaders’ summit in June. The 
talks are focusing on three key topics:  

Outstanding aspects of the withdrawal agreement  

The Irish/Northern Irish border and  

UK-EU relations (including trade) post-Brexit.  
 
1.5.5  Reports in April suggest that the UK is continuing to advance its “customs partnership” 
proposal to support a frictionless border, whilst the EU sees this proposal as 
unrealistic.  
 
1.5.6  David Davis has advised  Parliament  that  MPs  will  receive  details of the Withdrawal 
Agreement and have an opportunity to table amendments in advance of a “meaningful 
parliamentary vote”. By October, there would not be a legal text but there would be a 
                                                           
2 Bills before Parliament 2017-19. Online at: https://services.parliament.uk/Bills/2017-19.html 
3 GOV.UK publication, March 2017. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-repeal-bill-white-paper 
4 GOV.UK news, October 2017. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-sets-out-vision-for-post-eu-
trade-and-customs-policy 
5 GOV.UK speech, November 2017. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/autumn-budget-2017-philip-
hammonds-speech 
6 GOV.UK collection. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/article-50-and-negotiations-with-the-eu 
7 GOV.UK publication, April 2018. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-position-paper-on-the-future-
of-cohesion-policy 
8 European Council, Council of the European Union. Online at: https://www.consilium.europa.eu/en/ 
9 House of Commons Library publication, March 2018. Online at: 
http://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/CBP-8269/CBP-8269.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   4 
 

detailed politically binding agreement, with the aim of a formal trade treaty by March 
2019. 
 
1.5.7  On 26th April,  MPs approved a non-binding motion saying the UK should stay in the 
customs union after Brexit. The Government’s position is that remaining in the customs 
union would prevent the UK from signing trade agreements with countries outside the 
EU.  The motion was passed without division. The  Trade Bill  will  come back to the 
Commons shortly. 
 
1.5.8  The  Local Government Association (LGA)  has  set up a ‘Post-Brexit England 
Commission’10 with the aim of presenting solutions to issues raised by Brexit for Local 
Government. It will principally investigate issues surrounding skills and productivity 
challenges, and infrastructure pressures. The findings will be published in spring 2019. 
 
2. 
Key Messages / Summary 
 
2.1 
Dover is the Gateway to Europe and the UK's exit from the European Union will have a 
significant impact on us, our district and our communities, creating opportunities to do things 
differently as well as challenges that need to be addressed. As the pathway to the district is 
through Kent, the impact will also be felt across the county and further afield.  
 
2.2 
Withdrawal from the EU involves a complex set of negotiations. Although the Government 
hopes to deliver a smooth and orderly Brexit, the outcome of the Article 50 process is difficult 
to predict.   
 
2.3 
It is crucial that we grasp any potential opportunities offered by Brexit to ensure that it is a 
success for the area and mitigate the negative impacts. Brexit, and the repatriation of powers 
from the EU, provides a once in a generation opportunity to shape local government for the 
future, devolving responsibilities and resources to local democracies. Any policies and 
strategies need to work for all our communities and address the concerns that led to the vote 
for Brexit.  
 
Transport and Infrastructure 
2.4 
With over  10,000 freight vehicles passing through the Port of Dover on peak days, and with 
HGV volumes expected to grow by +43% by 203011, the implications of changes to border and 
customs arrangements are substantial. Capacity problems within the Port of Dover, and the 
knock-on effects on transport flows within the district, and wider transport network, are a major 
concern. We therefore need urgent clarity on post Brexit arrangements, adequate support to 
keep trade flowing and transport networks moving and need to consider contingency plans for 
the possibility of a hard / high-friction Brexit.  
2.5 
Operation Brock, the interim plan to avoid cross-channel congestion12, needs to be delivered 
before any change to customs arrangements in March 2019, but a start date for necessary 
road works has not yet been announced and there does not appear to be a Plan B. A 
permanent solution will not be in place for many years, if enacted through current planning  
 
 
                                                           
10 Local Government Association (n.d). Post-Brexit England Commission. Online at: https://www.local.gov.uk/devoforall 
11 Kent County Council response to CLG Select Committee Inquiry on Brexit and Local Government, November 2017. 
Online at: https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/communities-and-local-
government-committee/inquiries/parliament-2017/brexit-local-authority-inquiry-17-19/publications/  
12 GOV.UK news, May 2018. https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-operation-stack-plans-to-keep-kent-moving 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   5 
 

processes and procedures13. It is also important that any solution implemented does not 
impede the practical and physical operations of businesses operating in the Dover district, for 
example, businesses being forced to travel to Maidstone to join the end of the queue to come 
back to Dover Port.  
 
2.6 
A key consideration for the Dover district is upholding the UK’s collaborative border 
relationship with France under the Treaty of Canterbury, Le Touquet Agreement and 
the Sangatte Protocol. 
 
2.7 
The impact of more queuing traffic on Dover’s roads, particularly within the Air Quality 
Management Area, as a result of any potential new customs arrangements at the Port of 
Dover, is of major concern and will likely impact on Dover District Council’s Air Quality 
Action Plan for Nitrogen Dioxide.  
 
2.8 
In addition, Dover District Council is the Port Health Authority14 for both the Port of Dover and 
the Channel Tunnel, with associated statutory responsibilities. Current port health controls, 
stipulated by statute, are small-scale. This is partly due to the import checks and examinations 
that are currently carried out on our behalf at the point of entry into and then across the EU. 
Depending upon the outcome of the Brexit negotiations, these may need to be completed in 
full at the ports. It is vital that there is adequate legislation, facilities, resourcing and authorised 
competent staff to provide the necessary checks for food safety in the Dover Port Health 
district.  
 
Local Economy and Workforce 
 
2.9 
In general terms, the major risks for the local economy are a shortage of available skills and 
labour, rising costs and the shrinking of the export market. This could have a negative impact 
on inward investment.  
 
2.10 
Research by the Centre for European Studies at Canterbury Christchurch University15  has 
found that at a local level, connections with the European economy and the single market may 
be seen in three respects: 
•  A large number of firms in the region either export products to EU member- states, import 
from them, or are involved in facilitating these transactions.  
•  The land-based industries in the Kent and Medway region depend upon EU subsidies of 
approximately £54 million per year. 
•  A significant proportion of workers in the region are citizens of other EU member-states, 
with many of them from the accession states in Central and Eastern Europe. 
 
2.11 
At this point in time there is no data collated / available to give the number of EU employees in 
the Dover district.  
 
 
 
                                                           
13 The Channel Tunnel Act, which authorised the construction of the tunnel and associated works, was a Hybrid Bill. The 
Hybrid Bill process, which combines elements of public and private legislation, is relatively rare, but has, in recent years, 
been used to authorise major infrastructure projects of national importance. If required, a hybrid bill can grant deemed 
planning permission for any scheme it provides for. For further information, please see UK Parliament, Hybrid Bills. Online 
at: https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/laws/bills/hybrid/   
14 For further information, please see GOV.UK, Port health authorities. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/port-health-
authorities-monitoring-of-food-imports 
15 Hadfield, A, Martill B, Nazarenko, L (n.d.). Canterbury Christchurch University, Centre for European Studies, Kent and 
‘Brexit’ Realities and Risks in Regional Perspective. Online at https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-
sciences/psychology-politics-and-sociology/cefeus/docs/cefeus-kent-and-brexit-report.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   6 
 

2.12 
The most accurate source of data on the UK population is the Census, published by the Office 
for National Statistics  (ONS). The most recent Census results showed  that, in March 2011, 
3,383 people (3%) living in the Dover district, were born in other EU countries16.  
 
2.13 
The most recent estimates of the EU migrant population of the Dover district are available 
from the Labour Force Survey, published by the ONS17. According to these figures, between 
July  2016  and June 2017, there were around 2,000 (rounded to the nearest 1,000) people 
born in other EU countries living in the district. Figures for the population aged 16-64 years in 
the district are not available due to disclosure control.  
 
2.14 
The number of new National Insurance Number (NINo) allocations to adult overseas nationals 
is also used as a measure for the number of new migrant workers in an area. However, this 
data has limitations and it is not possible to determine how many migrant workers there are in 
an area at any one time. 
 
2.15 
A  map  of NINo allocations shows that, in 2016/17, no  district  in  Kent  was in the top 20% of 
English  local authorities with the highest NINo allocations.  However,  neighbouring Medway 
was  in the top 20% with 2,762 NINos in 2016/17 and had the eighth  highest number in the 
region.   
 
2.16 
Of the 13,926 NINOs allocated in Kent in the year following the referendum, the Shepway and 
Dover districts had among the lowest allocations in the region with 477 and 495 NINos 
respectively. 
 
2.17 
In the Dover district,  workers from the EU Accession States accounted for more than two 
thirds (68.1%) of all new NINo allocations. In Kent, all districts had a higher proportion of new 
migrant workers from the EU Accession States than the England average of 47.0% with the 
exception of Shepway (45.1%). 
 
2.18 
The  top country of origin in the Dover district was Romania (114), followed by Bulgaria (61) 
and Poland (55)18.  
 
2.19 
Official data on the type of industries that EU nationals are working in in the Dover district is 
not available. However, the industries that may see the greatest impact, if overseas worker 
migration was restricted, include wholesale and retail trade, agriculture and construction. 
 
2.20 
The Migration Advisory Committee, an advisory non-departmental public body, sponsored by 
the Home Office,19  is considering the impacts of Brexit on the UK labour market and will be 
making recommendations on how to better align the visa system to the needs of employers. 
The committee’s findings are expected to be published by September 2018. 
 
2.21 
The Dover district is predominately-rural (79.3%)20. For the rural economy, a major concern of 
Brexit is the loss of EU subsidies.  The government has promised an Agriculture Bill to replace 
the Common Agriculture Policy (CAP), which has guided EU funding and policy up until now. 
 
                                                           
16 Office for National Statistics, 2011 Census. Online at https://www.ons.gov.uk/census/2011census 
17 Office for National Statistics. Online at: 
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/datasets/populatio
noftheunitedkingdombycountryofbirthandnationality 
18 Migrant Workers in Kent (KCC Strategic Business Development & Intelligence) Published August 2017. Online at: 
http://www.kent.gov.uk/about-the-council/information-and-data/Facts-and-figures-about-Kent/economy-and-employment 
19 Migration Advisory Committee. Online at   https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/migration-advisory-committee 
20 According to the 2011 Rural Urban Classification for Small Geographies. Further information is available online at: 
https://www.ons.gov.uk/methodology/geography/geographicalproducts/ruralurbanclassifications/2011ruralurbanclassificati
on 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   7 
 

2.22 
Farming is worth £5.4bn to Kent’s economy21, with an estimated 20,000 seasonal agricultural 
workers employed in the county. Uncertainty about changes to immigration is already reported 
to be having an impact on seasonal workers’ intentions to return for work in Kent farms. 
 
2.23 
There is limited data available at a district level to help us assess the likely impact of Brexit on 
local businesses. We therefore recommend that we either:  

Carry out a survey of businesses in the Dover district on the challenges and opportunities 
of Brexit or  

Include a small number of Brexit questions in the forthcoming Local Business Survey 
being undertaken as part of the Local Plan.   
 
2.24 
This will be a useful way of gaining insight into the: 

Level of trade that exists between the EU and employers in the district 

Concerns regarding access to skills 

Local reliance on EU funding 

Support needed to prepare for changes to the regulatory and legal framework (for 
example, changes to customs, exports and public protection standards) 

New market opportunities.    
 
2.25 
We could also consider inviting Professor Hadfield, from the Centre for European Studies and 
Christ Church University in Canterbury, to give a presentation to the Dover Brexit Taskforce – 
please see Appendix 3 for details of Brexit research carried out.  
 
Tourism 
 

2.26 
It is estimated that the tourism industry provides 5,562 jobs in the district, which equates to 
15.9% of total employment.  Between 2013 and 2015, the value of the visitor economy in the 
Dover District increased by 6.6%, compared to 4.8% across Kent22.  
 
2.27 
The Kent and Medway region attracts a significant number of visitors from overseas each 
year. A greater proportion of visitors arrive from EU member-states (77%) than the national 
average (67%) owing to our proximity to the European continent and its usefulness as a 
waystation for travellers heading to London and beyond. 
 
2.28 
There are several risks identifiable to the tourism sector of a British exit from the EU, which 
may adversely affect the number of visitors to the region from EU member‐states.  
 
2.29 
The most important concerns the effects of the re-imposition of customs controls that may 
accompany a British withdrawal. Visitors from Europe may be less inclined to holiday in the 
UK if there is an increase in the time, costs and restrictions on entering the country, especially 
if they are able to travel within neighbouring countries easier. 
 
2.30 
Post-Brexit the free flow of goods and visitors in vital. The visitor economy lost over £1m per 
day during Operation Stack in 2016 (not including the reputational damage caused)23. 
 
2.31 
There will also be direct effects on Dover residents: If customs restrictions are re-imposed and 
cross-border travel made slower, the marginal benefits of short breaks to the continent will 
decrease. 
 
                                                           
21 Kent Rural PLC. Online at: https://ruralplc.com/ 
22 Visit Kent, Destination Research Economic Impact of Tourism, Dover – 2015 Results (2016). Online at: 
https://www.visitkentbusiness.co.uk/library/Economic_Impact_of_Tourism_-_Dover_2015_FINAL_REPORT.PDF 
23 Visit Kent. Online at: https://www.visitkent.co.uk 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   8 
 

2.32 
The tourism industry relies heavily on European and migrant labour, and concerns regarding 
labour availability and attracting homegrown talent, with the necessary skills, have been 
raised.  
 
