This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Master of Philosophy in Finance and Economics Handbook for 2016/17'.



 
Dr James Knapton 
Information Compliance Officer 
 
 
 
 
Andre Brasov 
 
By email 
 
 
Reference: FOI-2018-576 
20 September 2018 
 
 
 
 
Dear Mr Brasov, 
 
Your request was received on 31 August 2018 and I am dealing with it under the terms of the Freedom 
of Information Act 2000 (‘the Act’). 
 
You asked for: 
 
a pdf copy of MPhil in Finance and Economics Handbook for 2017/18. 
 
The handbook is attached. Please note that the attached document should not be copied, reproduced 
or used except in accordance with the law of copyright. 
 
If you are unhappy with the service you have received in relation to your request and wish to make a 
complaint or request an internal review of this decision, you should contact us quoting the reference 
number above. The University would normally expect to receive your request for an internal review 
within 40 working days of the date of this letter and reserves the right not to review a decision where 
there has been undue delay in raising a complaint. If you are not content with the outcome of your 
review, you may apply directly to the Information Commissioner for a decision. Generally, the 
Information Commissioner cannot make a decision unless you have exhausted the complaints 
procedure provided by the University. The Information Commissioner may be contacted at: The 
Information Commissioner’s Office, Wycliffe House, Water Lane, Wilmslow, Cheshire, SK9 5AF 
(https://ico.org.uk/)
 
Yours sincerely, 
 
James Knapton 
The Old Schools 
Trinity Lane 
Cambridge, CB2 1TN 
 
Tel: +44 (0) 1223 764142 
Fax: +44 (0) 1223 332332 
Email: xxx@xxxxx.xxx.xx.xx 
www.cam.ac.uk 
 


Handbook for Participants in the 
MPhil in Finance and Economics 
2017-18 
 
[Mid-Course Examinations: 9, 10, 11, 12, January 2018] 
 
 

 

MPhil in Finance & Economics 2017-18: KEY DATES 
Date 
Event 
Time/Location/Contact 
Michaelmas Term lectures commence: Monday 2 October 2017 
F. 13 October 
Preparatory Course Examination 
1.00 to 3.00 – Room to be confirmed 
Feedback Meeting 
 
F. 1 December 
Lectures finish 
 
 
W. 13 December 
Deadline for ALL applications to 
Apply online as per website.  Queries to Joanna  
 
continue 
Gathercole xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
M. 18 December 

Submit Provisional Choices for 
Contact Tom Craske 
Specialist Modules 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx  
 
 
 
Lent Term lectures commence: Monday 15 January 2018 
 
 
 
10,11, 12 January 
Mid-Course Examinations of Core 
Lecture Block, Sidgwick Site 
 
Modules 
24, 25, 26 January 
Mid-Course Examinations Feedback 
1.00-2.00 – rooms to be confirmed 
sessions 
24 Jan: E100; 25 Jan: F100/200; 26 Jan: E300 
 
M. 22 January 
Submit dissertation topic by 12 noon 
Contact Tom Craske 
 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx  
M. 22 January 
Final opportunity to change Module 
Contact Tom Craske 
 
choices for Easter Exams 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx  
 
M. 26 February 

Allocation of Dissertation Supervisors 
Students informed of their dissertation supervisors 
F. 16 March 
Lectures finish 
 
Easter Term lectures commence: Monday 23 April 2018 
M. 23 April 
Submission of dissertation title by 12 
Contact Tom Craske xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx  
noon 
M. 30 April 
Inform Faculty of your Dissertation 
On-line form to confirm students have made 
supervision arrangements 
arrangements with their dissertation supervisors 
7-16 May 
Core Module Examinations 
Full timetable will be issued  
 
24 May to 1 June 

Specialist Modules Exams 
Full timetable will be issued  
 
W. 13 June 

Graduate Garden Party 
TBA 
 
12.30 to 2.30 
M. 25 June 
Final opportunity to amend dissertation  Contact Tom Craske 
titles 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx 
M. 30 July 
Dissertation submission by 12 noon 
Graduate Office 
 
M. 1 October  

Degree Committee Meeting to award 
Final transcripts & award letters distributed by end of 
 
degrees 
October 
 
M. 8 October  

Results & marks published 
CamSIS self-serve 
 
http://www.camsis.cam.ac.uk/cam-only/index.shtml 
M. 15 October  
Award letters and transcripts issued 
Posted to your home address  
[ensure that your address is correct on CamSIS] 
 
 

 

A GUIDE FOR PARTICIPANTS IN THE 
MPHIL IN FINANCE & ECONOMICS COURSE 2017-18 
 
 
              
 
 
 
 
 
          Page 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1. INTRODUCTION 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Course Duration 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2. THE FACULTY and its Graduate Programme 

 
 
 
 
 
5  
   
Taught Courses 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Contacts   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Faculty Staff with Graduate Responsibilities   
 
 
 
 
  
 
Social Events 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    
 3. THE MPHIL PROGRAMME 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8  
 
Preparatory Course in Mathematics and Statistics 
 
 
 
 
 
   
Supervision and Advice 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
MPhil in Economics   
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Compulsory Core Modules 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Classes and Problem Sets 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Dissertations 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
    
 
Advice on dissertation content   
 
 
 
 
  
    
 
Criteria for successful dissertations 
 
 
 
 
  
    
 
Literature survey 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
    
 
Dissertation assessment criteria   
 
 
 
 
  
    
 
Format of Dissertations 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Examinations 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Criteria for Passing MPhil 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Oral Examinations 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Transferral between MPhil Courses 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Examination Results   
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Award of Degrees 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Graduate Examination Allowance 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
Appeals and Complaints 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
  
 4. PLAGIARISM and correct referencing in dissertations 
 
 
 
 
18  
 
 
The Scope of plagiarism 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
How to avoid plagiarism 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Plagiarism detection & submission of dissertations 
 
 
 
 
     
 5.  FACILITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS   
 
 
 
 
 
20  
   
CamSIS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CGSRS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Calculators for Examination Purposes 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Computing 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
 
Wireless Internet, E-mail and Faculty website 
 
 
 
  
   
Graduate Common Room 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Graduate Student Representatives 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hardship Funding 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
   
Master’s Self Evaluation 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Marshall Library 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
Noticeboards 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Photocopying 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
Student’s Union 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Teaching Evaluation Questionnaires 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Timetable   
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
University Counselling Service 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
Health and Safety 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
Disabled Access 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Library 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
  

 

1.  Introduction  
  
Welcome  to  the  Faculty  of  Economics  Cambridge!  This  Handbook  is  for  all  graduate  students 
registered for the MPhil in Finance and Economics degree.  
  
Please read this book carefully and keep it to hand, as it will answer many of the questions you 
will have throughout the year about the graduate programme and facilities for graduate students.    
  
If you need information, check this guide first before seeking help.  Faculty staff will be available 
by appointment to discuss issues not covered by the guide.  
  
All MPhil students are assigned a Director of Studies, who will be your first port of call in cases of 
difficulties with the Course.  Your Director of Studies will meet with you in the Michaelmas and 
Lent Terms in formal or informal settings to allow you to discuss progress through your Course 
and any other aspects of graduate study in economics that may be relevant. 
 
Course Duration 
  
The course begins on Monday 11 September 2017 and continues until 30 July 2018. 
  
Please  note  that  the  timetable  for  the  MPhil  course  is  not  restricted  to  the  undergraduate 
teaching  year  of  three  eight-week  terms  (Full  Term).    It  has  extended  teaching  terms  to  give 
enough  study  time  for  the  subjects  covered.  You  will  therefore  be  required  to  be  in  residence 
during the following dates:  
   
Michaelmas Term 
2 October 2017  
to 
1 December 2017 
Lent Term 
 
15 January 2018 
to 
16 March 2018 
Mid Term Exams 
10 January 2018 
to 
12 January 2018 
Easter Term 
 
23 April 2018   
to 
30 July 2018 
  
It  is  a  good  idea  to  let  your  college  know  this  at  the  beginning  of  the  year  if  you  have  college 
accommodation.  

 

2.  The Faculty and its Graduate Programme  
  
Taught Courses 
  
The Faculty’s graduate programme offers three MPhil Courses:  MPhil in Economics for applicants 
who do not intend to do a PhD, the MPhil in Economic Research for applicants who are intending 
to  go  on  to  PhD  studies,  and  the  MPhil  in  Finance  and  Economics,  as  well  as  the  Advanced 
Diploma in Economics.
  The Faculty admits around a hundred and forty MPhil students each year.  
Up  to  fifteen  research  students  embark on  doctorates  each year.   Around  twenty-five  students 
each year will take the Advanced Diploma in Economics.    
  
