This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Planning Officer report communications'.

HERTFORDSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
Agenda No.
DEVELOPMENT CONTROL COMMITTEE
1
FRIDAY 09 FEBRUARY2018 AT 10.00 AM
ST ALBANS DISTRICT COUNCIL
APPLICATION FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF NEW 6 FE SCHOOL
BUILDINGS, VEHICULAR ACCESS/EGRESS ONTO THE LOWER LUTON
ROAD, VEHICULAR ACCESS ONTO COMMON LANE, TWO PEDESTRIAN
ACCESSES/EGRESSES ONTO COMMON LANE, CAR PARKING, CYCLE
STORAGE, COACH PARKING, PLAYING FIELDS, TENNIS COURTS /
MULTI-USE GAMES AREA, SURFACE WATER ATTENUATION
MEASURES, HARD AND SOFT LANDSCAPING AND OTHER
ASSOCIATED DEVELOPMENT AT LAND TO THE NORTH OF LOWER
LUTON ROAD, HARPENDEN, HERTFORDSHIRE

Report of the Chief Executive and Director of Environment
Contact:
Chay Dempster
Tel: 01992 556308
Local Member:
David Williams
Adjoining Members: Teresa Heritage/ Annie Brewster
Purpose of Report
1.1
To consider application 5/2733-17 (CC0798) for construction of new 6
FE school buildings, vehicular access/egress onto the Lower Luton
Road, vehicular access onto Common Lane, two pedestrian
accesses/egresses onto Common Lane, car parking, cycle storage,
coach parking, playing fields, tennis courts / multi-use games area,
surface water attenuation measures, hard and soft landscaping and
other associated development at land to the north of Lower Luton
Road, Harpenden, Hertfordshire.
Summary
1.1
The application proposes the construction of a new 6 form of entry
secondary school, sports hall, multi-use games area, playing fields,
new vehicular access and egress from the Lower Luton Road, plus a
service access from Common Lane and pedestrian accesses from
Common Lane and the Lower Luton Road.
1.2
The proposed highway works in front of the site include: a right turn
lane, toucan crossing to the east of Crabtree Lane, modifications to the
mini-roundabout at Common Lane/Lower Luton Road junction,
pedestrian footway on east side of Common Lane, and the introduction
of a 30mph speed limit between Batford and Wheathampstead. The full
package of off-site highway works, including pedestrian improvements
across the wider area are set out in Appendix 2.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
1

1.3
The education need statement sets out the requirement for additional
secondary school capacity within the Harpenden Education Planning
Area (EPA) covering Harpenden, Redbourn, Wheathampstead and the
surrounding villages, indicating that there is an unmet demand in
excess of 6 forms of entry by 2022/23.
1.4
The sequential approach to identifying suitable location(s) for meeting
the rising demand considered the potential to provide additional
capacity at the three Harpenden secondary school sites. Feasibility
studies identified that an additional 0.6FE could possibly be provided at
the St Georges School site, plus an additional 2FE at the Sir John
Lawes School site. The potential to expand Roundwood Park was
considered undeliverable because of the combined traffic effects
generated by an expanded Roundwood Park secondary school
operating alongside Roundwood primary school on the adjoining site.
The 2011 highway appraisal regarded this option as being unlikely to
be acceptable in highway terms.
1.5
In any event, the number of additional places that could be delivered
through the potential expansion of St Georges and Sir John Lawes
Schools would fall short of the required capacity. Furthermore, both of
the schools have expanded their Published Admission Number (PAN)
within the last decade under an agreement with the County Council and
the schools have stated that they would be unwilling to expand further
on a permanent basis.
1.6
The comparative site assessment 2015 (and 2017 update) identified
potential sites for a new school site (or detached playing fields) within
the urban areas of Harpenden, Redbourn, Wheathampstead. The
assessment, which covered land within HCC ownership, commercial
sites and areas of open land, concluded that there are no suitable,
available and deliverable sites.
1.7
The comparative site assessment also considered potential sites on the
edge of Harpenden. The site search initially identified 11 sites, later
reduced to 9 sites.
1.8
The comparative site assessment considered each site against a range
of environmental effects generated by the development of a new 6FE
secondary school. The assessment produced a shortlist of 3 sites.
Viability reports were produced for the 3 sites. The site with the least
adverse Green Belt effects and the least number of adverse
environmental effects was Site A (Land to the East of Luton Road,
Harpenden); however, Site A is promoted as a housing site in the draft
local plan, and the cost of acquiring the land make it undeliverable.
1.9
Of the three sites, the application site (Site F) was the least favourable
in terms of construction considerations, but most favourable in terms of
acquisition. Following the completion of the comparative site
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
2

assessment (January 2015) the County Council entered into
negotiations to purchase Site F and completed the purchase on 25
August 2017.
1.10
Having assessed the planning merits of the application, the report
concludes:
▪  There is a clear, demonstrable and pressing need for additional 
secondary school capacity within the Harpenden EPA (until at least
2028);
▪  The level of demand in 2023 justifies the provision of 6 forms of entry of 
additional capacity with the Harpenden EPA;
▪  The options to expand capacity at St Georges and Sir John Lawes 
schools cannot meet the level of demand within the required
timescales;
▪  The option of expanding capacity at Roundwood Park is undeliverable 
within the required timescale;
▪  There are no more suitable or available sites within the urban areas of 
Harpenden, Redbourn, Wheathampstead;
▪  There are no more clearly suitable sites within the Green Belt on the 
edges of Harpenden (that are deliverable within the required
timescales)
1.11
The development of a 6FE secondary school at the application site
would result in adverse impacts on the Green Belt and also in terms of
landscape, transport, air quality, drainage and heritage assets, and
whilst the adverse effects are mitigated as far as possible, there are
likely to be residual adverse effects to landform and landuse, to the
public highway and in terms of surface water flooding affecting the
Lower Luton Road.
Planning balance
2.12
When considering planning applications, local authorities should
ensure that substantial weight is given to any harm to the Green Belt.
Very special circumstances will not exist unless the potential harm to
the Green Belt by reason of inappropriateness, and any other harm, is
clearly outweighed by other considerations (NPPF: Paragraph 88).
2.13
The Very Special Circumstances in this case are:
▪  The wider benefits of providing the level of additional secondary school 
capacity required within the area of need;
▪  the lack of suitable, available and deliverable sites within the urban 
areas of Harpenden, Redbourn, Wheathampstead; and
▪  the lack of available sites within the Green Belt (which potential y could 
result in less harm) undeliverable within the required timescales
2.14
The Very Special Circumstances are considered sufficient to clearly
outweigh the harm to the Green Belt and the other harm identified in
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
3

this case, specifically with regard to the provisions of the NPPF
(paragraph 72) which states:
The Government attaches great importance to ensuring that a sufficient
choice of school places is available to meet the needs of existing and
new communities. Local planning authorities should take a positive,
proactive and collaborative approach to meeting this requirement, and
to development that would widen the choice in education. They should:
give great weight to the need to create, expand or alter schools; and
work with schools and promoters to identify and resolve key planning
issues before applications are submitted.
3.
Recommendation
3.1
For the reasons set out above and in the main body of the report, it is
recommended (a) that planning permission should be granted subject
to the conditions set out below, which are necessary to make the
development acceptable, relevant to planning and the development to
be permitted, enforceable, precise and reasonable in all other respects,
in accordance with the NPPF (Paragraph 206), subject to (b) the
application is referred to the Secretary of State as a departure from the
development plan for a decision as to whether or not to call in the
application for his determination
Conditions
Timing
▪  Commencement of development: within 3 years 
▪  Construction hours: 7am - 6pm Monday - Friday; Saturday 8am - 1pm; 
▪  Sports facilities: hours of use: 8am to 9pm Monday - Saturday; Sunday 
9am to 7pm
General requirements
▪  Vehicular and pedestrian access: implemented in accordance with 
approval plans
▪  Travel Plan: 56% sustainable travel modal split (specified in the Travel 
Plan version 3) to be delivered, maintained and monitored on an
annual basis, in accordance with the measures set out in the
intervention strategy
Prior to the commencement of development
Further details required in respect of:
▪  Samples of materials of construction: for external elevations 
▪  Fences and other means of enclosure 
▪  Levels: cross section drawings 
▪  Refuse storage areas 
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
4

▪  Hard and soft landscaping: enhancement scheme: 
▪  Lighting: 
Drainage:
−  Scheme of infiltration testing 
−  Site drainage strategy 
−  Detailed design of overland flow routes 
−  Detailed design of surface water ditch; 
−  Construction Management Plan; 
▪  Detailed schemes for off-site highway works 
▪  Drainage: cross section drawings showing proposed site contours 
▪  Soil handling: methodology statement 
▪  Sports pitches: assessment of ground conditions 
▪  Sports facilities: multi-use games area - detailed specification 
▪  Archaeology: Written Scheme of Investigation 
▪  Archaeology: mitigation strategy for preservation in situ 
▪  Ecology: ecological management plan 
Prior to the first occupation
▪  Provision of new vehicular and pedestrian access on Common Lane 
▪  Provision of off-site highway works 
▪  Extension of 30mph speed limit from Wheathampstead to Batford; 
▪  Travel Plan: implementation of measures specified in the Travel Plan 
(Phase 1);
▪  Energy use statement 
▪  Drainage:  
−  implementation of drainage strategy principles; 
−  submission of drainage strategy for sports pitches; 
−  submission final drawings showing drainage and overland flow 
routes;
Prior to second year intake
Actions and further information requirements
▪  Provision of new access onto the Lower Luton Road 
▪  Parking and turning space: in accordance with approved plans 
▪  Provision of area wide parking restrictions shown in principle on 
Drawing No.2675-AWP-S30-01;
▪  Off-site highway works: detailed schemes 
▪  Off-site highway works: implementation of approved plans 
Other timescales
▪  Ecology: survey (presence of badgers) minimum 2 weeks prior to 
commencement;
▪  Ecology: management plan: not later than 6 months prior to first 
occupation
▪  Community Use Agreement: prior to occupation of the school in Year 
13 and above;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
5

▪  Sport pitches: noise assessment prior to any community use after 6pm 
▪  Drainage: submission of drainage and maintenance plans 
4.
Background
4.1
Harpenden Secondary Education Trust’s (HSET1) submitted an
application for funding under the free schools programme to the
Department of Education (DfE) in October 2014. The application
received approval to enter the pre-opening process in March 2015.
4.2
The process required HSET to provide valid evidence of demand for
the school. The submitted evidence was assessed alongside data held
by DfE as well as information provided by the local authority. The
Education and Skills Funding Agency (on behalf of DfE) regard the free
schools application as having ‘clearly demonstrated strong parental
demand and a marked need for this school’. The application was
allowed to proceed to the next stage of the pre-opening process, under
the following arrangements:
▪ 
HCC take responsibility for acquiring the site;  
▪ 
DfE/ ESFA take responsibility for carrying out the capital works.  
▪ 
HSET take responsibility for developing site designs (alongside the 
EFSA) and to develop the educational, financial and governance
plans to the required standard to enable the Secretary of State to
consider entering into a funding agreement
4.3
In May 2017 Kier Construction Ltd were awarded the contract to design
the building.
4.4
The County Council negotiated the purchase of the site from January
2015 and completed the acquisition land on 25th August 2017. The
landowner retained a strip of land (‘retained land’) measuring
approximately 35m wide between the application site and Common
Lane.
4.5
The application was submitted on 11 September 2017 and public
consultation began on 28 September 2017 for 6 weeks. Further
information on archaeology, transport, and surface water drainage was
submitted on 14 December 2017 and a further period consultation
lasted for 21 days.
4.6
This is a joint application by Hertfordshire County Council (HCC) and
the Education and Skills Funding Agency (EFSA) under the Town and
Country General Regulations 1992 (Regulation 3 development).
1 The Harpenden Secondary Education Trust was established to promote a fourth secondary school in the town.
HSET Trust is a partnership of the three existing secondary schools, the University of Hertfordshire and
Rothamsted Research
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
6

4.7
The application site is located in the Green Belt and is therefore a
departure from the development plan. Any resolution to grant planning
permission will be subject to the application being referred to the
Secretary of State for a decision on whether to call in the application for
his determination
5.
Site and Surrounding Area
5.1
The application site is located in Harpenden East on the north-east
edge of the settlement to the east of Batford, as shown on the attached
OS extract. The site is approximately 17.20 hectares in area.
5.2
The application site adjoins Common Lane and the Lower Luton Road.
The land is in.
5.3
The site comprises:
▪  four fields of grassland (last used for grazing cattle),  
▪  hedgerow along the northern boundary to Mackerye End Lane,  
▪  public right of way along the eastern site boundary and the dense 
vegetation filtering views into the site,
▪  the southern site boundary to the Lower Luton Road marked by post 
and wire fences with a small section accommodating a remnant
hedgerow
The site is bounded by–
▪  Mackerye End Lane and agricultural land to the north and the hamlet of 
Mackerye End to the north east;
▪  Harpenden Public footpath: 027A to the east; agricultural land and land 
in multiple ownership beyond,
▪  The Lower Luton Road (B653) to the south; with Old Batford Mil  south 
west, the Grade II listed Thatched Cottage on the corner of Lower
Luton; with fields, hedgerow and pasture adjoining the River Lea to the
south; and
▪  Common Lane and the ‘retained land’ to the west 
5.4
The tree survey records 29 trees within or adjoining the site, in
Categories B1, B2, C2 or U and four hedgerows all Category C2.
5.5
The current land use is agriculture. The land is classified Grade 3a, i.e.
best and most versatile agricultural land.
5.6
The land is described as currently vacant. In 2013 an agricultural
viability report was undertaken to support the comparative site
assessment. The 2013 report identified the land was managed under a
farm business tenancy and was used for rearing beef cattle. The tenant
owns Dane Spring Farm (12ha) and occupies other land parcels under
annual grazing licences. The land within the site forms the main base
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
7

for the enterprise where cattle being overwintered, either on the land or
within the farm buildings on the site.
5.7
In 2017 a further agricultural viability report was commissioned to
reflect the change in circumstances. The report concluded:
▪  The tenant’s grazing has reduced by half  with cattle stock numbers 
reduced by approximately 60%;

The retained land to the east of Common Lane is 8.5 acres which is not
large enough to sustain agricultural livestock use of the site;

The size of the enterprise has reduced significantly affecting
economies of scale and profitability of the enterprise. The livestock
enterprise is part of a larger business operation which is not solely
reliant upon the income from livestock;

The significant decrease in the size of the enterprise will have a short
to medium term impact on the overall business;

The proposed development would have a large adverse impact in
terms of agricultural viability.
Conservation designations
5.8
The Mackerye End Conservation Area is located immediately to the
north of the application site. There are a number of listed buildings
(high sensitivity) in close proximity to the site, including:
▪  The Thatched Cottage (Grade II listed) adjacent opposite the site on 
the south side of the Lower Luton Road
▪  Mackerye End House (Grade I listed) adjacent to northern east corner 
of the site
▪  The stable, coach house and cottage (Grade II) south-east of Mackerye 
End House, located approximately 50m north-east of the application
site
▪  Cory Cottage and Wright Cottage located north east of the application 
site are medium sensitivity.
Landscape designations
5.9
The site falls within National Character Area 110: Chilterns (national
designation) wherein the main aims are to enhance local
distinctiveness and create or enhance green infrastructure. The
landscape type is described as Wooded Chalk Valley Landscape
(regional designation). The central and southern parts of the site are
within the Upper Lea Valley (Landscape Character Area 33). The
northern part of the site is within the Blackmore End Plateau
(Landscape Character Area 34). Both landscape character areas have
medium landscape sensitivity value with high susceptibility to change.
Landscape context
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
8

5.10
The site is located on the northern valley slopes, strongly influenced by
the course of the River Lea; lesser valleys cut back towards Blackmore
End plateau north and west of the site. The town of Harpenden extends
south along the River Lea. The surrounding development includes
Batford Farm, Windmill Cottage and the settlement of Mackerye End.
To the east of the site, Valley Rise estate (Manor Road, Marshalls
Way, Valley Rise and Castle Rise) on the north side of the V653 to the
east of Batford.
Landscape sensitivity
5.11
The LVIA describes the sensitivity of the site in terms of: landform,
landuse, vegetation, historic assets, and public footpaths:
▪  landform: high overall sensitivity, landscape sensitivity, and
susceptibility to change
▪  landuse, vegetation, historic assets : medium overall sensitivity,
landscape sensitivity, and susceptibility to change;
▪  public footpath: medium overall sensitivity and landscape sensitivity;
high susceptibility to change
6.
Proposed development
6.1
The application seeks planning permission for the construction of
▪  School buildings comprising 8457sqm (GEA floor space) 
▪  Sports hal  comprising 2104sqm (GEA floor space) 
▪  Two vehicular and pedestrian access points onto Lower Luton Road 
▪  One vehicular access point onto Common Lane 
▪  Two pedestrian access points onto Common Lane 
▪  One car park (access from Lower Luton Road) comprising 79 spaces 
▪  One car park (access from Common Lane) comprising 18 spaces 
▪  Cycle storage comprising 120 spaces 
▪  One grassed large footbal  pitch (102x66m) 
▪  One grassed large rugby pitch (124mx78m) 
▪  Two large grassed footbal  pitches (106mx59m) 
▪  One smal  grassed footbal  pitch (73mx46m) 
▪  Four hard surface tennis/netbal  courts (74x38m) 
▪  Provision for summer sports as shown on the masterplan (synthetic 
cricket wicket, high
▪  jump, javelin) 
▪  Flood attenuation basin (3250m3) 
▪  Drainage ditch 
▪  Al otments (for school use) 
6.2
The package of highway improvements schemes to be delivered as
part of the development is described in Appendix 2. All of the off-site
highway improvement schemes shown in Appendix 2 are proposed to
be implemented prior to the first occupation of the school, with the
exception of the Station Road junction capacity improvements (Scheme
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
9

11) which is not required before the school is 50% occupied
(September 2021).
6.3
Works to the highway outside of the site will require separate approval
under the Highways Act (section 278) and would be subject to statutory
public consultation. The detailed engineering works would require final
approval of the Highway Authority.
6.4
The next section of the report describes the proposal in detail
Capacity
6.5
The application is for a new 6FE school to accommodate 1150 pupils
fully occupied, consisting of 900 pupils in Years 11-15 and 250 pupils in
the sixth form.
Phase 1 of the school will need to be completed by September 2018 to.
The timetable provides for the main school buildings to be occupied by
September 2019. The school would fill over 7 years (120 students per
year) reaching full capacity in September 2025
Amount of development
6.6
The proposed floor area (school buildings) is designed to meet the
minimum size requirements for a 6FE secondary school in Building
Bulletin 103, i.e. 2.1ha for a 6FE secondary school with separate
provision for detached playing fields.
Layout
6.7
In early development several models were considered including:
▪  super block – one single building  
▪  street and fingers  - blocks at 900 angle to a main building;
▪  campus - a series of individual or linked’ buildings. 
6.8
The campus model was chosen as the most sympathetic option to
minimise the size, scale and massing of development and reduce the
impact upon the Green Belt.
6.9
The main buildings form three elements:
▪  southern block – providing the main school entrance, office 
accommodation, ICT classrooms, Library Resource Centre, Sixth form
space, and specialised teaching classrooms;
▪  main hal  and kitchens - located to the rear of the block; 
▪  northern block – inverted U-shape block with enclosed courtyard 
accommodating the main teaching classrooms.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
10

6.10
The sports hall and multi-use games area (MUGA) are sited to the
north of the school buildings. The upper playing fields are located in the
north east corner of the site.
6.11
The drawings show potential for expansion to 8FE (if required),
however, the current proposal is for a 6FE school only.
Scale and massing
6.12
The maximum dimensions of the school buildings measure:
▪  height - 9.6m (finish floor to parapet) is; 
▪  width - 75m (from east to west); 
▪  length - 108m (from north to south); 
6.13
The maximum dimensions of the sports hall measure:
▪  height - 10.7m (finish floor to parapet).; 
▪  width - 19m (from east to west); 
▪  length - 58.5 m (from north to south). 
6.14
The scale and massing have been designed to minimise the impact
upon the Green Belt. The buildings are sited close to the edge of
settlement on the western side of the site. The buildings are a
maximum two storeys. The buildings are set back from the Lower Luton
Road, which serves to reduce visual impact and provide separation
from the listed building (Thatched Cottage) opposite the site.
Residential amenity
6.15
The distances between the school building and the nearest properties
are:
▪  116m  - front façade to nearest houses on Lower Luton Road;  
▪  58m   - western elevation to front gardens on Common Lane;  
▪  590m  - to houses at Mackerye End.  
6.16
The application documents include cross section drawings to show the
relationship of buildings with the adjoining land, including properties on
Common Lane and Lower Luton Road.
Appearance
6.17
The proposed materials for external elevations are:
▪  red brick for most elevations - to reflect local character; 
▪  dark grey screen panels - main entrance, sports hal , drama studio; 
▪  white render – some internal / external elevations - to lighten the 
spaces close to the building;
▪  aluminium clad timber frame windows – energy efficient and long life; 
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
11

▪  glass curtain wal ing - entrance and learning resource centre – provides 
a visual connection to the outside environment.
6.18
The sports hall is proposed to be constructed of cross laminated timber
panels for speed and ease of construction. The construction method
and materials meet the BREEAM very good rating.
Proposed site levels
6.19
The proposals would require existing site contours to be extensively re-
modelled. The proposed contours are:
▪  school buildings: 91.8m to finish floor level; 
▪  sports hal , MUGA, senior footbal  pitch: 93 - 94m; 
▪  main car park: 90 - 93m; 
▪  main sports pitches: 98m; 
▪  upper sports pitches: 121 - 122m 
Phasing
6.20
The proposed construction is phased (two phases):
▪  The first phase of construction (from March 2018) would involve the 
construction of the sports hall , car park (18 spaces) and all-weather
pitch, vehicle crossover, visibility splays and pedestrian access to
Common Lane, construction of the Toucan crossing on the Lower
Luton Road, formation of the flood attenuation measures, site levels,
and archaeological investigations.
▪  The second phase would involve construction of the main school 
building; car park; vehicle and pedestrian crossovers / bus stops on the
Lower Luton Road; site levelling, construction of the playing fields, off-
site highway works, archaeological investigations, and conversion of
the sports hall.
▪  The school is scheduled to open in September 2018. The sports hal  
would be used for classrooms in Year 1 (September 2018) and
subsequently converted to a sports hall.
Site access
6.21
The proposed site access comprises:
▪  main vehicular access from Lower Luton Road  
▪  secondary vehicular access from Common Lane for services and 
community use;
▪  pedestrian and cycle access from the Lower Luton Road; 
▪  pedestrian and cycle access from Common Lane. 
6.22
The main vehicular access is provided by an in and out arrangement
with the entrance approximately
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
12

Drop off facilities
6.23
The proposal internal layout provides a bus stop and pupil drop
facilities in three separate locations. Vehicle movement through the site
would be managed by an internal circulation road.
6.24
The drop-off facility provides 19 spaces for cars and additional capacity
to queue 16 cars within the site. The TA predicts up to 80 drop-off
movements between 08:00 and 09:00, and 63 movements between
3.15pm and 4.15pm. The TA estimates that up to 7 buses would arrive
during the AM peak hour. The maximum design capacity of the drop-off
facility is 64 cars and 7 buses during a 15 minute period.
6.25
The average time between entering and exiting the site is estimated to
be just over 2 minutes. The maximum delay for vehicles exiting the site
is estimated to be 74s.
Travel Plan
6.26
The Travel Plan is predicated on achieving a high proportion of pupils
travelling to school by walking, cycling and bus services. This reflects
the objectives of the draft Local Transport Plan, which has been out to
public consultation at the same time as this application. The objective
of the Travel Plan is to achieve 56% of pupils attending the school by
sustainable modes of travel. The strategy is to be delivered through
provision of good pedestrian access via the package of off-site
improvement schemes (set out in Appendix 2) plus additional bus
services (set out in Supplementary Transport Note 3: December 2017),
and provision of on-site cycling facilities including 117 secure cycle
spaces, lockers and showers. The scheme also proposes dedicated
parking for multi-occupancy vehicles.
Bus services
6.27
The Supplementary Public Transport Note (December 2017) provides
additional information on existing available capacity (based on a survey
of current capacity on existing bus services undertaken in October
2017), plus information on projected pupil demand for these services,
and suggests two options for potential improvements to bus services
(Option A and Option B) during the 7 years of occupation of the school.
Option A is the preferred option being promoted. This option would
involve the provision of up to 6 additional bus services to areas
including Markyate, Redbourn, Wheathampstead and the Kimptons.
These additional services would be initially funded for the first 7 years.
The cost is being met by the EFSA and Hertfordshire County Council.
The method for funding these services is set out in the Highway section
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
13

of the report. It is anticipated that the additional services would become
economically viable after 7 years
Landscaping
6.28
Woodland planting using native species is proposed in the north east
corner of the site. This will provide additional habitat and help to filter
views of the site from Mackerye End. It is proposed to plant semi-
mature trees in groups along the site boundaries to strengthen existing
boundary hedgerows. It is proposed to plant individual trees at the front
of the site and within the car park to break up areas of hardstanding
and soften the visual impact of the development.
6.29
It is proposed to plant an orchard to the north of the football pitch
adjoining the sports hall. Ornamental planting is proposed between the
car park and the southern boundary of the site, and to the east of the
main school buildings to screen the cycle shelters.
6.36
The sloping areas around the playing fields are proposed to be planted
as meadows providing habitat for insects and butterflies. Extensive
meadow areas are anticipated to enhance the visual appearance of the
site and enhance habitat value and biodiversity.
6.37
The open ditch and attenuation basin on the western side of the site
would be planted with wetland marginal and tree and shrub species. To
the north of the sports hall the ditch would be widened to form a
shallow pond, enhancing biodiversity and providing a learning
resource.
6.38
Hard landscaping would include: concrete block paving, standard
concrete flag paving, feature paving slabs, bitumen bonded gravel, self-
bound gravel, porous retained gravel, and tarmacadam
Drainage
6.39
The Flood Risk Assessment identified an overland flow route running
through the site close to the western boundary. Surface water is
generated from a wider catchment to the north of the site. The LLFA
have conducted an independent catchment assessment which
indicates that for a 1 in 30 year rainfall event storage volume of
3200m3 needs to be provided. The drainage strategy proposes an
infiltration basin (capacity 3250m) in the south west corner of the site to
attenuate the volume of surface water generated in the 1 in 30 year
rainfall event.
6.40
Should the storage basin fill at a faster rate than water can infiltrate
through the base, flood will flow naturally across the Lower Luton Road
close to the junction with Crabtree Lane. In the current situation this
section of the Lower Luton Roads floods during a high rainfall event.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
14

The proposed drainage strategy, by formalising the water course and
attenuating the flow within the site, seeks to reduce the frequency of
the existing flooding problem.
6.41
The surface water volumes from the development site for the 1 in 100
year rainfall event plus climate change will be managed within the site
prior to discharging into the infiltration basin. On site drainage features
provide total attenuation volumes of 1932m3, comprising; permeable
paving (440m3); swale (30m3); and an attenuation tank (1462m3)
located beneath the main car park. Further details are required by
condition in respect of the means to drain the sports pitches.
Sports facilities
6.43
The proposed sports facilities comprise:
▪  multi-use games courts (74 x 36m) adjacent to the sports hal  ; 
▪  large sports pitch east of the main school building for summer sports 
(400m running track and field sports) and rugby pitch (124m x 78m);
two large football pitches (106m x 59m)
▪  one smal  footbal  pitch (73m x 46m) with cricket and rounders pitches 
in the north east corner of the site.
6.44
The sports hall is located close to the school buildings and Common
Lane to serve the school and provide community use. Paths (gradient
1:20) would provide access to the large (lower) sports pitch. Pedestrian
access to the northern sports pitches is proposed via a grass reinforced
track (gradient 1:15) which is wide enough to allow emergency vehicles
to access the upper playing fields.
6.45
The Trust has indicated the sports facilities would be available for
community use outside school hours and would be willing to enter into
a community use agreement.
Design objectives
6.46
The Architects developed the scheme based on a series of education,
planning, highways, landscape, and site layout objectives, which are
summarised below.
Education
▪  visible learning – transparent spaces visible from front of school 
▪  creating a community focus at the heart of the school; 
▪  maximise sports provision; 
▪  minimise impact on Phase 1 students as work progresses on Phase 2; 
▪  6FE capacity with potential to expand to 8FE; 
▪  provide departmental adjacencies  
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
15