2.33 
In January 2018, a Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee report on the potential impact 
of Brexit on the creative industries, tourism and the digital single market24, found that the UK 
has received significant European funding, for example through the Creative Europe 
programme. Although non-EU countries can still participate in this particular programme, they 
must accept free movement of people, which the UK government has rejected.  
 
2.34 
The Committee recommended the government carry out a full mapping exercise of direct and 
indirect funding streams that support these sectors and clarify which funds will be replaced 
and the criteria that will apply.   
 
Funding 
 
2.35 
The LGA estimates that a potential funding gap of €10.5 billion (c. £8.4 billion) for local 
government will open immediately from the point the UK officially exist the EU, unless a viable 
domestic successor to EU structural funding is implemented25. 
 
2.36 
The South East LEP (Local Enterprise Partnership) has an indicative allocation of £160 million 
of Structural Funds from the EU, awarded by the Government for the 2014 – 2020 EU funding 
period. This is made up of £74.2m ERDF (European Regional Development Fund); £71.6m 
ESF (European Social Fund); and £14.5m EAFRD (European Agricultural Fund for Rural 
Development).  
 
2.37 
Kent County Council has a strong record of accomplishment of securing access to EU 
funding, which the Dover district benefits from. A report to its Growth, Economic Development 
and Communities Cabinet Committee in July 2016, on the Impact of the EU Referendum on 
European Funding,26 indicated that KCC has secured a total of £52.62m for the 2014-2020 
programming period, including £42.3m for the Port of Dover and £5.3m for the LEADER 
programme27 in West Kent, East Kent and Mid Kent. 
 
2.38 
Since 2014, over £200m of EU grants and loans have come into Kent-based organisations. 
 
2.39 
Brexit creates an opportunity for a streamlined model to replace EU funding and support 
growth based on local need.  
 
2.40 
The Government has confirmed that all signed structural fund projects are guaranteed funding 
up to the point when the UK departs the EU – even when these projects continue after we 
have left. Projects will have to demonstrate good value for money and be in line with domestic 
strategic priorities. 
 
2.41 
The Government has also committed to creating a UK Shared Prosperity Fund (UKSPF) to 
replace EU economic aid. There are no further details available regarding the criteria for this, 
                                                           
24 House of Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, The potential impact of Brexit on the creative 
industries, tourism and the digital single market. Online at: 
https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201719/cmselect/cmcumeds/365/365.pdf 
25 Local Government Association, Beyond Brexit: Future of funding currently sourced from the EU. Online at: 
https://www.local.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/2017-07_Beyond%20Brexit%20-
%20LGA%20Discussion%20%28FINAL%29_0.pdf 
26 Kent County Council, Impact of the EU Referendum on European Funding. Online at:  
https://democracy.kent.gov.uk/documents/s70051/Item%20C3%20-
%20Impact%20of%20the%20EU%20Referendum%20on%20European%20Funding.pdf 
27 The LEADER programme is a European Union initiative to support rural development projects initiated at the local level 
in order to revitalise rural areas and create jobs 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   9 
 

how much will be allocated to it, the relationship it may have with the Local Growth Fund, 
whether the EU principle of match funding will apply, or what outcomes the Government 
expects from this. In January 2018, the Government pledged to consult widely on the design 
of the UKSPF, and has asked LEPs to lead on regional responses; the consultation is 
expected later this year28.  
 
2.42 
In November 2017, the Government published the Industrial Strategy White Paper29, 
reiterating that it will ensure that local areas continue to receive flexible funding for their local 
needs. Local industrial strategies (LIS) are central to this focus.  
 
2.43 
The South East Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP)30 will lead the LIS in our area. LEP’s 
currently develop Strategic Economic Plans (SEPs) to define local economic strategy and 
access the Government’s Local Growth Fund. LISs have a wider remit and place focus and 
will involve more institutions. Areas will need to build on their SEPs to develop their respective 
LISs, which will need to be agreed in partnership with the Government.  
 
2.44 
The South East LEP is currently renewing its Strategic Economic Plan31 and has consulting a 
range of public and private stakeholders. The aim is to publish the SEP early 2018.   
 
2.45 
The 2015 Growth and Infrastructure Framework for Kent and Medway32 is also currently being 
refreshed. This will provide a picture of housing and infrastructure requirements based on 
forecasts of population for Kent and Medway and for each district in the county. These 
population forecasts and consequential housing needs will be projected to 2031; the refreshed 
GIF will also suggest different growth scenarios for up to 2050. 
 
2.46 
In November 2017, Kent County Council set out its plan to develop an Enterprise and 
Productivity Strategy33, to improve Kent’ overall standard of living over the next 30-years. KCC 
is expected to consult on the strategy in autumn 2018.      
 
EU Legislation 
 

2.47 
The White Paper Legislating for the UK’s withdrawal from the EU34 states that Brexit is an 
opportunity to ensure returning ‘power sits closer to the people of the UK than ever before’.  It 
includes a commitment to continue to champion devolution to local government.  
 
2.48 
The LGA has scoped out the relevant legislation for local government that could affect 
councils and it is recommended that we form an internal working-group to assess the local 
impact of these on district council services.   
 
Further Information 
Please see the following pages for further information.  
 
                                                           
28 GOV.UK publication, April 2018. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-position-paper-on-the-future-
of-cohesion-policy 
29 GOV.UK publication, November 2017. Online at:   
https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/664563/industrial-
strategy-white-paper-web-ready-version.pdf 
30 South East LEP. Further information is available online at: https://www.southeastlep.com/ 
31 South East LEP, Strategic Economic Plan. Online at: http://www.southeastlep.com/strategic-economic-plan 
32 Growth and Infrastructure Framework for Kent and Medway 2015. Online at: 
https://www.kent.gov.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0012/50124/Growth-and-Infrastructure-Framework-GIF.pdf 
33 Kent County Council, An Enterprise and Productivity Strategy for Kent. Online at:  
https://democracy.kent.gov.uk/documents/s80850/An%20Enterprise%20and%20Productivity%20Strategy%20for%20Kent
%20v.2.pdf 
34 GOV.UK publication. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-repeal-bill-white-paper/legislating-for-
the-united-kingdoms-withdrawal-from-the-european-union 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   10 
 

3. 
Transport and Infrastructure 
 
Port of Dover  
 
  The main risks for the district are the capacity problems within the Port of Dover and the knock-on 
effects on transport flows within the district, Kent and beyond. 
  Need to press the Government to ensure that it treats the free flow of traffic through the port as a 
top priority in its Brexit negotiations.  
  Need to consider contingency plans for the possibility of a hard / high friction Brexit.  
 
3.1 
As the ‘Gateway to Europe’, a  principal concern for Dover is the ability  for the Port to cope 
with the volume of freight and customs if there are changes to the free movement of goods; 
this is because there is limited inspection space at the Port.   
 
3.2 
Most  goods entering or leaving the UK on a vehicle (to or from the EU) go through a roll-
on/roll-off (ro/ro) port or terminal, of which the Port of Dover is the largest.  
 
3.3 
Dover handles one sixth of the UK’s total trade in goods with a value of £119bn per year. 
Latest figures show that around 2.6 million freight vehicles passed through the Port of Dover 
in 2017. Nearly all (99%) freight moved through the port is intra-EU. To give an idea of the 
scale of freight, if all lorries that pass through Dover in a single day were lined up end to end 
in lane 1, they would stretch from the port to London’s Stansted Airport, almost 100 miles 
away35. 
 
3.4 
The Channel Tunnel also operates as a ro/ro and a further 1.6m lorries used Eurotunnel in 
2017. Together, Dover and Eurotunnel carried 32.6m passengers in 2016, more than the UK’s 
third largest airport. 
 
3.5 
The Port of Dover is fully integrated into a frictionless single market, with customs checks last 
carried out for UK-EU trade in 1992.  It is estimated that there could be an extra 300 million 
declarations a year once outside the trade bloc and it will take time for industry to adjust.   
 
3.6 
The freight vehicles currently only take seconds to clear the Port of Dover but if Brexit ends up 
creating regulatory  and tariff barriers between the UK  and the EU, it is predicted that there 
could be gridlock around the town and through to Maidstone and beyond. If increased waiting 
times  persisted then perishable goods could be damaged and supply chains interrupted. 
There is also a potential impact on air quality of any increased traffic queues at border 
controls. 
 
3.7 
The government says around four percent of non-EU imports are currently subject to customs 
checks at border entry points.  This means that more than 300 a day could be stopped at the 
Port of Dover if they are checked at a similar rate36.  
 
3.8 
Customs checks on imports from outside the common market can take between 5 minutes to 
45 minutes per vehicle. Port officials have warned that increasing the average time it takes to 
clear customs by as little as two minutes could lead to 17-mile traffic jams37.  
 
3.9 
The Government is also due to replace the information technology system used by HM 
Revenue &  Customs (HMRC) with effect from January 2019. In July 2017, a National Audit 
                                                           
35 Dover Harbour Board. Online at: https://www.doverport.co.uk/  
36 Reuters, UK customs model unlikely to achieve frictionless post-Brexit trade. Online at:  
 https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-britain-eu-ports/uk-customs-model-unlikely-to-achieve-frictionless-post-brexit-trade-
idUKKCN1BP20J 
37 Dover Harbour Board. Online at: https://www.doverport.co.uk/ 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   11 
 

Office (NAO) report38 on the progress of the Customs Declaration Service (CDS) programme, 
warned there was still a significant amount of work to complete and there was a risk that 
HMRC would not have full functionality and scope of CDS in place by March 2019 when the 
UK plans to leave the EU. The  CDS programme also  faced uncertainty due to the unknown 
outcome of the UK/EU negotiations. Any changes to the new system requirements made 
shortly before the planned implementation date would increase the risk of additional cost or 
delay to the programme. 
 
3.10 
The NAO reports that the Port of Dover could see delays after Brexit because of the need to 
make many more customs checks. It also predicts bottlenecks and congestion as the time 
needed to make checks will increase. The NAO estimated that immigration officials would 
need to make 230% more decisions a year if the existing regime for travellers from outside the 
European Economic Area (EEA) is extended to European arrivals. If customs declarations 
were needed for trade between the UK and EU, the total number could increase  by 360%. 
The  NAO  report warns that the Port of Dover does not have capacity for inspecting and 
checking vehicles and it would be wrong to think that border controls can continue by “doing 
more of the same”. 
 
Borders and Customs  
 
3.11 
Leaving the EU is highly likely to have a major impact on border controls at points of entry to 
the UK. Juxtaposed immigration controls were set up in the early 2000s with the UK Border 
Force carrying out controls at the port of Calais, the Coquelles Eurotunnel terminal and at 
Eurostar’s continental stations. However, the Le Touquet Treaty governing these 
arrangements is a bi-lateral treaty and is therefore not directly affected by leaving the EU.   
 
3.12 
A key consideration for Kent and the Dover district is upholding the UK’s collaborative border 
relationship with France under the Treaty of Canterbury, Le Touquet Agreement and 
the Sangatte Protocol.  
 
3.13 
Kent County Council is urging the Government to maintain this arrangement, maximising the 
French infrastructure investment in the Pas de Calais region to build on our strong collective 
working arrangements with European partners on security, emergency planning and public 
protection39.  
 
3.14 
A modern customs clearance facility needs to be delivered by 2019.  
 
3.15 
A national exercise looking at the impact of additional customs checks in France and UK 
outward-bound traffic is expected to be carried out later in 2018 and we would expect to be 
involved via the Kent Resilience Forum.   
 
Roads 
 
3.16 
The road freight industry is worth £74bn to the UK economy and accounts for 41% of vehicles 
on Kent’s strategic road network. Annually 4.5m freight  vehicles come through Kent, 
equivalent to a lorry on our roads every 7 seconds. 
 
                                                           
38 National Audit Office, The Customs Declaration Service (July, 2017). Online at: https://www.nao.org.uk/report/the-
customs-declaration-service/ 
39 Kent County Council response to CLG Select Committee Inquiry on Brexit and Local Government, November 2017. 
Online at: https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/communities-and-local-
government-committee/inquiries/parliament-2017/brexit-local-authority-inquiry-17-19/publications/ 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   12 
 

3.17 
A smart, resilient transport network is required to accommodate rising international freight, 
with Dover seeing a 30% growth in freight vehicles in the last 3 years. Cross-Channel traffic is 
estimated to grow by 40% by 2030, with HGV volumes growing by 43%. This would equate to 
3.8m HGVs using Dover40. 
 
3.18 
Freight and vehicle fluidity is essential for the business models of Dover and Eurotunnel. The 
current transport infrastructure, which is insufficient to respond to changing border 
arrangements, puts the local and UK economy at risk. The estimated daily cost of the 
disruption caused by Operation Stack is £1.45m to Kent and Medway’s economy and £250m 
to the UK economy41. 
 
3.19  
On  21st  May 2018, the Government announced a new interim plan to avoid cross-channel 
congestion42. The plan, codenamed Operation Brock, needs to be   delivered  before any 
possible change to customs arrangements in March 2019 but a  start date for necessary road 
works has not yet been announcedand there does not appear to be a Plan B. 3.20  A 13-mile 
stretch of the coast-bound section of the M20, between Junction 8 near Maidstone and 
Junction 9 near Ashford, will be earmarked to hold Heavy Goods Vehicles, in what will 
effectively become a giant temporary lorry park holding around 2,000 lorries. The London-
bound stretch will then become a contraflow with two lanes of cars going each way. Highways 
England will spend £25 million on these preparations, including the hardening of both the hard 
shoulders to cope with normal traffic. 
 