The  total  number  of  graduate  economists  (Diploma,  MPhil  and  PhD  students)  is  over  170  (it 
changes  from  month  to  month  as  students  complete  their  research).    Graduate  students  are 
represented on the Faculty Board and the Degree Committee by a student representative, who is 
elected in November each year.  
  
Contacts 
  
The Course Director and the Directors of Studies are assisted in organising the MPhil programme 
by Tom Craske, who is located in the  Graduate Office  (Room 9) on the first floor of the Faculty 
building.   
  
There are many points of contact in the Faculty depending on the type of help you require, and 
this  booklet  describes  what  is  available.    Problems  relating  to  individual  subjects  may  best  be 
handled  via  the  module  co-ordinator.    Academic  staff  hold  regular  office  hours,  which  will  be 
advertised  on  the  Faculty’s  website:  http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk/people/academic-staff-office-
hours 
  
The  Teaching  Administrative  Officer,  Silvana  Dean,  may  be  able  to  help  with  financial  issues  or 
matters of University procedure.  She is based in Room 8 on the first floor, and appointments can 
be made directly by email (xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx).  Remember also that your College Graduate Tutor 
is there to assist you with any problems you may have, particularly of a more personal nature.  In 
case of any illness, or other problems which prevents you from participating fully in the course, it 
is  vital  that  you  inform  both  your  college  tutor  and  the  Graduate  Office  immediately,  so  that 
proper  help  can  be  given.    It  is  particularly  important  that  you  produce  relevant  medical 
certificates if illness before or during examinations might affect your performance.    
  

 

Faculty Staff with Graduate Responsibilities  
  
The  following  people  have  specific  responsibilities  in  the  running  of  the  Faculty's  Graduate 
Programmes:  
 
Role 
Name & contact details 
Chairman of the Faculty 
Prof. Sanjeev Goyal xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx    
  
Director of Teaching 
Dr Pontus Rendahl  xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
Director of Graduate Education &  
Professor Robert Evans xxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
Chairman of Degree Committee 
 
Secretary of Degree Committee & 
Mrs Silvana Dean xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
Teaching Administrative Officer 
 
MPhil Economics/Economic Research Director   Dr Donald Robertson xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
 
MPhil in Finance and Economics Director 
Prof. Chris Harris (xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx)  
 
PhD Programme Director 
Prof. Coen Teulings xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
Advanced Diploma Director 
Dr Soenje Rieche xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
Dr Meredith Crowley xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
MPhil Directors of Studies 
Dr Koen Jochmans xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
Dr Alex Rodnyansky xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
Dr Flavio Toxvaerd xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
Graduate Dissertations Coordinator 
Dr Donald Robertson xxxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
Computer Manager 
Mr Craig Peacock xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
Website Administrator 
Mr Jake Dyer xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
 
IT Support 
Mr Nather Al-Khatib xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
Mr Ryan Hilton xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
Graduate Office 
Mr Tom Craske xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx 
 
Ms Louise Cross xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx    
 
Graduate Admissions 
Mrs Joanna Gathercole xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx   
Mr Kieron Flaherty xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx  
 
 
  

 

Social Events 
 
The Faculty organises a number of social events throughout the years, starting with a  Welcome 
Party 
on the first day of the Preparatory Course in September.  This is a lunch-time function, to 
give the students on the Courses a chance to get to know each other. 
 
There  will  be  a  Dinner  at  the  end  of  the  Michaelmas  Term,  where  some  key  staff,  as  well  as 
Diploma and PhD students are invited.  The function is usually held in one of the Colleges. 
 
The Faculty also plans to hold a dinner at the beginning of the Easter Term, which will be held in 
Christ’s College on 23 April 2018
 
The end-of-Course Garden Party is scheduled for 13 June, and is likely to be held in Newnham 
College. 

 

3.  The MPhil Programme  
  
Preparatory Course in Mathematics and Statistics 
 
The  MPhil  programmes  start  with  an  intensive  three-week  Mathematics  and  Statistics  Course 
covering linear algebra, statistics, differential equations and optimisation techniques. Attendance 
is  compulsory  for  all  students  and  there  will  be  a  short  examination  at  the  end  of  this  Course. 
Whilst this examination does not form part of the formal assessment, a weak performance may 
indicate a student will struggle with the mathematical content of the Course modules.   
 
Supervision and Advice
 
  
The Directors of Studies are formally the supervisors of their assigned MPhil students.  They will 
meet  their  assigned  students,  most  commonly  in  a  group,  in  October,  and  make  their  own 
arrangements  for  continuing  contact.    However,  you  should  not  expect  from  them  the  kind  of 
close supervision that an undergraduate tutor might offer.  They will be able to help by discussing 
the  MPhil  programme  and  your  subject  choices  with  you.  They  will  be  responsible  for  writing 
reports  on  your  progress,  based  on  contacts  with  you  and  your  results  in  marked  exercises  or 
examinations.  They will also be the appropriate people for you to ask for references for future 
applications.  Please contact them by e-mail for appointments.  
  
Individual  lecturers  or  module  co-ordinators  are  the  right  people  to  approach  where  there  are 
queries about particular subjects.   
  
College  Graduate  Tutors  are  normally  the  appropriate  contact  for  any  personal  issues,  and  the 
Teaching Administrative Officer can advise on funding and procedures.  
  
MPhil in Finance & Economics 
  
Candidates are required to take 8 coursework modules and submit a dissertation as follows:  
 
  6 Compulsory Modules: 
E100 
 
Microeconomics I 
E300 
 
Econometric Methods 
F100 
 
Finance I 
F200 
 
Finance II 
F300 
 
Corporate Finance 
F400 
 
Asset Pricing 
 
  2 Optional Modules from the following* but only one of which may be taken from the 
Options borrowed from the MPhil in Economics  
   

F500 
 
Empirical Finance 
F510 
 
International Finance 
F520 
 
Behavioural Finance 
F530 
 
Venture Capital in the Innovation Economy 
F 540   
Topics in Applied Asset Management 
Modules borrowed from the MPhil in Economics 
E101 
 
Applied Microeconomics 
E200 
 
Macroeconomics 
E201 
 
Applied Macroeconomics 

 

S140    
Behavioural Economics 
S150 
 
Economics of Networks 
S301 
 
Applied Econometrics 
 
 * NB:  Please note that the Faculty may not run any optional module for which there are fewer than 5 enrolments.  
 
  A dissertation of 10,000 words   
  
Compulsory Core Modules 
 
  
Four of the compulsory Modules E100 Microeconomics, E300 Econometric Methods, F100 Finance 
I
 and F200 Finance II are taught in the Michaelmas Term only (note that E100 Microeconomics is 
taken  by  students  from  all  three  MPhil  Courses,  while  E300  Econometric  Methods  is  taken  by 
students  for  the  MPhil  Economics,  and  MPhil  in  Finance  &  Economics.    The  remainder  of  the 
compulsory modules, F300 Corporate Finance and F400 Asset Pricing, are taught in the Lent Term 
only.   
 
For  students  wishing  to  take  E200  Macroeconomics  as  one  of  their  two  optional  modules, 
students need to be aware that this is taught in the Michaelmas Term.    
 
Classes  
 
Classes in problem sets are an essential component of the compulsory subjects taken by students, 
and  these  are  usually  taken  by  the  Faculty’s  teaching  assistants.    The  problem  sets  provide 
practice  in  developing  methods  of  analysis  introduced  in  the  lectures.    It  is  essential  to  do  the 
problem sets in order to understand the material and to prepare for the examinations.  It is very 
important that students have an incentive to do each problem set and regularly receive feedback 
on their work.   
 