Town Planning objectives
▪  site buildings close to Common Lane to maximise green space 
between Harpenden and Lea Valley Estate;
▪  minimise harm and visual impact to the Green Belt; 
▪  minimal building footprint; 
▪  reduce massing using individual buildings (campus layout0; 
▪  limit building height to two storeys; 
▪  setting back buildings from Lower Luton Road and Common Lane to:  
reduce visual impact on adjoining residential properties; minimise noise
from road traffic; minimise impact on heritage assets (Thatched
Cottage, Mackerye End Conservation Area;
▪  mitigate surface water flooding transiting the site and mitigate surface 
water generated by the development
Landscape and site layout objectives
▪  maintain a green and open character perception of the landscape from 
the Lower Luton Road;
▪  conserve and enhance existing character where possible; 
▪  extend the natural landform to optimise sports facilities; 
▪  balance cut and fil  to: enable fast construction, avoid the need for 
additional traffic movements, and minimise impact on landscape;
▪  create a setting and presence which welcomes the community; 
▪  provide accessible sports facilities for the community  
▪  position sports facilities in least visible locations; 
▪  create courtyard: central space providing shelter and views of the wider 
landscape;
▪  secure environment for students 
▪  maintain openness  
▪  minimise unsightly fencing; 
▪  retaining boundary vegetation; 
▪  create recreational spaces with good natural surveil ance; 
▪  enhance the habitat value of the site through planting and 
management; and
▪  planting trees to provide shade for recreation areas. 
Highway objectives
▪  safe and acceptable vehicular, pedestrian and cycle access 
▪  minimise the impact of vehicles using adjoining residential roads; 
▪  one-way internal circulation  
▪  separate drop-off facility  
▪  separate pedestrian circulation for enhanced safety; 
▪  maximum parking in accordance with local standards; 
▪  minimise the occasions pedestrians have to cross vehicular traffic; 
▪  prioritise sustainable transport (walking, cycling, buses) above link 
capacity highway improvements (Local Transport Plan objective;
▪  provide level access to al  areas; 
▪  minimise conflict between pedestrians and vehicles in drop off area; 
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
16

▪  disabled and visitor parking close to the entrance; 
▪  sheltered cycle parking close to entrance; 
▪  separate access for deliveries  
Access strategy
6.47
The proposed access direct from the Lower Luton Road was regarded
as the best option for the following reasons:
▪  avoids diverting traffic on to residential streets  
▪  minimises residential impacts on Common Lane and Batford; 
▪  avoids additional vehicle movements at Common Lane junction; 
▪  provides a direct access for buses; 
▪  minimises the number of trees and hedgerow to be removed 
7. The Development Plan
7.1
Planning applications must be determined in accordance with the
development plan unless material considerations indicate otherwise. 2
In dealing with such an application the authority shall have regard to
the provisions of the development plan, so far as material to the
application, and to any other material considerations3. The
development plan is the development plan documents (taken as a
whole) which have been adopted or approved in relation to that area4.
7.2
The development plan incorporates the Local Development Framework
for the area as well as 'saved policies'.
7.3
The development plan documents for the area comprise:
▪  St Albans District Local Plan Review 1994 
▪  Hertfordshire Minerals Local Plan 2007 
▪  Hertfordshire Waste Development Framework Waste Core Strategy & 
Development Management Policies Development Plan Document 2011
– 2026: Adopted November 2012
7.4
The relevant policy wording is included in Appendix 4 to the report.
Relevant policies
7.5
The St Albans District Local Plan Review 1994 (Saved Policies)
1 – Metropolitan Green Belt; 2 – Settlement Strategy; 4 - New Housing
Development in Towns; 34 – Highway Considerations in Development
Control; 35 – Highway Improvements in Association with Development;
39 – Parking Standards General Requirements; 65 – Education
2 Section 38 (6) Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004
3 Section 70 (2) Town and Country Planning Act 2004
4 Section 38 (3) (b) Planning and Compulsory Act 2004
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
17

Facilities; 69 – General Design and Layout; 74 – Landscaping and Tree
Preservation; 84 – Flooding and River Catchment Management; 86 –
Buildings of Special Architectural Interest; 96 – Medium Intensity
Leisure Uses in the Green Belt; 97 – Existing Footpaths, Bridleways
and Cycleways; 102 – Loss of Agricultural Land; 104 – Landscape
Conservation; 106 – Nature Conservation; 110 – Archaeological Sites
for Local Preservation; 111 – Archaeological Sites Where Planning
Permission May be Subject to a Condition
Emerging policies
7.6
The NPPF (Paragraph 216) states: ‘From the day of publication,
decision-takers may also give weight to relevant policies in emerging
plans according to:
▪  the stage of preparation of the emerging plan (the more advanced the 
preparation, the greater the weight that may be given);
▪  the extent to which there are unresolved objections to relevant policies 
(the less significant the unresolved objections, the greater the weight
that may be given); and
▪  the degree of consistency of the relevant policies in the emerging plan 
to the policies in this Framework (the closer the policies in the
emerging plan to the policies in the Framework, the greater the weight
that may be given’
St Albans City and District Strategic Local Plan 2016
7.7
The Plan recognises the forecast requirement for up to 13 FE
secondary schools places across the District through to 2025/26 and
supports the expansion of existing schools serving existing
communities because they can be provided relatively quickly and cost
effectively, and reduce the need for new schools in Green Belt
locations. However, the planning and highway constraints at the
existing school sites and the requirement for the schools to agree to
any expansion proposals make it uncertain whether the required places
can be provided on the existing school sites. The Plan acknowledges
that new schools will also be needed, and that such sites are likely to
be located in the Green Belt, and that such locations are likely to be
supported by this Council if all other expansion possibilities have been
exhausted.
7.8
The Plan acknowledges the Local Education Authority’s promotion of a
site for a new secondary school to meet future needs in the Harpenden
EPA and proposes new school development and expansion of existing
facilities will be included in the DLP.
7.9
Policy SLP6 (Educational Facilities) supports the provision of new or
expanded educational facilities to meet the needs of residents of the
District in appropriate and sustainable locations, including in the Green
Belt, if all other expansion possibilities have been exhausted. To meet
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
18

the requirement for additional secondary schools places in the District
to 2026 -
▪  expansion of existing secondary schools wil  be supported (subject to 
meeting planning, infrastructure and sustainability policies)
▪  a suitable more detailed policy approach is proposed as part of the 
DLP to provide an element of flexibility to assist the expansion of
existing secondary schools located in the Green Belt;
▪  locations to provide detached playing fields wil  be identified in the DLP 
(if required to enable expansion of existing schools); and
▪  locations, including in the Green Belt, wil  be identified in the DLP to 
provide new secondary schools for the following settlements and Broad
Locations (including Harpenden).
Harpenden Neighbourhood Plan (Draft) October 2017
7.10
The October 2017 consultation neighbourhood plan5 is the final draft
produced after two rounds of community engagement. The final draft
will be subject to an examination, a referendum and final adoption
potentially in June 2018. The draft Plan is a material consideration and
some limited weight may be attributed to the policies. Following
examination the policies will carry greater weight and following the
referendum and adoption the policies will carry full weight6.
7.11
The draft local plan includes a list of key planning issues which are
identified as being important to local people, including:
▪  A proposed new secondary school in East Harpenden;
▪  The potential al ocation of land at “North West Harpenden” by St 
Albans City and District Council for circa 500 homes; and
▪  The proposed new St Albans Local Plan, which is expected to include a 
housing target of 15,500 new dwellings between 2016 and 2036, up
from the proposed target of 8,720 new dwellings between 2011 and
2031 in the SLP. This could result in a need to look at other potential
housing sites, including “North East Harpenden”, a promoted site
around Batford.
Local Transport Plan 2011 – 2031: Hertfordshire County Council
Volume 1 Strategy Document November 2017
7.12
The County Council is consulting on the draft Hertfordshire LTP for 12
weeks from 31 October 2017 until 23 January 2018. The LTP will
establish the county councils approach to transport policy up to 2031. It
includes a range of measures to promote sustainable travel choices
that will achieve a behavioural change to enable people to choose
alternative travel modes for journeys which don’t need to be made by
car. The strategy is based on nine objectives framed around the
5 Localism Act 2011: Regulation 14: Pre-submission draft Neighbourhood Plan
6 A neighborhood plan attains the same legal status as the Local Plan once it has been approved at a referendum. At
this point it comes into force as part of the statutory development plan (NPG: Paragraph: 006 Reference ID: 41-006-
20170728)
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
19

themes of Prosperity, Place and People. The core feature of the LTP is
to do more to improve conditions for sustainable modes such as
walking, cycling and passenger transport. Tackling air quality is one of
the key environmental policies.
7.13
The relevant draft LTP policies for the consideration of the application
include:
1 - Transport user hierarchy; 2- Influencing land use planning; 3 -
Travel plans and behaviour change; 4 - Demand management; 5 -
Development management; 6 – Accessibility; 7: Active Travel –
Walking; 8: Active Travel – Cycling; 9: Buses; 12: Network
management; 15: Speed Management; 17: Road Safety; 19: Emissions
reduction; 20: Air Quality; 21: Environment
7.14
The county council has an active role in promoting the changes that are
needed in order to deliver the LTP objectives:
National Planning Policy Framework 2012
− 
4.  Promoting sustainable transport 
− 
7.  Requiring good design 
− 
8.  Promoting healthy communities 
− 
10.  Meeting the chal enge of climate change, flood and coastal 
change
− 
11.  
Conserving and enhancing the natural environment 
− 
12.  
Conserving and enhancing the historic environment 
8.
Statutory consultee responses
St Albans City and District Council:
8.1
The above proposal was considered at the Council’s Planning Referral
Committee of 27th November 2017 where the Council resolved to
recommend that prior to making a decision Hertfordshire County
Council as the decision maker should satisfy themselves that the case
for very special circumstances overcomes the in principle and any
actual harm, namely:-
▪  The site has been identified as containing matters of potential y 
nationally significant archaeological interests. Whilst the majority of the
site has areas of archaeological interest that can be dealt with by
condition there is a section of the site which contains burials which may
be of national significance and a suitable methodology for protecting
these remains needs to be established, either through protecting the
remains by burying them, or excavating the site prior to granting
permission.
▪  The applicant has not used appropriate methodology to demonstrate 
that the impact upon the ecology of the site is acceptable, and further
information should be sought in this respect.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
20

▪  Consideration as to whether al  of the sports facilities are essential to 
the provision of the school and whether a portion of the site could be
retained for agricultural purposes thereby minimising the amount of
land that is lost from agricultural purposes.
▪  To assess whether the proposed technical details of the access are 
acceptable and will result in a safe and functional highway network. It is
requested that the provision of the access, visibility splays and road
improvements are secured by condition
8.2
The following matters should be secured via a legal agreement:
a) School Travel Plan for pupils and staff
b
improvements to bus network, including frequency of services and
service routes
c)
wider sustainable access improvements, including concern is
raised that the currently inaccessible ford at the end of Crabtree
lane is shown as a 20mph zone. Offsite works should be secured
by a legal agreement, with a timetable for implementation. It would
be expected that these works are in place as soon as possible,
ideally before the second year of year 7 entry in 2019.
d) establishing whether any community use of the school facilities can
be secured by way of a legal agreement
e) future maintenance of the surface water drainage strategy.
8.3
St Albans City and District wrote a letter dated 02 January 2018
following discussion of the application by their Cabinet on the 21st
December 2017 confirming the Council welcomes the application in
principle, but requests Hertfordshire County Council as the decision
ensures that the following matters are addressed prior to a decision
being made (together with the issues raised in our previous letter dated
28th November 2017).
−  There is concern about the safety of the Lower Luton Road and that 
this road has been designated a safe route for children to access
school on foot or by cycle.
−  The amount of parking proposed is not considered to be adequate for 
staff and it is not clear how staff would safely access the school and
that displaced parking would cause congestion.
−  Continued concerns about the Travel Plan and the proposed parking 
and drop off arrangements at the site causing congestion and delays
during drop off.
−  Request that sixth formers enter a home / school contract to prevent 
parking on the school site or in local roads, causing congestion.
8.4
Harpenden Town Council held a committee meeting on 27November
2017 when the application was considered. At the meeting the Council
resolved to:
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
21

▪  Support the application, however, concern is expressed that this 
development will have a negative impact on the surrounding road
network.
▪  Harpenden Town Council would request that additional mitigating 
measures are put in place for transport infrastructure. In particular, the
site requires a proper turning circle for vehicles entering it and
additional parking spaces provided on site to cater for staff and visitors
to limit the number of vehicles parking on adjoining roads.
▪  In addition, the Council would request that a condition is put in place for 
future use of floodlights. This should set out the permitted hours of
operation.
8.5
Wheathampstead Parish Council raises the following concerns:
▪  The Parish Council has always had serious reservations about the 
methodology of site selection and the ultimate choice of this site;
Green Belt
▪  The Parish Council is very concerned about coalescence between 
Harpenden (Batford) and Wheathampstead, leaving just one field (held
in multiple ownership) separating Wheathampstead from Harpenden;
▪  The topography of the site is poorly suited to the development of a 
large school. The proposal will cause significant harm to the Green Belt
(adjoining Wheathampstead Parish) and the road network;
▪  The choice of materials (red brick and white render) shows a lack of 
appreciation for the history of the site and its Green Belt status;
▪  We support the decision to locate buildings in the lowest part of the 
site, closest to the urban edge of Batford;
▪  We support attempts to keep the height of the building to two stories to 
minimise the adverse impact on the Green Belt;
Education Need
▪  We appreciate the need to address the lack of school places for vil age 
children (both now and in the future) and note this is the only current
proposal for a secondary school for students from Harpenden and
Wheathampstead;
▪  We note the vast majority of children from Wheathampstead wil  be 
allocated Katherine Warington School and that in some ways it
represents a loss of ‘choice’ for village children. Equally, it also
presents an opportunity for village children to remain together and for
the school to be a community asset which benefits all residents of the
village both in terms of school and leisure/sporting facilities
Landscape and Design
▪  There are concerns regarding the significant degree of land re-forming 
and the volume of soil proposed to be pushed into the north-eastern
part of the site, which is an area of “high landscape sensitivity”;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
22

▪  The proposed cut and fil  operation necessary to create the proposed 
level areas will increase the final levels in the north east of the site by
up to six metres and significant ‘reforming’ will be necessary to create
the proposed access onto the Lower Luton Road. The effects will
completely change the nature of the site, destroying the gentle natural
rural transition from rural landscape to the edge of the urban
settlement;
▪  The 2-3m high gabion wal  proposed adjacent to the athletics track wil  
be highly visible and urbanising;
▪  The design of the proposed building and choice of landscaping 
materials is from an urban landscape - inconsistent with the rural
setting of this school;
▪  The sports hal  is too high relative to the school buildings; at odds with 
the overall desire to keep the school buildings as low and unobtrusive
as possible;
▪  The proposed landscaping materials fail to take account for the sites’ 
connection with the countryside; rural materials such as dark timber
cladding rural would help to create a better connection with the rural
heritage of the site;
▪  more green space could be provided at the heart of the site; 
▪  the herb garden, outdoor classroom and outdoor gym are supported; 
▪  Tree and hedge planting should be strengthened on the boundaries, 
and many more trees planted within the site.
Transport
▪  There is concern about the impact of school buses, parental drop offs 
and large numbers of students trying to cross the LLR and Common
Lane within a small time window, and that this will cause traffic chaos
and significant risk of accidents unless well managed;
▪  HCC considers the section of the LLR between Wheathampstead and 
Harpenden to be a safe route to school, however, the path is extremely
narrow 60-75cm in places and there are high levels of traffic (HGV’s,
buses, intercity coaches, cars and cyclists) using the road at peak
times.
▪  The Parish Council does not consider the route to be safe; therefore, 
access to school buses for Wheathampstead children should be
subsidised by Herts County Council to make it affordable;
▪  The Parish Council recognises the proposed one-way configuration in 
and out of the site is probably the only viable option for traffic
management around the site, however, there is concern that this
configuration will affect the flow of traffic along the Lower Luton Road,
increasing the already bad congestion and the risk of car/car and
pedestrian/car accidents;
▪  There is concern that increased traffic wil  compromise emergency 
vehicle access. Ambulances regularly attend the vicinity as it abuts the
Lea Springs Residential Care Home
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
23

Sustainable Travel
▪  225 students (19.6% of al  students) are expected to travel to the 
school from Wheathampstead;
▪  increased car usage would increase traffic volumes and associated risk 
of accidents on the LLR;
▪  The TA assumes that 50% of al  students wil  travel to school by bus, 
and therefore it is critical that accessible bus services are provided
between Wheathampstead and the school site, and that pupils are
encouraged to use school buses at peak times;
▪  There is concern that parents from Southdown may attempt to access 
the school site by car from the other side of Harpenden, increasing the
volume of traffic on Leasey Bridge Lane/Cherry Tree Lane, which is a
narrow single-track road with passing places already close to gridlock
at peak times. Previous HCC studies have highlighted the road is
unsuitable for increased levels of traffic. The planning application does
not mentions this and provides no solutions;
▪  The proposed improvements to existing walking/cycle paths between 
the proposed school to the Lea Valley Estate are welcome, and the
Parish Council would like to see a pedestrian crossing near the junction
of Marshalls Heath Lane and the Lower Luton Road to facilitate access
across the road for cyclists from Gustard Wood/Blackmore
End/Mackerye End who might then use the Nicky Line walking/cycle
path to reach the school ‘off road’.
Access
▪  The height of the site relative to the road has not been ful y taken into 
account when assessing the traffic risks. The TA highlights the problem
of the poor visibility splay caused by level changes when leaving the
site;
▪  There is concern about the street lighting in this location and consider 
better quality lighting is needed for this stretch of the LLR, including at
entrance and exit points to the site;
▪  The visibility splays onto the LLR wil  require significant cutting back of 
the existing banking, which will affect the footpath that currently runs
alongside the LLR;
▪  It is unclear how the school entrance, right turn lane and footpath wil  
work given the 1-2m level change between the level of the road surface
and the edge of the site;
▪  There have been 18 col isions along the LLR between Castle Rise, 
Pickford Hill, and Common Lane junctions in the past five years. Most
collisions occur during the months when schools are at their busiest.
The TA considers “there are no existing road safety issues pertinent to
the development of the site” however, the accident data clearly
highlights the significant safety concerns
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
24

Toucan crossing
▪ 
The road surface for the section in front of the school should be 
surfaced in a different type/colour material to ensure that
cars/coaches/HGV’s reduce speed to turn into the site;
▪ 
There appears to be no evidence of traffic speed surveys having been 
undertaken on the Lower Luton Road – for a section of the LLR where
there is significant local concern with regard to the volume of traffic,
traffic speed and risk of accidents occurring.
Common Lane
▪  There have been numerous accidents at the Common Lane/LLR 
junction in the past five years;
▪  The proposed accesses - Common Lane and Lower Luton Road wil  
result in accidents unless the traffic management system is thoroughly
and systematically worked out in advance of the school opening;
▪  Common Lane is incorrectly described as “a two–way carriageway 
approximately 2.5km in length linking Lower Luton Road to Kimpton
Bottom (B652), in reality, it is only a two-way road for a few hundred
metres, the remainder is a single carriageway rural road with passing
places;
Flood Management
▪ 
There is concern about the impact of hard surfaces on flooding, 
particularly in the south-west corner of the site, where buildings and
hard surfaces account for 13% of the 17.20 ha site;
▪ 
the FRA confirms there is a watercourse running alongside Common 
Lane draining 129 hectares of surrounding rural and residential land.
▪ 
The FRA confirms risk of flooding of local infrastructure (roads) if the 
local sewers/drains are overloaded or blocked by flood water;
▪ 
There is concern the LLR will flood if the drainage proposals do not 
work as planned or fail as a result of poor maintenance and/ or extreme
weather;
▪ 
There is no provision for long-term management of the drainage 
features - basin, swales, permeable surfaces, onsite drainage - which
are key to the effective drainage of the site;
▪ 
There is insufficient information about how the sports pitches wil  be 
drained and the impact on the overall site
Lighting
▪   There is no indication of floodlighting of the sports facilities which is at 
odds with Policy 80 of the St Albans District Council; floodlighting
should not be permitted where the visual impact (of lighting columns,
intensity or glare) would detract from the visual amenity of residential
properties, rural areas or listed building and conservation areas;
▪   If floodlighting of the sports facilities is required it would be detriment to 
the residential area, the character of the rural area, and harm ecology;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
25

Archaeology
▪   The Parish Council is aware there is a burial site of potential national 
significance dating from the late 7th Century which is vulnerable to
development and the activities of illegal metal detectorists. In the event
of development being approved the parish council believe that
excavation of the site is essential for the long term public benefit and
acquisition of knowledge. This significantly outweighs any option to
deep bury the cemetery in situ.
8.6
The Highway Authority does not wish to restrict the grant of planning
permission subject to the following conditions:
Pre-commencement
1.
Submission of a detailed scheme for the off-site highway improvement
works
Pre-occupation
2.
Implementation of off-site highway improvement works in accordance
with a detailed scheme to be approved (Condition 1 above)
3.
Provision of vehicular and pedestrian access
4.
Provision of New access to common lane
5.
Implementation of those parts of the Travel Plan (ref LTP/2675/Final
Issue 3, 06/12/2017) identified as being capable of implementation
prior to occupation in accordance with the proposed timetable therein
and shall be maintained for the lifetime of the school
6.
Submission of a detailed scheme of off-site highway works for the
Lower Luton Road, including an extension of the 30mph zone between
Wheathampstead and Batford – identified as Option 1 on drawing
2675-AWP-SL01-02;
Prior to second year intake
7.
Implementation of the works approved under Condition 6 above
8.
Provision of new vehicular and pedestrian accesses on to the Lower
Luton Road
9.
Provision of crossing/capacity improvements for the Lower Luton
Road/Station Road junction;
10. Implementation of all waiting restrictions shown on in principle drawing
2675-AWP-S30-01 (Proposed Waiting Restrictions);
Prior to the fifth year intake
11. Prior the fifth year of pupil intake, an assessment shall be prepared and
submitted of the adequacy of existing area wide parking restrictions (in
addition to the proposed waiting restrictions identified in Condition 10
above) and once approved shall be implemented . For the avoidance of
doubt the restriction may take the form of either additional standard
style waiting restrictions and/or CPZ.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
26

Travel Plan – sustainable travel
12. The implementation of the Travel Plan shall achieve a minimum of 56%
of pupils travelling to school by bus measured across the full school
year (from September to July) for each of the first seven years following
the first occupation of the main school buildings. Reason: to ensure the
modal split towards public transport is delivered in practice in the
interests of sustainable travel, and to avoid congestion at the entrance
to the school generated by unnecessary car journeys
8.7
The Highway Authority comments-
▪  The applicant has carried out an assessment of the access options and 
settled on a main highway access from Lower Luton Road, with a
secondary access via Common Lane initially to serve the temporary
first year arrangements, thereafter primarily to serve community sports
facility, delivery and servicing.
▪  Lower Luton Road is a busy route used by a combination of local and 
through traffic. The route is generally free flowing outside usual peak
periods but the mini roundabout junction at Station Road is the point
where a majority of congestion occurs. As part of the proposal the
applicant will deliver a scheme to increase capacity at the junction and
help accommodate additional demand.
▪  In the immediate vicinity of the school new and improved pedestrian 
facilities will be provided including a new toucan crossing between
Common Lane and the proposed entrance to the school. A further
package of off-site pedestrian and cycle improvements is proposed as
part of the development.
▪  A fundamental part of measures to support the school is the additional 
bus service provision which is specifically designed to around the scale
and location of predicted catchment.
▪  The proposals include the provision of a total of 97 car parking spaces, 
including 79 spaces served via the primary access from Lower Luton
Road, and 18 spaces served via the secondary access from Common
Lane. A series of off-site parking restrictions will be introduced to
ensure vehicles dropping off/picking up do not obstruct routes or
junctions. An additional contribution towards further parking restrictions
and/or a residential CPZ will be made available. A total of 117 cycle
parking spaces will be provided at the site. These spaces will be
located in a covered and secure area with good natural surveillance to
the south-east of the main school building.
▪  Sixth form parking will not be permitted on-site and al  on-site parking is 
expected to be reserved for staff and visitors
▪  The overarching theme of the proposal is a greater emphasis towards 
sustainable access to the school. The combination of an extensive
package of off-site pedestrian/cycling measures with specific additional
bus services are designed to support an ambitious modal split target
which will be monitored by a robust Travel Plan.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
27

8.8
The Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA) have no objection in principle
on flood risk grounds, following submission of the updated Flood Risk
Assessment (January 2018), and advise that the proposed
development site can be adequately drained and can mitigate any
potential existing surface water flood risk, if carried out in accordance
with the submitted drainage strategy. The LLFA also advise:
▪  At the pre-application stage the drainage consultants acknowledged 
that there is an overland flow route which crosses the site it was agreed
that the proposed development should remove the risk of flooding of
the Lower Luton Road in the 1 in 30 year rainfall event (as a minimum).
▪  An infiltration basin has been proposed on the site at the junction of 
Common Lane and the Lower Luton Road to accommodate this and
this has been designed to provide a total storage volume of 3250m3.
This basin will naturally overtop for flows in excess of the 1 in 30 year
rainfall event onto the Lower Luton Road.
▪  The LLFA have conducted an independent catchment assessment 
which indicates that for a 1 in 30 year rainfall event a storage volume of
3200m3 needs to be provided; therefore the current design appears to
be sufficient. Basin cross section drawings, half drain-down times and
inflow/outflow hydrographs have been provided to support the basin
design.
▪  Infiltration tests have been carried out to ensure the feasibility of the 
proposed scheme. The topography of the site is to be re-profiled and
this may affect the infiltration potential of the soils and it has been
agreed that detailed infiltration tests would be set as a condition and
carried out following re-profiling of the site.
▪  At the detailed design stage we would also expect information relating 
to the ground water and river levels to be confirmed and whether there
are any impacts to the ability to infiltrate through the bottom of the
basin as this could fundamentally impact upon the approach being
taken to discharge water from the site.
▪  The surface water volumes from the development site for the 1 in 100 
year rainfall event plus climate change will be managed within the site
prior to discharging into the infiltration basin. The infiltration basin is
solely a means of disposal for surface water and does not provide any
attenuation for the development site.
▪  Site drainage features provide total attenuation volumes of 1932m3 
which include permeable paving (440m3), swale (30m3) and an
attenuation tank (1462m3). The sports pitches (1, 2 and 3) and the
Multi Use Games Area (MUGA) will manage surface water within their
sub-base and discharge at a maximum rate of 2l/s into the site surface
water drainage network. Quick storage estimates for these areas have
been provided and the storage required will be provided for within the
sub-base for these features.
▪  The Archaeological Impact Assessment identifies a 7th Century 
cemetery near the western site boundary and sets out proposals for the
protection in the form of extra cover to the archaeological remains. It
has been confirmed that the levels of the proposed development and
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
28

the ditch conveying the overland surface water runoff are incorporated
into the current protection contours;
▪  We therefore recommend the fol owing conditions to the LPA should 
planning permission be granted:
Pre-commencement conditions
Condition 1: Submission of updated infiltration and ground condition tests:
to include
▪  location specific infiltration tests for main infiltrating features including 
basin
▪  confirmation of ground water and river levels and the impacts on the 
ability of the basin to infiltrate;
▪  updated half drain down times for the infiltration basin;  
▪  minimum infiltration figure of approximately 1.0 x 10-5 m/s. If this 
cannot be achieved a revised drainage strategy will need to be
submitted to and approved by the Local Planning Authority.
Condition 2: Submission of a final detailed site drainage strategy based on
updated infiltration tests, to include:
▪  provision of a minimum attenuation volume of 1932m3 (excluding 
MUGA and pitches);
▪  limiting surface water run-off to a maximum of 7.1l/s discharging into 
the infiltration basin for the 1 in 100 year event.
▪  undertake the drainage strategy to include to the use permeable 
paving, swales, and an attenuation tank and infiltration basin;
▪  confirmation of which SuDS features wil  infiltrate and at what rate; 
▪  opportunities for above ground drainage features to reduce 
requirement for underground storage.
▪  al  calculations, model ing and drain down times for al  storage features.  
▪  ful  detailed engineering drawings (including cross and long sections) 
and all components of the scheme, pipe runs etc.
▪  silt traps for protection for any residual tanked elements.  
▪  details of final exceedance routes, including those for an event which 
exceeds to 1:100 + cc rainfall event.
Condition 3: Submission of final design confirming final overland flow
management arrangements, to include:
▪  detailed assessment of catchment area, characteristics and model ing 
flows for the 1:30, 1:100, and 1:100 + 40% for climate change events.
▪  updated catchment model ing and include assessment of residual flows 
coming down Common Lane impact safe access / egress from the
school site.
▪  Details of any exceedance routes including exceedance flooding in the 
vicinity of the site which may arise from the channelling of the flow
route to the basin.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
29