3.20 
This  news follows the decision not to defend a Judicial Review into the Government’s 
favoured permanent successor to Operation Stack43.  
 
3.21 
The Government acknowledges  a structural shortage of lorry parking spaces and says 
Highways England will launch a public consultation on a permanent solution to Operation 
Stack “shortly” (this is likely to be in June / July 2018). However, it is likely that a permanent 
solution will not be in place for many years if enacted through current planning processes and 
procedures44. It will  also  depend on the post-Brexit customs arrangements reached with the 
European Union. Therefore, the ‘temporary’ traffic-management system “Operation Brock” will 
be in force for some time.  
 
3.22 
It is also important that any solution implemented does not impede the practical and physical  
operations of businesses operating in the Dover district, for example, businesses being forced 
to travel to Maidstone to join the end of the queue to come back to Dover Port.  
 
3.23 
The  impact of more queuing traffic on Dover’s roads, particularly within the Air Quality 
Management Area, as a result  of any potential new customs arrangements at the Port of 
Dover, is of major concern and will likely impact on Dover District Council’s Air Quality 
Action Plan for Nitrogen Dioxide. 
                                                           
40 Kent County Council response to CLG Select Committee Inquiry on Brexit and Local Government, November 2017. 
Online at: https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/communities-and-local-
government-committee/inquiries/parliament-2017/brexit-local-authority-inquiry-17-19/publications/ 
41 KCC response to the Department for Transport’s ‘Shaping the Future of England’s Strategic Roads’ consultation on 
Highways England’s ‘Strategic Road Network Initial Report’. Online at: 
https://democracy.kent.gov.uk/documents/s82607/Item%208%20-%20Appendix%20A%20-
%20KCC%20Response%20to%20DfT%20Strategic%20Roads%20Consultation%20FINAL.pdf 
42 GOV.UK news. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-operation-stack-plans-to-keep-kent-moving 
43 GOV.UK news. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-fully-committed-to-operation-stack-solution 
44 The Channel Tunnel Act, which authorised the construction of the tunnel and associated works, was a Hybrid Bill. The 
Hybrid Bill process, which combines elements of public and private legislation, is relatively rare, but has, in recent years, 
been used to authorise major infrastructure projects of national importance. If required, a hybrid bill can grant deemed 
planning permission for any scheme it provides for. For further information, please see UK Parliament, Hybrid Bills. Online 
at: https://www.parliament.uk/about/how/laws/bills/hybrid/   
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   13 
 

 
3.24 
Wider infrastructure improvements are also needed to facilitate traffic to and from the Channel 
Ports. These include the New Lower Thames Crossing and enhancements of the M2/A2 
corridor, including key junction improvements (e.g. M2 Junction 7 Brenley Corner), to enable 
the bifurcation of traffic between the M2/A2 and M20/A20 corridors and enhance the network’s 
resilience45. 
 
Port Health and Imported Food Controls 
 
 
Current port health controls,  stipulated by statute, are small-scale. This is partly due to the 
import checks and examinations that are currently carried out on our behalf at the point of entry 
into and then across the EU. Depending upon the outcome of the Brexit  negotiations,  these 
may need to be completed in full at the ports. 
 
It is vital that there is  adequate legislation, facilities,  resourcing and authorised  competent 
staff to provide the necessary checks for food safety in the Dover Port Health district46.    
 
3.25 
Port health authorities (PHAs) are usually the UK local authority where a port or airport is 
located. PHAs enforce a wide range of international, European and domestic legislation at 
ports and aboard vessels carrying passengers and freight. The controls are in place to protect 
the public, animal and environmental health of the UK and Europe. 
 
3.26 
The Port of Dover is a Port Health district and Dover District Council is the Port Health 
Authority (PHA) for that district.  The Channel Tunnel is also located within the Port Health 
district, entering the UK within the Dover district. This means that we are responsible for:  
•  monitoring the safety of imported food which is not of animal origin (NOAO) 
•  infectious disease control 
•  ship inspections 
•  food safety 
•  hygiene standards and general public health within the Port Health district. 
 
3.27 
Technically,  the Port of Dover has an internal border (border within Europe via ro-ro ferries) 
which has Designated Point of Import (DPI) status and an external border (goods arriving from 
outside of Europe via deep-sea vessels typically fruit) which has Designated Point of Entry 
(DPE) status. 
3.28 
The relevance of the DPI and DPE status is that the higher status of DPE was only awarded 
to the facilities at the smaller external  border area, facilitating deep-sea imports. This was 
because the facilities and maintenance of the rest of the port were not of the standard 
required. This is likely to be an issue post Brexit (especially as the majority of trade enters the 
port via the DPI). The Channel Tunnel has neither as currently high-risk foodstuff are not 
permitted to enter the UK through this route. 
3.29 
All foodstuffs NOAO travelling into the EU must first enter the community through a DPE. 
Products of Animal origin (POAO) from third countries must also enter the community through 
a Border Inspection Post (BIP).  The Port of Dover and the Channel Tunnel are not BIP’s. 
Therefore, POAO can only travel through Dover and/or the Channel Tunnel if they are already 
in free circulation.  This means they must have been presented and cleared at a BIP, 
approved by the European Commission, before their arrival at Dover or the Channel Tunnel. 
 
3.30 
The majority of foodstuffs entering the UK via Dover are considered low-risk foodstuffs, such 
as fruit and vegetables. However, a number of high-risk foodstuffs are also imported through 
                                                           
45 Kent County Council, Local Transport Plan 4: Delivering Growth without Gridlock 2016–2031 (n.d.). Online at: 
https://www.kent.gov.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/72668/Local-transport-plan-4.pdf  
46 Information on port health and food import controls provided by DDC Regulatory Services 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   14 
 

Dover and these are controlled under specific Emergency Control Regulations.  Importers of 
food such as nuts, dried figs, uncultivated mushrooms, spices etc.  are required to provide 
evidence that they have been produced and tested to a certain standard.  The food may be 
required to be sampled before it is cleared to enter the UK. 
 
3.31 
Protecting the quality of food imports is an important issue, and any change in import controls 
would create capacity demands on public protection services and place pressure  on the 
transport network. At this stage, we can only surmise the implications and potential changes 
to processes, which are largely based on whether we have a soft or hard Brexit.  
 
3.32 
A  soft exit may result in current systems being largely replicated  but with some additional 
checks that could (if quantities are not excessive) be conducted at Dover Port and the 
Channel Tunnel sites. Facilities and the maintenance of them would have to be significantly 
improved to DPE and / or BIP standards (depending on the outcome of the negotiations) at 
potentially both ports and space for this is an issue. The provision and maintenance of 
facilities is the responsibility of the port operators at both sites, but the provision of competent 
staff is the responsibility of Dover District Council (as the DPHA). 
 
3.33 
A hard exit would most probably see the need for a BIP at Dover Port and potentially the 
Channel Tunnel. This is because post Brexit the expectation is that goods will transit across 
Europe to the UK border for  inspection.  The  BIP  designation is the highest level and would 
cover all foodstuffs (i.e. POAO and NOAO). 
 
3.34 
The current system in place is simple, limited and dependant largely on goodwill. It relies on 
agents pre-notifying DPHA, via our online system, with basic details about themselves and the 
food they are importing.  Nationally, the HMRC HUB profiles foodstuffs covered by an 
Emergency Control, and therefore  legally  classed  as ‘High Risk’,  which alerts us to goods 
entering that cannot clear without Port Health clearance. 
3.35 
POAO for human consumption, e.g., meat, meat products, dairy, fish or composite products 
containing these, and potentially other POAO that are not for human consumption i.e. hunting 
trophies, blood etc. may need to be stopped and examined and potentially sampled and 
detained by this authority depending on the legal requirements specified etc. The 
infrastructure to do this is not currently in place. 
 
3.36 
The quantity of POAO entering the UK through both sites is believed to be substantial. Neither 
port obtains manifests of the type, quantity or weight etc. of goods transiting them. Therefore, 
it is impossible to obtain accurate figures as to the scale of the potential foodstuffs that may 
require additional controls. However, we do know that approximately 10,000 lorries per day (in 
and out) use the Port of Dover and 6-7,000  lorries  per day (in and out) use the Channel 
Tunnel.   
 
3.37 
Of these,  a significant number of lorries will be carrying foodstuffs that are likely to need 
additional checks. In practice, these will require the following provisions to be maintained 24 
hours a day: 
• 
Interactive Pre-notification system 
• 
Examination Facilities 
• 
Competent Port Health Officers (to examine foodstuffs) 
• 
Competent Vets (to examine POAO) 
• 
Handling Staff (to physically move and put loads out for examination) 
• 
Administration Staff (to process paperwork and take payments etc.) 
• 
Office facilities including IT 
• 
Storage facilities for ambient, chilled and frozen foodstuffs 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   15 
 

• 
Holding Facilities 
• 
Secure parking and detention bays etc. 
 
3.38 
Current systems are based on juxtaposed controls being conducted in France and England 
(currently we do not do this for food imports). Once outside of the EU such controls may 
cease, but if they do not then the PHA may be required to provide imported food controls on 
the French side of the border at each point of entry i.e. Dunkirk, Calais and Coquelles. If this 
were the case, we will need to factor in additional issues to our  service provision  such as 
language barrier, travel time for Environmental Health Officers, availability of accredited 
laboratory and facilities, H&S and insurance implications of working outside the UK etc.  
3.39 
To provide a service at the juxtaposed positions would require a substantial work force, which 
at this stage we cannot begin to surmise other than to draw inference from the provision 
provided by other ports such as Felixstowe BIP. Felixstowe employ approximately 50 port 
health staff and 9 vets to operate their facility, which has a smaller throughput than the two 
ports combined. 
3.40 
In terms of food safety, the fundamental concern of the PHA and the Food Standards Agency 
is bio-security and the prevention and containment of infectious diseases such as foot and 
mouth, avian flu, swine fever etc. Therefore,  all controls are required to be conducted (as 
stipulated within the current legislation) within the confines of the port to prohibit the spread of 
disease and infection across the UK and beyond.  
3.41 
However,  port  operators  concerns surrounding the  flow (keeping traffic moving) and lack of 
space or facilities to conduct such controls on site, remain high and critical. The default of 
encouraging the PHA to conduct official controls (if permissible by law) in France will come at 
a significant additional cost to the authority. In addition, suggestion of re-routing trade to a port 
with adequate facilities would have substantial implications on the local economy. 
3.42 
In addition, we cannot ignore the implications on export controls as post Brexit the authority 
may also be required to carry out additional checks and certification for goods leaving the UK 
via the two ports. 
 
3.43 
In order for local authorities to provide efficient controls, the Government will need to provide 
sufficient investment to maintain the resilience of the  infrastructure, including enhancing 
inspection facilities (the last inspection took place in 1992)  and revising the relevant 
legislation. 
 
3.44 
We ask that the Government fully engages with us to ensure that the food safety function is 
fully understood and any proposed controls are outlined with DPHA to ensure that they are 
relevant, workable and logistically feasible bearing in mind the current status, that: 
 
•  DPHA have powers to examine and detain food BUT not to physically stop vehicles in the 
first place. 
•  DPHA have no access to manifests or import/transit data, so in the large are blind as to 
what is entering the Port. 
•  Dover Port is an open port with no physical boundaries (goods land and drive out of the 
port within 7 minutes), so nothing to stop vehicles leaving the port. 
•  DPHA have inadequate facilities at the port to inspect food or appropriately store food. 
•  DPHA have no facilities at the port to park vehicles waiting for examination etc. 
•  DPHA would also have very similar issues if ‘Export’ checks were required on goods 
leaving the UK, which are not currently undertaken. 
 
3.45 
Viable regulatory solutions in other countries could be adapted and, with sufficient forewarning 
and resources (e.g. manifest schedules and Port Inspection Teams);  a new entry regime 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   16 
 

could develop to reflect the unique demands of Dover. It is essential Government engage 
effectively with local government, sector bodies, and European partners to address concerns 
and develop solutions.  
3.46 
In  October 2017, the  government set out its proposals for a post EU trade and customs 
policy47. The Treasury’s Customs Bill White Paper48,  confirmed that, regardless of the 
outcome of negotiations, the UK would need new customs laws in place by March 2019. 
Responding to calls from businesses for continuity, the white paper  also  confirms that the 
UK’s new legislation will, as far as possible, replicate the effect of existing EU customs laws. 
3.47 
However, the white paper also covers provisions for the implementation of customs, VAT and 
excise regimes in the event that no deal is reached.  
3.48 
Brexit could have significant impact on the Council’s budget as we may need a considerable 
increase in staffing to manage the workload and then all the associated impacts around 
officers having a safe working environment, access to food stuffs, testing facilities and 
managing freight through put etc. Therefore, clarity over our port health responsibilities, post-
EU, is needed as soon as possible. We also need to have assurances that there will be 
effective reimbursement and a nil-detriment to our budget.  
4. 
Local Economy and Workforce 
 
4.1 
In general terms, the major risks for the local economy are a shortage of available skills and 
labour, rising costs and the shrinking of the export market. 
 
4.2 
Research by the Centre for European Studies at Canterbury Christchurch University49  has 
found that at a local level, connections with the European economy and the single market may 
be seen in three respects: 
•  A large number of firms in the region either export products to EU member- states, import 
from them, or are involved in facilitating these transactions.  
•  The land-based industries in the Kent and Medway region depend upon EU subsidies of 
approximately £54 million per year. 
•  A significant proportion of workers in the region are citizens of other EU member-states, 
with many of them from the accession states in Central and Eastern Europe. 
 