Problem Set Classes will be of 2 hours’ duration, held in week 2 to 9 for Modules of 27 hours, and 
weeks  4  to  9  for  those  with  18  hours of  lectures.    Problem  sets will  be  issued  by  the  Teaching 
Assistants  a  week  in  advance,  and  submission  will  be  by  12  noon  on  the  assigned  dates.    The 
schedule will be published on the Faculty’s website here: 
 
https://www.vle.cam.ac.uk/course/view.php?id=138491&sectionid=1851081 
 
This is how the Classes will be organised: 
  Students are assigned to a Class by the course administrators 
  There will be a list with names and photographs for identification purposes 
  Within each class, students will be assigned into groups of 4 (max 5) students, so a class 
will comprise 5 groups  
  Example sheets have four exam type questions 
  Each group submits one set of solutions to the example sheet for each class 
  All the questions will be marked by the TA and returned to the group 
  The group receive a mark as a whole 
  This is not part of their formal assessment but can help us monitor student progress via 
their group performance  
  The groups should meet together to decide on their submission 
  Good practice would be that each member of the group first attempts to answer all 4 
questions and they then collectively work out their best solutions  

 

  Each member of the group then writes up one question (so they all get practice in 
actually writing an answer) 
  The group then submits one answer to the TA 
  If one of the group members does not show up or does not contribute to solving the 
problem set, students can report that on their submission 
  This method teaches students to collaborate, organise team work, and present their work 
to each other  
  If a student within a group utterly fails to participate the TA will be notified and this can 
be recorded and then investigated by the student’s DoS 
 
In order to help to meet up and work on the problem sets, it is the intention to group together 
students  from  the  same  (or  geographically  near)  colleges.    However,  there  will  also  be  rooms 
available in the Faculty for this purpose: 
 
 
Graduate Common Room  
 
Supervision Rooms 1 and 2 (bookable via Reception) 
Mary Paley Room – see link below for booking form 
https://www.marshall.econ.cam.ac.uk/contactus/mary-paley-room-booking-form 
Room 2, or Marshall Room, or Meade Room (bookable via Reception) 
 
Answers  to  the  problem  sets  will  be  marked  by  the  teaching  assistants  and  returned  for 
discussion at the next class.  The marking scheme will be: 
 
Excellent 
75+ 
Very Good 
70-74 
Good 
65-69 
Satisfactory 
60-65 
Marginal 
58-60 
Fail OR POOR 
57and below 
 
Problem Sets for Finance Modules 
 
Assignments for F100 Finance I and F200 Finance II consist of 7 problem sets and 3 case studies. 
These assignments enable you to apply the material covered in class to analyze real life situations. 
You will be returned your answers with written comments and a grade of either 0, 1 or 2 points.  
For problem set assignments nos. 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9 and 10, you should hand-in a hard copy of your 
individual  work.  You  will  then  receive  detailed  solutions  to  these  problems.    For  case  study 
assignments nos. 2, 3 and 8, you will do these assignments in pre-determined groups and should 
hand-in a hard copy of your group's work. A presentation by one group and a class discussion will 
then follow. 
 
Course outlines will be available from the faculty intranet with information about the content and 
method of examination of each course.  All MPhil students should inform the Graduate Office of 
their  initial  choice  of  specialist  subjects  by  18  December  2017.    If  you  are  not  certain  of  your 
choices  by  then,  you  will  have  an  opportunity  to  revise  your  decision  during  the  Lent  Term  to 
meet the absolute deadline of 23 January 2018.  Please submit your choices as soon as you can, 
so that module co-ordinators can estimate the likely number of students attending their courses.   
 
While you are encouraged to discuss your choice of Modules with your Directors of Studies, this is 
by no means compulsory, provided that you have chosen from the list specified.   
  
10 
 

Dissertations 
  
Students will be required to submit a short paragraph to the Graduate Office outlining the general 
topic of their dissertation, (which may be on any subject that falls under the general heading of 
Economics),  by  mid-January.    On  the  basis  of  the  general  topic  proposed,  a  dissertation 
supervisor  will  be  appointed  for  each  student  in  the  Lent  Term.    Students  are  encouraged  to 
approach  potential  supervisors  and  to  inform  the  Graduate  Office  if  they  have  obtained  their 
agreement.  Once allocated, it will not be possible to change your supervisor, and you should be 
aware that it is not possible to ensure that supervisors will have precise expertise in the topic in 
question.    The  precise  title  of  the  dissertation  should  be  discussed  with  the  dissertation 
supervisor, and this must be submitted to the Graduate Office by the beginning of Easter Term.  
(There  is  a  degree  of  flexibility  about  the  title  of  the  dissertation,  so  long  as  the  dissertation 
supervisor is in agreement, you may amend your title up until the beginning of July, provided the 
changes do not necessitate the appointment of a new examiner
).  
  
Dissertation supervisors will be available until the end of June to offer up to two contact hours of 
supervision per student.  This time frame may only be extended by mutual agreement.  It is up to 
the student to contact the supervisor
 in good time to arrange meetings.  Students are required 
to put in place supervision arrangements with their supervisors by the beginning of Easter Term, 
and to complete the on-line form which confirms these arrangements
.  The schedule should be 
as follows:  
 
1 hour in May to finalise the title and to discuss detailed content;  
1 hour in June for comments on final draft.    
 
The supervisor will be permitted to comment on one draft of the dissertation only.  The Director 
of  MPhil  Dissertations  can  be  contacted  during  July  to  answer  queries  (but  not  to  provide 
supervision
).   
  
The deadline for submission of dissertations is Monday 30 July 2018, and this signals the official 
end of the  Course.  Students  must  remain in residence  in Cambridge  until they have  submitted 
their dissertations, except with the prior permission of the MPhil Course Director.  
  
There will be a series of hands-on Classes to introduce students to STATA and a session on how to 
avoid  any  plagiarism  issues  (the  Faculty  routinely  submits  dissertations  to  the  plagiarism 
detection  service).    There  will  also  be  a  series  of  workshops,  run  by  PhD  students  who  have, 
themselves, taken the MPhil in Economics, and will be aware of the requirements.   
  
The word limit of the Dissertation is 10,000 words.  
  
Advice on Dissertation Content  
Aims and objectives 
The  main  aim  of  the  dissertation  is  to  enable  students  to  undertake  a  research  project  which 
involves  studying  a  specific  economic  problem  or  issue  in  depth.    It  allows  students  to  gain 
experience of independent but supervised research, and provides a foundation for future original 
research.  Students should be able to demonstrate that they have acquired the ability to:  
  
 
 Define a feasible project within time and resource constraints  
 
 Develop an adequate methodology  
 
 Make use of library resources  
 
 Access databases, understand their uses and limitations and extract relevant data.  
11 
 

 
 Work without the need for continuous supervision  
 
Criteria for successful dissertations 
 
The  dissertation  is  a  test of  a  student’s  ability  to  do  a  piece  of  independent work which  shows 
some originality.  It therefore  follows  that  the preferred MPhil dissertation will not  simply  be  a 
survey  of  the  literature,  but  will  rather  demonstrate  that  the  student  is  capable  of  putting  the 
analytical techniques covered in the course to some use.  
 
The Faculty recognises that the amount of time available is limited and hence what is expected is 
not unrealistically high.  Experience suggests the following two common models for dissertations 
with some original content, although these are certainly not the only possible ones.  
  
Empirical 
This type of dissertation would include a survey of the literature and an overview of the relevant 
theory,  a  testable  hypothesis  derived  from  it,  and  a  competent  application  of  appropriate 
econometric methods to the relevant data.  Students are not required to produce a substantively 
original piece, but are expected to take an established model, give it a new slant and apply it to 
an appropriate dataset.    
 
NH: You do not need to submit data sources with your dissertation, but you should retain data and 
programs in case examiners request them. Data sources should be summarised in an appendix of 
the dissertation particularly if they are non-standard 
 
Applied theory 
In this type of dissertation, the student would choose a topical question and survey the relevant 
theory, modifying it to fit the case under discussion.  Examiners would be looking for a thorough 
knowledge  of  the  literature,  the  ability  to  organise  the  material  well  and  some  independent 
critical power.  An attempt  should be made to make an original contribution by identifying and 
dealing with some unsatisfactory or overlooked feature of the theory in the field.  
 
These are not the only types of dissertation with some original content, and since the aim of the 
dissertation is to produce a piece of original and independent work, any that attempt to do this 
will be marked more generously than those merely surveying the literature.  
  
 
Literature survey 
 
A literature survey which is no more than a catalogue of what has been published can at best only 
achieve a bare pass mark.  In order to achieve a mark of 70 or more, it should:  
  
  Demonstrate a high level of competence in analysis and expression 
  Integrate and synthesise existing ideas, demonstrate the relationship between them, and 
assess their significance 
  Demonstrate a deep grasp of the motivation, content and structure of the literature 
 
Dissertation assessment criteria   
The  criteria  by  which  dissertations  will  be  assessed  are  listed  below.    All  work  is  graded  on  a 
percentage scale. 
  