Condition 4: Submission of a final design and engineering details regarding
the surface water ditch, to include:
▪  al  model ing of the channel and the supporting calculations;  
▪  definition of any residual impact on Lower Luton Road for events over 1 
in 30 return period;
▪  details of the impact of the flows from the ditch on the infiltration basin  
▪  details of storage volumes within the ditch, including any flood event 
hydrographs to show the speed of flow.
▪  longitudinal bed profile and cross sections, and detailed drawings of 
culverts/structures
Condition 5: Submission of a construction management plan to address all
surface water runoff and flooding issues during the construction stage; to
include:
▪  Timeframes for construction activity and explanation of any phasing 
approach to the construction.
▪  Final plan for the management of surface run-off during any 
construction activity on the site to prevent flooding to the site or any
disruption to the Lower Luton Road.
Pre-occupation conditions
Condition 6: Development shall be carried out in accordance with
implementation principles detailed in the surface water drainage strategy
(January 2018); to include:
▪  the appropriate drainage strategy based on infiltration using 
appropriate above ground SuDS measures as indicated in drainage
strategy drawings;
▪  appropriate measures to manage the overland flow route up to the 1 in 
30 year event incorporating a surface water diversion ditch and
infiltration basin to attenuate and manage the flows.
▪  Limiting surface water run-off to the infiltration basin to a maximum of 
7.1l/s for the 1 in 100 year + climate change critical storm event
▪  discharge from al  sports pitches/MUGA restricted to 2l/s  
▪  discharge from the remainder of the school site restricted to 5.1l/s into 
infiltration basin.;
▪  providing storage to ensure that there is no increase in surface water 
run-off volumes for all rainfall events up to and including the 1 in 100
year + 40% climate change event. The following minimum volumes
shall be provided:
−  Infiltration basin 3250m3  
−  Permeable paving 440m3  
−  Swale 30m3  
−  Attenuation Tank 1462m3  
−  Sport Pitch 1 870m3  
−  Sport Pitch 2 1886m3  
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
30

−  Sport Pitch 3 2198m3  
−  MUGA 372m3  
Total 10,508 m3
Condition 7: Submission of a detailed drainage strategy for the sports
pitches and any landscaped areas on the site, to include:
▪  maximum discharge of 2 l/s from al  pitches to the school surface water 
drainage network;
▪  final design for the drainage of the sports pitches including the 
locations of any storage features and any control structures to manage
the run-off and final engineering drawings;
▪  final runoff rates and storage volumes.  
▪  details of the final discharge location and means of conveyance for 
residual flows to the basin.
Condition 8: Submission of a detailed set of drawings showing site
drainage and overland flow route, to include:
▪  Final confirmation of management and maintenance requirements  
▪  Provision of complete set of as built drawings for both site drainage and 
overland flow route management.
▪  Details of any inspection and sign-off requirements for completed 
elements of the drainage system.
On completion
Condition 9: Submission of the drainage works a management and
maintenance plan for the SuDS features and drainage network to the LPA,
to include details of:
▪  maintenance and operational activities;  
▪  arrangements for adoption and any other measures to secure the 
operation of the scheme throughout its lifetime.
The County Archaeologist commented (30 November 2017) –
▪  This office recommended that an archaeological evaluation should be 
carried out (May 2015) and the results submitted with any planning
application (to comply with the NPPF paragraph 128);
▪  The archaeological information submitted with this planning application, 
includes an archaeological desk-based assessment, a geophysical
survey, an archaeological trial trench report and an addendum
describing the exhumation of a human burial;
▪  As part of the archaeological investigation eighty trial trenches were 
dug (during Summer 2017) and heritage assets found in 34 of them,
including multi-period heritage assets with archaeological interest,
dating from Mesolithic and Neolithic periods, Bronze Age, Iron Age and
early medieval (Anglo-Saxon) periods;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
31

▪  Several of the discoveries are of high significance, mainly located in the 
southern part of the site, including an enclosure which dates to the
Middle Iron Age period (for which evidence is rare in Hertfordshire),
pottery dating from the early Neolithic period (also rare), and hundreds
of pieces of flint from the Mesolithic to the Bronze Age;
▪  The most interesting are the fourteen human burials found in the 
northern part of the site which are thought to date to the seventh
century (archaeological evidence from the end of the Roman Empire
until after the Norman conquest is extremely rare in Hertfordshire).
These finds are regionally significant at least and it is possible that
further burials remain to be discovered. We recommended that one of
these burials be exhumed so that their significance could be better
understood, as per NPPF, paragraph 128;
▪  The applicant has submitted a short report on this investigation 
confirming date of the burial was the latter half of the seventh century.
The report notes that associated finds include an iron buckle and knife
and remnants of iron sheeting. The study has generated some useful
information regarding the date of the burials and their significance;
▪  Given the significance of the burials and the fact that this planning 
proposal allows for minimal development and disturbance in the part of
the site where the burials are located, we have agreed that a strategy
of preservation in situ could be an appropriate treatment of these
heritage assets. This is as per NPPF paragraphs 135 and 139;
▪  The applicant has also submitted an Archaeological Impact 
Assessment, which includes a method statement to achieve the
preservation of these heritage assets. As it stands the method
statement is inadequate because it does not demonstrate that the
method proposed for covering the cemetery will protect the
archaeological remains. Further archaeological investigation is required
in order to confirm the area which needs to be preserved;
▪  Should an acceptable proposal for the preservation and protection of 
the area of the burials be submitted, it is likely that the archaeological
implications of the development on the rest of the site can be dealt with
by the imposition of archaeological conditions if you are minded to
grant consent.
8.9 The County Archaeologist further advised (30th November 2017) –
▪  The programme of archaeological preservation does not adequately 
demonstrate that it will protect the archaeological remains. In summary:
−  The programme of archaeological investigation should initial y aim to 
confirm the full extent of the burials and any associated archaeological
features. It should describe the measures which will be put in place to
achieve this. A suitable buffer may be required.
−  There should be clear information including plans and diagrams which 
show where and by how much the ground is to be reduced or built up.
The likely impact of both the programme of preservation and the
development on any below ground archaeological remains should be
shown. This may include the impact of activities like the running of
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
32

machinery across the site ….This may have a bearing on the
methodology of preservation.
−  The document should demonstrate that the project wil  be appropriately 
monitored by archaeologists. Finally the proposed areas of
archaeological investigation in figure 5 look to be inadequate.
8.10
Following the submission of the Archaeological Impact Assessment
(December 2017) the County Archaeologist commented –
▪  In previous advice letters (13 and 30 November) we advised you the 
applicant should demonstrate that a strategy of preservation in situ
could be an appropriate treatment of these heritage assets (in line with
NPPF Paragraphs 135 and 139). The programme should include
provision to protect the archaeological remains from disturbance;
▪  We have advised you that the two proposals which have been 
submitted thus far were inadequate and subsequently Historic England
has confirmed (a) the archaeological remains are of such significance
they should be treated in line with paragraph 139 of the NPPF and (b)
the information submitted by the applicant is not sufficient to be
confident that the heritage assets will be appropriately conserved.
▪  Notwithstanding the above, we maintain that the archaeological 
implications of the development can be dealt with by the imposition of
archaeological conditions (if you are minded to grant consent),
however, if a suitable scheme of preservation and protection is not
possible then other strategies such as archaeological excavation may
need to be considered for the whole site.
8.11
Consequently, the following conditions are recommended:
A. No development shall take place/commence until an Archaeological
Written Scheme of Investigation (WSI) has been submitted to and
approved by the local planning authority in writing;
B. The development shall take place/commence in accordance with the
programme of archaeological works set out in the WSI approved under
part (A);
C. The development shall not be occupied until the site investigation and
post investigation assessment has been completed in accordance with
the programme set out in the WSI approved under part (A) and provision
made for analysis and publication where appropriate.
8.12 Historic England initially advised that the LPA to consider seeking advice
from its own specialist conservation and archaeological advisors.
Historic England was re-consulted on the Archaeological Impact
Assessment (November 207) and commented:
8.13 The development of which would affect the buried remains of a
seventh century Anglo-Saxon inhumation cemetery. The cemetery
would be located on the edge of the proposed school grounds, close to
the area where playing fields are proposed. Although there are no
proposals to build on the area, the development includes remodelling of
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
33

levels over the area of the playing fields and cemetery and, as a result, it
is proposed that the cemetery would be preserved in situ, by covering
the remains with 1m + of topsoil to protect them and to prevent damage
from illicit metal detecting, after which the area would be retained as a
meadow.
8.14 The conservation of heritage assets is given great weight in the NPPF
and given the rarity of Anglo-Saxon cemeteries in Hertfordshire, Historic
England believes that the remains should, for planning purposes, be
treated as though it were a scheduled monument, in line with [NPPF]
para 139, and therefore paragraphs 132-134 of the NPPF applies i.e.
the more important the asset, the greater the weight which should be
given to its conservation
any harm to their significance should require
clear and convincing justification. If the level of harm is judged to be less
than substantial, this should be weighed against any public benefits in
the proposed development.

8.15 The issue is ensuring the mitigation strategy results in no loss of
significance which could be recovered through archaeological
investigation. In general, the approach presented could potentially
protect the archaeological remains; however, additional information
would be required before determining whether the remains would be
adequately conserved by this approach, in both the short and long term.
8.16 Historic England considers the following matters should be addressed
before the proposed mitigation strategy is approved:
▪  the range in depth of the archaeology needs to be taken into account 
so that it is clear the proposed strategy will be suitable for shallow
remains as well as those that are more deeply buried;
▪  information needs to be provided regarding the loading pressure on the 
underlying deposits after the soil has been placed on top, as well as the
sort of machines that will carry out the work, for example, smaller
tracked machines should be used rather than larger or wheeled
vehicles;
▪  a method statement should set out clear working arrangements which 
demonstrate how civil contractors will carry out the work while
complying with the risk management strategy.
▪  there needs to a management plan setting out how the area of the 
cemetery would be managed as part of the school's grounds, to ensure
that the existence and protection of the site was documented and
actively managed, to avoid accidental damage to the remains from
works associated with maintenance, services or longer term
development.
8.17
In these circumstances, Hertfordshire County Council may wish to
consider requesting Historic England Enhanced Advisory Service to
assess whether the site should be recommended for scheduling, thus
providing a degree of certainty as to the status of the heritage asset,
and its management. In the event that an effective and sustainable
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
34

methodology for protecting the remains in situ cannot be assured, an
alternative strategy of prior archaeological excavation should be
considered.
8.18
The County Landscape Officer comments –
The effects of the proposed development are set out in the LVIA:
Landscape Character Areas:
▪  major-moderate adverse on the Upper Lea Valley LCA (Area 33) at
year 1 becoming moderate adverse at year 10. This conclusion is
supported. The proposed development fundamentally changes the
existing character of the south facing valley slope, between the
Blackmore End plateau and the River Lee corridor, from open
countryside that is characterised by semi-improved grassland to one
that is developed and characterised by a school campus with
associated meadow, amenity grassland and sports pitches.
▪  moderate adverse on Blackmore End Plateau LVA (Area 34) at year 1
becoming minor adverse at year 10. This conclusion is supported. The
proposed development changes the character of the plateau from open
countryside characterised by semi-improved grassland to one that is
characterised by amenity grassland and a small football pitch, and
woodland. At year 10 the woodland will be well established and
providing more effective mitigation, contributing to local landscape
character and visual amenity.
Landscape features:
▪  major adverse effect at year 1 becoming major-moderate adverse at
year 10. This conclusion is supported. The proposed development
significantly alters the natural topography of the south facing valley
side. The proposed cut and fill operations change the consistent valley
slope to a series of flat development platforms and terraces separated
by retaining walls and steep banks.
Landuse:
▪  major-moderate adverse at year 1 becoming moderate adverse at
year 10. This conclusion is supported. The proposed development
fundamentally changes the use of the site from vacant grassland to
educational use comprising a school campus with associated amenity
grassland and sports pitches.
Vegetation:
▪  neutral at year 1 becoming minor beneficial at year 10. This conclusion
is supported as the proposed development will increase the quantity of
vegetation across the site.
Historic site boundaries:
▪  minor adverse at both year 1 and year 10. This conclusion is
supported. It is proposed to remove two sections of established
hedgerow and five trees to accommodate the development. In addition
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
35

there is no intention to recreate any historic hedgerow boundaries that
may have crossed the site.
Visual effects:
▪  By Year 10 significant effects on visual receptors would be limited to 
very localised points on public footpaths or from a small number of
specific residential properties in the surrounding landscape. This
conclusion is supported in part. With regards to local visual effects,
however there are significant effects upon short distance views from
the highways within close proximity to the site boundary. From here the
development is viewed as a new large scale element within wider views
of the settlement edge and sloping valley landform.
▪  The proposal to locate the new school campus within the lower lying 
south west corner of the site is fully supported, in this location the main
building and sports hall appear as an extension of the settlement edge,
and their rooflines are viewed against the backdrop of the open and
elevated sports pitches, helping to assimilate them with their wider
valley landscape setting.
Landform
▪  It is proposed to carry out a significant quantity of cut and fil  and create 
a series of flat development platforms and terraces separated by
retaining walls and steep banks. Further information is required to show
the existing and proposed landform across the site. In particular a
composite plan that shows existing and proposed levels and 1m
contours is required to clearly show where material will be removed
and deposited and levels raised or lowered.
Landscape character
▪  The site is currently vacant grassland and the proposed development 
will enhance the character and condition of the grassland through the
introduction of meadow and other small scale habitat features that will
be positively managed in the long term as part of the schools on-going
management and maintenance regime.
▪  The proposed woodland planting at the northern apex of the site is 
considered to provide an adequate landscape and visual buffer to
protect the setting of these historic assets (Mackerye End Conservation
Area and listed buildings)
Planting strategy:
▪  The details set out in the submitted planting strategy are ful y 
supported, in particular the intention to use native species along the
site boundaries and peripheral areas becoming more mixed and
ornamental towards the heart of the school campus within recreational
spaces.
Layout and design:
▪  the intention to create a comprehensive range of spaces and planting 
typologies is fully supported.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
36

▪  There are opportunities to enhance the sense of arrival and legibility 
through the landscape layout and design; through paving, highlighting
key desire lines and routes, and providing a wider range of integrated
sustainability solutions should be explored.
8.19
Hertfordshire Ecology comments –
▪  The site has been improved grassland for approx. 20 years and would 
appear to have limited ecological interest (except boundary habitats);
▪  col ectively, the habitats within the proposed development site are 
assessed as being of Lower value at the Parish level – this probably
overestimates its value given the established use as farmland (and
some hedgerow interest);
▪  the grassland has little intrinsic quality but it is reasonably extensive
and consequently is likely to support some farmland ground nesting
birds;
▪  a range of protected species are likely to use the site, such as badgers,
bats, possibly reptiles, breeding birds and invertebrates although there
is nothing to suggest the site supports any community or species of
such significance it would represent a major constraint on the
proposals;
▪  the impact on the existing habitat is considered to be minor adverse,
which is an underestimate of the impact given the nature of the whole
site will change, some areas will be largely urban with hardstanding as
well as formal amenity (playing field) grasslands which will lead to the
area opened-up to significant disturbance, despite the habitat
enhancements;
▪  the creation of large areas of meadow is welcomed, which would be 
locally significant in terms of habitat improvement site.
The following aspects of the proposals are noted:
▪  retention as much of the existing vegetation and trees as possible  
▪  enhancing the habitat value of the site through planting and 
management
▪  al otments for school use;  
▪  creation of landscape features shown on the Landscape masterplan, 
including a small orchard;
▪  enhancement of overal  biodiversity - for nature conservation and as a 
learning resource;
▪  student involvement in the management of the proposed habitat area; 
▪  extensive areas of meadow management on sloping areas around 
playing fields will enhance its habitat value;
▪  planting an open ditch with wetland marginal and tree and shrub 
species;
▪  planting large maturing (native) tree species and shrubs around the 
perimeter to reinforce local distinctiveness
▪  lack of floodlighting - given sensitive site location and topography.  
▪  no requirement for off-site compensation - no habitat of any particular 
significance will be lost;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
37

▪  grassland wil  be enhanced by proposed meadows and other smal  
scale habitat features within the site;
▪  The retained land wil  now be too smal  to be incorporated into the 
existing livestock enterprise;
▪  Condition should be used to secure the submission of detailed planting 
plans, formal landscape / ecology management plan for approval not
later than 6 months prior to completion of works;
8.20
Natural England makes no comment on the application and has not
assessed the impacts on protected species. The letter refers the LPA
to its Standing Advice which can be used to assess the impact upon
protected species; alternatively, the LPA may wish to use its own
ecology services for advice.
8.21
Thames Water comments:
▪  sewerage infrastructure capacity - no objection 
▪  surface water drainage – the developer is responsible for making 
proper provision for drainage to ground, water courses or a suitable
sewer. Storm flows should be attenuated using on/off site storage
before entering the public network;
▪  prior approval is required from Thames Water before a new connection 
is made to a public sewer; when a combined public sewer is proposed
site drainage should be separate and combined at the final manhole
nearest the boundary. Removal of groundwater is not permitted.
8.22
UK Power Networks notes the presence of an 11,000volt underground
cable within the Lower Luton Rd side of the proposed development
8.23
Hertfordshire Fire and Rescue comments with regard to access for fire
service vehicles, hydrant standards and Building Regulations
requirements -
Access – current provision is inadequate
▪  turning facilities should be provided for any dead-end route more than 
20m long, which may be achieved by use of a hammer head or turning
circle;
▪  access routes for Hertfordshire Fire and Rescue Service vehicles 
should achieve a minimum carrying capacity of 18 tonnes;
Water supply - hydrant provision - should be:
▪  not more than 60m from an entry to any building on the site; 
▪  not more than 90m apart for commercial developments; 
▪  preferably immediately adjacent to roadways or hard-standing facilities 
provided for fire service appliances;
▪  not less than 6m from the building or risk to remain usable during a fire; 
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
38

▪  buildings fitted with fire mains must have a suitable hydrant sited within
18m of the hard standing facility provided for the fire service pumping
appliance.
Building Regulation requirements:
▪  access for fire fighting vehicles should be in accordance with The 
Building Regulations 2000 Approved Document B (ADB), section B5,
sub-section 16;
▪  water supplies should be provided in accordance with BS 9999 and be 
capable of providing an appropriate flow in accordance with National
Guidance documents; hydrants should be provided in accordance with
BS 750;
▪  Where no piped water is available, or there is insufficient pressure and 
flow in the water main, or an alternative arrangement is proposed, the
alternative source of water supply should be provided in accordance
with ADB Vol 2, Section B5, Sub section 15.8.
8.24
Sport England comments –
▪ 
St Albans City and District does not have an up-to-date sports facility 
strategy to confirm the requirement for community sports facilities
(indoor or outdoor) within the Harpenden area, however, sports
governing bodies indicate there are high levels of public participation in
the area across a range of levels; however, the current level of
provision does not meet that need;
▪ 
Sport England is supportive of the proposals (as a non-statutory 
consultee on the application) and notes the proposed facilities - sports
hall , activity studio, multi-use games area (MUGA) and natural turf
playing fields – are potentially being made available for community use
outside school hours;
▪  Sport England recommend a feasibility study be prepared to assess the 
existing ground conditions (drainage, soils, topography etc.) and
identify the constraints that may affect the ability to deliver good quality
playing surfaces that would sustain the anticipated levels of use by
both the school and the community;
▪  The design / construction of the playing pitches wil  need to be 
informed by a sports pitch feasibility study to ensure the pitches are fit
for purpose; the pitch construction needs to optimise carrying capacity
for school and community use; the proposed agronomic assessment is
welcomed;
▪  There is the potential for an al -weather pitch in the future, however the 
current proposal does not meet 3G all-weather size requirements for a
football pitch (112 x 76m) or hockey pitch (101.4 x 63 m);
▪  The proposed artificial grass cricket wicket will help facilitate school 
and community cricket use. The pitch should meet ECB standards;
▪  Sport England recommends the fol owing conditions: 
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
39

−  detailed specification of the construction of the multi-use games area 
to ensure it meets Sport England design guidance and industry
technical standards;
−  an assessment of existing ground conditions; 
−  detailed specification for sports pitches (informed by the assessment 
of existing ground conditions) to address constraints; including as
gradients, drainage, surface quality and maintenance issues,
potentially restricting playing capacity and performance quality of the
playing fields.
−  submission of a community use agreement to ensure facilities meet 
community needs over a long term period in practice to help meet
unmet indoor sports facility needs
Third Party Representations
8.25
Statutory consultation started on 28 September 2017 initially for a
period of 6 weeks. In total, 734 notification letters were sent to
properties in the vicinity of the site, and 4 site notices were placed in
locations at the boundary of the site; press notices were placed in the
St Albans and Harpenden Review and Herts Advertiser on 02 October
2017.
8.26
Additional information was submitted in November 2017 and the
consultation period extended by 21 days; a further press notice was
placed in the St Albans and Harpenden Review and Herts Advertiser
[date] and site replacement site notices erected at the site; the
additional information published on hertsdirect.org.
8.27
Further information was in December 2017 and the consultation period
was extended for 21 days; site notices were erected at the site and
notification letters/emails were sent to people who had previously made
representations on the application; the additional information published
on hertsdirect.org.
8.28
Further information on the proposed drainage strategy was submitted
in January 2017; the additional information published on
hertsdirect.org.
8.29
The total number or respondents has been:
▪  1,297 objecting (including 740 in two petitions); and  
▪  1,290 in support;  
8.30
The main grounds of objection are:
Road Capacity
▪  The B653 is the one of the busiest such roads in the County; 
▪  The B653 links Luton and Hatfield and is used as a cross country 
connection between the M1, A1, and A414;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
40

▪  The B653 is inadequate for the capacity of traffic which it already 
carries;
▪  The additional traffic wil  cause further congestion which wil  have 
negative wider economic impact;
▪  Free flow of traffic on the B653 ceases when the M25 or A414 is 
blocked
▪  Traffic levels on the B653 have increased every year since it was 
downgraded (A6021) in the 1970s. Plans for widening the road have
never happened, although a lorry ban was introduced;
▪  Additional traffic is anticipated on the Lower Luton Road due to the 
proposed expansion of Luton Airport and a planned new school at the
Gypsy Lane Retail Park on the Batford/Harpenden side of Luton;
▪  The proposal is for a dangerous junction on the busiest B-road in the 
county, one that is already over capacity;
Site access
▪  The proposed access on the LLR is on a steep incline so drivers 
heading towards Batford will be unaware of the entrance until the very
last minute and find it harder to stop in time;
▪  Large vehicles emerging from the proposed goods entrance on 
Common Lane would not be visible due to the high hedgerow.
Common Lane is already a busy road used by parents driving children
to Sauncey Wood Primary School and Batford Nursery;
Junction and other improvements
▪  Proposed mitigation measures involves removal of safety measures 
such as the roundabout at the Common Lane/LLR junction and
changing the Station Road/LLR junction from a signal controlled
crossing to a zebra crossing, both of which were introduced recently;
▪  There are no measures proposed for the section of the LLR between 
the site and Wheathampstead;
Road Safety
▪  Building a new secondary school next to a busy road increases the risk 
of pedestrians coming into conflict with road traffic;
▪  Accessing the LLR from Common Lane is stil  dangerous. The 
roundabout junction was introduced as a safety improvement, however
it is still dangerous;
▪  Parents wil  drop off children on Crabtree Lane and Common Lane. 
Provision for pedestrians on Common Lane is inadequate – there is no
footpath and crossing;
▪  The exit is inadequate and in a prime position to cause accidents;  
▪  A new school in this location would deprive pupils of a safe, walkable 
school journey;
▪  Station Road is the only route from south or central Harpenden, Station 
Road railway bridge is narrow and cannot accommodate a second
lane;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
41

▪  There are already narrow and dangerous sections of the LLR where 
pedestrians risk coming into collision with cars;
▪  Insufficient provision is made for improving cycle infrastructure  
Parking
▪  Parking facilities are inadequate for a 6FE school, yet expansion to 
8FE is already within the design;
▪  The amount of parking proposed is woeful y inadequate; 
▪  The school wil  lead to on-street parking on the surrounding road 
network
▪  The number of staff is less than other schools and therefore parking is 
under provisioned;
Sustainable travel
▪  The provision for Buses is inadequate; 
▪  There are no suitable walking and cycle routes; 
▪  The Lower Luton Road is unsafe for cyclists; 
▪  The majority of individuals highlighted in the Travel Plan are those who 
would need to travel the furthest distance across Harpenden –
generating unnecessary traffic;
▪  The travel plan assumes the majority of pupils will come from 
Redbourn, Flamstead and Markyate, with only one third of pupils
coming from Wheathampstead. The figure for Wheathampstead is
likely to be higher because it is closer than the other settlements and it
will be the nearest school within the Priority area.
▪  The travel plan implies the majority of pupils wil  walk or cycle to school 
– this is at best impractical given that most will like too far away to walk
or cycle, and at worst dangerous given that the Lower Luton Road and
lanes from Southdown are not suitable for cyclists;
▪  Pupils wil  have a longest, most time consuming and expensive journey 
to school compared with the other schools
Survey data
▪  The traffic surveys that were undertaken for the site viability were 
undertaken during the school holidays at times of low usage;
▪  Proposals for dealing with additional school traffic are whol y 
inadequate.
Choice of site
▪  Site F is the wrong location to meet the need 
▪  The site is the most highly conspicuous of al  of the potential sites 
▪  The school buildings are further into the Green Belt because of the 
retained land
Alternative sites
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
42

▪  A school closer to the pupils in need (Wheathampstead/Southdown) 
would take pupils and traffic off the roads and be a more sustainable
long terms solution
▪  This wil  be yet another school in the already wel  served North of 
Harpenden town, whereas there are no secondary schools in the south
of the town; there was a site identified on Pipers Lane which could offer
walking and cycling opportunities for pupils from Southdown, East and
West Common, central Harpenden, south of Station Road, Redbourn
and Wheathampstead;
▪  The comparative site assessment (table on page 35) seems to have 
weak correlation with the consultant’s report it refers to. As this table is
the basis for the selection of the site and its removal from Green Belt
the officers of HCC or truly independent consultants should analysis
this as the report currently cannot be used to justify this application
Noise, light and air pollution
▪  School pupils will be exposed to significant levels of noise and air 
pollution from road traffic in this location;
▪  Noise from the playing fields wil  carry across the val ey 
▪  The school are bound to want floodlighting at some stage and this 
would harm the Green Belt
Landscape
▪  The terracing and substantial buildings wil  be highly visible and change 
the outlook for a significant proportion of Harpenden;
▪  Raising significant sections of the field has a huge visual impact from 
all directions and will the site even more prominent;
▪  The cut and fil  operation wil  result in levels increasing by up to 6m in 
places, this will introduce and imbalance to the Lea Valley and a blot
on the landscape
Consultation process
▪  There has been inadequate time to review the volume of documents; 
▪  The proposal is presented as a fait accompli  
▪  No meaningful consultation has taken place with local residents 
Loss of agricultural land
▪  The farming tenancy has been ended has adversely impacted a viable 
business;
▪  The land has been referred to as low grade agriculture, where in reality 
cattle grazing for decades and has sustained a viable farm tenancy
Flood risk
▪  The development of the site wil  create large areas of hard surfacing;  
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
43