Economic Growth: GDP & GVA 
 
4.3 
Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and Gross Value Added (GVA)  are  both  measures of 
economic activity:  
 
4.4 
To measure how large an economy is, we look at its total output –  the total value of new 
goods produced and services provided in a given time period. This is calculated at a national 
level using Gross Domestic Product (GDP). GDP growth figures are usually reported in real 
(inflation-adjusted) terms. When GDP goes up, the economy is growing – people are spending 
more and businesses may be expanding. 
 
                                                           
47 GOV.UK news. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/government-sets-out-vision-for-post-eu-trade-and-
customs-policy 

48 GOV.UK publication. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/customs-bill-legislating-for-the-uks-future-
customs-vat-and-excise-regimes 
49 Hadfield, A, Martill B, Nazarenko, L (n.d.). Canterbury Christchurch University, Centre for European Studies, Kent and 
‘Brexit’ Realities and Risks in Regional Perspective. Online at https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-
sciences/psychology-politics-and-sociology/cefeus/docs/cefeus-kent-and-brexit-report.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   17 
 



4.5 
At a regional/country or local level, GDP data is not available, but another similar measure 
called Gross Value Added (GVA) is. GVA is GDP excluding taxes and subsidies on products 
(so GVA does not include VAT, for example). These estimates allow us to see where the UK’s 
economic output is being produced and, by using GVA per head, to compare the standard of 
living in different areas of the country. These  GVA figures are only available in cash (not 
inflation-adjusted) terms.   
 
4.6 
In the run up to the UK-EU membership referendum in 2016 a number of studies examined 
the potential consequences of Brexit for the UK economy. Most mainstream studies predicted 
that Brexit would have a negative impact on UK GDP.  
 
4.7 
The LSE has conducted research50  into the local impacts of the increases in trade barriers 
associated with Brexit. It presents the predictions under two different scenarios, soft and hard 
Brexit. The average area level effect is negative  under both scenarios,  and more negative 
under hard Brexit. Please see maps below.  
 
Figure 2: Maps of Percentage Decreases in Local Authority GVA 
 
Change in GVA under Soft Brexit (%) 
Change in GVA under Hard Brexit (%) 
 
 
Source: LSE – Local economic effects of Brexit 
 
                                                           
50 S. Dhingra, S Machin, H. Overman, The Local Economic Effects of Brexit: Centre for Economic Performance, The 
London School of Economics and Political Science (July 2017). Online at: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   18 
 

Impact of Brexit for Kent and Medway Local Authorities (% change Gross Value Added) 
 
Local Authority 
Soft Brexit (%) 
Hard Brexit (%) 
Tunbridge Wells 
-1.2 
-2.6 
Dartford 
-1.3 
-2.5 
Maidstone 
-1.2 
-2.3 
Sevenoaks 
-1.2 
-2.3 
Shepway  
-1.2 
-2.3 
Tonbridge and Malling 
-1.1 
-2.3 
Ashford 
-1.2 
-2.2 
Medway 
-1.2 
-2.2 
Thanet 
-1.3 
-2.2 
Canterbury 
-1.1 
-2.2 
Gravesham 
-1.1 
-2.1 
Swale 
-1.0 
-1.9 
Dover 
-0.9 
-1.7 
Source: LSE – Local economic effects of Brexit.  
 
 
4.8 
The LSE research predicts that the Dover district would experience negative growth in GVA 
under a Soft Brexit of -0.9% and under a Hard Brexit of -1.7%.  
 
4.9 
These overall geographical  patterns  identified by the LSE deviate markedly from a small 
number of existing studies  that  suggest that impacts are likely to be biggest outside of the 
South of England. 
 
4.10 
The LSE says that two factors appear to explain these differences: 
 
• 
First, existing studies are based on  measures of trade exposure to the EU, which is 
larger for areas outside of the South of England.  However, these measures of current 
exposure underestimate the importance of increases in non-tariff barriers (particularly in 
the hard Brexit scenario).  
• 
Second, simply looking at trade exposure ignores the willingness of individuals and firms 
to substitute away from foreign to  domestic supply as trade-costs rise. These 
substitution effects are largest in service industries that are concentrated in the South of 
England (and Primary Urban Areas).  
• 
The LSE model accounts for both these factors and thus predicts a different pattern in 
terms of those areas predicted to be most negatively affected by Brexit. 
 
4.11 
GVA data for the Dover district shows that economic performance in the Dover district is 
already relatively low compared with the rest of the country. Three local authorities in Kent 
(Dover, Gravesham and Thanet) are among the lowest districts for GVA per head in the whole 
of the South East51.  
 
 
                                                           
51 Office for National Statistics, Regional GVA(I) by local authority in the UK (March 2017). Online at: 
https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/grossvalueaddedgva/datasets/regionalgvaibylocalauthorityintheuk 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   19 
 

Estimated GVA per head, 1998 to 2015,  
£ thousands 
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015
Dover
Kent & Medway
South East
United Kingdom
 
Source: Office for National Statistics, March 2017 
 
Economic Growth: Sector Specific Impacts 
 
4.12 
The LSE research into the local impacts of the increases in trade barriers associated with 
Brexit52 also analyses sector specific impacts. Under both hard and soft Brexit the estimated 
shocks to imports, exports and Gross Value Added (GVA) by World Input-Output Database 
(WIOD)  sector are predominantly negative. The GVA impacts under the two different 
scenarios are reported in Table 1 below. 
4.13 
The Table also shows that industry specific GVA shocks are on average lower under soft 
Brexit than under hard Brexit (the same is true for imports and exports).  
4.14 
The LSE paper is a first attempt to look at the Local Authority impacts of the increases in trade 
barriers associated with Brexit. It says further work is needed to understand these impacts 
better and to understand the impacts working through other channels, such as migration and 
investment, and to understand the longer-term impacts as the economy adjusts.  
 
4.15 
In the Dover district, the dominant industries are located in the Construction (F) sector and the 
Professional, scientific and technical (M) sectors, which account for 14.4% of businesses 
each.  
 
                                                           
52 S. Dhingra, S Machin, H. Overman, The Local Economic Effects of Brexit: Centre for Economic Performance, The 
London School of Economics and Political Science (July 2017). Online at: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/brexit10.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   20 
 


 
Source: LSE – Local economic effects of Brexit. 
 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   21 
 

Number of enterprises in the Dover District, by Broad Industry Group, 2016 
500
450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
A)
)
)
)
)
)
)
 (C)
F)
 (J)
 (K)
 (P)
er
nd E
) (H)
l (M
 (Q)
th
ing
e (O
tion (
tal
ion
ion
 o
nica
 fishing (
operty (L)
fenc
actur
truc
 services (I)
rt services
Health
ades (Part G
tail (Part G
unicat
Pr
Re
m
 insurance
 tech
po
& de
Educat
)
anuf
Cons
r tr
olesale (Part G
tilities (B,D a
e (inc pos
 food
om
al &
 sup
S,T,U
 u
M
oto
Wh
ag
 &
 c
M
 &
)
 stor
ion
s (R,
at
entific &
stration 
ion
nanci
(N
Fi
ini
ent, recreation &
lture, forestry &
t &
od
at
dm
inm
icu
m
m
uarrying &
service
spor
inistration &
ic a
rta
Agr
 q
Infor
dm
Tran
Accom
Publ
ining,
ss a
, ente
M
Professional, sci
ine
Arts
Bus
 
Source: Office for National Statistics dataset UKBAA01b - Enterprises53 
 
4.16 
In the Dover district, the highest proportion of GVA was generated by the Distribution sector, 
accounting for over a quarter (26%) of the GVA generated in the district. This sector includes 
distribution, transport, accommodation and food.  
 
4.17 
Production other than manufacturing accounts for the smallest proportion of GVA generated in 
the district (1%)54.  
 
                                                           
53 Office for National Statistics, UK Business - activity, size and location. Online at: 
https://www.ons.gov.uk/businessindustryandtrade/business/activitysizeandlocation/datasets/ukbusinessactivitysizeandloca
tion  
54 Office for National Statistics, Regional GVA(I) by local authority in the UK (March 2017). Online at: 
https://www.ons.gov.uk/economy/grossvalueaddedgva/datasets/regionalgvaibylocalauthorityintheuk 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   22 
 

Distribution of GVA generation in the Dover district by industry, 2015  
£ million   
29  28 27 
Distribution; transport; accommodation and food
42 
Public administration; education; health
59 
110 
461 
Real estate activities
Manufacturing
151 
Construction
Business service activities
Other services and household activities
170 
Financial and insurance activities
389 
Agriculture, forestry and fishing
313 
Information and communication
Production other than manufacturing
 Source: Office for National Statistics, March 2017 
 
 
Jobs in the district 
 
4.18 
As at March 2015, there were a total of 34,000 jobs in the Dover district (23,000 full-time and 
11,000 part-time).  
 
4.19 
A  significant  majority  of  local  firms  (87.7%)  in the Dover district are  micro  businesses 
employing between one and nine employees.   
 
4.20 
In  terms  of  employment  patterns,  a  majority  of  residents  in the district are  employed  in  the 
‘Services’ industry (G-S), with 29,800 jobs (87.6%).  The ‘Public Admin, Education and Health’ 
sectors (O-Q) employ 10,750 people (31.6%).  
 
4.21 
The  percentage of  employees in the ‘Transport and Storage’  industry  in the district 11.8%, 
which is a significantly higher percentage than Kent (5.3%); South East (4.5%) and Great 
Britain (4.7%)55.  
 
4.22 
At this point in time there is no data collated / available to give the number of EU employees in 
the Dover district.  
 
                                                           
55 Office for National Statistics, NOMIS – Official Labour Market Statistics. Online at: https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/  
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   23 
 

Employee Jobs by Industry, 2015, percentage 
20
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
n
y
n
n
ing
or
ing
ing
ent
tio
age
itie
ion
or
io
io
ry
c
ot
ities
ities
ities
ities
ities
ities
tiv
at
s
at
tur
tion
u
f M
tor
c
c
tiv
tiv
tiv
tiv
tiv
reat
tiv
uar
tr
c
c
c
c
pul
c
c
ac
s
duc
n
uni
r O
e A
 A
 A
ec
om
 A
k
d Q
ondi
anagem
o
nd S
ic
m
e A
e A
al
e
e A
 : E
n
anuf
v
tat
c
ic
 C
P
ic
A
ir C
 : C
epai
les
er
om
anc
s
v
e;
nd R
v
: M
te M
ities
F
c
hni
er
 Wor
er
 R
y
ion A
ur
 E
nc
 A
ing 
c
tiv
e;
c
tat
ial
 S
nd C
ns
ec
t S
e
in
nd A
c
or
eal
T
ef
oc
ent
 A
A
ood S
y
 Was
ity
rad
ot
por
F
 A
nd I
 R
nd 
D
ther
ur
nm
 : M
e,
ion 
M
ion
uppor
B
am
ppl
l T
nd 
 A
L :
 A
nd 
ec
nd S
te
u
ag
at
ai
at
rtai
 : O
S
er
nd 
rans
A
m
ial
ific
d S
 S
e
S
, S
edi
et
 A
n
th A
nt
ew
 : T
ion 
or
A
ial
as
tion A
c
les
H
ient
o
eal
, E
; S
em
nd R
c
c
dat
inanc

tra
S
, G
y
o
 : Inf
 F
iv
H
rts
d R
hi
J
, S
is
ity
 :
n
e A
e
m
K
trat
in
an 
uppl
A
al
V
s
 : A
tric
R
 S
es
om
c
ional
s
ini
dm
um
lec
er
ol
c
s
 A
 H
h
e
dm
ic
 :
 E
 A
 :
Q
 W
I :
rof
D
 : A
ubl
 : Wat
 :
 P
N
E
G
 :
M
 : P
O
Dover
Kent
South East
Great Britain
Source: NOMIS (%  is a proportion of total employee jobs (Employee jobs excludes self-employed, government-
supported trainees and HM Forces). These figures exclude farm agriculture56  
 
 
EU citizens living in the Dover district 
 
Census 2011 
 
4.24 
The most accurate source of data on the UK population is the Census, which is conducted 
every 10 years. The most recent Census results showed that in March 2011, there were 3,383 
people (3%) born in other EU countries living in the Dover district. This estimate covers all 
countries that were EU member states in 2011, so it does not include a small number of 
people born in Croatia, which joined the EU in July 201357. 
 
 
                                                           
56 Office for National Statistics, NOMIS – Official Labour Market Statistics. Online at: https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/ 
57 Office for National Statistics, 2011 Census. Online at: https://www.ons.gov.uk/census/2011census 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   24 
 

EU citizens living in the Dover District, Census 2011 
1,200
1,000
800
600
400
200
0
France Germany
Italy
Portugal
Spain
Other Lithuania Poland Romania Other EU
(including member
accession
Canary countries
countries
Islands) in March
2001
 
 
Member countries in 2001 
 
Accession countries April 2001 to March 2011 
 
Source: Nomisweb, QS203EW – Country of Birth (detailed)58 
Labour Force Survey estimates 
4.25 
The most recent estimates of the EU migrant population of the Dover district are available 
from the Labour Force Survey, and are published in an ONS annual statistical release on 
‘Population by Country of Birth and Nationality’. According to these figures, between July 2016 
to June 2017, there were around 2,000 (rounded to the nearest 1,000) people born in other 
EU countries living in the district. Figures for the population aged 16-64 years in the district 
are not available due to disclosure control59.   
4.26 
Official data on the type of industries that EU nationals are working in in the district is not 
available. The table below shows estimates of the number of EU migrants employed in the UK 
by the industry section in their main job. These estimates are taken from the quarterly Labour 
Force Survey for Q1 2017.  
 