86 and above:  
Outstanding work showing originality, clarity and independent critical thought.  Work which, with 
revisions, could be worthy of publication in a learned journal of standing in its field.  
12 
 

 
75 – 85:
 
Work  of  distinction  standard  displaying  clarity,  precision  of  expression  and  proper  scholarly 
presentation.  In addition, the work should have at least one of the following qualities: discovery 
and  presentation  of  new  material;  an  original  approach  to  primary  material;  an  innovative 
comparison of other works generating /fresh insights.   
 
70 – 74: 
 
A very good piece  of work showing a high standard of scholarship and argument.  Work  in this 
category should demonstrate genuine interest in the chosen area of research either by providing 
a new interpretation or by presenting new and relevant material.   
 
66 – 69: 
 
Competent  work  showing  evidence  of  independent  thought  and  research.    Ideas  are  explained 
clearly and in a well organised manner, and there is some critical reflection.    
 
60 – 65: 
 
Satisfactory  work  but  with  limited  critical  reflection  and  a  more  mechanical  approach.    Some 
flawed reasoning or shortfall in presentation.  
 
59 and below: 
 
Unsatisfactory work, incoherent in its arguments or unacceptably poor in its standard of writing 
or presentation.  Demonstrates an inability to reflect critically.  The student has failed to engage 
seriously with the subject and shows inadequate levels of expression and organisation.  
  
Format of Dissertations  
Each  dissertation  submitted  shall  be  in  English,  and  shall  not  exceed  10,000  words  in  length 
(inclusive  of  footnotes  and  appendices,  but  exclusive  of  bibliography).    One  A4  page  consisting 
largely  of  charts,  statistics  or  symbols  will  be  regarded  as  the  equivalent  of  250  words.    The 
contents of such pages may not be subjected to multiple reductions in the course of reproduction 
to  the  point  where  they  are  not  readily  legible.    A  candidate  will  be  required  to  give  full 
references to sources used.  Please note that the Faculty will routinely submit your work to the 
plagiarism detection service, Turnitin. 
  
The  number  of  words  used  in  the  dissertation  must  be  reported  by  a  computer  count  from  a 
word-processing package. You must ensure that your word count complies with the 10,000 word 
criteria  set  out  above.    An  examiner  is  entitled  to  stop  reading  once  the  word  limit  has  been 
reached,  and  to  grade  your  work  exclusively  on  the  portion  of  it  which  he  or  she  has  read.  
Students’  attention  is  drawn  especially  to  the  need  to  avoid  plagiarism  of  others’  work.    The 
regulations regarding plagiarism and proper citation of references are set out below.  
  
The deadlines for submission of dissertations is 12 noon on Monday 30 July 2018. 
  
Late submission will be penalised by a reduction in the mark accorded to the dissertation.  You 
should  submit  two  copies  of  your  dissertation  to  the  Graduate  Office.      In  addition  you  should 
send an electronic version of the dissertation to xxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx.  You will receive 
an  e-mail  receipt  which  you  should  print  and  submit  at  the  same  time  as you submit your  two 
paper copies and your plagiarism declaration form.  The dissertations themselves should not have 
names on them: they should be identified by the Candidate Number only.  
 
The dissertation does not need to be bound, or in a folder, but must be on A4 size paper, with 
13 
 

sheets held firmly together under a cover sheet, with pages numbered. It should be typed, except 
in  exceptional  circumstances.  The  express  permission  of  the  MPhil  Course  Director  must  have 
been  granted  in  advance  to  present  a  hand-written  manuscript,  which,  if  allowed,  should  be 
written on one side of the paper only.    
 
The cover should contain the following details:   
  Title of the Dissertation  
  Your Candidate Number  
  The actual word count  
  A statement that it is your own work and does not contain material that has already been 
used for a comparable purpose and does not exceed the maximum length.  
  
NB: Either your name, or your supervisor’s, should NOT appear on the Dissertation   
 
Please  be  aware that copies  of dissertations are not retained by the Graduate Office after they 
have been examined.  
  
Examinations 
 
Mid-Course examinations for the three Core Compulsory Modules will be held in the week prior 
to the beginning of the Lent Term, that is 9, 10, 11 12 January 2018.  The examinations will be of 
2 or 3 hours’ duration, and whilst the marks do not fully count towards the final degree result, 
there will be an incentive scheme whereby 2 marks are awarded for sitting the mid-term exams, 
then 2 further marks for obtaining a mark of 30, and 1 further mark for obtaining a mark of 40.  
So  students  are  well  advised  to  sit  these examinations.    These  will  give  you  the  opportunity  to 
practice under examination conditions for the formal May examinations, and will also give you a 
good indication of your progress. The Faculty will also use the results from these examinations to 
rank students for funding purposes.    
  
Formal examinations for all Modules will begin in the second week of May.  Provisional dates are 
as follows: 
 
MPhil in Finance & Economics Compulsory Modules: 7 to 18 May 
Module 

Name 
Date & Time  
 
E100 
Microeconomics 
Monday 7 May 
2 hours 
E300 
Econometric Methods  
Friday 11 May 
3 hours 
F100 
Finance I 
Monday 14  May 
2 hours 
F200 
Finance II 
Wednesday 16 May 
2 hours 
F300 
Corporate Finance 
Wednesday 9 May 
2 hours 
F400 
Asset Pricing 
Friday 18 May 
2 hours  
 
Specialist Modules – 24 May to 1 June  
Full scheduling is only possible once student choices are submitted 
Module 

Name 
Date & Time  
Duration 
F500 
Empirical Finance 
Friday 25 May 
2 hours 
F510 
International Finance 
 
2 hours 
F520 
Behavioural Finance 
 
 
F530 
Venture Capital in the Innovation Economy 
Friday 16 March 
PROJECT 
F540 
Asset Management 
 
 
E101 
Applied Microeconomics 
Monday 14 May 
2 hours 
14 
 

E200 
Macroeconomics 
Wednesday 9 May 
2 hours 
E201 
Applied Macroeconomics 
Wednesday 16 May 
2 hours 
E201 
Applied Macroeconomics 
PROJECT: Tuesday 27 
Titles: 16 
March 
March 
S140 
Behavioural Economics 
 
 
S150 
Economics of Networks  
 
 
S301 
Applied Econometrics 
 
 
 
Marking Scheme  
  Top of Scale 
 
 
 
100  
  Distinction 
 
 
 
75  
  Pass mark for each Module  
 
60  
  Pass mark for the Coursework element   60  
  Pass mark for the Dissertation element  60  
 
Students who achieve an overall average mark of 75 across the coursework and dissertation, will 
receive a Distinction from the University.    
 
Each year up to three Stevenson Prizes (value £500), are awarded to the top students across the 
three MPhil degrees.  
  
Criteria for Passing MPhil 
 
The  normal  requirement  to  pass  the  M.Phil  degree  is  to  achieve  an  overall  average  mark  of  at 
least 60 in the coursework Modules, and separately a mark of at least 60 in the Dissertation.    
  
Candidates who marginally fail Core Modules will be referred to the External Examiner.   
  
A marginal fail which brings the overall average mark for the 8 Modules to between 55-59, may 
be outweighed by a high performance in the Dissertation.    
  
Dissertation  
A  fail  mark  in  the  Dissertation  may  be  outweighed  by  high  performance  in  the  Coursework 
Modules.  There is no explicit definition of a marginal fail in the Dissertation.  Any such case will 
be considered on its merits by the External Examiner.  
  
Oral Examinations 
 
Candidates at risk of failure of the degree will be asked to attend an oral examination (normally 
for  compulsory  modules  only,  but  under  very  specific  conditions,  may  include  other  failing 
modules)  which  will  be  held  shortly  before  the  Examining  Board  meets  at  the  end  of  June.  
However, if the situation  is deemed to be irredeemable  by the Examiners, and that holding an 
oral examination is pointless, candidates will be asked to withdraw from the Course.  
  
Transferral between MPhil Courses 
 
If  you  are  considering  changing  Courses  contact  Tom  Craske  in  the  Graduate  Office.    Students 
wishing to transfer to the MPhil in Economics should submit, in writing, to the Graduate Office, by 
Thursday  28  September,  the  reasons  why  they  are  requesting  a  transfer.    No  requests  will  be 
considered after this date
.  All requests will be considered at the same time by the Directors of 
the  two  MPhils.    Transfer  will  be  conditional  on  a  good  performance  in  the  Mathematics  and 
15 
 

Statistics examination and will be at the discretion of the Directors.   
 
