This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Council monitoring Social Media'.



 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Date: 29/08/2018 
 
Response/Digest FOI: 8496 
 
Wrexham County Borough Council does hold some of the information 
requested. 
 
Request: 
 
Council monitoring Social Media 
 
1.  How many occasions in 2017/18 did the Council gather information from Twitter 
and Facebook? Please provide the list of organisations that are 'followed' and 
those that are actively monitored? 
Like most other councils, the Marketing and PR Team looks at Twitter on a 
daily basis, to see which Wrexham-related topics and issues are popular or 
‘trending.’ This can help us understand how people feel about local issues, 
and help us become aware of important issues or concerns in our 
communities. It’s also a good way to keep up-to-speed with positive things 
being said about Wrexham on social media, and sometimes we’ll share 
those positive messages so they reach more people. 
 
We monitor for topics and trends on Twitter. We don’t monitor individual 
accounts. 
 
We do ‘follow’ other users / organisations on Twitter (standard practice on 
this social media platform) and their tweets appear in our Twitter-feed 
(which means we can see what they tweet).  At the time of writing, we follow 
892 Twitter users on our main English account, and 958 on our main Welsh 
account – you can see who we follow by going to  
https://www.twitter..com/wrexhamcbc 
and 
https://www.twitter.com/cbswrecsam 
and clicking on ‘following’ (you might 
need to be logged into Twitter to do this). 
 
These Twitter users know we are following them, and can block us from 
following them, or viewing their content if they don’t want us to see it, at 
any time. However, this doesn’t happen very often. Twitter users generally 
want others to follow them, as the platform relies on users engaging with 
each other – reading, responding to, sharing and liking each other’s posts.  
 
We analyse our own tweets (i.e. content tweeted by Wrexham Council) to 
help us understand which topics our followers are interested in. For 
example, we look at data that tells us how many times one of our tweets 
has been potentially read (called ‘reach’), liked, retweeted or how many 
times the link has been clicked.  

Please note that where information is subject to copyright belonging to the Council, you will need to 
obtain the permission of the Council to re-use it for purposes other than private study or non-
commercial research. The Council may charge for re-use. Where third party copyright material is 
disclosed, you must obtain permission to re-use from the copyright holders concerned. 

                                                                                                                                                                                            

We also try to identify popular content on Twitter, and we compile some 
statistics every month to help us understand which topics and tweets 
reached a lot of people or generated the most interest from other users 
(this helps us identify key local issues, and helps us understand how the 
public feels about these issues, as explained above).  
 
We don’t monitor specific, individual Twitter accounts and there is no ‘list’ 
of Twitter users we ‘actively monitor.’ We monitor for topics and trends on 
Twitter. 
 
On Facebook, we look at messages and comments that other users post on 
the council’s own Facebook pages (standard practice on the platform), and 
will analyse our own Facebook posts to help us understand which topics 
our followers are most interested in. 
 
We sometimes look at other organisations’ Facebook pages if they’re 
public (i.e. open for everyone to look at) and we’re interested in a particular 
issue or piece of information they’ve posted. For example, we might look at 
a partner organisation’s Facebook post, or a news story posted on another 
organisation’s Facebook page. Typically, we’re prompted to look at the 
page because we’ve read about it elsewhere (e.g. somewhere else on social 
media) or we’ve heard about it via word-of-mouth. 
 
We ‘like’ other Facebook users from our corporate Facebook pages 
(English page: https://www.facebook.com/wrexhamcouncil 
 / Welsh 
page:  https://www.facebook.com/cyngorwrecsam 
 ). Our pages are 
‘business pages’, and we can see content from the pages we’ve liked by 
clicking on ‘see pages feed.’ 
 
You can see the pages we’ve ‘liked’ by clicking on ‘pages liked by this 
page’ – located in the right-hand column of the desk-top version of 
Facebook. 
 
Employees and councillors might follow or connect with other users and 
pages from their personal accounts, which they are free to do like any other 
Facebook user. In other words, employees and councillors are free to 
follow or connect with whoever they like on social media via their personal 
accounts in their own time outside of work. 

 
2.  On how many occasions in 2017/18 did the council use information from 
Facebook and/or Twitter in regard to an investigation into a staff member or 
Council Member? Please indicate the split  
None 
 
3.  Who has the authority in the Council to request that a Facebook or Twitter 
account is monitored? Is monitoring carried out by an internal officer or is the 
work externalised? What is the policy to authorise monitoring? 
The Marketing & PR Team do not monitor specific, individual social media 
accounts and there is no list of accounts they actively monitor. See answer 

Please note that where information is subject to copyright belonging to the Council, you will need to 
obtain the permission of the Council to re-use it for purposes other than private study or non-
commercial research. The Council may charge for re-use. Where third party copyright material is 
disclosed, you must obtain permission to re-use from the copyright holders concerned. 

                                                                                                                                                                                            

to question 1 for details on how and why they identify popular and trending 
content on Twitter and Facebook.  

 
4.  How much did the Council pay in 2017/18 to any external monitoring company or 
spend on internal staff costs? 
Information not held.  We do not record specifically how much time we 
spend looking at social media content and data. Several people in the team 
can look at social media information at different points in the day or week, 
but we don’t record this time, so we are unable to break down salaries to 
offer a meaningful figure of spend on ‘internal staff costs.’ 
 

Please note that where information is subject to copyright belonging to the Council, you will need to 
obtain the permission of the Council to re-use it for purposes other than private study or non-
commercial research. The Council may charge for re-use. Where third party copyright material is 
disclosed, you must obtain permission to re-use from the copyright holders concerned.