 
                                                           
58 Office for National Statistics, NOMIS – Official Labour Market Statistics. Online at: 
https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/census/2011/qs203ew 
59 Office for National Statistics. Online at: 
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/internationalmigration/datasets/populatio
noftheunitedkingdombycountryofbirthandnationality 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   25 
 


EU national workers by industry, Q1 2017 
 
•  Within the broad industry sections 
shown in this table, the industry 
divisions with the largest numbers of 
EU national workers were: 
o  Retail (203,000), 
o  Food and beverage service activities 
(186,000),  
o  Education (149,000),  
o  Manufacture of food products 
(116,000),  
o  Human health activities (106,000), and  
o  Construction of buildings (105,000) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Source: House of Commons Briefing Paper –
Migration Statistics60  
 
 
 
National Insurance Number (NINo) allocations  
 
4.27 
The number of new National Insurance Number (NINo) allocations to adult overseas nationals 
is used as a measure for the number of new migrant workers in an area.  
 
4.28 
The data shows only those who are entering the UK each year and not those currently in the 
UK or those who are leaving. It shows where the person was at time of registration and not 
their subsequent movements. It is therefore not possible to determine how many migrant 
workers there are in an area at any one time.  
 
4.29 
The following map shows the number of NINO allocations in each district and unitary authority 
in the South East region.  Areas in red show the top 20% of English local authority districts 
with the highest number of new National Insurance Number allocations to overseas nationals.  
 
4.30 
The map shows that no Kent district was in the top 20% of local authorities in England with the 
highest NINo allocations;  however,  neighbouring Medway was within the top 20% in the 
country with 2,762 NINos in 2016/17 and had the eighth highest number in the region 2016/17 
% of new migrant workers61.  
 
                                                           
60 House of Commons Briefing Paper – Migration Statistics (February 2018). Online at:  
http://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/SN06077/SN06077.pdf 
61  Migrant Workers in Kent (KCC Strategic Business Development & Intelligence)  Published August 2017. Online at: 
http://www.kent.gov.uk/about-the-council/information-and-data/Facts-and-figures-about-Kent/economy-and-employment 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   26 
 



 
Source: Migrant Workers in Kent (KCC Strategic Business Development & Intelligence). Published August 2017 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   27 
 

4.31 
There were 13,926 NINOs allocated in Kent in the year following the referendum. Maidstone 
district had the 10th highest number of NINos in the South East in 2016/17 (2,561). Shepway 
and Dover districts had among the lowest allocations in the region with 477 and 495 NINos 
respectively.  
 
4.32 
In the Dover district, there has been a -6.8% (-36) change in NINo allocations between 
2015/16 and 2016/17. This compares to -5.4% change across Kent. Only one Kent district 
(Sevenoaks, +13  or  +2%) among the thirty South East districts saw an increase in NINo 
allocations over the year.  
 
4.33 
When looking at long-term changes, the Dover district has seen an increase of +119% (+269) 
since 2002/03.  
 
4.34 
Nationally the highest proportion of NINo  allocations was to workers from EU Accession 
States. This is also reflected in the South East region and in Kent as a whole.  
 
4.35 
In the Dover district workers from the EU Accession States accounted for more than two thirds 
(68.1%)  of all new NINo allocations.  In  Kent,  all districts had a higher proportion of new 
migrant workers from the EU Accession States than the England average of 47.0% with the 
exception of Shepway (45.1%). 
 
4.36 
NINO allocations to workers from the European Union (excluding Accession States) made up 
the second largest proportion of all those issued in the Dover district (15.4%).  
 
4.37 
When looking in more detail at the specific country of origin, the top country of origin in the 
Dover district was Romania (114), followed by Bulgaria (61) and Poland (55).  
 
4.38 
In  2016/17, the majority of new migrant workers in the Dover district (66.1%) were aged 34 
and under at the time of registration. This is below the national average of 73.0%62.  
 
 
Migration and access to skills 
 
4.39 
Government has committed to end free movement. All EU citizens in the UK at the point of 
leaving the EU will be able to remain although they may be required to be part of a new 
registration scheme.  
 
4.40 
If restrictions are imposed on migration then there is also a risk that labour and skills 
shortages will emerge. Some  sectors are more heavily reliant on access to flexible, low skill 
workers from the EU than others.  The industries that may see greater impact if overseas 
worker migration was restricted include  agriculture,  construction, hospitality and retail trade, 
health and care, and the scientific and technical sector.  
 
4.41 
With regards to the agriculture and horticulture sector, the Government has indicated that it 
does  not feel Seasonal Agricultural Workers schemes is necessary but have undertaken to 
keep this under review and to consult widely with business about how access to skills can 
work following an end to free movement. 
 
4.42 
The construction industry is highly reliant on migrant labour; between 2007 and  2014, the 
proportion of EU migrants in the construction sector rose from 3.65% to  7.03%63. Any 
                                                           
62 Migrant Workers in Kent (KCC Strategic Business Development & Intelligence) Published August 2017. Online at: 
http://www.kent.gov.uk/about-the-council/information-and-data/Facts-and-figures-about-Kent/economy-and-employment 
63 Royal Town Planning Institute. Online at http://www.rtpi.org.uk/briefing-room/news-releases/2016/july/rtpi-overview-of-
new-uk-government/ 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   28 
 

restrictions on free movement could have an adverse impact on building costs and supply, at 
least in the short to medium term.  
4.43 
According to the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB), across the UK a fifth of small 
business employers have EU workers, with 72% recruiting them when they were already living 
in the UK. Its report,  A Skilful Exit: What small firms want from Brexit64, reveals that 59%  of 
small businesses with EU workers are worried about being able to access the skills they need 
after the UK leaves the EU. 
4.44 
The Migration Advisory Committee, an advisory non-departmental public body, sponsored by 
the Home Office,65 which is considering the impacts of Brexit on the UK labour market and will 
be making recommendations on how to better align the visa system to the needs of 
employers. It is expected to report its findings by September 2018. 
 
Rural Economy 
 
4.45 
The Dover district is  predominately-rural  (79.3%)66, with a very rich landscape, comprising 
coastal cliffs and marshes, orchards and arable lands and the rolling chalk downs with 
numerous ancient woodlands and valleys.  
 
4.46 
For the rural economy, a major concern of Brexit is the loss of EU subsidies.  The government 
has promised an Agriculture Bill to replace the Common Agriculture Policy (CAP), which has 
guided EU funding and policy, up until now. 
 
4.47 
Therefore, the  impact on Dover’s land-based industries including farming and growers  will 
depend on the  level of subsidies from the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy will be 
compensated by central government. 
 
4.48 
The loss of EU labour is also a reported concern for the rural economy, which has been wholly 
dependent on cheap labour from Central and Eastern Europe since 200467.  
 
4.49 
Farming is worth £5.4bn to Kent’s economy68, with an estimated 20,000 seasonal agricultural 
workers employed in Kent. Uncertainty about changes to immigration is already reported to be 
having an impact on seasonal workers’ intentions to return for work in Kent farms. 
 
4.50 
Mutual recognition of food regulations between the UK and EU will be essential to ensure 
continued trade in food and drink. Without this, our exports to the EU will automatically face 
complex documentary and physical inspection requirements, which  would make exporting 
more difficult and costly for UK producers. The absence of a regulatory agreement could 
amplify these issues in some EU Member States as it  could result in a greater risk of 
protectionism via the use of non-tariff barriers to trade. 
 
 
 
                                                           
64 FSB, A Skilful Exit: What small firms want from Brexit (April 2017). Online at:  https://www.fsb.org.uk/docs/default-
source/fsb-org-uk/a-skilful-exit---what-small-firms-want-from-brexit.pdf?sfvrsn=0 
65 Migration Advisory Committee. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/migration-advisory-committee 
66 According to the ONS 2011 Rural Urban Classification for Small Geographies. Online at: 
https://www.ons.gov.uk/methodology/geography/geographicalproducts/ruralurbanclassifications/2011ruralurbanclassificati
on 
67 A. Hadfield, M Hammond, Centre for European Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent And Medway: 
Making A Success Of Brexit A Sectoral Appraisal Of Small And Medium Sized Enterprises And The Rural Economy (July 
2017). Online at: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/psychology-politics-and-
sociology/cefeus/docs/Making-A-Success-of-Brexit-20-July-2017.pdf 
68 Kent Rural PLC. Online at: https://ruralplc.com/ 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   29 
 

Local Business Readiness 
 
4.51 
For  local  businesses, it is assumed that one of the major  concerns  will be the difficulty in 
preparing for leaving the EU, as there  is still much to be negotiated and what it will mean in 
practice.  
 
4.52 
Local businesses will need business  support  services  to adapt to new regulatory and 
legislative changes and explore international trading opportunities. This could be delivered by 
local councils, with funding from Government.  
 
4.53 
There is limited data available at a district level to help us assess the likely impact of Brexit on 
local businesses. We therefore recommend that we either:  
•  Carry out a survey of businesses in the Dover district on the challenges and opportunities 
of Brexit or  
•  Include a small number of Brexit questions in the forthcoming Local Business Survey 
being undertaken as part of the Local Plan.   
 
4.55 
This will be a useful way of gaining insight into the: 
•  Level of trade that exists between the EU and employers in the district 
•  Concerns regarding access to skills 
•  Local reliance on EU funding 
•  Support needed to prepare for changes to the regulatory and legal framework (for 
example, changes to customs, exports and public protection standards) 
•  New market opportunities.    
 
 
5. 
Tourism 
 
5.1 
The visitor economy is one of this country’s fastest growing economic sectors and there is 
significant growth potential for the Dover district. Nationally, tourism industries employ nearly 3 
million people, making it the third largest employer, accounting for 9.5% of total employment69. 
It is predicted to grow by an annual average of 2.9% over the next decade. This is more than 
the overall economy (2.5%) and outpaces nearly every other sector70.  
 
5.2 
According to the most recent tourism research71, commissioned by Visit Kent, the total 
economic impact of tourism in the Dover District in 2015 was £264,821,200. This is an 
increase of +6.6% compared to the last survey for 2013. The total number of actual tourism 
related employment rose by +8.2% to 5,562.  
 
                                                           
69 UK Tourism Statistics 2016, Tourism Alliance (n.d.). Online at: 
http://www.tourismalliance.com/downloads/TA_390_415.pdf 
70 LGA Local Solutions: boosting the visitor economy (July 2016). Online at: 
https://www.local.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/local-solutions-boosting--494.pdf 
71 Visit Kent, Destination Research Economic Impact of Tourism, Dover – 2015 Results (2016). Online at: 
https://www.visitkentbusiness.co.uk/library/Economic_Impact_of_Tourism_-_Dover_2015_FINAL_REPORT.PDF 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   30 
 

Tourism Jobs as a Percentage of Total 
Employment in the Dover District, 2015 
15.9 
Tourism Jobs
Non-Tourism Jobs
83.1 
 
Source: Destination Research Economic Impact of Tourism, Dover – 2015 (published 2016) 
 
5.3 
Between 2013 and 2015, there has been a +8.2% increase in tourism related jobs in the 
Dover district. This compares to +5.9% across Kent.  
5.4 
It is estimated that the tourism industry provides 5,562 jobs in the district, which equates to 
15.9% of total employment.   
 
5.5 
The value of the visitor economy in the Dover District increased by 6.6% between 2013 and 
2015. This compares to 4.8% across Kent.  
 
5.6 
The tourism industry is characterised by its diversity. Over 80% of the accommodation, 
hospitality and attractions that welcome domestic and overseas visitors are small or medium 
sized enterprises (SMEs) and many are family owned.  
 
5.7 
Tourism is recognised as having a significant multiplier effect on the economy, which makes it 
a strong driver for growth. 
 
5.8 
Money spent directly purchasing tourism goods and services has spill over benefits through 
the wider supply chain and consumer spending that arises from direct tourism expenditure.  
 
Direct Expenditure by visitors to the Dover District, 2015  
(£ millions) 
Accommodation
Entertainment
Food & Drink
Retail
Transport
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80  
Source: Destination Research Economic Impact of Tourism, Dover – 2015 (published 2016) 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   31 
 

5.9 
The Kent and Medway region attracts a significant number of visitors from overseas each 
year.  A greater proportion of visitors arrive from EU member-states (77%) than the national 
average  (67%) owing to our  proximity to the European continent and its usefulness as a 
waystation for travellers heading to London and beyond. 
 
5.10 
Visit Kent, the official Destination Management Organisation for Kent and Medway, engages 
with audiences both nationally and internationally with 2  for  1 campaigns in partnership with 
businesses including the ferry operators. They have also been targeting French, Dutch and 
German visitors via Facebook. 
 
Visitor Breakdown for the  
Visitor Breakdown for the  
Dover District, 2015 
Dover District, 2015  
 (Number of visitors, thousands) 
(Value of visit, £ millions)  
341  83 
64 
3,900 
116 
25 
Overnight: Domestic Visitors
Overnight: Domestic Visitors
Overnight: Overseas Visitors
Overnight: Overseas Visitors
Day Visitors
Day Visitors
 
 
Source: Destination Research Economic Impact of Tourism, Dover – 2015 (published December 2016) 
 
5.11 
In addition to being one of the UK’s main trade gateways with Europe, and the busiest 
passenger port in Europe, the Port  of Dover is also a hub port for cruise lines in the South 
East of England, with over 25 different cruise lines operating out of the Port. It is one of the 
busiest cruise ports in Britain and Northern Europe and welcomes more than 200,000 cruise 
passengers every year. 
 