▪  The flood risk assessment provides insufficient capacity for the 
volumes of surface water storage/attenuation required
Green Belt
▪  Common Lane presents is a strong boundary to the Green Belt;  
▪  Development of the site would result in coalescence with the Val ey 
Rise estate / Wheathampstead and produce an indefensible Green Belt
boundary;
▪  Development of the site wil  cause significant encroachment to the 
countryside and significantly reducing the gap between Batford and
Valley Rise.
▪  Building a new school in the narrow gap between the Val ey Rise 
Estate and Batford conflicts with one of the purposes of the green Belt
and it will cause harm;
▪  Development of the site wil  result in encroachment into the Green Belt  
▪  The preferred Option 4 may cause the least harm to the Green Belt (of 
the options available), however the harm is still significant;
▪  Other sites would result in less environmental damage; 
▪  The amount of earthworks is not in the spirt of the Green Belt or 
sustainable development
▪  The proposal appears to be founded on unproven need; the HCC 
forecast has been “adjusted” to generate the number of children. There
is no indication of where in the area the majority of school age children
live. The case for very special circumstances is very unconvincing;
Education Need
▪  Hertfordshire County Council is accepting the figures from its own 
Schools Planning Department as its principle source of information.
The figures are usually produced in early Summer each year and
updated in Autumn. The most recent forecast this year (from around 27
October) contains different information from previous publications by
HCC;
▪  The Priority area for Harpenden (which is used to guide the al ocation 
process) covers the Harpenden SPA and St Albans SPA;
▪  There are significant variations in the forecast information provided by 
HCC as part of the planning application; in practice HCC has amended
the forecasts for the purposes of this planning application;
▪  There is no supporting evidence for the scale of the adjustment 
proposed by HCC;
▪  This manipulation of the figures is not a sound basis to justify 
inappropriate development in the Green Belt;
▪  There are more than enough places for Harpenden children in existing 
schools;
▪  There need for additional places is unproven - HCC “adjusted” earlier 
forecasts in order to generate the necessary number of children;
▪  HCC data forecasts fal ing primary rol s which in turn do not lead to a 
need for significant additional places in the short or medium term;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
44

▪  There is a higher demand for places forecast over the next 8 years, 
however this peaks in 2019-2020 and then decreases to near supply
available levels (+4 according to HCC figures) – this demonstrates that
there is only a short term requirement for additional places and that no
significant medium-long term secondary schooling is required in the
foreseeable future;
▪  The aim should be for a school to be in place for at least 100 years, 
however there is only demand for this in the short term, not in the
medium-long term;
▪  The case for justifying a school at the site has not been clearly made.  
▪  There has been no demonstration of local need when other schools are 
taken into account;
▪  The large people support for a fourth school appears of greater 
importance than where it is located;
▪  The amount of potential new housing in the area does not amount to a 
need for a complete new school even for Harpenden children (given
standard housing/pupil yield data);
▪  It is not sustainable special planning to create further school places 
when the location of new housing is unknown and which rely no out of
area pupils
Historic Environment
▪  Archaeological heritage (of potential y national importance) is being 
ignored and would be irrevocably damaged by the proposed
development;
▪  The proposed development would have a significant adverse impact 
upon listed buildings (grade II) i.e. Marquis of Granby pub and the
Thatched Cottage
Financial considerations
▪  The site wil  be expensive to develop due to the scale of earthworks 
required
▪  The cost of landscaping such a large site wil  be excessive; 
▪  Other sites would represent far greater value for money 
Amenity
▪  The building (design, bulk, massing, detailing and materials), 
overbearing, out of scale, and detrimental to the area;
▪  The height of both the terracing and buildings would make the 
development highly visible and have a significant detrimental impact
upon the privacy, light and quality of life of residents of Common Lane,
Millford Hill and Tallents Crescent;
Design and appearance
▪  The external materials of the building are unsympathetic in the Lea 
Valley
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
45

Other
▪  The application documents are incomplete, misleading and conflict with 
one another;
▪  The application certificates were incorrect; 
▪  Too much information for people to be able to read and understand in 
the time;
▪  Access to the documents has been poor  
▪  Lack of transparency – none of the objection letters and not al  
application documents have been published on the website;
▪  The application is being made on behalf of Hertfordshire County 
Council and will be determined by the same council and this suggests
there will be significant bias and I am not confident that a fair and
balanced view of the application can be made;
▪  Hertfordshire County Council said it would not be purchasing the site 
unless and until planning permission has been granted, yet the site was
acquired by the county council on 25 August 2017 before the planning
application was submitted;
▪  Playing fields at the top of the site restrict access for people and for 
emergency vehicles;
▪  The number of slopes on the site wil  need to be engineered properly to 
old them in place and to sustain high rainfall and flooding events;
Right School Right Place
8.31
Right School Right Place is a residents group representing over 1,000
local residents, with the core membership from Harpenden North East
and Harpenden Rural (formerly St Albans Rural) wards. The group was
formed in response to Hertfordshire County Council announcement of
intent in September 2013 to purchase land for establishing a new
school.
8.32
RSRP has written a series of letters - dated 09, 16 October, 2, 6, 16, 30
November, 8 December, 20 December, and 21 December raising
concerns with regard to procedural matters, inaccuracy of certificates
and planning application documents, and the inadequacy time to
consider the information. The letters also raise planning objections. The
letters are provided as an Appendix 4 to the report. A summary of the
comments is provided below.
09 October
▪  HCC acquired the site on 25 August 2017; the planning application was 
submitted on 11 September 2017. Section 25 of the Town and Country
Planning Act 1990 requires notice to be served on any party having an
interest in the land 21 days prior to the application being submitted.
The county council was not the owner of the site for the full 21 days
before the application was submitted. This amounts to false declaration
- the planning application should be withdrawn;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
46

▪ 
the name of the joint application was incorrectly stated on the application 
forms;
▪ 
key application documents were missing from the councils website; 
▪ 
2 weeks elapsed from the date the application was submitted to the start 
of public consultation;
▪ 
inadequate time has been al owed for consultation for an application of 
this size and complexity, and the number of documents and volume of
material
16 October
▪ 
There are potential errors and omissions in the current information that 
potentially preclude full and fair evaluation of the proposals for the
purposes of consultation:
▪ 
Sections of the Education needs statement are missing - section 3.2 and 
two appendices (ref to A1)
▪ 
The Noise impact assessment includes an il egible figure on page 2; 
tables and data missing for the day-time sound survey for MP3 in
appendix B; values for 8-9 July 17 are presented as a single line, whereas
other values are presented in 15 minute intervals. This is potentially
misleading and/or inaccurate; there is an illegible chart in appendix B;
▪ 
Appendices 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, and 27 from the Transport 
Assessment are all missing; a number of documents are labelled draft
indicating the contents may be subject to change without further
consultation; page 34 refers to a document which is not presented in the
appendix nor listed as one of the reference documents;
▪ 
Appendices are missing from the Statement of community involvement; 
the document wrongly claims that HCC were the owner of the site at the
time of the exhibition in July 2017; the document refers to the Education
and Skills Funding Agency as the applicant whereas the application forms
make it clear state this is a joint application with HCC; scales on the
graphs are different and this creates an artificial impression of the level of
support relative to the opposition and concern
We consider that the potential severity of the errors and omissions noted
above mean material considerations for those intending to make
representations are compromised and as such the application requires
withdrawal, correction of errors and omissions before any possible re-
submission.
16 November
▪ 
We are a residents group, representing over 1,000 local residents - details 
provided in our letter of 16 November 2017.
▪ 
We strongly object to the proposals.  
▪ 
That the Planning Application included a substantial number of 
documents, which on review revealed a significant number of errors and
omissions.
▪ 
A need for mitigation on response times to al ow proper consideration of 
matters arising from errors and omissions.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
47

▪ 
Significant new material was added close to the submission date 
(between 7 -13 November 2017), for which we considered there was
insufficient review time
▪ 
Our intention to continue our analysis of the material and to make a 
further submission(s)
▪ 
We have no option but to apply a high level of assumption to our review, 
and that will be noted on our comments.
30 November
▪ 
The Transport Assessment appendices were not uploaded to the council’s 
website until 07 November and the education needs letter, which appears
to contain significant new information, was not uploaded until 10
November. This is less than 21 days which HCC has committed to giving.
No-one, other than those constantly checking your web-site, would have
any indication of the existence of the new information
08 December
▪ 
RSRP maintain their view that inadequate information has been provided, 
and that this is prejudicial to a fair assessment of the application. The
objections focus on the Education Needs Assessment; Schools Planning;
Very Special Circumstances; and the forecasting system and its role in
forecasting need
Education Needs Statement
▪ 
the letter published on hertfordshire.gov.uk on 10 November 2017 was 
authored by HCC Development Services, not Schools Planning, and it is
unclear who is being represented;
▪ 
the letter notes the 4 schools have formalised their relationship as a multi 
Academy Trust;
▪ 
the comparative site assessment (2014) references the educational needs 
assessment, however no needs assessment was available at the time the
viability work was awarded, given that considerable reliance is placed on
the comparative site assessment, it is inexplicable why the applicants
have not chosen to forward this evidence in support of that work;
▪ 
the letter refers to methodology and model ing, planning or forecasting 
models – it is unclear whether these are bespoke or commercially
available;
▪ 
the letter implies the principles of the process are wel  established and 
that no changes in methodology have occurred;
New forecasting system
▪ 
HCC introduced a new forecasting system in late October/ early 2017; 
▪ 
the letter fails to mention the use of a new system and fails to reconcile 
significant differences to results that were published by HCC and in the
public domain at the time the application was submitted;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
48

▪  the application data appears to rely on the new forecasting system 
which is still being bedded in;
▪  it is unclear why the new system is not running in paral el with the 
previous system to enable results to be compared and any differences
fully explored;
▪  the new system has produced limited output (4 years instead of 11) 
except for Harpenden where additional years have been extracted and
then further manipulated;
▪  The new system is apparently unapproved and untested and/or the old 
system which HCC has relied upon (without the need to make bespoke
adjustments) has been found to be unreliable or not fit for purpose;
▪  There is no reference the new forecasting / model ing system being 
approved in Education Panel minutes;
▪  it would be unsafe to progress on the basis of the information provided; 
▪  The use of the old system to assess need for additional school places 
in Harpenden put forward in 2011 and 2015 may have produced
unreliable data;
Assumptions and adjustments
▪  There is no information relating to any review and approval, delegated 
or otherwise, for departure from accepted practice to bespoke
adjustments
▪  manipulations to the Harpenden data would have consequential 
reductions in forecast demand in adjacent areas, however no evidence
is provided by HCC to substantiate the balancing re-allocations;
▪  St Albans forecasts were adjusted for the period 2011-13 by the 
removal of Sandringham cohorts of Harpenden EPA children, with ‘high
priority’ allocations (including non-geographical up to ‘Siblings’) added
back;
▪  the model ing assumptions effectively removed any Wheathampstead 
resident children who qualified for places at the school under the next
category of allocation – ‘children for whom it is their nearest school in
the priority area’;
Availability of data
▪  2017/18 forecasts were not available publicly at the time of submission 
of the application. The Summer 2016-17 forecast and Meeting the
Rising Demand Report (2016-17) were in the public domain for part of
the application consultation period, however, following the move to the
new forecasting system announced in late October / early 2017 the
‘Meeting the Rising Demand’ reports have been removed from HCC
website with no replacement issued.
Demand for School Places
▪  The projected shortfal  for the Harpenden EPA in the 2016 statement 
(page 11) shows a significant short term issue before falling back to
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
49

576 places by 2026/27 (close to the current capacity of the 3 existing
schools). In essence there is no long term demand;
▪  Within the adjoining St Albans EPA the peak forecast is slightly smal er 
scale around 3-4 years later than the Harpenden EPA;
▪  In essence the forecasting system, on which HCC have placed 
considerable reliance, shows a demand for approximately one school
over the forecast period, initially in the Harpenden EPA and
progressively moving to the St Albans EPA, which in practice are
considered part of the same larger Priority Area for allocation purposes,
this raises the question of whether any build should be sited in a
location that is readily accessible to meet both area shortfalls over the
course of time. No consideration has been entertained by HCC.
Sandringham School
▪  Sandringham School accepted pupils within 4.3 km in the category of 
nearest school in priority area, corresponding with the South East of
Wheathampstead village. Sandringham as nearest school in priority
area, and that for prospective pupils living in the area Sandringham
School is likely to be a higher choice than any Harpenden School as
there is a greater priority given to application to that school.
Forecasting system and its role in determining need
▪  HCC treats the Harpenden Education Planning Area (EPA) as a single 
area in all aspects of planning at secondary school level. The lack of
differentiation between Harpenden Town and the Harpenden EPA is
misleading. The current number of places is an overprovision to cater
for pupils living outside of the Town; 60% of applicants for secondary
places in the Harpenden EPA are typically Harpenden Town residents;
40% reside outside Harpenden.
▪  In most years between 400 and 450 are pupils from within Harpenden 
Town; 100 pupils arise from outside Harpenden Town (for all year
groups), rising to 300 pupils in peak years. Wheathampstead may
produce 100 pupils in a typical year. Villages between
Wheathampstead and Hitchin - concentred on The Kimptons - typically
generate 50 pupils; Redbourn typically generate 2.5FE; Flamstead and
Markyate generate1.5FE;
▪  The historic distribution of secondary schools in the Harpenden EPA – 
with 3 schools in the Town, 1 school in Wheathampstead, and 1 school
in Redbourn - which existed for most of the 20th Century - aligned well
with the actual pattern of demand;
▪  The closure of Wheathampstead school led to parental preference for 
schooling in St Albans over Harpenden and places for pupils displaced
from Harpenden were created at Sandringham school;
▪  In 2006 there were significant issues with the al ocation of secondary 
school places for children in Harpenden EPA resulting in an overview
and scrutiny review with 12 recommendations, including:
recommendation 3: that (Childrens Services) introduce a more granular
level of modelling (e.g. parish) for hot spot areas and that the result of
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
50

the modelling be factored into to the final planning of places. The
recommendations were fully accepted by HCC but there is no mention
of the need for more granular modelling in the St Albans and
Harpenden EPAs in either in the Meeting the Rising Demand for
School Places report of 2009 or the consultation response to SADC in
2010 (as part of the local plan process) which sought to justify the need
for a new secondary school in the Harpenden EPA;
▪  The HCC scrutiny report (published in 2011 - too late for the St Albans 
process) identified HCC’s preference for secondary schools between 6
and 10FE , but acknowledged smaller schools of 4-6FE should not be
discounted;
▪  HCC acknowledged Harpenden EPA contains hotspot areas - 
Wheathampstead and The Kimptons – but failed to apply granular
modelling – in accordance with recommendation 3 of the scrutiny report
- HCC has not considered the potential provision of a 4-6FE school to
meet the need generated within the Harpenden EPA;
▪  The site assessment viability work was based on a simplified approach 
that Wheathampstead only has 2.5FE primary school capacity –
however this does not consider the planned growth in the Waldens.
This approach has led to all new primary provision being delivered in
Harpenden Town to the point of large excesses - when there are
remaining shortfalls in Wheathampstead and Redbourn;
▪  A new free school at Harperbury was awarded DfE approval based on 
demand from Radlett, Borehamwood, Shenley and South St Albans,
however, the project was cancelled because HCC (Schools Planning)
stated there was no demand for the school – whilst at the same time
providing supporting needs assessments for a proposed new
secondary school at Croxley Danes;
▪  HCC suggest the Haperbury cohort would be satisfied by the Croxley 
Danes school and maintain there would be no shortfall in South St
Albans bordering Radlett and Borehamwood;
▪  In essence, HCC’s failure to recognise a hotspot with similar 
characteristics to parts of Harpenden EPA only serves to illustrate the
failings of the unmodified planning and forecasting system;
▪  HCC presented the case for new school sites as part of St Albans local 
plan process in 2016 – the information presented was out of date and
incomplete – it did not present the available information for the full
period which gave the impression of small decline when in reality HCCs
own figures reveal a substantial decline
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
51

9.
Planning Issues
The main issues in the determination of the application relate to:
▪ 
Educational need 
▪ 
Alternative Site Assessment 
▪ 
Continued protection of the Green Belt 
▪ 
Sustainable transport 
▪ 
Drainage  
▪ 
Archaeology  
▪ 
Landscape  
▪ 
Design 
▪ 
Ecology 
▪ 
Noise  
▪ 
Light pol ution 
▪ 
Air Quality 
Education Need
9.1
The application includes an Education Needs Assessment (September
2017) which sets out the long term demand for secondary school places
in the Harpenden EPA and the steps that have been taken to meet the
level of demand.
9.2
The assessment explains Hertfordshire County Councils role as a
commissioner rather than as a direct provider of school places and in
partnership working with Hertfordshire schools through the Hertfordshire
Schools Improvement Strategy (2014-17) and Herts for Learning (2013).
9.3
As a commissioner of places the County Council seeks to ensure there
is a sufficient supply of suitable school places by managing the increase
in pupil numbers through negotiation of additional places at existing
schools wherever possible. Academies have greater autonomy to
choose whether or not to expand to accommodate additional pupils
meaning the County Council has no power to require schools to provide
additional places.
9.4
The County Council still has a duty to secure sufficient school places in
their area and to allocate those places to the children of all parents who
want one. The County Council fulfils its planning responsibilities by
forecasting the demand for school places with the aim of ensuring there
are sufficient school places in the system to meet the demand for
mainstream schools and negotiates the required number of places each
year and through longer term strategic planning.
9.5
In 2009 Hertfordshire County Council published the document ‘Meeting
the rising need for school places’ which quantified future demand for
both Primary and Secondary school paces for every EPA in
Hertfordshire. The document is updated on a 6 monthly basis and is
available on the councils’ website – hertfordshire.gov.uk.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
52

Demand for Secondary School Places in the Harpenden EPA
9.6
The Harpenden EPA includes a wide catchment around Harpenden and
the surrounding area taking in the following settlements.
▪ 
Harpenden, Wheathampstead, Redbourn in St Albans District  
▪ 
Flamstead and Markyate in Dacorum Borough; and 
▪ 
Blackmore End, The Kimptons, Whitwel , Breachwood Green and the 
Waldens in North Hertfordshire District
9.7
A map of the Harpenden EPA is shown on Appendix 3.
Existing capacity at the three Harpenden secondary schools
9.8
There are three secondary schools in Harpenden currently: Roundwood
Park, Sir John Lawes School, and St Georges Schools. In 2006 St
George’s increased its PAN from 130 (plus 20 boarding places) to 160
places (plus 20 boarding places), and in 2014, the PAN at both
Roundwood Park and Sir John Lawes School increased to 6.53FE under
an agreement with Hertfordshire County Council.
9.9
The document identified the expansions of the existing schools as
temporary measures pending further feasibility work to ascertain the
most appropriate long term solution to deliver the required additional
capacity across Harpenden and St. Albans ‘which could include
expansion of existing schools, establishing new provision, or a
combination of both’. The provision of additional capacity is needed in
order to improve access to Harpenden schools for village children.
9.10 The 2017 summary admissions information for each school is
summarised Table 1 below:
Table 1: applications to Harpenden secondary school in 2017
Harpenden Schools
2017
PAN
Applications
Roundwood Park
196
735
Sir John Lawes
196
831
St Georges
170
621
Forecasting demand
9.11 In 2009 the forecast demand for secondary school places in Harpenden
was 594 places by 2020/21. The forecast demand for primary school
places was more immediate and additional primary places were provided
at existing Harpenden primary schools in September 2014, with 120
additional places each at High Beeches, The Grove and The Lea
Primary Schools.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
53

9.12 The education needs assessment sets out the drivers for the demand for
additional secondary school places, and the steps that have been taken
to meet the rising demand, in summary:
▪   
the total number of primary school age children in Harpenden 
requiring a school place has grown significantly. In recent years the
demand has been accommodated by expansion of a number of
existing primary schools and provision of a new primary school in
September 2012. In the near future these children will require a place
at secondary school;
▪   
the number of children currently attending primary schools in 
Harpenden exceeds the number of places available at existing
secondary schools by an average of approximately 6FE over the next
5 years;
▪   
as pupil numbers have exceeded capacity in recent years, a 
growing number of children have been accommodated at schools in
the surrounding area, particularly in St Albans;
▪   
however, accommodating Harpenden children at St Albans 
schools is not sustainable beyond 2018 given the increase in demand
for places in that area, the temporary nature of some of the
contingency arrangements and the accessibility of many of the
schools for Harpenden families;
▪   
as a consequence of children from Harpenden EPA attending 
schools in St Albans the actual level of demand for Harpenden
secondary school places is higher than recent forecasts indicate;
▪   
it is therefore necessary to consider the level of demand which 
would have been shown, if different trend data had been used in the
calculation;
▪   
Table 2 below indicates the forecast level of demand al owing for 
a more representative percentage of Harpenden children seeking
secondary school places within the Harpenden EPA:
Table 2: forecast demand for secondary school places in the Harpenden EPA up to 2027/28
HARPENDEN
PAN
FORECAST
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
2025
2026
2027
/19
/20
/21
/22
/23
/24
/25
/26
/27
/28
Year 7 places
572
572
572
572
572
572
572
572
572
572
572
available
Demand
703
759
730
730
773
723
716
670
639
679
(model)
Surplus/
-131
-187
-158
-158
-201
-151
-144
-98
-67
-107
Shortage
% Surplus/
-23
-32.6
-27.7
-27.7
-35.1
-26.4
-25.2
-17.1
-11.7
-18.8
Shortage
No of FE
-4.4
-6.2
-5.3
-5.3
-6.7
-5.0
-4.8
-3.3
-2.2
-3.6
Note: The above forecast does not include a contingency margin. The addition of 6FE within the
Harpenden EPA would result in a surplus of 1.7% across the next five years on average, which the needs
assessment regards as ‘small and not unreasonable in the context of prudent school place planning’
9.13 The education needs assessment identifies the barriers to providing
additional places at the existing school sites, and the reasons why
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
54

Harpenden remains the preferred location for additional secondary
school places. In summary:
▪   
there is insufficient capacity in the surrounding areas for 
permanent expansions to meet the required level of current and future
demand;
▪   
the 3 existing Harpenden secondary schools (Roundwood Park, 
St Georges and Sir John Lawes) have said they would be unwilling to
expand on a permanent basis;
▪   
the scale of projected demand over the next 5 years makes 
temporary solutions untenable;
▪   
dispersing pupils from Harpenden primary schools across a wide 
number of secondary schools in the surrounding area would be
undesirable in terms of accessibility and travel, community cohesion
and equality of opportunity;
▪   
Harpenden remains the area which has seen the greatest 
increase in primary pupil numbers, and while primary school numbers
have dipped from the peak level of demand, they remain significantly
higher than any other settlement within the Harpenden EPA;
▪   
in terms of sustainable transport, the existing Harpenden 
schools have previously worked with HCC and a number of
commercial operators to help ensure sustainable travel options are
available to children travelling into the town; work is ongoing between
HSET, HCC and the ESFA to ensure sustainable travel options are
available to access a new school in the town;
▪   
Hertfordshire County Council prefers to locate new schools in 
larger settlements wherever possible to maximise long-term
sustainability;
▪   
Harpenden remains the preferred location for a new school. 
Forecasting long term demand
9.13
The forecast system considers data from a number of sources
(beyond the numbers of children already born) including:
▪   
Office for National Statistics (ONS) projections: indicating 
secondary phase pupil numbers in St Albans District will continue to
rise over the next 20 years;
▪   
Birth rate patterns: which have been on an upward trend for the 
last 40 years; years where there has been dip in the number of
children born are typically followed by further periods of growth;
▪   
Development planned in strategic local plans;  
−  The St Albans Strategic Local Plan (SLP) 2011-2031 Publication 
Draft (2016) identifies Harpenden as the second most sustainable
location for development after the City of St Albans, indicating
Harpenden will need to accommodate some level of additional
housing, generating upward pressure on the demand for school
places;
−  The SLP was seeking to deliver a housing target of 436 per 
annum to be accommodated within the existing settlements and 4
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
55

Broad Locations in the Green Belt, including 500 homes at the
North West Harpenden Broad Location.
−  The Planning Policy Committee: September 2017 identified that 
the new local plan “must propose substantially higher housing
need figures” than presented in the draft Strategic Local Plan
(SLP), to include;
−  increasing density in existing urban areas;  
−  including four additional Broad Locations as identified in the 
Independent Green Belt Review (this would see the inclusion of a
second Broad Location within Harpenden (North East Harpenden)
creating a further 650 new homes;
−  extending existing Broad Locations; and,  
−  finding sites for ‘garden vil age(s)’.  
−  The review of the SADC local plan looks set to increase the 
annual delivery of new dwellings significantly above the number
presented in the SLP;
−  Furthermore, the review of the Dacorum Borough Council Local 
Plan may also promote a higher level of development than is
currently being planned, which could have a consequential impact
on demand for school places in adjoining EPAs.
9.14
The consultation generated criticism of the effectiveness of the
forecasting system. Hertfordshire County Council Development
Services clarified the purpose of the forecasting system in predicting
shortfalls or surpluses for each EPA. The forecasts take into account:
▪  historic pupil numbers in each year group 
▪  0-5 year olds registered with general practitioners 
▪  primary pupils moving on to secondary school 
▪  additional pupils arising from new housing development 
▪  pupil movement patterns, taking into account cross-area flows both 
the planning areas within Hertfordshire and out of the county, as well
as from the independent sector;
▪  secondary school forecasts are based on actual children, both in 
schools and registered with general practitioners, for 10 years ahead
together with a calculation of additional pupils arising from new
housing development
9.15
The demand for places increased between 2010 and 2014 based on
number of children in Harpenden primary schools over the period. More
recently, the forecast has reduced, but demand remains at a higher
level than in 2009, linked to the rising number of Harpenden children
being accommodated elsewhere due to the lack of local places.
Accommodating Harpenden children in St Albans schools is not
sustainable beyond 2018 given the increase in demand for places in
that area, the temporary nature of some of the contingency
arrangements and the accessibility of many of the schools for
Harpenden families.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
56

9.16
Ultimately, all projections change over time, the planning application for
the Katherine Warrington School is based on the latest, current
assessment of need, as set out in the Education Need Assessment.
Evaluation of education need
9.17
The justification for building a new school is projected shortfall in
secondary places available within the Harpenden EPA. There is an
immediate need secondary school places for children already in
primary schools in Harpenden. The forecast shortfall exceeds 4FE by
2018/19 and is forecast to exceed 5FE between 2019 and 2023 which
largely reflects the number of children currently attending primary
schools in Harpenden. The peak shortfall 6.7FE occurs in 2022/23.
9.18
Since 2014 Hertfordshire County Council has provided additional
primary school places at Harpenden primary schools in order to meet
the rising demand for primary places within Harpenden. The level of
demand currently within the Harpenden primary school system
demonstrates there is a clear and pressing need for additional places
over the five years.
9.19
The forecasting system takes into account a range of factors to
accurately predict the level of shortfall or surplus within each education
planning area and is the primary tool used in school place planning in
Hertfordshire.
9.20
The forecasting system takes into account a number of variables,
including the number of school age children moving into and out of an
area, and provides contingencies to meet any shortfalls by providing
additional places within the area of need or within an adjoining area. A
very similar situation has existed in Harpenden in recent years where a
large body of pupils have been allocated places in St Albans schools.
However that situation is untenable in longer term due to the rising
pupil number in the St Albans EPA, and moreover, it is not a
sustainable long term solution for children from Harpenden and the
surrounding villages, due to the increase in demand for places in the St
Albans EPA, the temporary nature of some of the contingency
arrangements, and because St Albans schools are less accessible by
sustainable modes of transport for Harpenden children.
9.21
Some of the consultation responses criticise the forecasting system
alleging:
▪  past failures in accurately predicting actual shortfal s in the Harpenden 
EPA, for example in 2006;
▪  that published data was withdrawn from the councils website during the 
application;
▪  data being ‘adjusted’ to support the case for a new school,  
▪  no formal authorisation process being in place for the new forecasting 
system;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
57