Please note that it is not normally possible to transfer to the MPhil in Economics Research, but 
under certain, extenuating circumstances, you may be able to transfer to the MPhil in Economic 
Research
 during the first week of the Michaelmas Term.   
  
 
Examination Results
 
 
The  Examining  Board  will  release  provisional  marks  for  the  Easter  Term  examinations  after  the 
Final Examiners’ meeting at the end of June. Each student’s overall average mark which will then 
be published anonymously on the Faculty’s website by the student’s candidate number.  Please 
note that these marks remain provisional until they are finally approved by the Faculty’s Degree 
Committee  at  its October meeting. In July you will receive an interim transcript  for Coursework 
Modules, as well as the marks for individual questions within each Module. You will receive your 
formal  transcript  for  the  whole  Course,  including  the  Dissertation  mark,  in  late  October  2018. 
These  transcripts  will  contain  all  assessments  calculated  to  one  decimal  place.    The  average 
calculated  over  all  marks  will  also  be  to  one  decimal  place.    Any  requests  for  provisional 
transcripts through the Faculty will require 3 days’ notice. 
  
The  Student  Administration  and  Records  Section  of  the  University’s  Student  Registry  is 
responsible for producing the official Cambridge University transcript.  All students are entitled to 
one  free  copy  of  their  transcript  after  graduation.    Students  pay  for  additional  copies  of  the 
official  University  transcript.  The  charge,  at  the  time  of  writing,  is  £15.    Order  forms  and 
information regarding the transcript can be found at: 
  
http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/studentregistry/current/newstud/graduation/certificates.html   
  
Award of Degrees 
 
The  degree of MPhil cannot  be  awarded until the  dissertation has been assessed.  Degrees  will 
not  therefore  be  awarded until after the Faculty’s Degree Committee  has approved them at  its 
meeting in early October 2018. 
 
In order to take your Degree, you should make arrangements with your college Praelector, who 
will enter your name for a Degree ceremony (Congregation) in Michaelmas Term.  Congregations 
are usually held on Saturdays.  If you wish to delay receiving your Degree, you may arrange with 
your college to attend a later Congregation.  If you are unable to attend in person, it is possible 
for  the  Degree  to  be  awarded  at  a  Congregation  in  your  absence  (in  absentia).    However,  a 
Degree  certificate  will  not  be  awarded  until  you  have  been  listed  at  a  Congregation  either  in 
person or in your absence.  Please consult your college for any other information you may require 
about these procedures.  
  
 
16 
 

Graduate Examination Allowance 
 
An allowance for a graduate examination normally comes into effect if you have been unable to 
undertake part or all of your examination, or failed part or all of it because of a grave cause.  
 
An  allowance  does  not  affect  the  marks  you  receive.    Its  purpose  is  to  allow  you  a  chance  to 
obtain the qualification for which you have been registered, if the Student Registry accepts that 
your performance in the examination has been affected by a grave cause.  
   
There are two possible outcomes:  
  to approve you for the graduate qualification without further examination if the Degree 
Committee has recommended that you have performed with credit in a substantial part 
of the examination   
  to allow you to re-sit failed Modules in the following year.     
 
You  will  need  to  request  your  Graduate  Tutor  to  make  an  application  to  the  Secretary  of  the 
Board  of  Graduate  Studies  for  an  Examination  Allowance  on  your  behalf  under  General 
Regulation 12.  If the reasons for making the allowance are medical, your Graduate Tutor will also 
need to include any relevant medical evidence. 
 
 
The Student Registry will consider your application at the earliest Board Meeting possible and let 
your Graduate Tutor know the result of the application in writing.  
 
 
Appeals and Complaints 
 
There  are  a  number  of  ways  of  bringing  any  concerns  or  complaints  you  may  have  regarding 
teaching, supervision, or the examination process.    
 
  By meeting with the Director of the Course.  The Course Director will take a decision on the 
issue.    
 
  By confidential meeting with the Teaching Administrative Officer.  Depending on the nature 
of  the  complaint,  the  TAO  will  consult  with  the  Course  Director,  or  the  Chairman  of  the 
Degree Committee in order to resolve the issue.  
  
  By the on-line student feedback form.   The e-quality hotline can be used to give constructive 
feedback to the Faculty about lectures and other relevant aspects of the teaching programme 
(e.g.  the  Library,  Computing,  etc).    The  comments  are  submitted  anonymously  to    e-
xxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx 
and passed on to the Chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee. 
 
  By  the  Termly  teaching  questionnaire  surveys.    MPhil  students  are  asked  to  rate,  and 
comment on the quality of the course as a whole, the quality of hand-outs, the organization 
of the course and the amount of material covered.  Results from these surveys are considered 
each term by the Graduate Studies Committee.    
 
  The appeals procedure regarding the outcome of an examination result is normally dealt with 
by  the  Chairman  of  Examiners.    You  should,  in  the  first  instance,  contact  the  Teaching 
Administrative Officer, who will advise you on the process.    
  
  Your  Student  Representative  will  have  access  to  the  Faculty’s  Committee which  deals  with 
17 
 

graduate students, so can bring up your complaint at via this route.  
  
  Alternatively,  the  Cambridge  University  Student  Union  offers  a  very  comprehensive  advice 
service, which is free, confidential and independent.  If you feel you have been discriminated 
against,  treated  unfairly  or  would  like  to  discuss  something  that  is  bothering you,  do  check 
out their website: http://www.studentadvice.cam.ac.uk/    
 
  If, however, you feel that a complaint has not been dealt with satisfactorily, or if the problem 
is of a more serious nature, then formal procedures are available via the University’s Formal 
Complaints Route:  http://www.cam.ac.uk/staffstudents/studenthandbook/complaints.html  
 
 
4.  Plagiarism and correct referencing in dissertations 
 
  
In general, plagiarism can be defined as the unacknowledged use of the work of others as if this 
were your own original work.  
In the context of an examination, this amounts to  passing off the 
work of others as your own to gain unfair advantage.  
 
  
Such use of unfair means will not be tolerated by the University; if detected, the penalty may be 
severe  and  may  lead  to  failure  to  obtain  your  degree.      As  a  means  of  detection  of  plagiarism,  
electronic copies of all essays and dissertations must be submitted (in addition to hard copies) in 
order  for  comprehensive  processing  through  anti-plagiarism  software  to  be  carried  out.  
Submission should be in Microsoft WORD or PDF format.  
  
The scope of plagiarism  
Plagiarism may be due to:  
  Copying (using another person’s language and/or ideas as if they are your own);  
  Collusion (unauthorized collaboration)  
 
Methods include:  
  quoting directly another person’s language, data or illustrations without clear indication 
that the authorship is not your own and due acknowledgement of the source;  
  paraphrasing  the  critical  work  of  others  without  due  acknowledgement  –  even  if  you 
change  some  words  or  the  order  of  the  words,  this  is  still  plagiarism  if  you  are  using 
someone else’s original ideas and are not properly acknowledging it;  
  using ideas taken from someone else without reference to the originator;  
  cutting and pasting from the Internet to make a ‘pastiche’ of online sources;  
  colluding  with  another  person,  including  another  candidate  (other  than  as  might  be 
permitted for joint project work);  
  submitting  as  part  of  your  own  report  or  dissertation  someone  else’s  work  without 
identifying clearly who did the work (for example, where research has been contributed 
by others to a joint project).  
 
Plagiarism can occur in respect to all types of sources and all media:  
  not just text, but also illustrations, musical quotations, computer code etc;  
  not  just  text  published  in  books  and  journals,  but  also  downloaded  from  websites  or 
drawn from other media;  
  not just published material but also unpublished works, including lecture handouts  and 
the work of other students.  
 