5.12 
Dover marina, with 400 berths in three berthing areas, is a member of TransEurope Marinas, 
welcoming yachtsmen and boaters from across the Channel72.  
 
5.13 
Visit  Kent73, in partnership, has also successfully secured EU funding through the Interreg 
programmes such as the current PROFIT project to help SMEs increase productivity, diversify 
and innovate and GO TRADE, which celebrates our market towns.  
 
5.14 
There are several risks identifiable to the tourism sector of a British exit from the EU, which 
may adversely affect the number of visitors to the region from EU member‐states.  
 
5.15 
The most  important concerns the effects of the re-imposition of customs controls that may 
accompany  a British withdrawal. Visitors from Europe may be less inclined to holiday in the 
UK if the time, costs and restrictions on entering the country are increased, especially if they 
are able to travel within neighbouring countries easier. 
 
 
 
                                                           
72 Dover Harbour Board. Online at https://www.doverport.co.uk/marina/ 
73 Visit Kent. Online at: https://www.visitkent.co.uk 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   32 
 

5.16 
Post-Brexit the free flow of goods and visitors in vital. The visitor economy lost over 1m per 
day during Operation Stack in 2016 (not including the reputational damage caused)74.  
 
5.17 
Moreover, visitors may also be dissuaded from coming to the UK by the perceived rise of anti-
foreigner sentiment in the country that has accompanied the referendum campaign. 
 
5.18 
A significant decline in the number of visitors from EU countries will hit the tourist industry 
hard, given that individuals from these states make up a significant majority of visitors to the 
district. The likely outcome will be a reduction in income and jobs in the tourism sector and 
allied industries.  
 
5.19 
There will also be direct effects on Dover residents: If customs restrictions are re-imposed and 
cross-border travel made slower, the marginal benefits of short breaks to the continent will 
decrease. 
 
5.20 
The tourism industry relies heavily on European and migrant labour, and concerns regarding 
labour availability  and attracting home-grown  talent, with the necessary skills, have been 
raised.  
 
5.21 
The recent “Sandhurst Summit”75  recognised the importance  for economic development and 
cross-border cooperation. Paragraph 54 commits the UK and France to work together to 
support the economic development of the Calais and Dover regions, to establish a working 
group on common projects and support the promotion of business and tourism.  
 
Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee 
 
5.22 
In January 2018, the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee published a report  on the 
potential impact of Brexit on the creative industries, tourism and the digital single market, 
following an inquiry by its predecessor committee which was dissolved due to the general 
election in 201776. 
 
5.23 
It themed its findings under three headings: Workforce; Loss of direct EU funding; and Future 
regulatory environment: 
 
1.  Workforce 
• 
The Committee found a lack of consistent data about the reliance of different sectors on 
workers from the EU-27. Sector representatives believed that the official figures 
underestimate the true total. For example, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates 
10%  of the tourism workforce are EU-27 nationals whereas UK  inbound, the tourism sector 
body, believes the proportion is above 15%, rising to 40%  in London and the south east. 
There are similar regional variations in other sectors.  
• 
Key challenges for the sectors include recruitment difficulties, future immigration 
arrangements, shortage of skills in the domestic workforce (for example language skills). 
Although there is an opportunity to upskill British workers, this was not considered a short-
term solution.  
 
 
 
                                                           
74 Visit Kent. Online at: https://www.visitkent.co.uk 
75 GOV.UK news. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-france-summit-2018-documents 
76 House of Commons Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, The potential impact of Brexit on the creative 
industries, tourism and the digital single market. Online at: 
https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201719/cmselect/cmcumeds/365/365.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   33 
 

2.  EU Funding 
• 
The  Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee found that the UK has been a recipient if 
significant European funding, for example the Creative Europe programme. Although non-EU 
countries can still participate in this particular programme, they must accept free movement of 
people, which the UK government has rejected.  
• 
The Committee recommended the government carry out a full mapping exercise of direct and 
indirect funding streams that support these sectors and clarify which funds will be replaced 
and the criteria that would be applied.  
 
3.  Regulatory 
 
The Committee’s focus was on  common rules on data protection, copyright and VAT. The 
tourism sector also raised concerns over aviation agreements, for example, the EU-US ‘open 
skies’ agreement, and lack of detail after March 2019.  
 
 
5.24 
The likely impact of Brexit is unclear because so many critical issues are still subject to 
negotiation. The effects are likely to be felt differently in different parts of the country – smaller 
British cities and rural areas may experience more effects that are negative.  The committee 
called on the government to provide clarity and to ensure the issues are reflected in its 
negotiations. The problem for the government is that all sectors have their own demands, 
technical issues and regulations on which they need certainty, illustrating the complexity and 
scale of the task of leaving the EU. 
 
6. 
Funding 
 
EU Funding Overview 
 
6.1 
A large number of European Union (EU) programmes offer financial support for projects 
helping to deliver economic, social or environmental benefits. Eligible organisations can apply 
for funding for projects under many of these funding programmes. 
 
6.2 
EU funding programmes operate in 7-year cycles. The current cycle runs from 2014 to 2020. 
 
6.3 
There are 3 main types of EU funding: 
 
1.  Thematic, Europe wide programmes 
Most of these programmes require multi-national partnerships and focus of particular 
topics such as  art and culture,  education and vocational training,  enterprise and 
Innovation, environment and nature, research and transport. 
 
2.  Geographically targeted funding 
EU INTERREG programmes aim to help regions and cities from different EU member 
states to work together. They aim to break down barriers and enable organisations to 
learn from each other through joint programmes, projects and networks under a variety of 
themes. 
 
Organisations from Kent can apply for joint projects under five different INTERREG 
Programmes77: 
 
•  The Interreg 5A 2 Seas Cross-Border Co-operation Programme 
Key topics:  Technological and social innovation, low carbon technologies, adaptation to 
climate change, resource efficient economy. 
                                                           
77 Kent County Council, EU funding explained. Online at: https://www.kent.gov.uk/business/business-loans-and-
funding/eu-funding/eu-funding-explained#tab-2 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   34 
 

•  The Interreg 5A France Channel England Cross-Border Co-operation Programme 
Key topics:  Innovation for economic  and societal issues, low carbon economy, 
attractiveness of the region, balanced and inclusive development. 
•  The Interreg 5B North Sea Region Transnational Co-operation Programme 
Key topics:  Economic growth, eco-innovation and green technology, climate change and 
environment, green transport and mobility. 
•  The Interreg 5B North West Europe Transnational Co-operation Programme 
Key topics:  Social innovation, low carbon, resource and materials efficient. 
•  The Interreg Europe Interregional Co-operation Programme 
Key topics:  Research and innovation, SME competitiveness, low carbon economy, 
environment and resource efficiency. 
 
3.  Nationally-run EU Funding Programmes 
Some EU programmes are run on a national basis and do not require international 
partnerships. For 2014-20, most of the available funds for England have been allocated to 
Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEP) areas under  the European Structural Investment 
Fund78  (ESIF). The South East LEP ESIF programme covers innovation and research, 
support for SMEs, low carbon, skills and employment and social inclusion. 
 
EU Structural Funding 
 
6.4 
EU structural funding has, since the UK joined the EU, co-financed critical projects to grow 
local economies, support people in jobs, enable businesses to start up and grow, and support 
people to develop their skills to meet the needs of the local economy. 
 
6.5 
The LGA estimates that a potential funding gap of €10.5 billion (c. £8.4 billion) for local 
government will open immediately from the point the UK officially exist the EU, unless a viable 
domestic successor to EU structural funding is implemented79. 
 
6.6 
The European Structural and Investment Funds (‘ESIF’) comprise three main Funds:  
1.  European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) supports innovation, SME 
competitiveness and the development of a low carbon economy.  
2.  European Social Fund (ESF) enables employability and skills support and social inclusion 
projects.  
3.  European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) supports the growth of the 
land-based economy. 
 
6.7 
The UK was due to receive some £5.3 billion in European Union structural funds in the 2014-
2020  programming period. Areas benefiting from structural funds have demanded that the 
Government should ensure that equivalent sums continue to be invested in their areas. 
 
South East 
 
6.8 
The South East LEP (Local Enterprise Partnership) has an indicative allocation of £160 million 
of Structural Funds from the EU, which was awarded by the Government for the 2014 – 2020 
EU funding period. This is made up of  £74.2m ERDF (European Regional Development 
                                                           
78 GOV.UK, European Structural and Investment Funds. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/european-structural-
investment-funds 
79 Local Government Association, Beyond Brexit: Future of funding currently sourced from the EU. Online at: 
https://www.local.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/2017-07_Beyond%20Brexit%20-
%20LGA%20Discussion%20%28FINAL%29_0.pdf 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   35 
 

Fund); £71.6m ESF (European Social Fund); and £14.5m EAFRD (European Agricultural 
Fund for Rural Development)80.  
 
Kent 
 
6.9 
Kent County Council has a strong record of accomplishment  of securing access to EU 
funding, which the district benefits from. A report to the Growth, Economic Development and 
Communities Cabinet Committee in July 2016 on the Impact of the EU Referendum on 
European Funding81  indicated that a total of £52.62m had been secured for the 2014-2020 
programming period, including £42.3m for the Port of Dover and £5.3m for the LEADER 
programme82 in West Kent, East Kent and Mid Kent. 
 
6.10 
Since 2014, over £200m of EU grants and loans have come into Kent-based organisations. 
 
Programming Period 2014-2020, (KCC / Kent Funding secured to July 2016)  

 
Programme 
Coverage 
Amount (£m) 
Interreg 5A ‘2 Seas’ 
County-wide 
0.43 
Interreg 5A ‘Channel’ 
County-wide 
 
Interreg 5B ‘North Sea’ 
County-wide 
 
Interreg 5B ‘North West Europe’  County-wide 
 
Interreg ‘Europe’ 
County-wide 
0.22 
South East LEP ‘ESIF’ (ERDF) 
Kent and Medway 
4.30 
South East LEP ‘ESIF’ (ESF) 
Kent and Medway 
 
South East LEP ‘ESIF’ (EAFRD)  Kent & Medway 
0.07 
Connecting Europe Facility 
Port of Dover 
42.30 
LEADER 
West Kent, Mid-Kent, East Kent 
5.30 
Total 
 
52.62 
 
6.11 
Given national cuts to local authorities’ funding, ESIF Funds have been important for the 
delivery of KCC’s core priorities through a range of co-financed projects and have represented 
longer term funding streams for the Council. 
 
6.12 
Kent County Council may also be funding projects in the district from EU funding sources, 
which could therefore stop or reduce.  
 
Dover District 
 
6.13 
It is difficult to pinpoint exact figures and the number of businesses in the district that have or 
are receiving funding from the EU.   
 
6.14 
Connecting Europe Facility: The Port of Dover has received funding as follows:   
•  BRIDGE (Building the Resilience of International & Dependent Gateways in Europe): 
£18,900,000  for  Maritime and civil works –  including new quay walls, dredging, land 
reclamation to create additional freight vehicle capacity.  
•  BRIDGE - Motorways of the Sea II:  
                                                           
80 South East LEP European Structural Funds. Online at:  
 http://www.southeastlep.com/european-funding/european-structural-funding 
81 Kent County Council, Impact of the EU Referendum on European Funding. Online at:  
https://democracy.kent.gov.uk/documents/s70051/Item%20C3%20-
%20Impact%20of%20the%20EU%20Referendum%20on%20European%20Funding.pdf 
82 The LEADER programme is a European Union initiative to support rural development projects initiated at the local level 
in order to revitalise rural areas and create jobs 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   36 
 

£23,450,000 for Financing of refrigerated cargo terminal in Dover and relocation of cargo 
operations to initiate port-centric distribution and utilise empty backloads.  
 
Future Funding Arrangements 
 
6.15 
Brexit creates an  opportunity for a streamlined model to replace EU funding and support 
growth based on local need.  
 
6.16 
The Government has confirmed that all signed structural fund projects are guaranteed funding 
up to the point when the UK departs the EU –  even when  these  projects continue after we 
have left. Projects will have to demonstrate good value for money and be in line with domestic 
strategic priorities83. 
 
UK Shared Prosperity Fund 
 
6.17 
The  Government  has  also committed to creating a UK Shared Prosperity Fund  (UKSPF) to 
replace EU economic aid. There are no further details available regarding the criteria for this, 
how  much will be allocated to it, the relationship it may have with the Local  Growth Fund, 
whether the EU principle of match funding will apply, or  what  outcomes the Government 
expects from this.  In January 2018,  the  Government has pledged to consult widely on the 
design of the UKSPF and has asked LEPs to lead on regional responses; the consultation is 
expected later this year.  
 
6.18 
However, the Conservatives’ manifesto in May said that the UKSPF would be “…specifically 
designed to reduce inequalities between communities. The money that is spent will help 
deliver sustainable, inclusive growth based on our modern industrial strategy. The UK Shared 
Prosperity Fund will be cheap to administer, low in bureaucracy and targeted where it is 
needed most.” 
 