▪  the new system stil  bedding and cannot be relied upon to yield 
accurate data; and:
▪  that size of developments coming forward in Redbourn and Hemel 
Hempstead will require new secondary schools (in any event) which
will reduce the demand within Harpenden EPA.
9.22
There is also criticism that there is an overprovision of secondary
school places in Harpenden, in that only 60% of the available places
are filled by children living in Harpenden, with the remaining 40% being
allocated to pupils from outside of the town.
9.23
The forecasting system is required to take into account a number of
variables and has generally produced accurate data for the Harpenden
EPA since it was introduced with the possible exception of 2006. The
forecast model first predicted the shortfall in secondary places within
the Harpenden EPA in 2009, giving the County Council a reasonable
amount of time to consider the options for expanding capacity to align
with demand. The model itself is therefore considered fit for purpose for
the task it is applied to, and moreover, has provided early warning of
the deficits that have emerged within the Harpenden EPA.
9.24
It is reasonable for any forecasting system to retain a degree of
flexibility to allow adjustments to be made to reflect the particular
circumstances within the individual EPA, for example, the temporary
provision of additional places for Harpenden children within the St
Albans EPA has necessitated an adjustment of the model when those
numbers of children are accounted for, otherwise there could be an
anomaly in the data. Regardless of adjustment made to account for
Harpenden children attending St Albans secondary schools, the data
still shows there is a significant deficit is school places in the
Harpenden EPA, however the number of children in this category is
significant and supports the preference for developing a new 6FE
school.
9.25
The allegation that Harpenden schools already provide an excess of
places measured against the number of children living in Harpenden
who require a place, is essentially a function of the geography of the
Harpenden EPA which extends across a wide area east to west
including small towns and villages within St Albans and North Herts
districts and Dacorum borough, and therefore the demand is from a
wider area than just Harpenden.
9.26
The deficit of places forecast by the model for the next 10 years, until at
least 2018, is regarded as a robust basis to assess the need for
additional places, and in the absence of other data, or another model
that is proven to produce more accurate data tested over an extended
period of time.
9.27
The three existing secondary schools have already been expanded on
a temporary basis to provide additional capacity; however, the schools
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
58

are unwilling to expand their PAN on a permanent basis. The 2011
feasibility studies identifies the potential to expand new St Georges by
0.6FE and Sir John Lawes by 2FE. However, the additional places that
could be provided at those schools would not meet the shortfall and
could not be delivered in the required timescales.
9.28
The forecast level of shortfall in places, the urgency of the requirement,
and the lack of opportunity to expand existing Harpenden secondary
schools justifies additional places being made available immediately
and for the foreseeable future, and the development of a new school
site within the Harpenden EPA.
9.29
Harpenden is considered to be the most sustainable location for a new
6FE secondary school because it is in the top tier of settlements in the
St Albans District meeting the needs of the local community for
services, employment, public transport and recreation. Harpenden is
located in the centre of the Harpenden EPA and the three other
secondary schools within the EPA are located there. Harpenden is a
hub for sustainable travel, with a choice of buses and trains, cycling
and walking.
9.30
The County Council has undertaken an extensive search for suitable
sites for a new 6FE school within the urban area of Harpenden, which
revealed no suitable sites are available and subsequently considered 9
potential sites in the Green Belt sites around the edge of Harpenden.
The Comparative Site Assessment is discussed in the next section of
the report.
In summary -
▪  The forecasting system is considered to be sufficiently reliable and the 
most useful tool to predict the shortfall in places in the Harpenden EPA;
▪  The forecast model has identified an urgent and sustained demand for 
additional secondary school places over the next 10 years within the
Harpenden EPA;
▪  the option of expanding existing school sites to accommodate the 
required places cannot meet the forecast deficit of places within the
required timescale and cannot be delivered because the schools are
unwilling to expand on a permanent basis; and
▪  Harpenden is an appropriate and sustainable location for a new 6FE 
secondary school due to options for sustainable travel choices, and its
location in the centre of the EPA it serves.
Alternative Sites Assessment
9.31
The planning application documents include:
▪  Comparative Site Assessment: January 2015 
▪  Comparative Site Assessment: Addendum report (incorporating 
Appendix 1, and Appendix 2 (September 2017));
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
59

▪  Harpenden, Redbourn and Wheathampstead Site Search Report 
(September 2017); and
▪  2014 technical assessments (for each site) of the environmental effects 
of the development of a 6-8FE at each of the 9 potential sites in the
Green Belt around Harpenden, including: Air Quality Assessment;
Archaeological Desk Based Assessment; Comparative Land Use
Viability Assessment; Flood Risk Assessment; Highways and Access
Feasibility Study; Heritage Impact Assessment; Landscape and Visual
Impact Assessment; Noise Assessment; Preliminary Ecological
Appraisal; and
▪  2014 Planning Appraisals (for each site) 
▪  Viability reports (Site A, Site D, Site F) 
9.32
The 2015 and 2017comparative site assessments consider sites
offering potential for the construction of a 6-8FE secondary school
within the urban limits of Harpenden, Redbourn and Wheathampstead,
and report on the availability of sites outside of the urban area (i.e.
Green Belt sites) around the edges of Harpenden.
Site area
9.33
Building Bulletin 103 sets non-statutory guideline standards for the
construction of new schools. BB103 is used by the EFSA to formulate
the costs of funding new school building projects.
9.34
BB103 sets a minimum requirement of 2.1ha for a 6FE secondary
school (or 2.6ha for an 8FE secondary school), with a separate
minimum requirement for detached playing fields.
9.35
The 2017 site search report describes how BB103 was applied to the
site search process:
▪  The BB103 requirement for an unconstrained site outside the urban 
area is 8.7ha-10.92ha. This assumes that a two storey building can be
accommodated on the site;
▪  The 10.92ha (maximum) is rounded up to 12ha (minimum) to take 
account of potential site abnormals;
▪  The 2015 report identified that a site search minimum area 12ha be 
used to identify a 6-8FE school site to allow for abnormals and to
provide for flexibility;
▪  The 2014 site assessments (for a 6-8FE secondary school) al ow 4ha 
for the school building zone with the residual 8ha being used for
playing fields;
▪  The 12ha should not be regarded as maximum requirement at the site 
search stage since site characteristics can vary significantly across
individual sites;
▪  The 12ha minimum has been tested out in other parts of Hertfordshire 
based on town planning experience7
7 planning permission granted for the construction of a new 8FE primary school on a 16.54ha site at land north of
Stevenage at Great Ashby Stevenage LPA ref 1/134909
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
60

9.36
The 2017 site search report confirms ‘ The County Council and EFSA
remain committed to the use of the minimum 12ha site search
approach for a 6FE secondary school of which a smaller or larger site
area may be required to accommodate a 6FE secondary school
depending on site characteristics’.
Existing secondary school sites
9.37
In 2011, town planning and highway capacity assessments of the
existing schools in Harpenden was undertaken to ascertain the
potential for those sites to accommodate a permanent expansion in
capacity. The appraisals were submitted to St Albans City and District
Council as part of the review of the local plan. The three existing
Harpenden Schools are: Roundwood Park; Sir John Lawes; and St
Georges. The sites are shown on Plan 5204/002, appended to this
report (Appendix 5). There are no existing secondary schools sites in
Wheathampstead or Redbourn.
Roundwood Park (8.02ha)
▪  the school expanded from 6FE to 6.53FE (2014) 
▪  The current site is insufficient in size to accommodate a 8FE school;  
▪  There is potential to acquire land to the north of the school; 
▪  The site adjoins Roundwood Park Primary School (an Academy), which 
expanded in capacity from 1.5FE to 2FE (2013);
▪  The highway appraisal (2011) identified the combined traffic impact on 
the roads in the immediate vicinity of the school as likely to be
unacceptable;
▪  expansion to 8FE could require relocation of the primary school; and  
▪  The school Academy owns the site (transferred from HCC);  
▪  In 2014, Roundwood Park School Governors said they would not be 
prepared to increase the school PAN. That position was restated in
July 2017.
St Georges School (11.37ha)
▪  The school operates at 6.5FE (unchanged since 2008); 
▪  The site is too smal  to expand capacity to 8FE; 
▪  The site is within the conservation area and some buildings are local y 
listed;
▪  The County Council owns the playing fields but not the school 
buildings;
▪  The 2011 town planning appraisal concluded - potential to expand the 
school on its existing site is constrained by the requirement to preserve
and enhance the conservation area, the requirement to demolish and
redevelop the site, and the requirement for additional land for playing
fields;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
61

▪  The highway assessment (2011) identified pedestrian safety issues in 
relation to two adjacent railway crossings and the need for pedestrian
improvements (still the case);
▪  The 2017 site search report concluded that only limited further 
expansion (0.6FE) would be achievable at the site because of the
highway and planning policy constraints; and the likely requirement for
demolition and rebuilding with modern buildings.
Sir John Lawes (6.53ha)
▪  The school has operated at 6.53FE since 2014; 
▪  The site is too smal  to accommodate a 8FE school; 
▪  The school Academy owns the site (transferred from HCC);  
▪  The 2011 planning appraisal identified the school could potential y 
expand but would require detached playing fields (subject to planning
permission);
▪  The 2011 highway assessment identified the school could expand by 
2FE subject to minor improvements to highway safety and visibility;
▪  The 2017 report concluded 2FE would fal  short of the forecast demand 
(6FE) required within the Harpenden EPA (even if it could be provided)
Urban area site search
Harpenden, Redbourn and Wheathampstead
9.38
The 2017 site search report for Harpenden, Redbourn and
Wheathampstead assesses –
▪  sites within the urban areas of Wheathampstead, Redbourn and 
Harpenden;
▪  non-urban sites around the edge of Harpenden; and  
▪  the capacity of the existing school sites in Harpenden to accommodate 
further expansion
9.39
The 2017 site search report updates:
▪  site search reports (2014),  
▪  comparative site assessment (2015),  
▪  site capabilities assessment (2011).  
9.40
The 2015 assessment was based on a database of commercially
available property (August 2014) which was reviewed in August 2017.
9.41
An extensive mapping exercise was undertaken in 2015 to identify sites
providing opportunities to provide school buildings with off detached
playing fields. The search includes:
▪  Open undeveloped areas of land  
▪  Employment zones  
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
62

▪  Land in HCC ownership8 – not required for service use and available
within the required timescales;
▪  Commercial y available land or buildings on the market;  
▪  Land or buildings known to be coming on the market  
9.42
The above criteria were considered satisfactory for the 2017 site
search report.
9.43
The mapping exercise eliminates all areas of land that may not be
suitable for the development of a 6FE secondary school. The remaining
parcels are identified using natural and man-made boundaries.
Wheathampstead
9.44
The potential sites in the urban area of Wheathampstead (June 2017)
shown on Plan 5024 003 include:
▪  6 parcels of land in HCC ownership – al  in active use; the largest site 
Beech Hyde Primary School (1.46ha) is being fully used by the primary
school;
▪  1 playing field in education use – St Helens Primary School (not owned 
by HCC);
▪  4 areas of open land – the largest – land off Mount Road is less than 
2.1ha;
▪  1 residential site al ocation;  
▪  4 commercial properties on the market (June 2017) – al  below 2.1ha 
9.45
The 2017 site search report concludes there are no available, suitable
sites within the urban area of Wheathampstead of the minimum 2.1ha
required to meet the need for 6FE school buildings with detached
playing fields.
Redbourn
9.46
The potential sites in the urban area of Redbourn (June 2017) shown
on Plan 5024 004, include:
▪  2 parcels of land in HCC ownership – both sites in active service use 
with no opportunity for new buildings. The largest parcel of land
(2.05ha) is being fully utilised for education purposes as part of
Redbourn Infants and Junior School;
▪  1 playing field in education use (not owned by HCC); 
▪  8 areas of open land – protected open spaces not available for 
development;
▪  5 residential site al ocations (completed)   
▪  2 commercial properties on the market (June 2017) – both sites below 
2.1ha
8 The site search considered all HCC owned sites, including existing primary schools. None of the primary schools in
Harpenden are surplus to requirements.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
63

9.47
The 2017 site search report concludes there are no available, suitable
sites within the urban area of Redbourn of the minimum 2.1ha required
to meet the need for 6FE school buildings with detached playing fields.
Former Wheathampstead Secondary School site
9.48
The former Wheathampstead Secondary School has been suggested
as a more suitable site for a 6FE school to serve the catchment.
Wheathampstead Secondary School operated from a site to the south
of Butterfield Road in Wheathampstead between 1967 and 1986. The
school buildings were demolished in 2008 and the site of the former
school buildings redeveloped for housing. The former school playing
fields are now in community use.
9.49
Green Belt sites on the edges of Wheathampstead were not assessed
in the comparative site assessment because sites within or on the
edges of Harpenden were considered more suitable to serve the
Harpenden EPA.
9.50
The village of Wheathampstead is forecast to generate almost 20% of
pupils attending the proposed school, however, a far higher proportion
of pupils are likely to originate from be the town of Harpenden and the
surrounding villages are forecast to generate a far higher proportion of
the students attending the school, notwithstanding that the village of
Wheathampstead is closer (by road) to some of the other villages (e.g.
the Kimptons) than is the application site, and therefore those students
would travel along the Lower Luton Road past Wheathampstead village
in order to get to a school at the application site.
9.51
Harpenden is the top group of settlements within St Albans district (with
St Albans and London Colney) to serve the needs of the district in
terms of services, housing and employment. It is therefore considered
a site within, or on the edges of Harpenden, will better meet the
demand for secondary school places within the Harpenden EPA than
would a school within the Green Belt around Wheathampstead.
9.52
The representations suggest the historic pattern of schools with one
school in each of Wheathampstead and Redbourn and 3 secondary
schools in Harpenden aligned well with the actual pattern of demand.
There is currently no secondary school in either Wheathampstead or
Redbourn reflecting the changing pattern of demand in the past and the
decisions that were made at the time to close those schools. The
County Council’s current preference is to locate new secondary
schools in larger settlements which are regarded as more sustainable
long term locations. Therefore it is unlikely that the County Council
would choose to develop a new secondary school in a village or a
smaller town.
Site search process – for sites outside of the urban area
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
64

9.53
The 2015 site search report identified building a new school in the
Green Belt around Harpenden would be preferable to building a new
school in the Green Belt surrounding Wheathampstead or Redbourn for
the following reasons:
▪  Harpenden is one of the main settlements in the district, along with St 
Albans and London Colney identified in district plan documents;
▪  Harpenden provides access to a wide range of facilities, services, 
employment and sustainable modes of travel, providing opportunities
for linked trips to school; and
▪  the majority of pupils wil  come from Harpenden and it is therefore 
sustainable and appropriate to locate the school where the main
demand for places is likely to arise.
9.54
The 2015 site search report and 2017 update presume that it would be
acceptable to accommodate buildings and playing fields on the same
site for a site within the Green Belt.
9.55
The 2015 site search report mapped constraints around the Harpenden
boundary, including: woodland areas; golf courses; flood zones 2 and 3
(higher risk of flooding), landscape and conservation designations;
definitive footpaths and bridleways, playing fields, and land in HCC
ownership.
9.56
Woodland areas, golf courses; and flood zones 2 and 3 were regarded
as less preferable (sequentially) and were therefore discounted,
although these sites may need to be considered again if no alternative
suitable sites were identified (outside of the constrained areas).
Existing playing fields were regarded as potentially suitable for dual
use, in case a school site could be identified in the urban area that
requires detached playing fields.
9.57
The potential sites for a new school (with playing fields) are shown on
Plan 5204/001 (Appendix 6).
9.58
In 2011 an initial site search was undertaken for St Albans,
Wheathampstead and Harpenden for sites with potential to
accommodate a secondary school of 6-8FE, resulting in the
identification of 11 possible sites within the Green Belt surrounding
Harpenden:
▪  Site A: Land east of Luton Road 
▪  Site B: Land north of Ambrose Lane, Harpenden 
▪  Site C: Land at Luton Road/Bower Heath Lane 
▪  Site D: Land east of Lower Luton Road 
▪  Site E: Land north of Redbourn Lane 
▪  Site F: Land north of Lower Luton Road 
▪  Site G: Land east of Croftwel  
▪  Site H: Land south east of Cross Lane 
▪  Site I: Land south of Cross Lane and east of railway 
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
65

▪  Site J: Reserve school site Ayres End Lane, Harpenden 
▪  Site K: Land at Harpenden Road/Beesonend Lane  
9.59
Further viability work and site appraisal work was undertaken in 2014
which resulted in 9 potential sites as a result of:
▪  Site B: Land north of Ambrose Lane, Harpenden based on the highway 
appraisal (2014) concluding that it would be unlikely that a safe and
suitable highway access could be achieved; and
▪  Site I & J were combined to comprise the Ayres End Lane Reserve 
School Site (owned by HCC) as this was considered to create a more
logical site
9.60
These sites are shown on drawing 4812 004: Existing secondary
schools and potential school sites appended to this report (Appendix
7).
Site selection process
9.61
In 2015, a comparative site assessment was undertaken by planning
consultants appointed by Childrens Services for the nine potential sites
based on a five stage methodology. For each site, this included:
1. a range of technical and environmental investigations
2. an assessment of the environmental effects of secondary school
development
3. an assessment of the Green Belt effects of secondary school
development
4. an assessment of whether a secondary school development would be
compliant with planning policy and whether planning permission could
by obtained assessing the environmental and Green Belt effects
5. an assessment of deliverability - in respect of acquisition and
development viability.
9.62
The 2015 comparative site assessment compares each site in terms of;
environment effects (Table 3); Green Belt effects (Table 4); policy
compliance (Table 5); and viability (Table 6) and scores each site to
produce a rank for each site against each criteria.
Environmental effects
Table 3: environmental effects: Site F ranked with other sites
Rank
Higher ranked
Lower ranked
Environmental effect
(with other
sites
sites
sites)
=2
Landscape
A
C, G, H, I/J, K
(D and E)
=3
Heritage
A, C, D
H, K
(E, G, I/J)
Heritage – Archaeology
=2
A, C, G
E, H, I/J
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
66

(D and K)
=2
Ecology
C, D, G
H
(A, E, I/J, K)
=
Flood Risk
N/A
N/A
all sites
=1
Ground Conditions
NONE
A, C, E, I/J
(D, G, H, K)
=
Water Resources
N/A
N/A
all sites
=2
Agricultural Equestrian
A, C, D, I/J
E, H, K
(G)
=
Noise
N/A
N/A
all sites
=
Air Quality
N/A
N/A
all sites
=2
Junction Impact
(A, C, D, E, G,
I/J
NONE
H, K)
=2
A, C, D, G, H,
Link Capacity
NONE
(E, I/J)
K
= 3
Pedestrian / Cycle
D, G, H
E
(A, C, I/J, K)
=1
Public Transport
NONE
C, G, H, I/J
(A, D, E)
Summary
Site F ranked
=1 in terms of public transport and ground conditions - with no better other
site(s)
=2 for ecology, junction impact, link capacity, archaeology and landscape; and
=3 for pedestrian and cycle – with only 1 worse site (Site E)
Green Belt effects
9.63
The comparative site assessment 2015 considered the impact of each
of the 9 potential sites against the five main purposes of the Green Belt
i.e.:
▪  to check the unrestricted sprawl of large built-up areas; 
▪  to prevent neighbouring towns merging into one another; 
▪  to assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment; 
▪  to preserve the setting and special character of historic towns; and 
▪  to assist in urban regeneration, by encouraging the recycling of derelict 
▪  and other urban land. 
9.64
Table 4 shows how each of the sites ranked in terms of the five
purposes of the Green Belt.
Table 4: Green Belt effects (all sites)
Site
Overall green Belt score
Ranking (Green Belt
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
67

Impact)
A: east of Luton Road
2
1
C: Lower Luton Road/Bower
5
=4
Heath Lane
D: east of Lower Luton Road
3
=2
E: north of Redbourn Lane
5
=4
F: north of Lower Luton Road
3
=2
G: east of Croftwell
5
=4
H: south east of Cross Lane
6
=7
I/J: south of Cross Lane
6
=7
K: Harpenden Road/ Beesonend
7
9
Lane
The 2015 comparative site assessment concluded:
large adverse effects in terms of
 safeguarding the countryside from encroachment - Sites C and E
 preserving the setting and special character of towns - Site K
moderate adverse effects in terms of
 preventing neighbouring towns from merging - Sites H, I/J and K;
 safeguarding the countryside from encroachment - Sites D, G H, I/J and K;
 protecting the setting and special character of towns - Site I/J; and,
 maintaining the existing settlement pattern - F and G
no adverse effects in terms of
 checking the unrestricted sprawl of large urban areas - for any of the sites
Planning Policy
9.65
The comparative site assessment considered the likelihood of planning
permission being obtained (for each site) based on an assessment of
the environmental and Green Belt effects at each site (Table 5):
Table 5: Sites where planning permission could be obtained for a 6-8
FE school
Site
Rank
A:
1
D:
2
F:
3
The 2015 comparative site assessment concluded; it would be unlikely
planning permission could be obtained for the development of a 6-8FE
school at Sites C, E, G, H, I/J for the following reasons:
Site
Reason
C:
lack of compliance with Green Belt policy, landscape policy (and
thus
education policy
E:
lack of compliance with Green Belt policy, sustainable transport
and highway policies, scientific impacts on land use viability
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
68

policy, and thus education policy
G:
lack of compliance with Green Belt policy, landscape policy and
thus education policy
H:
lack of compliance with Green Belt policy, landscape policy,
heritage policy and thus education policy
I/J:
lack of compliance with Green Belt policy, sustainable transport
and highway policies, heritage policy, landscape policy, and
thus education policy
Deliverability
9.66
The 3 shortlisted sites (Site A; Site D; Site F) resulting from the
planning policy assessment were considered in terms of viability and
deliverability, i.e. the cost and complexity of delivering the development
a 6FE secondary school at each site. Table 6 shows how the sites
ranked on deliverability.
Table 6: ranking of sites – deliverability
Rank
acquisition considerations -
construction considerations -
▪  current land value 
▪  site preparation; 
▪  likely total acquisition 
▪  site flows; 
costs (CPO);
▪  construction; 
▪  complexity of ownership 
▪  residential amenity 
1
Site A
Site F
2
Site D
Site D
3
Site F
Site A
9.67
In 2017 Lambert Smith Hampton carried out an updated valuation for
each site: The position in relation to each site is summarised below:
Site A: The site having been subsequently identified for allocation in
the Consultation Draft DLP for residential use means that there is
significant hope value attached to this site and the site is likely to be
significantly more expensive to purchase than either of the other sites
and the difference in value between Site A and the other two sites has
increased as a result of its identification in the Consultation Draft DLP.
The current value of the site and its acquisition costs are estimated at
£35M current market value or total compensation payable if acquiring
the land by compulsory purchase which would be £35.1M. The site is in
single ownership.
Site D: The site having initially been identified in the SKM report as
being “potentially suitable for release from the Green Belt” means that
there is hope value at a level above that of other sites on the edge of
Harpenden. The current value of the site and its acquisition costs are
estimated at £2.8M current market value or total compensation payable
if acquiring the land by compulsory purchase which would be £3M.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
69

The site is comprised of six separate titles and the ownership profile at
Site D may require the implementation of a compulsory purchase
process to ensure comprehensive acquisition of all the plots within the
site area
Site F: the site is smaller than previously identified in the previous
report (reference being made to the retained land) and the site has
been identified in the Consultation Draft DLP for education use; there is
some hope value albeit at a lower level than for the other two sites. The
current value of the site is estimated at £1.7M current market value or
total compensation payable if acquiring the land by compulsory
purchase would be £1,717,220. There is a contract in place for the
acquisition of Site F by Hertfordshire County Council.
As a result of the hope value now being attached to Site A and Site D
the sites were ranked as follows:
▪ 
Most favourable site – Site F 
▪ 
Second Most favourable site – Site D 
▪ 
Least favourable site – Site A  
9.68
Furthermore, LSH were aware that there was already a contract is in
place to purchase Site F, and as such, there is much greater certainty
as to the eventual price to be paid for Site F than would be the case in
respect of the other two sites. The LSH report concluded, the fact that
Hertfordshire County Council has now agreed terms for the purchase of
Site F makes the deliverability of a new school on Site F significantly
greater than a new school on Site D, with the likelihood that
Hertfordshire County Council would be the owner by the time the
application is submitted.
Evaluation
9.69
The initial site search process (2011) covered the areas of Harpenden,
Wheathampstead and Redbourn to identify suitable sites to
accommodate a school of 6-8FE. The forecast levels of demand (2014)
indicated that a 6FE school (with playing fields) would be sufficient.
9.70
The site search focussed on Harpenden as the most appropriate
location for a new school because of the numbers of pupils in
Harpenden primary schools who will require a place from 2018 are
higher than any other area within the Harpenden EPA allowing
Harpenden children to remain at a Harpenden schools rather than
being allocated a place in St Albans or Sandringham. Harpenden is in a
central location within the Harpenden EPA, and provides opportunities
for partnership working to develop with other Harpenden schools. The
choice of Harpenden as a location for a new school therefore seems to
be reasonable in school planning and town planning terms.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
70

9.71
The site search identified no available sites within the urban area of
Harpenden for a new 6FE school, and no realistic alternative sites have
been brought forward during the application consultation period. The
site search applies a reasonable (sequential) approach to identifying
potential sites. The conclusion that there are no available sites
(minimum 2.1 ha) within the Harpenden urban area appears to be
robust.
9.72
The site assessment has given detailed and thorough consideration to
the possible 9 potential sites within the Green Belt on the edges of
Harpenden, including, commissioning detailed technical reports on the
environmental effects of a new 6FE secondary school (at each site)
and an assessment of Green Belt effects.
9.73
The ranking of sites against a range of environmental criteria did not
identify one or more sites as clearly more favourable than the others,
with the exception of Site A: Land east of Luton Road, which is
regarded as having the least number of adverse environmental
impacts. In terms of Green Belt effects, the Green Belt Review
submitted with the planning application concluded that development of
any of the sites would result in some level of adverse impact on the
Green Belt, with only the proposed development of Site A (for a 6FE
school) regarding as likely to result in less harm.
9.74
The deliverability of a new 6FE school within the required timeframe
became a key consideration in a decision to reject Site A and Site D in
favour of Site F. The costs of acquiring Site A was thought to be
prohibitive, and potential difficulty in acquiring Site D due to the number
of owners and hope value of the land could require a Compulsory
Purchase Order which would delay the delivery of the school.
9.75
Planning regulates the use of land and ownership is not normally. The
extent to which the fact the County Council own Site F is material to the
decision relates only to deliverability, i.e. that the County Council can
ensure the development is delivered, where currently it could not at
Site A or Site D.
9.76
In summary, the site search exercise has satisfactorily demonstrated
that:
▪  There are no clearly more sequential y preferable, available and 
deliverable sites within the Green Belt surrounding Harpenden;
▪  There are no available sites that could accommodate a 6FE entry 
school (with playing fields) in the built up area of Harpenden Town;
▪  The existing schools are unwil ing to expand their roles on a permanent 
basis to cater for the forecast demand in school places – peaking at
6.7FE in 2022/23;
9.77
The technical assessments that have been carried out for each of the
nine sites, together with the assessment of Green Belt effects
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
71