18 
 

How to avoid plagiarism  
The main ways of avoiding plagiarism are:  
  
  when presenting the views and work of others, include in the text an indication of the 
source of the material, e.g.  ...as Sharpe (1993) has shown,....  
  and give the full details of the work quoted in your bibliography;  
  if  you  quote  text  verbatim,  place  the  sentence  in  inverted  commas  and  give  the 
appropriate  reference  e.g.  ‘The  elk  is  of  necessity  less  graceful  than  the  gazelle’ 
(Thompson, 1942, p 46) and give the full details in your bibliography as above;  
  if you wish to set out the work of another at length so that you can produce a counter-
argument,  set  the  quoted  text  apart  from  your  own  text  (eg  by  indenting  a  paragraph) 
and  identify  it  by  using  inverted  commas  and  adding  a  reference  as  above.    NB  long 
quotations may infringe copyright, which exists for the life of the author plus 70 years.  
  if you are copying text, keep a note of the author and the reference as you go along, with 
the copied text, so that you will not mistakenly think the material to be your own work 
when you come back to it in a few weeks’ time;  
  if  you  reproduce  an  illustration  or  include  someone  else’s  data  in  a  graph  include  the 
reference  to  the  original  work  in  the  legend,  eg  (figure  redrawn  from  Webb,  1976),  or 
(data from Webb, 1976)  
  if  you wish to  collaborate with  another  person  on  your  project,  you  should  check  with 
your  supervisor  whether  this  might  be  allowed  and  then  seek  permission  (for  research 
degrees, the permission of the Board of Graduate Studies must be sought);  
  if  you  have  been  authorised  to  work  together  with  another  candidate  or  other 
researchers, you must acknowledge their contribution fully in your introductory section. 
If  there  is  likely  to  be  any  doubt  as  to  who  contributed  which  parts  of  the  work,  you 
should make this clear in the text wherever necessary, e.gI am grateful to A. Smith for 
analysing the sodium content of these samples;  
  be  especially  careful  if  cutting  and  pasting  work  from  electronic  media;  do  not  fail  to 
attribute  the  work  to  its  source.  If  authorship of  the  electronic  source  is  not  given,  ask 
yourself whether it is worth copying.  
 
The Golden Rule:  
  
The examiners must be in no doubt as to which parts of your work are your own original work 
and which are the rightful property of someone else.  
  
Plagiarism Detection & Submission of Dissertations  
All assessed work will be routinely checked for plagiarism using TURNitIN software.  
  
You 
should, 
therefore, 
send 
an 
electronic 
version 
of 
the 
dissertation 
to 
xxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx    You  will  receive  an  e-mail  receipt  which  you  should  print  and 
submit  at  the  same  time  as  you  submit  your  two  paper  copies  and  your  plagiarism  declaration 
form.  Please ensure that all submitted work is clearly identified by your Candidate Number only.  
  
NB:    It  is  University  policy  that  students  may  be  found  guilty  of  an  act  of  plagiarism 
IRRESPECTIVE of intent to deceive, and be subject to the deprivation of a degree.  
 
  
  
  
19 
 

5.  Facilities for Graduate Students  
  
The  facilities  for  Economics  Graduate  Students  are  located  in  the  Austin  Robinson  Building  in 
Sidgwick  Avenue.  The  building  is  open  from  about  9am-5pm  weekdays.    Access  to  graduate 
facilities at other times is possible by using your University Card. The Sidgwick Site has a number 
of lecture rooms which are used in addition to the teaching rooms within the Faculty building.  
  
CamSIS 
This  is  an  on-line  student  self-service  database.    The  University  manages  student  records 
(admission, registration, progress, examination, transcripts) through a web-based system known 
as  CamSIS.      All  students  have  access  to  their  own  student  record  through  their  on-line  Self 
Service.   
  
CGSRS (Cambridge Graduate Students Reporting System)  
This  is  the  Student  Registry’s  online  reporting  system  for  graduate  supervisors.    These  reports, 
once submitted, are available to the student.  They are also read by the Course Director, Degree 
Committee,  College  and  Student  Registry,  who  all  take  an  interest  in  the  student’s  progress.  
Supervisors are encouraged to give an honest appraisal of the student’s progress but to do so in a 
manner  that  can  be  used  positively  to  provide  useful  feedback.    Students  should  read  their 
reports and discuss any concerns with their supervisor.  Failure to have read the reports will not 
be accepted as a reason for ignorance of their contents in cases of dispute.    
 
Calculators for Examination Purposes 
University  Regulations  require  that  only  calculators  of  a  prescribed  type  may  be  used  in 
examinations.  For  examinations  in  2018  the  approved  model  will  be  the  Casio  fx  115  (any 
version):  CASIO  fx  570  (any  version)  or  CASIO  fx  991  (any  version).      An  approved  calculator 
(CASIO fx 991-ES) can also be purchased from Reception during normal office hours.   The use of 
non-approved calculators in examinations is expressly forbidden. 
 
  
Computing 
Windows  PCs  for  student  use  are  available  in  the  Marshall  Library  and  in  the  two  basement 
computer rooms. These are part of a university-wide Managed Cluster Service. These computers 
have access to all econometric software used by the Faculty, as well as word processing software, 
web browsers and many other programs.  The network is available on a 24 hour basis, but access 
to the building is by card access only outside of office hours and at weekends.  
 
Photocopiers  are  sited  in  the  Library  and  basement  rooms  which  also  work  as  printers  for  the 
Managed  Cluster  Service.    MPhil  students  are  given  a  free  allocation  of  printing/photocopying 
credit of £25 per year. Additional credit can be added online or at Reception and in the Library.  
Current prices are displayed next to the photocopiers. 
  
Almost  all  colleges  also  have  their  own  computing  facilities;  enquiries  about  them  should  be 
directed to the College Computer Officer.  
  
Also  available  to  all  graduate  students  are  facilities  provided  by  the  University  Information 
Service.  Further information is available on the Computing Service website www.ucs.cam.ac.uk    
  
For any problems or questions about the computers and the Faculty network please contact the 
Faculty  IT  Support  Team  in  Room  53:  xx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx,    ext  48160  Craig  Peacock,  Jake  Dyer, 
Ryan Hilton and Nather Al-Khatib. 
.  
20 
 


  
  Wireless Internet access 
Wireless  internet  access  is  provided  throughout  the  Faculty  building  by  the  University 
Lapwing  and  eduroam  services.    Information  on  configuring  laptops  and  mobile  devices  is 
available from the IT Support web pages or the IT Support Team.  
 
  E-mail 
All students are issued an email address by the University Information Service.  Email is the 
main method of communication between the Graduate Office and students.   You should use 
email as the main way of communicating within the Faculty, and Faculty email addresses are 
easily found through the Faculty web pages.   
  
  Faculty website 
The  Faculty  website  is  at  www.econ.cam.ac.uk.    The  website  contains  a  great  deal  of 
information including course outlines, lecture handouts and past examination papers.  
 
Environmental Sustainability 
The  University  of  Cambridge  has  an  Environmental  Sustainability  Vision,  Policy  and  Strategy 
setting  out  the  University’s  commitment  to  achieving  outstanding  environmental  sustainability 
performance.  Every  member  of  the  University,  staff  and  student,  is  asked  to  play  their  role  in 
helping to achieve this vision. The following tips give some suggestions for how you can help. 
General tips 
•  Waste and recycling – most of our rubbish can be recycled. Crisp packets and polystyrene 
are key exceptions. Look out for posters on or near to bins for guidance.  
•  Travel  –  walk,  cycle,  or  take  the  University-subsidised  Universal  bus  to  get  around  the 
city. 
•  Food and drink – get a KeepCup and try the more sustainable options in University cafés. 
•  Energy  –  dress  appropriately  for  the  season  and  switch  off  lights  and  equipment  when 
not in use. 
•  Water – don’t leave taps running, and report any dripping taps. 
•  Get more involved – become a sustainability leader and help take things to the next level. 
Energy 
  The University spends £16 million on energy each year.  
  The  University  target  is  to  reduce  carbon  emissions  from 
energy use by 34% by 2020 (against a 2005 baseline). 
  This  can  be  achieved  through  some  simple  steps  –  such  as 
switching off lights and equipment when they are not being 
used. A single light left on overnight over a year accounts for 
as much greenhouse gas as a car driving from Cambridge to 
Paris.
 