6.19 
Whether and to what extent EU funding would be replaced will depend on factors such as the 
health of the economy as a whole and the spending priorities of the government of the day. 
Industrial Strategy White Paper 
 
6.20 
The  Industrial Strategy White Paper,  published late November 2017, reiterates that the 
government will ensure that local areas continue to receive flexible  funding for their local 
needs. The White Paper outlines five foundations of productivity: Ideas; People; Infrastructure; 
Business environment; and Place.  
 
6.21 
Local industrial strategies are central to this focus.  A local industrial strategy (LIS) should 
bring together a well-informed evidence base about an area’s economy and outline a long-
term set of priorities that capitalise on existing opportunities in the economy, address 
weaknesses and resolve an area’s needs.  
 
6.22 
In areas without an elected metro mayor, the LIS will be led by the local LEP. LEP’s currently 
develop Strategic Economic Plans (SEPs) to define local economic strategy and access the 
Government’s Local Growth Fund. LISs have a wider remit and place focus  and will involve 
more institutions. Areas will need to build on their SEPs to develop their respective LISs, 
which will need to be agreed in partnership with the Government.  
 
6.23 
The South East LEP SEP84 is currently being renewed and SELEP has been consulting with a 
range of public and private stakeholders. The aim is to publish the SEP early 2018.   
                                                           
83 GOV.UK news. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/further-certainty-on-eu-funding-for-hundreds-of-british-
projects 
84 South East LEP, SEP. Online at: http://www.southeastlep.com/strategic-economic-plan 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   37 
 

 
6.24 
Given the increased  responsibility and need to deliver,  LEPs will be reviewed and reformed 
accordingly. The government says it will make additional financial resources available 
following its review of LEPs. The review will look at leadership, governance, accountability and 
geographic boundaries to give LEPs a clearly defined set of activities, objectives and 
responsibilities. 
 
6.25 
The  White Paper has a stated aim of delivering the first LISs by March 2019, with  Greater 
Manchester and the West Midlands Combined Authority leading the way.  
 
6.26 
The White Paper says that LISs will guide how devolved funding streams will be used;  this 
includes the UK Shared Prosperity Fund. Other funds are expected to be included such as the 
£115m Strength in Places Fund. 
 
6.27 
The 2015 Growth and Infrastructure Framework for Kent and Medway is currently  being 
refreshed: this will provide a picture of housing and infrastructure requirements based on 
forecasts of population for Kent and Medway and for each district in the county. These 
population forecasts and consequential housing needs will be projected to 2031; the refreshed 
GIF will also suggest different growth scenarios for up to 2050. 
 
6.28 
In November 2017, Kent County Council set out its plan to develop an  Enterprise and 
Productivity Strategy, to improve Kent’ overall standard of living over the next 30-years. KCC 
is expected to consult on the strategy in autumn 2018.      
 
6.29 
All these plans will need to align to the LIS.  
 
LGA 
 
6.30 
The LGA report ‘Beyond Brexit’85 has an in-depth analysis of a number of options to inform the 
design and delivery of the UKSPF.  
 
Other Funding  
 
6.31 
In the November 2016 Autumn Statement, the Government  announced the creation of a 
National Productivity Investment Fund (NPIF), pledging to spend £23 billion over the course of 
the four years from 2017/18 to 2021/22. The investment would be spread across four main 
areas: housing, transport, digital communications, and research and development (R&D). The 
spending programme, to be funded through additional borrowing, would provide the fiscal 
stimulus to tackle the UK's poor productivity and lower growth forecasts, resulting from Brexit. 
 
6.32 
In January 2018, the Government advised that an additional £2bn over next 2-years for 
departments to prepare for legislative transition. However, to-date, no further details are 
available as to exactly what type of Brexit preparations this would fund. 
 
European Investment Bank  
 
6.33 
The European Investment Bank (EIB) has invested some €42 billion in the UK over the past 
ten years. Membership of the EU is not required to access loans, but it may lead to greater 
requirements for guarantees and potentially a more onerous application process.  
 
                                                           
85 Local Government Association, Beyond Brexit: Future of funding currently sourced from the EU. Online at: 
https://www.local.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/2017-07_Beyond%20Brexit%20-
%20LGA%20Discussion%20%28FINAL%29_0.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   38 
 

Financial Impacts for local government 
 
Local Government Budgets 
 
6.34 
Most economic forecasts suggest that Brexit will have a negative impact on UK GDP. If there 
is such an impact, this could have a knock-on effect on local government revenue. This is 
because changes to how local government raises finance may make revenue coming in 
increasingly sensitive to the health of the local economy. The changes underway include a 
reduction in central government grants, councils raising more revenue from council tax and, in 
the long-term, retaining all business rate revenue locally. Councils will become more exposed 
to falls in tax revenue resulting from economic downturns. The difficulty of forecasting  may 
also increase, making long-term financial planning trickier. 
 
6.35 
The council will be affected by additional financial pressures as a result of changes to the 
prices of goods, tariffs, inflation, interest rates and sterling value. There is already some 
evidence of rising costs and markets pricing for uncertainty.  
 
6.36 
Rising costs could also affect essential capital infrastructure projects or our tendering of major 
contracts.  
 
Affordable Homes 
 
6.37 
The construction industry has warned about the impact of prolonged uncertainty on house 
prices and the cost of borrowing. The  industry  is highly reliant on migrant labour; between 
2007 and 2014, the proportion of EU migrants in the construction sector rose from 3.65% to 
7.03%86. Limits on free movement therefore could have an adverse impact on building costs 
and supply, at least in the short to medium term.  
 
Credit ratings 
 
6.38 
Four local authorities who hold credit ratings from Moody’s – Cornwall, Birmingham, Guildford, 
and Wandsworth – have seen them downgraded from AAA to AA1. Lancashire was cut from 
AA1 to AA2. Transport for London has also seen its credit rating downgraded. A number of 
housing associations have also seen their credit ratings downgraded by one-step  by both 
Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s.  
 
 
7. 
EU Legislation 
 
7.1 
Since the triggering of Article 50, the Government has unveiled eight ‘Brexit Bills’ including the 
EU (Withdrawal), Customs, Trade, Immigration, Fisheries and Agriculture Bills. These have 
been 
followed by a series of policy papers, including: 
  

A White Paper on the EU (Withdrawal) Bill which outlined plans to transfer EU legislation 
into the UK statute, subject to review by Ministers using ‘Henry VIII powers’ to amend 
secondary legislation without an Act of Parliament. 
 

White Papers on the Trade & Customs Bills outlining potential contingency arrangements 
in the event of no deal and the announcement of £3bn for Brexit contingency planning in 
the Autumn Budget. 
                                                           
86 National Housing Federation Briefing: The vote to leave the EU. Online at: http://s3-eu-west-
1.amazonaws.com/pub.housing.org.uk/The_vote_to_leave_the_EU_-_considerations_for_housing_associations_-
_26_July.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   39 
 

 

A series of position and future partnership papers on a range of issues including EU & UK 
citizens’ rights, foreign policy, defence and development and collaboration on science and 
innovation. 
 
Repatriation of EU powers 
 
7.2 
The White Paper Legislating for the UK’s withdrawal from the EU87 states that Brexit  is an 
opportunity to ensure returning ‘power sits closer to the people of the UK than ever before’.  It 
includes a commitment to continue to champion devolution to local government.  
 
7.3 
The White Paper says there are believed to be 12,000 EU regulations (one type of EU law) in 
force, while Parliament has passed 7,900 statutory instruments implementing EU legislation 
and 186 Acts that incorporate a degree of EU influence. The total body of European law dates 
back to 1958  and  binds all member states. In 2010,  it  was estimated to consist of about 
80,000 items, covering everything from workers' rights to environment and trade.  As well as 
regulations, this includes EU treaties, directions and European Court of Justice Rulings. New 
EU legislation is being created all the time and will continue to apply to the UK until it leaves. 
 
7.4 
If passed, the EU Withdrawal Bill88 (or "Great Repeal Bill" as it was originally called) will end 
the primacy of EU law in the UK. The Bill is supposed to incorporate all EU legislation into UK 
law in one lump, after which the government will decide, over a period of time, which parts to 
keep, change or remove.  
 
7.5 
Not all of this can be done through the EU Withdrawal Bill, so the government plans to create 
powers to "correct the statute book where necessary". This power -  known as Henry VIII 
power - is the one of the most controversial features of the Bill and the Government is facing 
claims from MPs that it is giving itself sweeping powers to change legislation without proper 
Parliamentary scrutiny.  
 
7.6 
The UK Government is in dispute with the Scottish and Welsh Governments over Clause 11 of 
the EU Withdrawal Bill. The clause prevents the devolved administrations from modifying 
‘retained EU law’, the term for all the European legislation the bill will bring into domestic law. 
The effect would be that all powers exercised in Brussels return to Westminster, at least 
initially, giving the UK Parliament the ability to create binding legal frameworks in place of EU 
law.  
 
7.7 
The Bill completed its passage through the House of Commons on 17 January 2018 and is 
now progressing through the House of Lords. The Institute of Government (IoG)  estimates 
that the Lords will probably conclude their consideration of the EU Withdrawal Bill by May, 
before sending any proposed amendments to the Commons89. If this timetable is kept, the Bill 
should receive Royal Assent by the summer recess. This would allow seven months for all the 
necessary secondary legislation before exit day (although the IoG points out that this 
timetable could prove optimistic, as the Government does not control timetabling in the Lords).  
 
7.8 
More complications are presented by the government's negotiations with the EU, which will be 
taking place while the bill is passing through Parliament. 
 
                                                           
87 GOV.UK publication. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-repeal-bill-white-paper 
88 UK Parliament. Online at: https://services.parliament.uk/bills/2017-19/europeanunionwithdrawal.html 
89 Institute of Government. Online at: https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/explainers/eu-withdrawal-bill-
amendments-and-debates 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   40 
 

7.9 
In January 2018, the Government advised that an additional £2bn over next 2-years for 
departments to prepare for legislative transition. However, to-date, no further details are 
available as to exactly what type of Brexit preparations this would fund. 
 
Legislative Impacts for Local Government  
 
7.10 
Local government carries out statutory and discretionary services. European legislation affects 
the delivery of several local services areas, for example the environment where European 
legislation impacts locally on areas such as major planning schemes and waste. Other 
European  legislation, such as procurement or state aid rules, affects how local authorities 
commission and deliver services.  
 
7.11 
The impact of Brexit on the regulatory environment in which local government operates will 
depend on the shape of the degree of access to the single market negotiated for the UK’s 
future  relationship  with the EU and how the government decides how to replace those EU 
laws that affect local government. 
 
7.12 
Currently, UK local government has a formal advisory role in the EU law and policy-making 
process through its membership of the EU Committee of the Regions. It must be formally 
consulted on a wide range of relevant issues, and has the right to bring actions before the 
European Court of Justice if the appropriate mandatory consultation process has been 
ignored or if due regard has not been given to the  principles of subsidiarity and 
proportionality. Therefore, the Committee has the effective power to block EU legislation, 
although this power has not been exercised to date. 
 
7.13 
The LGA says it is of  fundamental importance to replicate this advisory role for  local 
government in the UK post-exit, without creating new bureaucracies, to develop effective 
legislation.    In January 2018, Sajid Javid advised that the Government is considering a 
domestic alternative to the Committee of the Regions.  
 
7.14 
The LGA has scoped out the relevant legislation for local government that could affect 
councils and it is recommended that we form an internal working-group to assess the local 
impact of these.   
 
General Observations 
 
Waste collection and disposal  
 
7.15 
The key piece of current EU legislation is the Waste Framework Directive, which sets out key 
definitions and duties relating to how waste must be collected, transported, recovered and 
disposed of. It also introduced recycling and recovery targets to be achieved by 2020. A 
detailed summary of current waste legislation applicable in the UK is set out on the GOV.UK 
guidance page on waste legislation90.  
 
7.16 
It is also important to note that, in April 2018, the European Parliament approved the Circular 
Economy Package91. The main features of the package are:  
• 
Municipal waste recycling target: 55% by 2025, 65% by 2035 
• 
No more than 10% landfilling by 2035 
• 
Separate collection of textiles and hazardous waste 
 
                                                           
90 GOV.UK publication. Online at: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/waste-legislation-and-regulations 
91 European Parliament news: Online at: https://www.europarl.europa.eu/news/en/press-
room/20180411IPR01518/circular-economy-more-recycling-of-household-waste-less-landfilling 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   41 
 

7.17 
Even though the UK is to leave the European Union, the government has already said it is set 
to include the Circular Economy measures within UK policy, partly because they will have 
become EU law before the UK leaves and also because it "wants the UK to be a world leader in 
resource efficiency"92.  These measures are expected to have significant extra cost to local 
authorities93.  
 
7.18 
The majority of existing EU waste management law has already been transposed directly into 
domestic law within the UK. This means that the relevant legislation and requirements on local 
authorities will not be automatically, or immediately, affected by the UK’s exit from the EU.  
 
7.19 
However, if the UK leaves the EU and does not become a member of the EEA, then the UK 
Government will be able to amend and/or repeal the domestic legislation that gives effect to 
EU waste legislation.   This may not lead to a substantial change in approach from the UK 
Government, however it is possible that it could choose to repeal or weaken EU requirements 
(for example, recycling targets) to reduce  the regulatory burden on businesses. This could 
lead to a change in approach to waste collection and disposal  services for some local 
authorities, particularly if lower cost solutions (such as landfill disposal) are permitted with a 
relaxation of environmental protections and technical requirements 
 
7.20 
The LGA sees Brexit  as an opportunity to introduce new approaches to tackling waste, 
recycling and landfill, with councils closely involved in any reforms or new targets, and full 
recognition of the ‘polluter pays’ principle.  
 