(purposes of the Green Belt) have provided a sound basis upon which
to generate a shortlist of suitable sites. None of the alternative sites
could be developed (for the purposes of a 6FE secondary school) at
significantly less harm to the Green Belt.
9.78
Site F has been shown to be more deliverable than the other shortlisted
sites (Site A and Site D) for the reasons given in the viability reports,
primarily related to hope value the sites have acquired since they were
promoted as potential housing sites.
9.79
The County Council owns the freehold for Site F, which demonstrates
that the proposed development can be delivered within the required
timescales. The County Council has the means to deliver the school
demonstrated by the agreement it has with the Education and Funding
Agency to fund construction of the school.
9.80
Overall, it is considered that Site F is the most deliverable site within
the timescales. For planning permission to be granted very special
circumstances must be demonstrated, which clearly outweigh the harm
to the Green Belt, and any other harm (NPPF: Paragraph 88).
Green Belt
9.81
The Government attaches great importance to Green Belts. The
fundamental aim of Green Belt policy is to prevent urban sprawl by
keeping land permanently open; the essential characteristics of Green
Belts are their openness and their permanence (NPPF, paragraph 79).
The Green Belt serves five purposes (NPPF, paragraph 80):
▪  to check the unrestricted sprawl of large built-up areas; 
▪  to prevent neighbouring towns merging into one another; 
▪  to assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment; 
▪  to preserve the setting and special character of historic towns; and 
▪  to assist in urban regeneration, by encouraging the recycling of derelict 
and other urban land.
9.82
Local planning authorities should plan positively to enhance the
beneficial use of the Green Belt, such as looking for opportunities to
provide access; to provide opportunities for outdoor sport and
recreation; to retain and enhance landscapes, visual amenity and
biodiversity; or to improve damaged and derelict land (NPPF,
paragraph 81).
Green Belt Review
9.83
The Green Belt Review prepared for St Albans, Welwyn Hatfield and
Dacorum in 2013 identifies the site as being located within a wider land
parcel to the north of Harpenden to Wheathampstead, which joins with
the South Bedfordshire Green Belt. The Green Belt Review Purposes
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
72

Assessment identified the wider land parcel as making a significant
contribution to the purposes of the Green Belt i.e. to::
▪ 
check the unrestricted sprawl of large built-up areas (Purpose 1) 
▪ 
assist in safeguarding the countryside from encroachment (Purpose 
3)
▪ 
preserve the setting and special character of historic towns (Purpose 
4)
9.84
The wider land parcel was assessed as making limited or no
contribution 
to preventing neighbouring towns from merging (Purpose
2). At the site level the land between Batford and Valley Rise functions
as primary local gap between settlements.
9.85
The Green Belt Review forming part of the LVIA in the planning
application considered the Green Belt effects of the proposed
development of a 6-8FE secondary school on five purposes of the
Green Belt. The proposed development at the application site (Site F)
was considered to result in: moderate-adverse effects in terms of
maintaining the existing pattern of development, but no large or
moderate adverse 
effects in terms of:
▪  checking the unrestricted sprawl of built-up areas (Purpose 1); 
▪  preventing neighbouring towns from merging (Purpose 2); 
▪  safeguarding the countryside from encroachment (Purpose 3); or  
▪  preserving the special character of towns (Purpose 4);  
9.86
The application also includes a Green Belt statement (September
2017) which sets out the case for very special circumstances for the
proposed development, i.e. -
▪  education need - the fundamental in principle requirement for the 
development;
▪  the lack of a more sequential y preferable alternative location to meet 
that need;
▪  analysis of site development options, with regard to harm to the 
purposes of the Green Belt, demonstrating that harm to the Green Belt
in the proposed location has been met; and
▪  the amount of development proposed is the minimum requirement - 
and therefore the least impactful effect;
9.87
The 2017 Green Belt statement regards the level of harm as being
outweighed by other considerations, noting that the development has
been designed to minimise the adverse impacts upon the Green Belt:
9.88
Initially four potential site layouts were considered. The proposed
layout was favoured because it met the maximum number of town
planning and landscape objectives set identified in section 5 of the
report, specifically in relation to the Green Belt i.e.:
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
73

▪  locating the school buildings on west side of site to maximise green 
space between Harpenden and Lea Valley Estate;
▪  minimising visual impact of buildings on the Green Belt; 
▪  minimising building footprint and impact on Green Belt; 
▪  breaking down the mass of buildings to individual blocks as part of 
campus layout;
▪  limiting building height to two storeys; 
▪  conserving and enhancing existing character and Green Belt where 
possible; and
▪  maintaining a green and open character perception of the landscape 
from the Lower Luton Road;
9.89
The proposed layout also delivered wider benefits in terms of:
▪  reducing visual impact on adjoining residential properties by setting 
back the school building from Lower Luton Road and Common Lane;
▪  siting and orientation of buildings to minimise impact of noise from 
existing sources;
▪  placement of buildings to minimise impact on heritage assets 
(Thatched Cottage, Mackerye End; and
▪  mitigation of existing surface water flooding running through the site.  
Evaluation
9.90
The NPPF states ‘inappropriate development is, by definition, harmful
to the Green Belt and should not be approved except in very special
circumstances (Paragraph 87). When considering any planning
application, local planning authorities should ensure that substantial
weight is given to any harm to the Green Belt. ‘Very special
circumstances’ will not exist unless the potential harm to the Green Belt
by reason of inappropriateness, and any other harm, is clearly
outweighed by other considerations (Paragraph 88). A local planning
authority should regard the construction of new buildings as
inappropriate in Green Belt (Paragraph 89).
9.91
The construction of new school buildings in the Green Belt must be
regarded as inappropriate development. The proposed sports facilities,
hard standing, car parking and construction of new accesses onto the
Lower Luton Road and Common Lane, and remodelling of the site
must also be regarded as inappropriate development.
9.92
The proposed development is also in conflict with Policy 1: Metropolitan
Green Belt of the St Albans Local Plan Review 1994.
9.93
The planning design and access statement identifies the total area of
the site covered by buildings and hard surfacing is 2.28ha (equal to
13% of the overall site area i.e. 17.20ha). The amount of development
is regarded as the minimum necessary for a new 6FE secondary
school in accordance with Government (non-statutory) guidance in
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
74

BB1039. The minimum amount of development is proposed in order to
minimise harm to the Green Belt.
9.94
The evolution of design identified four different site development
options with the aim of minimising the harm to the Green Belt.
9.95
The proposed layout is relatively compact and allows the school to
function while meeting the education objectives set out in section 5 of
the report and a number of landscape objectives i.e.
▪  providing a setting and presence for the school and welcoming the 
community;
▪  providing accessible sports facilities for the community  
▪  creating a space in the centre of the development with outward views 
to the landscape;
▪  provide a secure environment for students  
9.96
The proposed layout would appear to minimise, as far as possible, the
negative impact upon the Green Belt by placing buildings close to the
edge of the settlement and placing open spaces on the western
boundary to provide the maximum gap to Valley Rise development,
and therefore limit encroachment into the countryside. The proposed
layout is considered to represent the minimum level of adverse impact
upon the Green Belt whilst meeting the maximum number of education
and landscape objectives. There would be little benefit in seeking to
reduce the amount of floor space because it would be unlikely to further
reduce the impact on the Green Belt.
9.97
In terms of Green Belt effects, in the comparative site assessment
(2015) the application site (Site F) ranked =2 with Site D (Land East of
Lower Luton Road). The only site which ranked higher i.e. conflicting
less with the purposes of the Green Belt was Site A: Land East of
Luton Road. However, Site A was identified as a potential housing site
in an early iteration of the St Albans Local Plan resulting the site having
acquired significant hope value, and therefore would not be deliverable
in practice. Similarly, Site D has been promoted as a potential housing
site and has acquired a relatively higher value than Site D.
9.98
There are no clearly more available or deliverable sites in the Green
Belt around Harpenden where the proposed development of a school
would have significantly less impact upon the Green Belt. The Green
Belt statement has demonstrated that there are available sites within
the urban area of Harpenden for the development of a 6FE secondary
school.
The site appraisal work was based on space standards in Building Bulletin 98 – the non-statutory Government
guidance on size standards for school buildings and grounds for secondary schools in place from March 2014 to April
2016. BB98 was replaced by Building Bulletin 103 Area Guidelines for Mainstream Schools which provides the up to
date non-statutory area guidelines for school buildings (part A) and sites (part B). The size specifications in BB103
are on average 15% lower than BB98. The proposed development is based on BB103 guidance.

Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
75

9.99
The proposed tree planting to strengthen site boundaries, extensive
meadow planting between playing fields, and woodland planting in the
north east corner of the site should help the developed site assimilate
with the surrounding countryside (after 10 years) and safeguard the
rural settlements at Mackerye End from adverse visual effects.
Very special circumstances
9.100 There is an immediate pressing demand for additional secondary
school places in the Harpenden EPA by September 2018, and a
sustained level of demand to support a 6FE school through to 2025 at
least, based on the forecast model, indicating there is significant level
of demand in the system.
9.101 The Education Needs Assessment alludes to the longer term demand,
based on Office of National Statistics (ONS) projections indicating the
numbers of secondary school age pupils will continue to rise over the
next 20 years. However, given the longer timeframe in which to
consider a range of options to meet the demand in the longer term, this
factor should not carry weight in the determination of this planning
application.
9.102 The pressing and urgent need for additional secondary school places is
the main justification for a new school. The comparative site
assessment (2015 full report and 2017 update) has identified that
further capacity sufficient to meet level of demand cannot be
accommodated at existing Harpenden school sites within the required
timescales, the lack of suitable/available sites within the urban area of
Harpenden, or other more preferable sites within the Green Belt
surrounding Harpenden that would be likely to result in less harm to the
Green Belt.
9.103 Overall, the level of demand for additional secondary places in the
Harpenden EPA and the lack of available, suitable, deliverable,
alternative sites to meet the demand, together form a persuasive case
for very special circumstances.
9.104 The NPPF (Paragraph 72) states –
The Government attaches great importance to ensuring that a sufficient
choice of school places is available to meet the needs of existing and
new communities. Local planning authorities should take a proactive,
positive and collaborative approach to meeting this requirement, and to
development that will widen choice in education. They should:
▪ give great weight to the need to create, expand or alter schools; and 
▪ work with schools promoters to identify and resolve key planning issues 
before applications are submitted.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
76

9.105 The circumstances of this planning application seem to precisely sum
up the circumstances being described in Paragraph 72, where
additional school places are clearly required to meet the needs of the
existing community. The County Council as local planning authority has
the opportunity to act positively and collaboratively by grant planning
permission for a new 6FE secondary school to secure the places
required over a sustainable period, and more generally widen the
choice in education in Harpenden.
9.106 Therefore, great weight is afforded to the requirement to meet the
needs of the existing community. The case for very special
circumstances has clearly been demonstrated in the Education Needs
Statement, Planning Design and Access Statement, Comparative Site
Assessment, and the effects on the purposes of the Green Belt has
been properly assessed.
9.107 The significance of the other harms and the relative weighting is dealt
with in the Planning Balance.
Transport
9.108 The planning application is accompanied by a Transport Assessment
and Travel Plan and additional information was submitted in November
and December 2017 in response to comments from the Highway
Authority.
9.109 The main highway related issues are:
▪  Trip generation 
▪  Walking and cycling; 
▪  Buses; 
▪  Access and circulation 
▪  Junction capacity 
▪  Parking provision  
▪  Street Parking;  
▪  Speed Control; and  
▪  Sustainable travel: walking, cycling and buses  
9.110 The Supplementary Transport Note (14 December 2017) sets out the
timing of provision of off-site highway works and provides an
assessment of:
▪ 
the efficiency of the pupil drop off,  
▪ 
the impact upon traffic flows between the school entrance and Station 
Road,
▪ 
provision of parking spaces, and  
▪ 
introduction of waiting restrictions on local streets and 
▪ 
sets out the details of the proposed bus strategy, roles and 
responsibilities and action plan measures to promote walking, cycling,
public transport, car sharing.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
77

Trip generation
9.111 The Transport Assessment identifies the likely pupil catchment area as
shown in Table 7 below. The TA predicts 292 pupils (25.4%) are
expected to live within a 2km (walking distance of the site) and a further
442 pupils (38.4%) are expected to live within a 2-5km distance of the
site with the remaining 36.2% expected to reside more than 5km from
the site.
Table 7: predicted pupil catchment
Area
Proposed Pupils
% Pupils
Area 1 (Kinsbourne Green)
5
0.5
Area 2 (New Mill End/East
10
0.9
Hyde)
Area 3 (Batford/Marshall’s
86
7.5
Heath)
Area 5 (Central Harpenden)
86
7.5
Area 6 (Hatching Green)
10
0.9
Area 7 (Southdown)
248
21.6
Blackmore End
14
1.2
Flamstead
67
5.9
Hemel West & South
105
9.1
Kimpton
43
3.7
Redbourn
81
7.0
Sandridge
5
0.5
Welwyn & East
5
0.5
Wheathampstead
225
19.6
Luton & North West
38
3.3
North Villages
91
7.9
St Albans & South
29
2.5
TOTAL
1,150
100
Walking and cycling
9.112 Southdown and Wheathampstead are identified as generating the
highest numbers of pupils. The application includes a package of
pedestrian improvements on local roads (Appendix 2) including a
toucan crossing opposite the site. The application site is generally
regarded as being accessible from within Harpenden using the existing
network of footpaths, for example, pupils from the Southdown area will
be able to access the site via Piggotshill Lane, Marquis Lane and
Crabtree Lane and the footbridge crossing the River Lea. The package
of pedestrian improvements schemes includes street lighting the
section of Piggotshill Lane between Wheathampstead Road and
Crabtree Lane. The package of sustainable transport schemes includes
improvements to existing walking routes in Harpenden and for sections
of the Lower Luton Road.
9.113 Wheathampstead is located over 2km from the school site which
exceeds a reasonable walking distance for secondary school pupils.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
78

There are very limited opportunities for cycling along the Lower Luton
Road due the narrow carriageway between Wheathampstead and the
application site, making it virtually impossible to construct a new shared
cycleway and footpath alongside the carriageway.
9.114 In 2011 the section of the Lower Luton Road between
Wheathampstead and Batford was classified as a safe walking route to
school (in relation to the Sir John Lawes School). The recent report by
the Road Safety Team considers this section not to be a safe walking
route to school in relation to a new 6FE school at the application site.
9.115 The transport strategy for the school is based on delivering a modal
split that significantly favours sustainable travel choices – walking,
cycling and public transport. Therefore, given the constraints of this
section of the Lower Luton Road to deliver improved pedestrian and
cycle facilities, there is even greater emphasis on bus services.
Buses
9.116 The Travel Plan includes an assessment of capacity on existing
services and identifies there is a need to provide additional bus
services for the first 7 years of the schools occupation. Initially theses
services will need to be funded, although it is anticipated that the
additional services will be commercially viable after 7 years.
9.117 The Travel Plan sets out two different options (Option A and Option B)
for how the demand would be met, including negotiating minor changes
to the timetable of the existing bus services to make best use of the
availability of capacity on that service by school pupils.
9.118 In addition, new school bus services are proposed to serve the
following areas: Slip End, Markyate, Flamstead, Redbourn
Wheathampstead, Kinsbourne Green, Area 6 (Hatching Green), the
Southdown area (Grove Avenue, Meadway and Topstreet Way). It is
anticipated that these additional services would be secured via a bus
partnership between the four Harpenden Schools, the bus operators
and Hertfordshire County Council.
9.119 The cost of the additional services will need to be specifically funded.
The EFSA have agreed to meet the large proportion of costs of these
additional services. The conditions require a bus services
implementation strategy to be submitted which will specify the means
by which the payments will be provided.
9.120 The Supplementary Transport Note (December 2017) confirms:
▪ 
The four schools are committed to integrated travel planning and 
partnership;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
79

▪ 
The two main bus operators are also wil ing to commit to the 
partnership subject to having the freedom to set fares at levels they
consider to be commercial;
▪ 
The schools wil  resource the analysis of postcode data to facilitate the 
annual review of the bus network;
▪ 
Parents/guardians of children joining the school will be asked to commit 
to using sustainable modes for home-to-school travel;
▪ 
The ESFA has committed to consider funding for bus services during 
the first seven years. The amount payable would vary year by year in
accordance with requirements assessed following the annual review
and actual demand, possibly subject to some form of capping.
Agreement will have to be reached on how the money is secured and
held;
▪ 
The Travel Plan wil  be strengthened to ensure the achievement of the 
necessary modal split and to show how the funding mechanism will
operate. The Bus Strategy will form a separate document
Modal split
9.121 The Travel Plan sets ambitious targets for achieving a modal split of
56% as part of the transport strategy in line with the objectives of
securing sustainable modes of travel set out in the Hertfordshire Local
Transport Plan consultation.
9.122 Table 8 shows the comparison of the baseline modal split identified in
the feasibility study with the enhanced modal split proposed in the
application.
Table 8: Baseline vs. Enhanced modal split
(a) Baseline modal split
(b) Enhanced modal split
Mode
Split
Pupils
Mode
Split
Pupils
(%)
(%)
Walk/cycle
24.5
282
Walk/cycle
25.6
294
Car share
11.4
131
Car share
5.1
59
Car/Taxi
28.6
329
Car/Taxi
12.8
147
Bus
35.5
408
Bus
56.5
649
Total
100
1,150
Total
100
1,150
9.123 The enhanced modal split will require the full package of pedestrian
improvement schemes being delivered as part of the development. The
conditions require that all but one of the schemes (Scheme 11:
proposed junction capacity improvements at Station Road/ Lower Luton
Road) are implemented prior to the first occupation of the school.
9.124 Achieving the enhanced modal split will minimise congestion on the
highway by reducing additional traffic flows generated by the school as
a result of unnecessary car journeys. The Travel Plan includes actions
in the form of an intervention strategy if the modal split is not being
delivered.
Access and circulation
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
80

9.125 The proposed accesses and internal circulation have been carefully
scrutinised by the Highway Authority and further clarification was
sought as to the efficiency of the internal circulation to cope with
predicted volume of traffic and the effects on traffic flow on the Lower
Luton Road.
9.126 The Supplementary Transport Note (December 2017) provides
information on the separation of car and bus movements, queueing
within the site and capacity of the right turn lane into the site. The
Highway Authority has commented that:
▪  the internal circulation provide adequate separation for buses and cars; 
▪  the double yel ow lines should ensure the drop off area is kept free; 
▪  the bus lane provides stacking space for up to 9 buses - equal to the 
maximum number of buses requiring waiting in the PM peak.
▪  the operation of the junctions (entrance and exit) with Lower Luton 
Road has been modelled and any queues to exit the site are predicted
to be contained within the site;
▪  the capacity of the right turn movement into the entrance is considered 
acceptable to accommodate right turning vehicles, leaving Lower Luton
Road westbound carriageway largely unobstructed; and
▪  both accesses have passed Stage 1 safety audit. 
9.127 The proposed accesses on the Lower Luton Road have been through a
Stage 1 safety audit and have been demonstrated as capable of
operating safely.
Parking
9.128 The maximum parking standards of the St Albans Revised Parking
Policy and Standards 2002 are: 1 space per 2 staff, plus 1 space per
15 students. The maximum capacity of the school is 1,150 staff. It is
expected that there will be 1 member of staff (full-time) per 30 students
(i.e. 39 teaching staff).
9.129 The maximum parking standard requires 20 spaces for staff (39 staff)
plus 77 spaces (1 space per 15 pupils) giving 97 spaces total. The
scheme proposes 97 spaces in order to provide the maximum
requirement.
9.130 The Transport Assessment assumes the school would employ 95 full-
time staff, of which 56.8% are likely to drive to school, generating an
real parking requirement of 54 spaces.
9.131 The level of provision is compared with other Harpenden Schools:
▪  Roundwood Park School - 1,260 pupils and 173 staff (124 FTE), with 
120 on-site car parking spaces for staff and visitors. The latest Travel
Plan for the school (February 2016) indicates 90% of staff currently
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
81

travel by car. The ratio of parking per staff member is 1 space per 0.69
staff, which is higher than is proposed at the KWS site, i.e. there are
less spaces available per member of staff at Roundwood Park than at
the KWS site;
▪  The Sir John Lawes School - 1,222 pupils and 172 staff (138 FTE), with 
107 on-site car parking spaces for staff and visitors. The latest Travel
Plan for the school (November 2016) indicates that 77% of staff
currently travel by car. The ratio of parking per staff member is 1 space
per 0.58 staff, which is comparable to that proposed at the KWS site.
▪  St George’s School - 1,327 pupils and 239 staff (152 FTE). There is not 
information on staff travel patterns or car parking provision at the site
provided in the most recent Travel Plan (June 2003)
Street Parking
9.132 The TA proposes to implement on street parking restrictions in the
vicinity of the site to be funded by the development in two phases. The
extent of the second phase cannot be accurately predicted without the
development in place, however, the funding for such schemes (if any
restrictions are required) can be secured as part of the application to
enable waiting restrictions to be implemented when the school is
occupied and with knowledge of current travel patterns.
Junction Capacity
9.133 The TA considered the capacity of the mini-roundabout junctions at
Lower Luton Road / Common Lane; and at Lower Luton Road / Station
Road, which confirms both junctions operate above normal capacity
criteria currently in the absence of the school traffic. By 2025 the
background traffic levels are predicted to increase leading to a slight
worsening in current levels of congestion.
9.134 The TA originally proposed replacement of the of the mini-roundabout
at Common Lane with a ghost island/right turn facility, however, the
Highway Authority prefers the existing arrangement to remain
unchanged with the proposed improvements to safety.
9.135 The proposed improvements to the Station Road mini-roundabout
junction, involving alterations to the kerb lines to allow the provision of
two lanes at the approaches to the junction, are considered acceptable
to the Highway Authority.
9.136 The proposals for these junctions are considered acceptable to mitigate
the impact of the development on junction capacity.
Speed Control
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
82

9.137 The proposal is to introduce a 30mph speed control between the
30mph zone at Batford to the 30mph zone at Valley Rise. The will have
the effect of providing a continuous 30mph zone between
Wheathampstead and Batford. The preliminary design includes
signage, road markings, and coloured surfacing. It is possible that
street lighting will be required as part of the detailed design. The
Highway Authority notes that the proposed 30mph zone would not
comply with the adopted Speed Strategy for Hertfordshire for roads of
the nature and capacity of the Lower Luton Road, however, on balance
there is a need to introduce speed restrictions in parallel with the new
school The County Council supports the introduction of 20mph zones
at some schools where it would result in improved safety. The Lower
Luton Road is not suitable for a 20mph zone due to the nature and
character of the road.
Evaluation
9.138 The Transport Assessment has demonstrated that the proposed
accesses can operate safely, with the 30mph zone in place, the impact
on junction capacity can be mitigated, and the drop off facilities and bus
stops provided within the site can operate without adversely impact
flow of traffic on the Lower Luton Road. The right turn lane for
westbound traffic turning into the site is considered to be acceptable to
accommodate the number of vehicles turning right during the AM and
PM peak, and on that basis the free flow of traffic along this section of
the Lower Luton Road should be largely unobstructed.
9.139 The Travel Plan proposes a pedestrian improvements scheme which
will be delivered prior to the occupation of the school, including a
toucan crossing opposite the site, lighting on Piggotshill Lane and
various pedestrian improvements schemes within Harpenden. The
Travel Plan sets an ambitious modal split target of 56% of pupils
travelling to school via sustainable travel modes (walking, cycling and
buses). The modal split will be delivered via the package of pedestrian
improvements and the provision of additional bus services from
outlying areas. The overall package of highway and pedestrian
improvements are considered acceptable to mitigate any significant
adverse impacts of the development on the highway network. The
Highway Authority raises no objection, subject to the recommended
conditions.
9.140 The proposed development is considered to comply with the
sustainable travel objectives within the NPPF, specifically in terms of
actively managing patterns of growth and making the fullest possible
use of public transport, walking and cycling (core planning principles
paragraph 17) and reduces unnecessary car journeys, and promotes
sustainable transport modes, offering people a real choice of how they
travel, and reduces the need for major transport infrastructure works.
The development achieves safe and suitable access to the site for all
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
83

people. The impacts on the transport network are not severe. The
residual traffic impacts are mitigated as far as possible. The application
should not be refused on transport grounds.
Drainage
9.141 The application includes a Flood Risk Assessment (FRA) which was
revised in December 2017 and January 2018 at the request of the Lead
Local Flood Authority (LLFA).
9.142 The application site is located within Flood Zone 1 which indicates that
the site is at a low risk of flooding from rivers. The applicant has
acknowledged the existence of an overland flow route which runs
through the site close to the western boundary. The overland flow route
is generated within a wider catchment to the north of the site. The
application site is located within 100m of the River Lea, and therefore
surface water from the overland flow causes poor drainage within the
site and flooding of the Lower Luton Road close to the junction with
Crabtree Lane.
9.143 The LLFA and the drainage consultant both agree that the proposed
development should remove the risk of flooding of the Lower Luton
Road during the 1 in 30 year rainfall event (as a minimum).
9.144 The scheme proposes an open ditch to convey water on the western
side of the site plus an infiltration basin to attenuate surface water from
the overland flow. The infiltration basin has been designed to provide a
total storage volume of 3250m3. The independent assessment of the
catchment indicated that storage capacity of 3200m3 would be required
for the 1 in 30 year rainfall event. Therefore the LLFA agrees that the
proposed attenuation volumes are sufficient for the 1 in 30 year rainfall
event. For events in excess of the 1 in 30 year event the basin will
naturally overtop onto the Lower Luton Road.
9.145 The LLFA recognise that infiltration tests that have been carried out to
inform the drainage strategy and that they are crucial to the overall
feasibility of the proposed scheme. The LFFA has concerns that the
extent of re-profiling of the land levels proposed in the application could
reduce the infiltration potential of soils. Therefore, at the detailed
design stage, the LLFA will require further detailed infiltration testing to
be carried out, and to be provided with details of the ground water and
river levels to ensure that the attenuation basin will infiltrate at the rates
required by the drainage strategy in practice. If the proposed rates of
infiltration cannot be achieved an alternative strategy will be required.
9.146 In terms of surface water generated within the development site,
proposed drainage features provide a total of 1932m3 attenuation
storage through a combination of permeable paving (440m3), swale
(30m3) and an attenuation tank (1462m3) located underneath the main
car park. Drainage from the sports pitches and MUGA will be managed
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
84

by storage within the sub-base material, and conveyed via a surface
water drainage network to the attenuation basin serving the overland
flow.
Evaluation
9.147 The LLFA has required the drainage strategy to demonstrate sufficient
storage capacity within the site for the 1 in 30 year rainfall event and to
demonstrate how surface water generated within the site during the 1
in 100 year (plus climate change) rainfall event would be managed
within the site before discharging to the infiltration basin.
9.148 The proposed drainage strategy has demonstrated that it capable of
managing surface water generated within the site up to the 1 in 100
year rainfall event (plus climate change) and provides able adequately
proposals to manage the overland flow route for the 1 in 30 year
rainfall.
9.149 The proposed drainage strategy therefore meets the requirements set
out in the NPG to ensure that post development run-off rates are
equivalent to pre-development levels (Greenfield runoff) for equivalent
storm events, and the volume of surface water run-off post
development should not exceed the pre-development volume based on
the 100 year 6 hour event.
9.150 The proposed drainage strategy also meets the standards required in
Policy 4 of the Lead Local Flood Authority (LLFA) SuDS Manual, which
states: flooding must not occur on any part of the site for a 1 in 30 year
rainfall event except in areas that are designed to hold and convey
water, and during the 1 in 100 year (plus climate change) rainfall event
no flooding should occur in any part of a building or on neighbouring
sites.
9.151 In relation to flooding that is likely to affect the Lower Luton Road for
rainfall events exceeding the 1 in 30 event, the drainage strategy
should reduce the frequency of flooding events in this location due to
increase volume of surface water storage being provided within the
site, which is a significant betterment of the current situation.
9.152 The proposed drainage strategy indicates the exceedance route for
surface water from the attenuation basin for surface water generated in
excess of the 1 in 30 year flood event, which also meets the
requirements of Policy 4 of the Hertfordshire SuDS Manual.
9.153 The LLFA has confirmed that the proposed development is acceptable
subject to conditions.
9.154 The NPPF (Paragraph 100) states ‘Inappropriate development in areas
at risk of flooding should be avoided by directing development away
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
85

from areas at highest risk, but where development is necessary,
making it safe without increasing flood risk elsewhere.
9.155 The sequential test is applied through the plan making process to steer
new development to areas with the lowest probability of flooding. The
NPPF (Paragraph 101) confirms that development should not be
allocated or permitted if there are reasonably available sites
appropriate for the proposed development in areas with a lower
probability of flooding.
9.156 The NPPF (Paragraph 102) goes on to say: If, following application of
the Sequential Test, it is not possible, consistent with wider
sustainability objectives, for the development to be located in zones
with a lower probability of flooding, the Exception Test can be applied if
appropriate.
9.157 The flood risk assessments submitted for all 9 potential sites all
conclude the sites are at an equally low risk of flooding (from rivers)
because all sites are located within Flood Zone 1. There is no widely
available information on surface water flooding at the site level;
therefore the risk of surface water flooding was not considered in the
comparative site assessment, however the FRA prepared for the
planning application makes significant provision for surface water
flooding at the site level.
9.158 Given that the sequential test has not been applied in the FRA followed
it is necessary to apply the exception test. The NPPF (Paragraph 102)
confirms that for the Exception Test to be passed:
▪ 
it must be demonstrated that the development provides wider 
sustainability benefits to the community that outweigh flood risk,
informed by a Strategic Flood Risk Assessment where one has been
prepared; and
▪ 
a site-specific flood risk assessment must demonstrate that the 
development will be safe for its lifetime taking account of the
vulnerability of its users, without increasing flood risk elsewhere, and,
where possible, will reduce flood risk overall
9.159 The site specific flood risk assessment demonstrates that the minimum
storage requirement is met within the site for the 1 in 30 year rainfall (fir
overland flow) and the 1 in 100 year rainfall event (for surface water
generated within the site). The proposed drainage strategy includes
sustainable drainage features which are designed to ensure that the
specific risks of surface water flooding in this location are minimised.
The proposed development is considered to meet the test of being safe
for its lifetime (taking account of the vulnerability of its users). The
drainage strategy provides improvement (betterment) of the existing
surface water flooding affecting the Lower Luton Road, to reduce flood
risk overall. Therefore, the exception test is met in the terms set out in
the NPPF. Furthermore, the LLFA are satisfied that the proposed
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
86

development adequately provides for both sources of surface water
flooding and is therefore acceptable, subject to conditions.
Heritage: Archaeology
9.160 The application includes an Archaeological Desk Based Assessment
(June 2017); Archaeological Evaluation (September 2017) and an
Archaeological Impact Assessment (November 2017).
9.161 The archaeological site investigation found an unenclosed Saxon
cemetery in the north-west corner of the site and an Iron Age enclosure
in the north east corner of the site. These areas are currently open
pasture. The proposed landscape masterplan shows these areas as
meadows which is compatible with preservation in situ because the
archaeological remains are not under threat of development. The
application proposals provide for significant changes in topography.
9.162 For the area of the Saxon cemetery this would involve raising the level
of the land by over 5m. The subsequent impact assessment identifies
that a minimum of 1m of soils would be placed on top of the remains to
preserve them in situ.
9.163 The County Archaeologist and Historic England were re-consulted on
the methodology proposed in the impact assessment and both
indicated that whilst the proposals for preservation in situ are
acceptable in principle, more details of the works will be required in
order to ensure that the heritage asset will be appropriately conserved.
Evaluation
9.164 The application documents are sufficient to demonstrate significance of
the heritage asset to inform decisions of how they should be treated.
The proposed preservation in situ is regarded as the most sensitive
way to conserve the Saxon cemetery.
9.165 The proposals are considered to comply with the NPPF, specifically:
9.166 In determining applications, local planning authorities should:
▪  require an applicant to describe the significance of any heritage assets 
affected, including any contribution made by their setting (Paragraph
128); and
▪  When considering the impact of a proposed development on the 
significance of a designated heritage asset, great weight should be
given to the asset’s conservation. The more important the asset, the
greater the weight should be. Significance can be harmed or lost
through alteration or destruction of the heritage asset or development
within its setting (Paragraph 132)
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
87