  Always  dress  appropriately  for  the  season  to  reduce  the  need  for  additional  heat  or 
cooling. 
  Where possible, use the stairs rather than the lift. 
Food and drink 
  You can buy a KeepCup in most of the University cafés.  They reduce use of disposable 
cups, and give you a saving each time you buy a hot drink. 
21 
 

  University cafés have a range of sustainable options (why not try the vegan option? Did 
you  know  the  biggest  impact  individuals  can  make  around  food  is  reducing  meat  and 
dairy intake). 
  All of the University cafés’ disposable packaging (Vegware), as well as any food waste, can 
be recycled in food waste bins. 
Waste and recycling 
  The University’s waste from a single year weighs as much as the London Eye. 
  The University has targets to: 
o  Recycle at least 95% of its total waste by 2016. 
o  Send no non-hazardous waste to landfill by 2020. 
  There are separate recycling facilities for: 
o  Food waste 
o  Glass 
o  Mixed  recycling  (paper,  cardboard,  plastic  bottles,  plastic  containers,  cartons, 
plastic wrapping, cans and tins) 
o  Batteries 
o  Printer cartridges 
  Look for the posters on or near the bins which say what should be placed in each. If bins 
do not have posters, please let your Department’s Environment and Energy Coordinator, 
Green Impact team or facilities staff know. 
  There are recycling points located… 
  If you are unsure of which bin to use, please ask… 
  Reducing  and  reusing  allows  us  to  decrease  the  amount  of  waste  that  will  need  to  be 
recycled. 
  Reduce: 
o  print double sided, and only print where needed 
o  share equipment wherever possible 
  Reuse: 
o  avoid disposable cups by using a KeepCup, mug or refillable bottle 
o  donate unwanted books and other items to charity 
  Most  things  can  be  recycled  but  key  exceptions  are  crisp  packets,  paper  towels/tissue 
paper and polystyrene (they need to go in the general waste bin NOT recycling). 
  Most plastics can be recycled so if in doubt, put plastics in the recycling bin. 
 
Water 
  The University spends £0.7 million per year on water. 
  The University is committed to a 20% reduction in water use by 2020. 
  Cambridge  is  in  one  of  the  driest  areas  of  the  country  so  saving  water  is  particularly 
important here. 
  Help save water by not leaving taps running. 
  If you see a leak or a drip, report it to… 
Get more involved 
  Keep  up-to-date  with  news  and  opportunities  by  subscribing  to  the  Greenlines 
newsletter. 
  Visit  the  Environment  and  Energy  Section’s  student  webpage  to  find  out  more  about 
projects including Green Impact and the Living Laboratory for Sustainability. 
  Email xxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xxx.xx.xx with any questions or to find out more about any 
particular opportunity. 
22 
 


  Contact your Environment and Energy Coordinator… or Green Impact team… to find out 
what  opportunities  there  are  to  get  involved  in  the  Department,  and  to  pass  on  your 
ideas for how the Department could be more sustainable. 
  Opportunities include paid internships, support running your own environmental project, 
and  Institute of  Environmental  Management  and  Assessment (IEMA)  accredited  auditor 
training and experience through Green Impact. 
 
 
Graduate Common Room 
The  newly  refurbished  Common  Room  is  available  to  all  graduate  students,  has  tea  and  coffee 
making facilities, and suitable seating for relaxation or group meetings.  
 
Graduate Student Representatives 
The election for the representative to serve during the academic year will take place at the end of 
November.   Nominations must be submitted in writing not later than one full week before the 
election.  Each nomination to be signed by the persons proposing and seconding the nomination 
and  accompanied  by  a  statement,  signed  by  the  person  nominated,  that  he/she  consents  to 
his/her nomination.  
 
Hardship Funding 
The eligibility for this fund has been expanded and students studying towards any of the following 
courses will be considered by the fund:  
Diploma  in  the  Conservation  of  Easel  Painting,  Advanced  Diploma  in  Economics,  Postgraduate 
Diploma  in  Legal  Studies  Postgraduate Diploma in International Law,  Advanced  Diploma  in 
Theology  and Religious  Studies,  MPhil  (full  time  and  part  time),  LLM, MCL, MRes,  MMus,  MLitt 
(full  time  and  part  time),  MASt,  MFin,  MSc,  MEd,  MSt,  VetMD,  PhD  (full  time  and  part  time), 
EngD, PhD, MD, EdD, PGCE, Certificate of Postgraduate Studies.  
The  amount  of  money  available  under  this  funding  stream  has  been  increased  to  ensure  the 
needs of the wider population of students can be accommodated and to take account of the fact 
that ALF will no longer be available.  
 
Students will still need to apply for funding via the online application form, the deadlines will be 
changed to coincide with Bell, Abbott and Barnes at the division of each term, the funding limit 
will be changed to £2,000 per student a year.  Details of the scheme, an updated application form 
and updated guidance  will be made  available in time for the commencement of Michaelmas at 
the following:  
 
http://www.cambridgestudents.cam.ac.uk/fees-and-funding/financial-hardship-support-access-funds/hardship-funding  
 
 
The Marshall Library of Economics 
 
The  Marshall  Library  originated  in 
the  small  Moral  Sciences  Library  created 
by Professor Alfred Marshall and Professor Henry Sidgwick from 1885 onwards, largely through 
the donation of their own books. It now contains in excess of 100,000 items. Further information 
with  regard  to  opening  hours  and  borrowing  entitlements  may  be  obtained  from  the  Marshall 
Library's www site: http://www.marshall.econ.cam.ac.uk 
23 
 




The Marshall actively seeks to support Undergraduate students within the Faculty of Economics 
by: 

Providing a great study environment. The Library has over 180 workplaces, comfortable seating, 
a relaxation area, 
 
full wifi coverage and a variety of newspapers available for consultation such as the FT, Guardian 
and the Economist.  
2017-18 we will be open in term time:  
Mon-Fri: from 9 am to 9 pm 
Sat: 11 am to 5pm,  
Sun: Open Easter Term only from 1pm to 5pm  
Ensuring  that  you  have  access  to  all  the  books,  journals  and  e-resources  that you  require  for 
your studies. 
The Marshall Library provides multiple copies of all the most important textbooks 
used for teaching by the  the Faculty of Economics. We are also increasing our ebook provision. If 
you  need  a  book  please  email  us
  (xxxxxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx.xx.xx)  OR  use  our  book  suggestion 
form at http://bit.ly/1evFbQr  
 
 
OR just come  to the Library and tell us! We will buy books very quickly. You will be  emailed as 
soon as it is available for you to borrow. If there are not enough copies of a particular textbook 
we will buy additional copies, or we will buy an ebook (where it is available to libraries). 
Providing scans of book chapters on undergraduate reading lists. You find these on the Marshall 
Library Moodle site http://bit.ly/2vmkPee OR by searching the iDiscover catalogue for the book 
which contains the chapter you want and following the electronic access link towards the bottom 
of the page.  
Providing access to commercial financial databases such as Bloomberg & 
Datastream 

The Library has one Bloomberg and one Datastream terminal which can be 
booked via the Marshall's www page or in person at the Issue Desk.  
 
24 
 



 
Assisting in the location of data 
Marshall Library staff are happy to assist students in the location of statistical data. Requests for 
assistance should be sent by email to the library (xxxxxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx.xx.xx) and should be as 
specific as possible with regard to the data sought. 
Helping you to avoid Plagiarism and with provision of Referencing advice 
Plagiarism is using ideas or the work of another person and presenting it as your own work. It is 
dishonest,  unprofessional  and  poor  scholarship.  The  Marshall  Library  provides  a  Plagiarism 
Libguide to help you understand and avoid plagiarism in your academic work. The guide includes 
a quick self-test at the end http://libguides.cam.ac.uk/plagiarism/home 
We  provide  an  Economics  Libguide  http://libguides.cam.ac.uk/economics      to  all  our  online 
materials  in  the  subject  and  this  includes  the  Faculty  referencing  guidance  with  examples 
http://libguides.cam.ac.uk/economics/referencing 
Social Area & Book Displays 
The Marshall Library provides a Social Area with 
comfortable seats where you can eat, drink and chat. 
You can also eat downstairs in the Foyer of the Library. 
Take a look at our regular book displays in this area which are 
based on relevant economic themes showcasing new 
purchases in particular areas 
 
 
Mary Paley Group Study Room 
The group study room is available for booking for up 
to two hours at any one time by students for group 
study. Ask at the Issue Desk or book via our webpage 
http://bit.ly/1VM92PF 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25 
 


 
Items for Sale 
There are second hand Economics books available for sale 
at the Marshall Library at low prices. You can also 
purchase mugs, pens, pencils, notebooks, USB drives, 
Marshall Library book bags and key rings at the Issue Desk 
http://bit.ly/2aHO3bE 
 
 
Library Induction Presentations 
The  Marshall  provides  induction  presentations  for  undergraduate  students  at  the  start  of  each 
academic year. These inductions are designed to give you the necessary information that you will 
need to make effective use of the Marshall and other Cambridge libraries. 
Contact details and staying in touch 
Tel: (01223) 335217 
Email: xxxxxxxx@xxxxxx.xxx.xx.xx 
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MarshallLib 
Twitterhttps://twitter.com/marshalllibrary 
 
 Master’s Self-Evaluation 
All  Master’s  students  will  be  asked  to  complete  a  Self-Evaluation  report  in  CamSIS  around  the 
division of Michaelmas Term, with prompts being sent to both Principal Supervisors and College 
Graduate Tutors once the student has submitted their self-evaluation.  
 