Air quality  
 
7.21 
The LGA94  wants to ensure that UK targets on clean air are at least as ambitious as EU 
targets and that where councils have a role;  they are given the appropriate powers and 
resources to deliver. 
 
Food Safety 
 
7.22 
The LGA would seek to retain EU regulations relating to food safety. It also sees Brexit as an 
opportunity to strengthen food safety laws by legally extending the mandatory display of the 
Food Hygiene Rating System’s ‘scores on the doors’ in England. This would not only improve 
consumer confidence and raise standards, but also should reduce the need for, and therefore 
cost of, enforcement action by councils. 
 
Procurement  
 
7.23 
The LGA believes that public procurement is an example where EU-origin laws might be 
made better through amendment.  Local government must comply with EU public sector 
procurement rules. The most significant requirement is for all public contracts over €209,000 
to be published in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU), thus making them 
accessible to suppliers from across the EU. The process sometimes sits uneasily with 
supporting the local economy. It can also take between three  and 18 months, which is twice 
as long as typical private sector procurement.  Almost no public contracts end up being 
awarded to companies in other EU member states. Only 20% of English councils receive 
expressions of interest from companies based in other EU countries. Across Europe, only 
3.5% of public contracts (by value) are awarded to companies based solely in other member 
states. 
                                                           
92 CIWM Journal. Online at: https://ciwm-journal.co.uk/uk-will-vote-in-favour-of-eu-circular-economy-package 
93 Letsrecycle. Online at: https://www.letsrecycle.com/news/latest-news/esa-eu-recycling-targets-challenging/ 
94 LGA. Online at: https://www.local.gov.uk/topics/european-and-international/brexit-and-local-government 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   42 
 

 
7.24 
In the medium term, public procurement rules more generally will remain in place as they have 
been implemented via UK law. Further information is available in the House of Commons 
Library briefing paper on public procurement95. 
 
State aid 
 
7.25 
European regulations prevent the Government from providing state aid to companies of over 
£200,000 in any three-year period. Tax reliefs and exemptions also fall into the definition of 
state aid. It is likely that some form of state aid provisions would remain in place post-Brexit, 
as it is required by both membership of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and the 
European Free Trade Association (EFTA).  
 
7.26 
The LGA sees an opportunity for state aid rules to be more tailored to supporting local 
economic growth, with clear exemptions for small-scale local projects of community benefit 
 
Energy efficiency 
 
7.27 
Local authorities must manage their buildings and procurement in line with energy efficiency 
rules based on EU law. The basis of these is the 2012 Energy Efficiency Directive,  which is 
transposed into UK law via a number of pieces of secondary legislation. The Directive 
establishes measures to help the EU reach its 20% energy efficiency target by 2020 and 
places a requirement on public authorities, which includes local councils, to ensure they 
purchase energy efficient buildings, products and services. In the past councils have raised 
concerns that such a requirement places additional costs on council procurement activity.  
 
Devolution deals 
 
7.28 
Some uncertainty has been expressed about the future of the ‘devolution deals’ agreed with 
various local areas in the aftermath of the vote to leave the European Union. This is mainly 
because Parliament and the civil service “face years of Brexit-related legislative congestion”96. 
There are no clear indications yet that the Government intends to change policy direction as 
regards devolution to local areas. 
 
8. 
Impact on other areas 
 
Higher Education  
 
8.1 
The main risks were a decline in student numbers, decreased access to European  funding, 
and a decline in cross-border collaborative research97. 
 
8.2 
The Kent and Medway area  has a thriving higher education sector. There are three major, 
internationally  oriented universities located in the region, with around 40,000 undergraduate 
and postgraduate students. The principal research university in the region is the University of 
                                                           
95 UK Parliament. Online at: https://researchbriefings.files.parliament.uk/documents/SN06029/SN06029.pdf 
96 New Local Government Network, Brexit: A turning point for devolution. Online at: 
http://www.nlgn.org.uk/public/2016/brexit-a-turning-point-for-devolution/ 
97 A. Hadfield, M Hammond, Centre for European Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University, Kent And Medway: 
Making A Success Of Brexit A Sectoral Appraisal Of Small And Medium Sized Enterprises And The Rural Economy (July 
2017). Online at: https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/psychology-politics-and-
sociology/cefeus/docs/Making-A-Success-of-Brexit-20-July-2017.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   43 
 

Kent,  with 19,000 students across four campuses, located in Canterbury, Medway, Brussels 
and Paris. 
 
8.3 
In total, 11 percent of Kent students come from the EU, and  the institution labels itself 
‘Britain’s European University’. 
 
8.4 
Canterbury Christ Church University is the second largest institution in the region with 16,000 
students, 10.6 percent of whom are from the EU. The University has campuses in Canterbury, 
Medway and Tunbridge Wells.  
 
8.5 
The University for the Creative Arts, a federal Institution with around 7,000 students, has two 
of its four campuses in the region, in Canterbury and Rochester. 
 
8.6 
Together the region’s universities provide a major source of employment in the local area and 
it  is estimated that  their combined economic impact across the South East amounts to over 
£1bn a year. 
 
Healthcare 
 
8.7 
Specific risks from British withdrawal from the EU arise in relation to healthcare provision:  
 
•  Staffing levels and the risk of skills shortages arising from the re-imposition of visa 
restrictions on migrant workers from EU member-states98. Whilst these individuals 
represent only around five percent of the workforce in the region, they help fill a number 
of crucial skills shortages and bring significant expertise to the area. 
•  The  loss of access to EU funding streams, which contribute significant investment to 
healthcare programmes and health research in the region. 
•  The effects of abrogating existing reciprocal arrangements, which may increase the 
strain on existing NHS resources in the  area, since hospitals will no longer be able to 
refer patients for treatment in France. 
 
Policing 
 
8.8 
Anticipated diminishing access to sources of cross-border intelligence and worsening 
diplomatic relations.  
 
 
                                                           
98 Hadfield, A, Martill B, Nazarenko, L (n.d.). Canterbury Christchurch University, Centre for European Studies, Kent and 
‘Brexit’ Realities and Risks in Regional Perspective. Online at https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-
sciences/psychology-politics-and-sociology/cefeus/docs/cefeus-kent-and-brexit-report.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   44 
 


Appendix 1: Brexit Negotiations Timeline  
 
 
Source: Parliament.uk 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District | Error! No text of specified style 
45 
in document. 
 

Appendix 2: Assessing the Impact of Brexit 
 
“It is clear that unpicking our ties with the EU and renegotiating our relationship with Europe 
will impact the UK in a whole host of different ways” (Parliament UK, 2017).99 
 
1.1  There is a considerable  amount of information and analysis available on the Parliament 
website100, including a series of the Government’s own position papers published as an aide 
to the negotiations. However, despite these (and a significant body of speculative research on 
Brexit), there is unlikely to be sufficient detail available  for councils to take a more informed 
view until the following is known:  
 
•  The nature of the deal to leave the EU,  
•  Our future trading relationship both with the EU and the rest of the world, and  
•  The criteria for the Shared Prosperity Fund, intended in part to re-purpose the UK’s 
former EU contributions.  
 
1.2  Both Houses of Parliament are scrutinising Brexit via a series of committees, including the 
Communities and Local Government Committee, which launched an inquiry into the impact of 
Brexit on local government in October 2017101.    The inquiry is set to continue hearing 
evidence throughout most of 2018.  
 
Local Government Association (LGA) 
 
2.1  The LGA is the voice of local government during the negotiations regarding the UK's exit from 
the European Union. 
It has identified five priority areas as containing 
the greatest potential risks and opportunities posed by Brexit102: 
 
  Autonomy of local government 
Responsibilities repatriated from the EU should not be centralised in Whitehall. We need 
devolution settlements to ensure responsibility for those powers are transferred to local 
authorities. 
 
  Developing a new legal base for local government 
There are many EU laws that affect the day job of local councils and the real world impact 
must be taken into account in the future review of UK laws of EU origin. This must lead to 
new legislative freedoms and flexibilities for councils so that communities, businesses and 
consumers can benefit. 
 
  Securing investment that is currently sourced from the EU 
The Government needs to begin developing a locally driven, fully funded growth policy to 
deliver its ambitions post-Brexit. This must be designed and delivered by local areas as 
an integrated replacement for EU funding and existing national schemes to support 
infrastructure, enterprise, and social cohesion. 
 
                                                           
99 The UK’s exit from the EU will have a significant impact at council level. Many scenarios ranging from ‘Hard Brexit’ to 
‘Soft Brexit’ have been discussed at length by numerous commentators (Parliament UK, 2017). Online at: 
https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/research/eu-referendum/leaving-the-european-union/ 
100 Parliament UK, Brexit: research and analysis. Online at: https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/research/eu-
referendum/ 
101 Housing, Communities and Local Government Committee, Brexit and Local Government inquiry. Online at: 
https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/communities-and-local-government-
committee/inquiries/parliament-2017/brexit-local-authority-inquiry-17-19/ 
102 Local Government Association, Brexit. Online at: https://www.local.gov.uk/topics/european-and-international/brexit 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   46 
 

  Community cohesion and workforce 
Councils play the leading role in bringing communities together and will be important in 
tackling challenges such as the retention of skilled workers. For example, the adult social 
care workforce has a unique set of skills, but struggles with recruitment and retention. 
With 7 per cent of existing adult social care staff from other EU nations, securing a 
sustainable adult social care workforce and excellent care skills must be a priority for the 
Government. The LGA is calling for urgent guarantees from Government to reform 
Whitehall's national approach to commissioning employment and skills funding, worth 
£10.5 billion a year. It is currently fragmented, costly, and fails to address the challenges 
faced by residents and employers. 
 
  Addressing place-based impacts 
In partnership with the LGA, government departments must begin to address the real and 
varied impacts and opportunities of Brexit at the local level, in both urban and rural areas. 
The LGA is consulting widely and building an evidence base to support the exit 
negotiations. 
 
Chartered Institute of Public Finance Accountants (CIPFA) 
 
3.1  In a report released by the Chartered Institute of Public Finance Accountants (CIPFA) before 
the referendum, it concluded –  as the EU has a far-reaching impact on public service 
management, delivery, demand, supply chain and funding –  the process of separating the 
sector from EU policy and legislation would be significantly challenging.  
 
3.2  Marking the triggering of Article 50, CIPFA announced the establishment of an independent 
Brexit Advisory Commission for Public Services (BAC)103. This will seek to highlight the 
opportunities and risks to public services during the Brexit renegotiation process. 
 
3.3  Significant areas of focus for the Commission will be the future of public services staff from EU 
countries, state aid rules, how structural and investment funding will be replaced and whether 
collaborative EU projects and initiatives will continue. The Commission will continue after 
Brexit as UK laws are established to replace EU laws initially written into UK statute. 
 
3.4  The BAC will provide evidence based analysis of the relationship between UK public services 
and EU funding and bring forward policy recommendations on how future funding 
mechanisms could best work. This work is still pending. 
 
Centre for European Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University 
 
4.1  The  Centre for European Studies at Christ  Church University in Canterbury has  produced  a 
series of reports looking at the potential impact of Brexit in Kent and Medway104.  
 
4.2  Its report “Kent and Medway: Making a Success of Brexit -  a Sectoral Appraisal”,  looks  at the 
county’s particular needs across a range of sectors, including business and commerce, agriculture, 
healthcare, local government, policing and security. 
 
                                                           
103 CIPFA, Brexit Advisory Commission for Public Services. Online at:  
https://www.publicfinance.co.uk/news/2017/08/cipfa-brexit-commission-launches-mission-statement 
104 Centre for European Studies, Canterbury Christ Church University, Brexit Hub. Online at: 
https://www.canterbury.ac.uk/social-and-applied-sciences/psychology-politics-and-sociology/cefeus/Brexit-Hub/Brexit-
Hub.aspx 
 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   47 
 

4.3  Other published reports have looked at Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises and the Rural 
Economy  in the county, and  there are two further reports, currently in draft form, on the 
implications for the health and care sector, and on borders and customs.  
 
Ready on Day One: Meeting the Brexit Borders challenge 
 
5.1  A report by Charlie Elphicke MP “Ready on Day One: Meeting the Brexit Borders 
challenge105”, published in July 2017, sets out a plan to ensure that the Channel Ports will be 
ready on day one to avoid gridlock if a trade deal has not been agreed. It points out that 
gridlock at the Channel Ports will mean gridlock for the UK economy. The plan includes: 
 
•  Resilient Roads to the Channel Ports:  The new Thames Crossing taken forward at 
speed, the M2/A2 upgraded and dualled all the way to the Channel Ports and the planned 
M20 Lorry Park to be delivered on time.  
•  Open for Business with systems ready on day one to ensure that customs controls are 
handled seamlessly, with long queues avoided and technology used to speed customs 
processing.  
•  A New Entente Cordiale to extend the Le Touquet Treaty to cover customs cooperation 
and build a new era of deeper co-operation with France.  
•  A Brexit Infrastructure Bill:  A powerful new law to speed through administrative 
processes would enable vital projects to be delivered in time.  
•  One Government  at the border; with responsibilities sitting under a single ministry  to 
ensure order and prevent confusion.  
 
                                                           
105 C. Elphicke MP, Ready on Day One: Meeting the Brexit Borders challenge (July 2017). Online at:  
http://www.elphicke.com/downloads/ready-on-day-one.pdf 
Leadership Support Team: Potential Impact of Brexit on the Dover District |   48 
 

Document Outline