9.177 The condition requires further details to be submitted and further
investigations to be carried out on site prior to the commencement of
development which will involve a qualified archaeologist being on site
during construction and changes to site levels. Any direct adverse
impact on archaeology is fully mitigated, although slight adverse impact
is attributed to the impact on the setting of the heritage asset.
Heritage: listed buildings
9.178 The application includes a Heritage Impact Assessment (Beacon
Planning – August 2017) developing 2014 assessment. The impact
assessment identifies the Thatched Cottage (Grade II) opposite the site
as being the principal heritage asset affected by the proposals. The
Marquis of Granby pub (Grade II) is located approximately 200m south
of the site on the banks of the River Lea. The impact assessment refers
to Historic England Good Practice Advice Note ‘The Setting of Heritage
Assets’ (2015).
9.179 The impact assessment notes that Mackerye End House (Grade I) is a
designated asset of the highest significance and great weight should be
given to its conservation (in line with the NPPF: Paragraph 132). The
Mackerye End Conservation Area is also a designated heritage asset
of high significance as it contains a highly-designated heritage asset (a
Grade I listed building) and a number of Grade II listed buildings of high
significance.
The Thatched Cottage
9.180 The impact assessment describes The Thatched Cottage as having
existed for 250 years. In the late C18 a Smithy developed to the south.
The heritage significance of the cottage is derived mainly from its
historic interest and connections with the early development of Batford
and associations with Batford Mill. The small group of buildings
opposite the cottage were removed in the mid-C19 since then the open
context of the cottage with the land opposite has remained relatively
constant. The view across the application site is not designated given
the low status of the cottage. The visual and function relationship with
Batford Mill was eroded as a consequence of the C20 development of
the mill complex. The mid-C20 remodelling of the cottage from
labourers houses to a single dwelling further lessened its relationship
with surrounding landscape.
Mackerye End Conservation Area
9.181 The impact assessment describes the Mackerye End Conservation
Area, located immediately to the north of the application site, as
containing a settlement continuously occupied from the end of the first
century BC at least until the end of the early Saxon Period. The St
Albans District Council: Conservation Area Character Assessment for
Mackerye End (February 2001) identifies Mackerye End as comprising
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
88

a small rural settlement situated north east of Harpenden and west of
Gustard Wood overlooking open undulating countryside with views
across Harpenden and north towards Kimpton and North Hertfordshire.
The main features of the conservation area is Mackerye End House a
Grade I listed manor house. The settlement is roughly centred on
Mackerye End Farm. Within the conservation area open spaces are
generally enclosed with informal hedges, flint walls or wooden fences.
9.182 The conservation area assessment describes much of the character of
the Mackerye End conservation area is derived from its rural situation
and its views out across open field and countryside, including many
imposing views between the hedgerows out across towards the urban
areas of Harpenden and Wheathampstead. The significant mature
trees and surviving hedges are major contributors to the conservation
area’s setting, character and appearance, and many historic field
boundaries still retain their hedgerows. Any new development should
respect the grain, setting, scale, materials and use of existing
development or land.
9.183 The impact assessment lists the 7 listed buildings within Mackerye End
Conservation Area, four of which are located within 75m of the
application site:
▪  Mackerye End - Grade I – is a large manor house essential y of 
Jacobean style and date, evidence suggests it was extensively altered
and re-built in 1665. The house is red brick, plain tile roof with Tudor-
style chimneys and bell turret tall finial and weathervane. Extensions to
the south were added in the early C19;
▪  Wel  House - Grade II – Wel  House. Mid C17 timber frame; red brick 
infill. Plain tile roof. Single storey.
▪  Barn south of Mackerye End - Grade II - Barn. C18. Timber frame. 
Weather boarded. Plain tile roof. 3 bays.
▪  Stables and Coach House at Mackerye End - Grade II - Stabling, coach 
house and cottage in single range. Mid or late C18. Red brick. Plain tile
roof.
9.184 Mackerye End Farm and Holly Bush Cottage (both Grade II) are
located to the north of Mackerye End manor house.
Evaluation
9.185 The proposed development will preserve the setting of listed buildings
in the vicinity of the site by maintaining acceptable distances between
school buildings and listed buildings i.e. the façade of the front of the
school is approximately 116m from The Thatched Cottage. The houses
at Mackerye End (Conservation Area) are approximately 590m to the
north of the school buildings. Block woodland planting is proposed in
the north east corner of the site screen and filter views of the
development. The impact on listed buildings is regarded as very
limited.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
89

9.186 In terms of historic environment effects, the application site ranked =3rd
(with sites E, G, I/J) in the comparative site assessment. Site A, Site C,
Site D ranked higher.
Landscape
9.187 The planning application includes a Landscape and Visual Impact
Assessment (LVIA) and Green Belt Impact Review, Landscape
Masterplan, Tree Surveys and Tree Protection and Topographical
Surveys.
Landscape baseline
9.188 The LVIA and Green Belt review describes views of the site –
▪  the val ey side location gives potential for the site to be exposed to 
views from a number of points in the surrounding landscape;
▪  more open views are available from the Lower Luton Road;  
▪  vegetation along the northern and eastern boundaries screen views, 
and in some areas provide filtered views;
▪  views towards from the Mackerye End Conservation Area are heavily 
filtered by existing vegetation;
▪  views from a number of residential properties on Common Lane;  
▪  views from public rights of way are mostly filtered by existing vegetation 
and/or topography
9.189 The tree survey identified three ‘character groups’ of trees:
▪  mature trees along the boundary with Common Lane – provide visual 
screen from Common Lane;
▪  trees and hedgerow forming an intermittent boundary with adjoining 
land on east of the site (including some large trees);
▪  a few maturing trees (hawthorns) along the southern boundary with the 
Lower Luton Road.
9.190 The topographical site surveys show existing site levels:
▪  The high point (125m AOD) is in the north east corner of the site 
adjoining Mackerye End. The levels fall to approximately 86m AOD in
the south east corner of the site adjoining Common Lane/ Lower Luton
Road. There is a subtle valley feature that runs along the west side of
the site close to Batford Farm buildings and Common Lane.
▪  Land to the north east of the site is bounded by a narrow lane linking 
Common Lane to Mackerye End, which rises fairly steeply towards the
north east corner of the site reflecting the rising land on the valley side.
In places the surface of the road is 2 metres below the level of the
northern part of the site before the road levels re-join the adjoining land
levels closer to Mackerye End.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
90

▪  Levels for the main car park fal  from east to west from 93m to 88.6m 
over a distance of approximately 100m (approx. 1 in 4 degree of slope).
The proposed flood attenuation basin in the south east corner of the
site measures 33m (east to west) by 49m (north to south) and has a
maximum depth of 2.7m.
9.191 The proposed development will involve extensive earthworks to create
the levels required for the main buildings, car park, sports hall and
playing fields.
9.192 The proposals would create 4 distinct levels within the site:
▪  upper playing fields (120 - 123m),  
▪  lower playing fields  - athletics track, cricket pitch, rugby pitch, field 
sports (98m);
▪  sports hal , multi-use games area (MUGA), artificial footbal  pitch (93 - 
94m);
▪  school buildings (91.8m finish floor level) 
Landscape Visual Impact Assessment
9.193 The LVIA assesses the adverse landscape effects and relative level of
significance associated with the proposed development in Year 1
(winter) and Year 10 (summer) in relation to: landuse, landform,
vegetation, landscape related heritage assets, landscape character
areas and from 21 representative visual receptor locations around the
site.
9.194 The overall significance of the landscape effects is summarised in
Tables 10, 11 and 12. The full range of landscape effects is
summarised in Appendix 8.
Landscape effects
Table 10: landscape effects (landform, landuse, vegetation, landscape)
Year 1
Year 10
Landform
Major
Major-moderate
Landuse
Major-moderate
Moderate
Vegetation
Minor
Minor
Landscape
Minor
Minor
Landscape character
1.195 The main body of the site falls within the Upper Lea Valley (LCA: 33)10
which follows the course of the River Lea between the Luton Hoo
Estate in the west and Lemsford in the east, wherein arable farming,
with smaller areas of pasture closer to settlements, woodland, and
10 Hertfordshire Landscape Character Assessment
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
91

three golf courses. The River Lea meanders along the narrow river
valley; views of the river floodplain are rarely very prominent. The edge
of the river slopes gradually (less than 1 in 500) with more pronounced
slopes on the valley sides (between 1 in 12 and 1 in 18). Views along
the valley are locally interrupted by belts of trees and small woodlands.
The major visual impacts are localised and comprise the built edge of
the settlements including Wheathampstead, the Folly, Batford and Lea
Valley.
1.196 The strategy for managing includes improving the network of woods
within the open arable landscape between Wheathampstead and
Harpenden by planting on the tops of the slopes to emphasise the
valley form; and, promoting hedgerow restoration through locally
appropriate measures including coppicing, laying and replanting.
1.197 The north east corner of the application site falls within the southern
edge of the Blackmore End Plateau (LCA: 34), which extends for a
distance of 6km between Harpenden in the west and Welwyn in the
east, to the north of the River Lea. The landscape character is made up
of an elevated plateau (120-130m altitude) with slopes of less than 1 in
250 across. The main land use is arable farming with smaller areas of
pasture closer to settlements, and areas of regenerated common.
Woodland is scattered through the area in discrete linear shapes. The
distinctive features of the area include Mackerye End House and
gardens, located immediately to the north of the application site, and
the village of Ayot St Lawrence, located approximately 3km to the east
of the application site.
Table 11: landscape effects (landscape character)
Year 1
Year 10
LCA33: Upper Leave
Minor
Minor
Valley (as a whole)
LCA33: Upper Lea
Major-moderate
Moderate
Valley (vicinity of the
site)
LCA34: Blackmore End
Negligible
Negligible
(as a whole)
LCA34: Blackmore End
Moderate
Minor
(vicinity of the site)
Visual Impact
1.198 The LVIA describes the main features of the proposed development:
▪  a low level terrace will be created using earthworks within the south-
western part of the site to locate the buildings. This will ensure the built
form relates to the edge of the settlement and minimises visual
influence from surrounding viewpoints in the landscape;
▪  slopes north of the sports hal  are managed as a meadow; 
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
92

▪  level changes extend the natural plateaux in the northern part of the 
site accommodate the playing fields and minimise effects on landform;
Representative viewpoints
9.199 The LVIA provides a Zone of Visual Influence (ZVI) drawing showing
21 representative viewpoints. The ZVI map showing the locations of
each visual receptor is appended to this report (Appendix 8).
Table 12: visual receptors: viewpoints in each category
significance of effect
Year 1
Year 10
Landscape effect
Viewpoint
Major
A
Major-moderate
E, L, M, Q, U
A, L, M, Q, U
Moderate
Minor-moderate
K, O, P
E, K, O, P
Minor
C, D, F, N, S
C, D, F, N, S
Low
Very Low
R
R
Negligible
B, I
B, I
No change
G, J, T
G, J, T
None
H
H
9.200 In terms of landscape effects, the application site (Site F) ranked equal
2nd (with Site D and Site E) in the comparative site assessment (only
site A resulted in less significant landscape effects).
Landscape proposals
9.201 The planting strategy is based on –
▪  planting large maturing tree species where possible and appropriate; 
▪  planting the perimeter areas with native tree and shrub species; 
▪  intermediate planting between buildings; 
▪  ornamental planting around buildings 
9.202 The proposals to increase biodiversity include:
▪  maintaining open glades and rough glazing by annual mowing; 
▪  creating of new wildlife ponds; 
▪  bat and bird boxes; 
▪  permanent wildflower meadows; 
▪  regular hedgerow maintenance; 
▪  creating habit piles 
9.203 The landscape strategy, illustrated on the Landscape Masterplan, is
based upon:
▪  keeping the northern and eastern parts of the site as open and green 
as possible to retain the ‘green-lung’ between Harpenden and
Wheathampstead, and reduce visual impact of the school;
▪  using existing contours to minimise the effects on topography; 
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
93

▪  using grass playing pitches in the northern and eastern parts of the site 
to integrate with surrounding landscape;
▪  setting back buildings from Lower Luton Road, to reduce visual impact  
▪  extensive meadow areas on slopes to the north of the building and 
retention of existing boundary vegetation.
▪  tree planting; including areas of native tree planting in the southern part 
of the site - providing screening and softening to the development;
▪  new tree and hedgerow planting to enhance the setting of the 
buildings, soften views and provide shade;
▪  establish native hedgerows on the western and southern site 
boundaries;
▪  setting back the car park from Lower Luton Road to minimise the 
impact park on views from the road and provide a generous landscape
buffer.
▪  tree and shrub planting around and within the car park to screen views 
of the cars;
▪  minimising the use of external lighting in order to minimise adverse 
effects on the surrounding landscape and visual receptors
Proposed Mitigation
9.204 The proposals illustrated on the Landscape Masterplan include:
▪  native shrub and hedge planting along the site boundaries to 
strengthen existing boundaries and supplementary planting to infill
gaps and open sections;
▪  planting a landscape buffer in the southern part of the site adjacent to 
Lower Luton Road, to enhance landscape quality;
▪  block woodland planting with native species in the north-western corner 
of the site to protect views from Mackerye End Conservation Area;
▪  native hedgerow planting, including re-instatement of native hedgerow 
on southern site boundary
▪  large areas of managed grassland on the sloping parts of the site  
▪  a management plan – detailing aftercare and future maintenance 
proposals to ensure the new planting establishes;
▪  limited use of 2m high green weldmesh fences to secure the area 
around the school buildings, with advance planting to soften and
screen); with 1.2m high timber post and rail fencing running parallel
with the front of the site
Evaluation
9.205 The overall significance of landscape effects (Year 1) are:
▪  major adverse effects on Landform and from Viewpoint A at the
junction of the Lower Luton Road and Common Lane.
▪  major-moderate adverse impacts in terms of landuse, landscape
conservation (Upper Lea Valley LCA in vicinity of the site) and from
viewpoints E: Makerye End Lane / public footpath no27a (edge of
Conservation Area
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
94

−  L: Common Lane from site boundary 
−  M: Footpath 27 c. from site boundary 
−  Q: Wheathampstead Road: 200m east Piggotshil  Lane, and   
−  U: Crabtree Lane/Marquis Lane: junction with national cycle route 
57
▪  moderate adverse effects on the Blackmore End LCA (vicinity of site)
▪  minor-moderate adverse effects on the following viewpoints:
−  K: Common Lane 
−  O: B652 Station Road 
−  P: Crabtree Lane 
▪  minor adverse effects on vegetation, landscape, the Upper Lea Valley
LCA (as a whole) and from viewpoints:
−  C: Manor Road: western end of Lea Val ey Estate 
−  D: Bridleway 54: between Mackerye End and Lea Val ey Estate 
−  F: Mackerye End (lane): northern edge of Conservation Area 
−  N: Ox Lane 
−  S: Footpath 28: Leasey Bridge Road to Harpenden Road 
9.206 The overall significance of landscape effects (Year 10) include:
▪  major-moderate adverse effects in terms of landform (Year 10) and
from viewpoints:
−  A: Junction of B653 Lower Luton Road and Common Lane 
−  L: Common Lane from site boundary 
−  M: Footpath 27 c. from site boundary 
−  Q: Wheathampstead Road: 200m east Piggotshil  Lane 
−  U: Crabtree Lane/Marquis Lane: junction with national cycle 
route 57
▪  moderate adverse impacts in terms of landuse, and to the Upper Lea
Valley LCA (in the vicinity of the site).
▪  minor adverse impacts to the vegetation and landscape of the site, to
the Upper Lea Valley LCA (as a whole), the Blackmore End LCA (in the
vicinity of the site), and the following viewpoints:
−  C: Manor Road, at western edge of Lea Val ey Estate 
−  D: Public Bridleway 54 between Mackerye End and Lea Val ey 
Estate
−  F: Looking south on Mackerye End 
−  N: Looking east Ox Lane 
−  S: Public footpath no.28 from Leasey Bridge Road to Harpenden 
Road
9.207 The landscape proposals include mitigation which will adequately
address the most significant landscape effects to landform and visual
effects after 10 years. The adverse effects to landuse and the
landscape conservation areas (in the vicinity of the site) cannot be fully
mitigated (after 10 years) due to the nature and scale of the proposed
development.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
95

9.208 The Landscape Officer’s comments are noted, in particular:
▪  the proposed development fundamental y changes the landscape 
character and condition of the site from a vacant parcel of semi-
improved grassland, to a fully developed school campus with
associated sports pitches; however the significance of this is mitigated
due to the introduction of woodland, meadow, trees and native shrub
planting that make a significant contribution to the landscape resource
and enhance biodiversity; and
▪  locating the school buildings in the lower lying south west corner of the 
site appears to be a logical extension of the settlement, and will help
the development assimilate within views and the wider landscape
setting;
9.209 With regard to the concerns raised by Landscape Officer with regard to
the visual impact of the development, the LVIA provides representative
viewpoints from the wider area surrounding the site which provides a
full visual context for the site in order to be able to objectively assess
the overall significance of the development. The level of information on
visual impact is sufficient to be able to determine the application. The
conditions require a detailed landscaping scheme to be submitted to
include details of additional woodland planting and cross section
drawings to ensure that the adverse landscape effects of the
development are mitigated as far as possible.
1.210 It is acknowledged that the proposed development would have long
term adverse effects on landform and five number of representative
viewpoints close to the site (major-moderate), and would result in
adverse effects on the Upper Lea Valley (in the vicinity of the site) and
from five representative wider viewpoints (moderate adverse). The
adverse landscape effects after 10 years are not considered to be at a
level of significance to warrant refusal of the planning application,
however, the adverse effects must be taken into consideration in the
overall Planning Balance.
Design and Appearance
9.211 The LVIA describes the design as a ‘campus style’ approach, with
three main building elements. The main (southern) block comprises the
main halls, offices and learning resource centre in an L-shaped layout.
The main block is linked to an inverted U-shape (northern) block which
provides the main classrooms. The space in between the main blocks
creates a sheltered courtyard space. The third element is the detached
sports hall located to the north of the teaching block.
9.212 The visual impact of the buildings is limited by the location and height
of the buildings. The buildings are two storeys high and located in the
south east corner of the site. The amount of development is the
minimum required in order to meet BB103 space standards for new
school development.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
96

9.213 The main building is set back by over 100m from the Lower Luton Road
in order to minimise visual impact. The front elevation of the main block
will be clad in red brick, with lesser areas of rainscreen cladding and
glazing. Render is proposed on the elevation facing the internal
courtyard and the elevation facing Common Lane.
Evaluation
9.214 The main school buildings is located on the west side of the site, as
close as possible to Common Lane, although a distance of 65m is
maintained to the nearest properties which is adequate to prevent
views from the upper windows of the development having an adverse
impact on residential amenity. The separating distance and the
proposed floor levels being similar to the storey height of properties on
Common Lane should prevent overlooking.
9.215 The development is a maximum of two storeys which is an appropriate
scale to existing development. The use of red brick matches the
predominant material used for houses on Common Lane. The
boundary planting will be strengthened to provide softening and
screening although a section of boundary hedgerow and trees would
need to be removed to create the service and pedestrian access,
meaning the school building will be clearly visible from houses on
Common Lane. However, the building should not appear overbearing
or visually dominant in views from Common Lane due the distance and
the modest height of the building. Although the sports hall is slightly
taller than the main school buildings it is modest in scale and massing
in relation to the houses on Common Lane. The sports hall is located to
the rear of the school building and would not feature prominently in the
main public views of the school site. The existing hedges would be
retained to screen views of the sports hall in views from Common Lane.
9.216 In terms of the scale of development, the amount of floor space is the
minimum level required and it is broken into separate buildings to avoid
the development appearing dominant in scale and massing.
9.217 The site layout meets a number of the educational objectives by
providing a secure layout with views into the school from the frontage
and out from the school to the landscape. The changes in levels will
need to be handled carefully to ensure that movement flows through
the site and changes in levels are not a barrier to movement within the
site.
9.218 Access for vehicles, pedestrians and cycles has been carefully
considered to provide separate access points to avoid unnecessary
conflicts. Pedestrians are able to access the site from the surrounding
network of footpaths and from bus stops opposite the site with a
Toucan crossing providing opposite the school enable pedestrians to
cross safely.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
97

9.219 The buildings are set back within the site to minimise the visual impact
of development on the site from the Lower Luton Road. This also helps
to reduce the impact upon residential properties and protects the
setting of the listed building opposite.
9.220 The entrance to the school has clear visual signposting from the
pedestrian accesses and car park. Cycle parking is provided in a
convenient location close to the pupil entrance. Overall the design of
the school is a good basis for establishing the school presence within
the landscape of the site and provides a welcoming presence for
visitors.
9.221 The appearance of the building will judged on the use of high quality
materials. The conditions require samples of materials of construction
to be submitted to the commencement of the development.
9.222 The proposed development is considered to be consistent with the
overall design aims in the NPPF (Paragraph 58) to ensure that
developments:
▪  function wel  and add to the overal  quality of the area  over the lifetime 
of the development;
▪  establish a strong sense of place; 
▪  creates attractive and comfortable places; 
▪  optimises the potential of the site to accommodate development; 
▪  incorporates green space,  
▪  supports local facilities and transport networks; 
▪  responds to local character and history,  
▪  reflects the identity of local surroundings and materials; and  
▪  is visual y attractive as a result of good architecture and appropriate 
landscaping
9.223 The proposed siting, scale, and building massing and the extensive
amount of proposed planting will reduce the adverse visual effects
upon the Green Belt and enhance the landscape and green
infrastructure value of the site. The proposal is consistent with the aims
of Policy 1 (Metropolitan Green Belt) of the St Albans Local Plan
Review 1994 requires new development in the Green Belt to integrate
with existing landscape, through careful siting, design and external
appearance, and additional landscaping.
Noise
9.224 The NPPF (Paragraph 109) provides that the planning system should
contribute to and enhance the natural and local environment by
preventing both new and existing development from contributing to or
being put at unacceptable risk from, or being adversely affected by
unacceptable levels of soil, air, water or noise pollution.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
98

9.225 Planning should aim to avoid noise giving rise to significant adverse
impacts on health and quality of life as a result of new development;
mitigate and reduce to a minimum other adverse impacts on health and
quality of life arising from noise from new development, (including
through the use of conditions) recognising that development will often
create some noise; and, identify and protect areas of tranquility which
have remained relatively undisturbed by noise and are prized for their
recreational and amenity value for this reason11.
9.226 Decision making should take account of the acoustic environment and
consider: whether a significant adverse effect is occurring or likely to
occur; whether or not an adverse effect is occurring or likely to occur;
and whether or not a good standard of amenity can be achieved;
including identifying whether the overall effect of the noise exposure
(including the impact during the construction phase wherever
applicable) is, or would be, above or below the significant observed
adverse effect level and the lowest observed adverse effect level for
the given situation12.
9.227 The relationship between noise levels and the impact on those affected
will depend on how various factors combine in any particular
situation13, including:
▪  the source and absolute level of the noise; and
▪  the time of day it occurs;
▪  the number of noise events, and
▪  the frequency and pattern of occurrence of the noise;
▪  whether or not the noise contains particular high or low frequency;
▪  the general character of the noise (i.e. whether or not the noise
contains particular tonal characteristics or other particular features);
and
▪  local topology and topography should be taken into account; along with
▪  the existing and, where appropriate, the planned character of the area.
9.228 The overall aims for noise management should be: to avoid significant
adverse impacts on health and quality of life; mitigate and minimise
adverse impacts on health and quality of life; and where possible,
contribute to the improvement of health and quality of life with the
broad aim of noise management being to separate noise sources from
sensitive noise receivers and to minimise noise14.
9.229 The noise impact assessment submitted with the application includes
background noise measurements at three locations:
11 The NPPF: Paragraph 123
12 National Planning Guidance: Noise: Paragraph: 003 Reference ID: 30-003-20140306
13 National Planning Guidance: Noise: Paragraph: 006 Reference ID: 30-006-20141224
14 Noise Policy Statement for England (2010)
(*)MP1 and MP2 were attended measurements taken at 15-minute durations for 3 consecutive hours between
11.30am and 14.30 on Friday 7th July 2017;
(**)
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
99