 
 
Noticeboard 
An  electronic  notice  will  be  sent  out  every  Wednesday  by  the  Graduate  Office.    This  provides 
information about events taking place in Cambridge and elsewhere. This does not mean that the 
Faculty  is  involved  in  organizing  the  events,  nor  does  it  mean  that  the  Faculty  recommends  or 
endorses these events. 
  
Photocopying 
Photocopiers are available in the Marshall Library and the basement computer rooms. These are 
charged to the same account as for printing.  Please ask the Library Staff or IT Staff if you need 
help. Some colleges and the Graduate Union also have photocopying facilities.  
 
Students’ Union 
The  Students’  Unions’  Advice  Service  offers  free,  confidential  and  independent  advice, 
information,  support  and  representation  to  all  Cambridge  University  students. We  can  discuss 
your concerns with you whatever  the  issue. We can help you explore your options and  provide 
support  in  resolving  matters.  We  can  also  represent  you  within  your  College  or  the 
University. You  can  come  to  the  Students’  Unions’  Advice  Service  with  any  concerns  you  may 
have, whether it’s the first time you have a question or as a last resort. Students often come for 
advice on: 
26 
 

 
  Academic-relates issues 
  Homesickness and culture shock 
  Personal issues 
  Disciplinary issues 
  Bullying/harassment 
  Mental health issues 
  Welfare concerns 
  Intermission 
  University and College complaints 
Our friendly Advice team includes two full-time staff members and three sabbatical officers. If we 
can’t help you directly, we will find someone who can.  
Students’ Unions Advice Service (CUSU and the GU) 
Ground Floor, 17 Mill Lane, Cambridge, CB2 1RX 
Monday – Friday 9am – 01223 746999 xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx.xx 
www.studentadvice.cam.ac.uk  
 
Teaching Evaluation Questionnaires 
The Faculty regularly monitors the quality of teaching and administration of both undergraduate 
and graduate courses.  To this end you will be asked to complete on-line questionnaires during 
the course of the year.  It is helpful if students make every effort to respond, as this is a useful 
way  for  the  Faculty  Board  to  be  able  to  assess  the  quality  of  teaching.    Your  comments  are 
important and will be taken into account in any teaching review.  If there are any immediate and 
urgent matters regarding the teaching programmes, student should make use of the Faculty’s e-
mail  hotline  -  'E-Quality'  -  to  facilitate  rapid  Faculty  response  to  concerns  -  e-
xxxxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx.xx 
 
 
TIMETABLE 
TIMETABLE  is  the  University's  online  timetabling  system  allowing  you  to  create  your  own 
personalised calendar.  It is maintained by the Faculty, so it always contains the most up to date 
information  about  your  lectures. To  try  it  out,  go  to  www.timetable.cam.ac.uk  click  sign  in, 
choose Economics from the dropdown menu, and start adding your options. If you required, you 
may then print it out or export it to your own calendar.  
   
University Counselling Service 
Most  personal,  relationship  or  identity  problems  can  be  helped  through  counselling  –  this 
includes  anxiety,  stress  and  depression;  family  and/or  relationship  difficulties,  sexual  problems 
and identity issue.  Counselling can also help with other issues such as: adjusting to a new culture, 
dealing  with  dilemmas,  making  difficult  decisions  or  choices,  as  well  as  more  specific  problems 
such as eating problems or addictions.   
 
The  Service  is  situated  at  2/3  Bene’t  Place,  Lensfield  Road,  Cambridge,  CB2  1EL,  Tel:  01223 
332865; email:  xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xxx.xx.xx.  Office opening times: 9.00am – 5.30pm 
on Mondays & Wednesdays, 9-00am-7.30pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays, 9.00am to 5.00pm on 
Fridays.  Please see this link http://www.counselling.cam.ac.uk/contactUCS.html    
 
27 
 

HEALTH AND SAFETY 
The Faculty is committed to achieving and maintaining the highest standards of health and safety 
for  all  employees  and  students  and  others  who  may  be  affected  by  our  activities.  This  is 
accomplished by following the Faculty’s Health and Safety Policy, a copy of which can be found on 
the  Faculty’s  website  at  www.econ.cam.ac.uk/intranet/safety.    However,  you  should  also  be 
aware  that  responsibility  rests  with  the  individual  as  well,  so  listed  below  is  some  basic 
information for your personal safety: 
  When visiting any building on the Site, e.g. Austin Robinson Building, the Marshall Library, 
Lecture  Block,  Lady  Mitchell  Hall,  Law  Faculty  etc.,  you  should  familiarise  yourself  with 
the location of Fire Exits, fire alarm call points and firefighting equipment. 
  In  the  event  of  the  fire  alarm  sounding  in  any  building  you  should  vacate  the  building 
immediately.  Do not use lifts or stop to collect personal possessions.  The building should 
not be re-entered until the all-clear is given by the Fire Brigade or Fire Wardens (who will 
be wearing fluorescent yellow jackets).   
  However please also note that in the Austin Robinson Building and Marshall Library, the 
fire bells are tested every Wednesday morning at 8.45 am.  You do not need to leave the 
buildings during this testing.   
  Please do not use lifts out of normal working hours. 
  In cases of emergencies which occur out-of-hours, Security can be called out on 31818 or 
on 101 from a University phone.   
  If you become unwell the staff in Reception will be able to telephone for an ambulance, if 
necessary, or will have access to the First-Aid Boxes, and to the list of those qualified to 
administer First Aid.   
  All accidents should be reported to Reception where the Accident Book is housed. 
  The  Health  and  Safety  (Display  Screen  Equipment)  Regulations  1992  set  out  detailed 
criteria for standardising conditions where workstations incorporating display screens are 
used. They require employers to minimise some of the risks by requiring workplaces and 
jobs to be well designed in the first  place.  The University has a Code of Practice for the 
Safe Use of Display Screen Equipment (VDUs) which you are strongly urged to read and can 
be found at: 
http://www.safety.admin.cam.ac.uk/subjects/workplace/display-screen-equipment 
If any student, who has a desk and computer in the Faculty and would like a workstation 
assessment, please contact Mr Craig Peacock (335253). 
The Faculty’s Health and Safety Officer is Mr Nathan Smith (335201) and the First Aiders are Mr 
Craig Peacock (335253) and Mr Tom Craske (335737).  Any safety issues concerning the building 
should be directed to Mr Smith. 
 
Disabled Access 
Wheelchair access to the building is level access to double doors (72cm wide) and then double 
doors (75 cm wide).  These gives access to a lift, which 110(w)x140(d) cm).  The lift gives access to 
the  rooms  occupied  by  the  Faculty’s  teaching  staff,  and  he  Keynes  Seminar  Room  and  the 
Common Room.  Movement around the building is made difficult by heavy doors, which need to 
be pulled open.  
 
There is an accessible toilet on the first floor.   
28 
 

 
Access to the Marshall Library is level access to double doors (65 cm wide) and then up flights of 
eight, nine and then ten steps.  Lift access to the Library is however available.  The Receptionist 
will ring the Library to arrange access.  Within the Library there are five steps between the Issue 
Desk and the main collection of books, but a stair lift is available.  The main journals collection is 
only accessible by stairs, but the library staff will fetch items on request.  
  
The stair lift fitted in the Marshall Library Foyer gives access to the disabled toilet and computer 
rooms  in  the  basement,  and  to  lecture/seminar  rooms  and  graduate  study  rooms  on  the 
Mezzanine floor.  
  
Doors  at  both  main  entrances  are  fitted  with  electric  door  openers  activated  by  swipe  cards.  
Regular wheelchair users can have their University Card added to the system.    
  
Disabled parking is available on the site.  
  
Large print or other versions of hand-outs can be provided on demand, and students should talk 
to the Graduate Office to arrange these.  For any other issues, please contact Mr Craig Peacock 
who is the disability officer.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
University of Cambridge 
Faculty of Economics 
Austin Robinson Building 
Sidgwick Avenue 
Cambridge 
CB3 9DD 
 
Tel: 01223 335208 
Email: xxxxx@xxx.xx.xx 
 
29 
 

Document Outline