MP1- approximately 6m from the carriageway of the Lower Luton Road;
MP2- proposed front façade main school building
(100m from Lower Luton Road; 64m from Common Lane);
NB: attended measurements were taken at MP1 and M2 for a 15
minute period on Friday 7th July between 11:30 and 14:45;
MP3 - western site boundary adjacent to Common Lane
(210m from Lower Luton Road).
NB: measurements were taken at MP3 using a sound level meter
over sequential 5 minute periods from 15:00 on Friday 7th July and
11:00 on Monday 10 July 2017
9.230 The noise assessment confirms road noise associated with the Lower
Luton Road is the dominant noise source at MP1 and MP2; road noise
associated with traffic on Common Lane was the dominant noise
source at MP3
9.231 The noise assessment has regard to the effect of existing noise
sources on the performance of internal teaching spaces15 and
demonstrates that natural ventilation may be used given the external
ambient (free field) noise levels would not exceed 16dB measured at
the façade of the building.
9.232 Background noise has been measured at a representative position of
the nearest noise sensitive receptors was used as a representative
value to compare with plant noise. It is likely that acoustic louvres or
screens may be required for plantrooms to ensure plant noise is less
than +5dB, above which can result in adverse impacts.
Evaluation
9.233 The noise assessment indicates that the adverse noise impacts
generated by the school are low, and the effect of environmental noise
on the school will be at an acceptable level, allowing natural ventilation
to be used. The noise assessment identifies the existing noise
environment is dominated by traffic noise. The school buildings have
been set back within the site to reduce the effects of noise on the
school as far as possible. Secondary schools are compatible with
residential areas. Noise associated with the use of the playing fields
during the school day, are generally accepted not to at a level to cause
significant disturbance to residents in the area.
9.234 With regards to use of the sports facilities outside school hours by the
community, this may have the potential to disturb residents, given the
relatively short distance in between. Therefore, it is appropriate to limit
the hours of use of the sports facilities to not later than 9pm Monday to
Saturday and 7pm on Sundays. The all-weather pitch shall not be used
for community use until a noise assessment has been completed taking
15 Building Bulletin 93: acoustic design for schools performance standards
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
100

into account background noise measurements, and measurements of
noise levels generated by the school use of the all-weather pitch,
modelling of the effects upon sensitive receptors, and mitigation
proposals as may be necessary.
Air Quality
9.235 The 2008 Ambient Air Quality Directive sets legally binding limits for
concentrations of particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) and nitrogen
dioxide (NO2). The Air Quality Impact Assessment (August 2017)
submitted with the application considers transport related air pollutants
– Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) and particulates (PM10).
9.236 St Albans City and District measure NO2 concentrations in 37 locations
including three in the Harpenden area. Table 9 shows the recorded
levels of NO2 at the three monitoring locations in Harpenden.
Table 9: Recorded levels: NO2 annual mean concentrations (µgIm-3)
High Street
Crabtree JMI,
High Street,
Harpenden
Crabtree Lane,
Wheathampstead
Harpenden
Year
2010
37.8
25.7
27.1
2011
32.4
21.1
23.5
2012
37.5
24.1
26.5
2013
32.8
20.2
24.4
2014
29.3
19.7
26.3
2015
30.9
15.7
20.4
Note: there is no recorded data for PM10 at these sites.
9.237 The air quality impact assessment includes recorded data for the
Harpenden area, and modelled data (adjusted) at the site level. Table
10 shows the mean levels of NO2 and PM10.
Table 10: mean NO2 and PM10: concentration (1) for the Harpenden
area: (2) modelled (adjusted) at the site level.
1. Average NO2 and PM10 (µgIm-3) per km2 for Harpenden (Defra)
Nitrogen Dioxide
Particulates
(NO2)
(PM10)
Year
2014
16.65
15.21
2017
14.87
14.73
2025
12.09
14.19
2. Modelled (adjusted) annual mean concentrations (µgIm-3) at site
level
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
101

2014
23.06
16.43
2017 (without development)
20.46
15.76
2017 (with development)
21.08
15.88
2025 (without development)
18.01
15.28
2025 (with development)
18.81
15.41
National Air Quality Strategy
40
40
(NAQS) objectives (µgIm-3)
Notes:
1. NAQS objectives - to be achieved by 31st December 2004;
2. 2014 = Base year; 2017 = opening year; 2025 = future year;
3. Modelled data is based on average daily traffic flows (with consideration to
the proportion of HGV traffic) from traffic counts undertaken for 1 week in May
2017 (over 2 weekends).
4. Reductions in annual mean NO2 concentrations from 2014 to 2025 are as a
result of presumed improved engine efficiency and reduced pollutant output,
meaning lower concentrations of pollutants are likely to be present16
5. All adjusted modelled concentrations are below the National Air Quality
Standard objectives
9.238 National Planning Guidance confirms the relevance of air quality to
planning decisions depend on the proposed development and its
location. Relevant considerations include whether the development
would significantly affect traffic in the immediate vicinity of the site (or
further afield) by generating or increasing traffic congestion;
significantly changing traffic volumes, vehicle speed or both;
significantly altering the traffic composition on local roads; or exposing
people to existing sources of air pollutants by building new
development in places with poor air quality.
9.239 Planning conditions can be used to secure mitigation, examples of
mitigation include:
▪ 
the design and layout of development to increase separation distances
from sources of air pollution;
▪ 
using green infrastructure, in particular trees, to absorb dust and other
pollutants;
▪ 
means of ventilation;
▪ 
promoting infrastructure to promote modes of transport with low impact
on air quality;
▪ 
controlling dust and emissions from construction, operation and
demolition; and
▪ 
contributing funding to measures, including those identified in air quality
action plans and low emission strategies, designed to offset the impact
on air quality arising from new development.
Evaluation
9.240 The comparative air impact assessment 2014 identified all sites as
being equal in terms of air quality. However, the 2017 comparative
16 Comparative Site Assessment: Addendum report Appendix 1 (paragraph 3.2.3)
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
102

sites assessment update concluded that the air quality effects
associated with the application site (Site: F) were slight adverse. On
this basis the site was ranked 9th (last) of all sites.
9.241 The level of traffic related air pollution (NO2/PM10) is presumed to fall by
2025 compared to current levels due to more efficient cars and fuel
technology. Therefore, the overall level of risk associated with traffic
generated pollution at the application site is regarded as low and does
not warrant refusal of the planning application. The site is not located
within an Air Quality Management Area indicating that no specific steps
are required to improve air quality in the vicinity of the site. The slight
adverse impact must be regarded with other harm in the Planning
Balance.
9.242 The proposed development delivers on opportunities for minimising the
effects of poor air quality related to road traffic by providing an
appropriate separation distance between the school and the Lower
Luton Road, delivering and the enhanced modal split, and by planting
semi mature trees at the front of the site to screen / filter/ absorb air
pollutants.
Lighting
9.243 The LVIA states ‘The use of external lighting is limited in order to
minimise any adverse effects on the surrounding landscape and visual
receptors. The car park fronting Lower Luton Road would be lit using
lighting columns. Cut-off luminaires would be used to minimise
unnecessary light spread. Lighting is also proposed for the external
spaces and paths associated with the main school building. No lighting
is proposed within the northern and eastern portions of the site, and
likewise there would no flood lighting of sports pitches
9.244 The NPPF (Paragraph 125) states ‘by encouraging good
design…decisions should limit the impact of light pollution from artificial
light on local amenity, intrinsically dark landscapes and nature
conservation.
Evaluation
9.245 The minimal lighting to buildings and car park areas and the avoidance
of floodlighting are welcomed. Given the sensitivity of the site in terms
of landscape and Green Belt floodlighting should be avoided if at all
possible in future. Further details are required of the light of car parks
and buildings to ensure the lighting is appropriate and to control levels
of glare, and the height and direction of lighting. There is an absence of
street lighting on this section of the Lower Luton Road. The introduction
of a new access and egress will change the nature and character of
this section of the road and may require lighting for signage and or
street lighting. There will be some harm to the Green Belt as a result
although this should be modest in scale and effect and can be
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
103

controlled by condition to ensure this remains a predominantly dark
environment.
Ecology
9.246 The NPPF (Paragraph 109) places a duty on the planning system to
contribute to and enhance the natural and local environment by
recognising the wider benefits of ecosystem services, minimising
impacts on biodiversity, providing net gains in biodiversity (where
possible); and establishing coherent ecological networks resilient to
current and future pressures.
9.247 Local planning authorities should aim to conserve and enhance
biodiversity, encourage opportunities to incorporate biodiversity in and
around developments, and as a last resort, refuse planning permission
where significant harm cannot be avoided, adequately mitigated, or
compensated for (Paragraph 118).
9.248 The site comprises four fields of improved grassland, with tree and
scrub lines along the eastern boundary (identified as an important
green lane), hedgerow along the northern boundary, and scrub and
tree cover along the western boundary (southern end). The proposals
include retaining as much as possible of the existing boundary
vegetation and introduction of new habitats including a school allotment
and orchard, creation of an area of meadow, and supplementary
planting with some semi mature trees along the boundaries. The new
drainage channel and attenuation basin will be planted with wetland
species. The proposals are designed to enhance habitat value for
wildlife and help reinforce local distinctiveness. The proposals are
designed to have minor beneficial impact (in green infrastructure terms)
by improving connectivity between the site and the wider landscape.
9.249 The Ecological Impact Assessment identifies the proposed
development would give rise to the loss of a large area of improved
grassland and some minor removal of boundary vegetation to create
the site access (Common Lane). In the absence of mitigation this would
give rise to a Minor Adverse impact upon habitats, however, after
mitigation the effects become Neutral, through inclusion of open glades
or areas of rough grassland scrub habitats maintained by annual
mowing, replacement planting with native trees and shrubs providing a
food source for wildlife.
9.250 The proposed biodiversity enhancements, including the creation of a
new wildlife pond in a corner of the site; increasing the structural
diversity of the boundary vegetation; and installation of bat boxes and
bird boxes would have a (minor) beneficial overall effect.
9.251 The County Ecologist consultation response notes:
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
104

▪  The existing grassland is considered to be of little intrinsic quality but is 
likely to support farmland nesting birds and species using hedgerows
and grassland edge habitats, however the relative value of the site will
be higher due to the extensive area of grassland and the low level of
disturbance having persisted at the site for a relatively long period;
▪  Some protected species are likely to use the site (badgers, bats 
reptiles, breeding birds, invertebrates), there is nothing to suggest the
site supports any community or species of such significance to
represent a major constraint on the proposals;
▪  The impact upon the existing habitat is described as being minor 
adverse, however, this is likely to be an underestimate given the whole
site will be affected, including the introduction of large areas of amenity
grass and hardstanding, however the relative significance is low /
negligible due to the nature and importance of the site to begin with,
and certainly does not represent an ecological constraint on the
proposals;
▪  The proposals for creation of an al otment, orchard and meadow, are 
particularly welcome and are regarded as having the potential to be
locally significant.
▪  Mitigation measures should be proposed in the form of detailed 
planting plans and a formal landscape / ecology management as a
condition of planning permission;
▪  The proposals do not include floodlighting, which is welcome given the 
sensitive nature of the site, its location and topography;
9.252 Comparatively, the application site (Site F) ranked =2nd (together with
Site A, Site E, Site I/J, and Site K) The proposed development at Site
C, Site D, and Site G would have less ecological effects.
Evaluation
9.253 The ecological impact assessment claims that the proposed
development would give rise to minor adverse effects (without
mitigation) although these would be reduced to neutral with mitigation.
The County Ecologist suggests there could be minor beneficial effects
if all of the proposed habitats (woodland, orchard, meadow, and ponds)
are delivered. The County Ecologist notes that there will be a
considerable level of disturbance to the site which would affect the
potential for wildlife (including protected species) to use the site in the
short term.
9.254 While the proposals for woodland and extensive meadow planting are
welcome, there appear to be opportunities to plant additional trees in
groups or small copses on the some of the slopes to mitigate views of
the level changes and strengthen landscape character. Additional
woodland planting would be in keeping with the Upper Lea Valley and
Blackmore End Landscape Character Areas. Woodland and meadow
planting are compatible and would create visual interest and
opportunities for shade. Planting additional trees would increase habitat
potential of the site, providing valuable habitat for birds, mammals and
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
105

insects. Carefully placed groups of trees could help to soften views of
the steeper slopes and reduce the visual impact of the playing fields.
9.255 Overall, the proposed development would not result in significant
ecological impacts at the site level and therefore it would not be
appropriate to refuse planning permission, furthermore, it does not
warrant consideration of alternative sites which could have less impact
on biodiversity. The proposals would, as far as possible, minimise the
effects on ecology. The application proposes adequate mitigation which
has the potential to enhance the ecological potential of the site overall.
The proposed development does not raise any significant conflict with
the NPPF objectives of conserving and enhancing the natural
environment (Paragraphs 109, 111 and 118).
10.
Planning Balance
10.1
The proposed development represents inappropriate development in
the Green Belt. The NPPF (Paragraph 87) states “inappropriate
development is by definition harmful to the Green Belt and should not
be approved except in very special circumstances. When considering
any planning application, local planning authorities should ensure that
substantial weight is given to any harm to the Green Belt. ‘Very special
circumstances’ will not exist unless the potential harm to the Green Belt
by reason of inappropriateness, and any other harm, is clearly
outweighed by other considerations”.
10.2
The proposed development would harm the openness of the Green
Belt and adversely impact visual amenity, landform and landscape
character in the vicinity of the site. The proposed layout and planting
strategy will mitigate adverse visual impact as far as possible, however,
the adverse impact cannot be fully mitigated, and therefore moderate
weight 
is attached to adverse landscape effects in the overall planning
balance.
10.3
The proposed development would result in slight adverse impact on
local air quality by 2025 (when the school is fully occupied) due to road
traffic pollution associated with the large number of vehicles on the
Lower Luton Road. However, air quality standards are expected to
improve in the vicinity of the site and more generally by the time the
school is fully occupied in 2025 due to reductions in harmful emissions
through the UK Clean Air Strategy. Therefore only very limited weight
is attributed to air quality impacts.
10.4
The proposed development would have a large adverse impact on the
individual enterprise and the permanent loss of an area of Grade 3a
(best and most versatile) agricultural land. However, there would be no
wider agricultural impact beyond the site level. Therefore moderate
weight 
is attributed to the agricultural impact.
10.5
The condition protecting the archaeology of the site should ensure the
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
106

remains are conserved in line NPPF policy. The setting of the
archaeological remains could be impacted by the development,
although this is unlikely to be to a significant degree because the most
significant remains will be within an area of meadow. Given the
significance of the remains some limited weight is attributed to the
potential impact however small. There would be no significant adverse
impact on listed buildings and therefore no weight is attributed (positive
or negative).
10.6
The drainage strategy will provide adequate attenuation within the site
for the 1in 30 year rainfall event for the overland flow and for the 1: 100
year rainfall event for the surface water generated within the site. The
proposal meets the requirement for greenfield run-off rates for new
development. The drainage strategy provides will improve the existing
situation by reducing the frequency of flooding on the Lower Luton
Road based in all probability. However, given the residual risk of
flooding remains, however slight, some very limited weight is attached
to the residual risk because of the nature and sensitivity of the school
development to flooding.
10.7
The Transport Assessment and Travel Plan provide tenable measures
to deliver a high modal split in favour of sustainable travel, which would
be a significant improvement above existing Harpenden schools. The
package of off-site infrastructure improvements, the additional bus
services and the means and mechanism to deliver it through the bus
partnership and direct funding should help to ensure that this ambitious
modal split is achieved in practice. The proposals demonstrate that the
operation of the school would not have a severe residual impact on the
highway network; however, due to the increase level of traffic and the
highway related impacts on the Green Belt of the new site accesses
and physical works, moderate weight is attached to the residual
highway impact.
10.8
The provision of sports facilities and the benefits for community use
within an area of high participation in sport and an apparent deficit of
community facilities across a range of sports is given modest weight.
10.9
The impacts on ecology are potentially positive in the long term;
however this is given no weight.
10.10 The education benefits of the of the development in terms of providing
the capacity for additional secondary school places needed in the
Harpenden School Planning Area, in particular the urgent and pressing
need for the places. Therefore, great weight is attached to the
educational need in accordance with the NPPF (Paragraph 72).
10.11 The education benefits and the development of a new 6FE secondary
school within the area of need, combined with the lack of available sites
within the built up area of Harpenden, and the lack of any more
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
107

suitable, available and deliverable sites within the Green Belt
surrounding Harpenden are significant.
10.12 Therefore great weight is given to the need to provide the additional
school places in the overall balance.
10.13 It is considered that these matters weight in favour of the proposed
development, and are sufficient to clearly outweigh the harm to the
Green Belt and the other harm that has been identified.
11.
Conclusion
For the reasons set out in the report, it is considered that there are very
special circumstances for the inappropriate development in the Green
Belt, related to the urgent and pressing need for additional secondary
school places with the Harpenden Education Planning Area that is
required between 2018 and at least 2028, and that these matters are of
sufficient weight to clearly outweigh the harm to the Green Belt by
reason of inappropriateness and any other harm.
12.
Conditions
Conditions
Time limit for commencement
1.
The development hereby permitted shall be begun before the expiration of
3 years from the date of this permission.
Reason: To comply with the requirements of Section 91 of the Town and
Country Planning Act 1990.
Samples of materials
2.
Prior to the commencement of development samples of the materials
proposed to be used for the construction of the external surfaces of the
buildings hereby permitted shall be submitted to and approved in writing by
the Local Planning Authority. Only materials that have been approved in
writing by the local planning authority shall be used in the construction of
the development hereby approved.
Reason: To ensure buildings are well-designed using high quality
materials; to comply with Policies 69 and 85 of the St. Albans District Local
Plan Review 1994; in the interest of sustainable development and the role
well-designed buildings can play in improving the quality of the environment
for its users and communities (National Planning Policy Framework 2012:
Paragraph 8).
Means of enclosure
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
108

3.
Prior to the commencement of development details of all fences, walls, and
other means of enclosure shall be submitted to and approved in writing by
the local planning authority, to include: a plan indicating the positions,
design, materials and type of boundary treatment to be erected. All
boundary treatments shall be erected in accordance with the approved
details prior to the first occupation of the main school buildings, unless
otherwise agreed in writing by the local planning authority.
Reason: In the interests of visual amenity. To comply with Policy 70 of the
St. Albans District Local Plan Review 1994 and The National Planning
Policy Framework 2012.
Hard surfacing
4.
Prior to the commencement of the development hereby permitted, details of
all materials to be used for hard surfaced areas within the site including
roads, driveways and car parking area shall be submitted to and approved
in writing by the local planning authority. Development shall be carried out
in accordance with the details so approved.
Reason: To ensure that the development does not detract from the
appearance of the locality. To comply with Policies 69, 70 and 85 of the St.
Albans District Local Plan Review 1994 and The National Planning Policy
Framework 2012.
Levels
5.
Prior to the commencement of development, details of the proposed
finished floor levels of all buildings and the finished ground levels of
surrounding property, including the finished relationship with the adjacent
roads and buildings shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the
Local Planning Authority. The development shall be carried out in
accordance with the approved details.
Reason: To ensure that construction is carried out at a suitable level having
regard to drainage, access, the appearance of the development and the
amenities of neighbouring occupiers, in compliance with Policy 69 of the St.
Albans District Local Plan Review 1994.
Refuse storage/ screening
6.
Prior to the commencement of development details of screened facilities for
the storage of refuse shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the
local planning authority. The refuse area shall remain thereafter and shall
not be used for any other purpose.
Reason: To ensure a satisfactory appearance and standard of
environment. To comply with Policy 70 of the St. Albans District Local Plan
Review 1994 and The National Planning Policy Framework 2012.
External lighting
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
109

7.
Prior to the first occupation of the development hereby approved, details of
all external lighting shall be submitted for the written approval of the local
planning authority, in the following areas: driveway, parking areas; and
pedestrianised areas; including ground mounted e.g. uplighters, bollards
and light standards, or attached to the buildings e.g. bulkhead and
downlights, and shall include detailed specifications of their lux, light spill
and energy. All lighting shall have the written approval of the local planning
authority prior to be installed.
Reason: to minimise the adverse impact upon the openness and visual
amenity of the Green Belt; in the interests of residential amenity.
8.
No floodlighting of any kind is permitted, including external sports facilities
Reason: to minimise the adverse impact upon the openness and visual
amenity of the Green Belt; to safeguard the character of section of the
River Lea valley; in the interests of residential amenity.
Noise
9.
Prior to the commencement of development a noise attenuation scheme
designed to minimise the adverse effects of noise on the local environment
shall be submitted to and agreed in writing by the. All works which form part
of the scheme shall be completed before any part of the development is
occupied.
Reason: In the interests of the amenity of nearby residential properties. To
comply with Policies 9 and 82 of the St. Albans District Local Plan Review
1994 and The National Planning Policy Framework 2012.
10.
No external loudspeaker systems shall be installed without the prior
approval in writing of the Local Planning Authority.
Reason: In the interests of the amenity of nearby properties. To comply
with Policy 9 of the St. Albans District Local Plan Review 1994 and The
National Planning Policy Framework 2012.
Construction hours
11.
The hours of construction permitted as part of this planning permission are:
▪  Monday to Friday 7am to 6pm 
▪  Saturdays 8am to 1pm  
No plant or machinery shall be operated on the premises outside of these
hours or at any time on Sundays or Bank Holidays.
Reason: In the interests of the amenity of nearby residential properties; to
comply with Policy 82 of the St. Albans District Local Plan Review 1994.
Parking & turning space
12.
Phase 1 of the development shall not be occupied until the car parking and
turning areas accessed from Common Lane, as shown on the approved
plans, have been constructed, surfaced and permanently marked out. The
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
110

car parking and turning areas shall be maintained ancillary to the school
development at all times. Phase 2 of the development shall not be
occupied until car parking within the main car park at the front of the site,
as shown on approved plans, has been provided, surfaced and
permanently marked out. The car parking shall be retained for ancillary use
in connection with the school at all times and no other purpose.
Reason: To ensure adequate parking provision at all times for the use of
staff and visitors to the school; to ensure the development does not
prejudice the free flow of traffic, highway conditions and general safety of
this section of the Lower Lutron Road; and in interest of the amenities of
existing local residents. To comply with Policies 34 and 39 of the St. Albans
District Local Plan Review 1994 and The National Planning Policy
Framework 2012.
Construction and Traffic Management Plan
13.
Construction of the development hereby approved shall not commence
until a Construction and Traffic Management Plan has been submitted to
and approved in writing by the local planning authority. Thereafter the
construction of the development shall only be carried out in accordance
with the approved Plan. The Construction and Traffic Management Plan
shall include details of:
▪ 
Construction vehicle numbers, type, routing; 
▪ 
Traffic management requirements; 
▪ 
Construction and storage compounds (including areas designated for 
car parking);
▪ 
Siting and details of wheel washing facilities; 
▪ 
Cleaning of site entrances, site tracks and the adjacent public highway; 
▪ 
Timing of construction activities; 
▪ 
Provision of sufficient on-site parking prior to commencement of 
construction
activities;
▪  Post construction restoration/reinstatement of the working areas and 
temporary access to the public highway;
▪  Provision of pre-condition condition survey. 
Reason: In the interests of highway safety; in order to protect highway
safety and the amenity of other users of the public highway and rights
of way
Highways
Provision of vehicular and pedestrian access
14.
The development shall not be brought into use until the proposed vehicle
and pedestrian accesses have been constructed to the specification of the
Highway Authority and the Local Planning Authority's satisfaction.
Reason: To ensure that the access is constructed to the current Highway
Authority's specification as required by the Local Planning Authority in
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
111

accordance with Policy 34 of the St. Albans District Local Plan Review
1994 and The National Planning Policy Framework 2012.
New access to common lane
15.
Prior to the first occupation of the development hereby permitted the
vehicular access to Common Lane shall be provided and thereafter
retained at the position shown on the approved plan (Preliminary Design –
Potential S278 Works – Common Lane vehicle Access Drawing Number
2675-AWP-oo2-1) in accordance with the approved highway specification.
Arrangement shall be made for surface water drainage to be intercepted
and disposed of separately so that it does not discharge from or onto the
highway carriageway.
Reason: To ensure satisfactory access into the site and avoid carriage of
extraneous material or surface water from or onto the highway.
New access to Lower Luton Road
16.
Prior to school second year intake of the development hereby permitted the
vehicular access to Lower Luton Road shall be provided and thereafter
retained at the position shown on the approved plan (Car Bus Drop off
Spaces, Drawing Number LTP/2675/T1/05.01) in accordance with the
approved highway specification. Arrangement shall be made for surface
water drainage to be intercepted and disposed of separately so that it does
not discharge from or onto the highway carriageway.
Reason: To ensure satisfactory access into the site and avoid carriage of
extraneous material or surface water from or onto the highway.
Proposed crossing/capacity improvements - Lower Luton Road/Station
Road
Part A
17.
Notwithstanding the details indicated on the submitted drawings no works
shall commence on site unless otherwise agreed in writing until a detailed
scheme for the off-site highway improvement works as indicated on S8 –
Proposed Crossing Conversion / S11 – Proposed Capacity Improvements,
Drawing No. 2675/AWP/S08/01 have been submitted to and approved in
writing by the Local Planning Authority.
Reason: To ensure that the highway improvement works are designed to
an appropriate standard in the interest of highway safety and to protect the
environment of the local highway corridor.
Part B
18.
Prior to first occupation of the development hereby permitted the off-site
highway improvement works referred to in Part A of this condition shall be
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
112

completed to the written satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority in
consultation with the Highway Authority.
Reason: To ensure that the highway network is adequate to cater for the
development proposed.
Highway improvements – off-site sustainable transport improvements listed
in Transport Assessment (table 22) and Travel Plan (Table 5)
Part A
19.
Notwithstanding the details indicated in the Transport Assessment and
indicative drawings no works shall commence on site unless otherwise
agreed in writing until a detailed scheme for the off-site highway
improvement works have been submitted to and approved in writing by the
Local Planning Authority.
Reason: To ensure that the highway improvement works are designed to
an appropriate standard in the interest of highway safety and to protect the
environment of the local highway corridor.
Part B
20.
Prior to the first occupation of the development hereby permitted the off-site
highway improvement works referred to in Part A of this condition shall be
completed to the written satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority in
consultation with the Highway Authority.
Reason: To ensure that the highway network is adequate to cater for the
development proposed.
Travel Plan
21.
No part of the development hereby permitted shall be occupied prior to the
implementation of the approved Travel Plan Reference No. LTP/2675/Final
Issue 3, 06/12/2017. Those parts of the approved Travel Plan that are
identified therein as being capable of implementation after occupation shall
be implemented in accordance with the timetable contained therein and
shall continue to be implemented as long as any part of the development is
occupied.
Reason: To ensure that the development offers a wide range of travel
choices to reduce the impact of travel and transport on the environment.
Area wide off-site parking restrictions (Part A)
22.
Prior to the second year intake, all waiting restrictions shown in principle in
Drawing No.2675-AWP-S30-01 (Proposed Waiting Restrictions) shall be
implemented.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
113

Reason: In the interests of highway safety.
Area wide off-site parking restrictions (Part B)
23.
Prior to the fifth year pupil intake a second phase of off-site parking
restrictions will be implemented to overcome any further parking issues
attributable to the school operation to the approval of the planning
authority. For the avoidance of doubt the restriction may take the form of
either additional standard style waiting restrictions and/or CPZ.
Reason: In the interests of highway safety and environmental amenity.
Highway Works - Lower Luton Road
Part A
24.
Notwithstanding the details indicated on the submitted drawings no
occupation shall be permitted unless otherwise agreed in writing until a
detailed scheme for the off-site highway improvement works as indicated
on drawing no 2675-AWP-SL01-02 (Option 1 – Extension of existing
30mph Speed Limit Wheathampstead to Batford) have been submitted to
and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority.
Reason: To ensure that the highway improvement works are designed to
an appropriate standard in the interest of highway safety and to protect the
environment of the local highway corridor.
Part B
25.
Prior to the second year intake of the development hereby permitted the
off-site highway improvement works referred to in Part A of this condition
shall be completed to the written satisfaction of the Local Planning
Authority.
Reason: To ensure that the highway network is adequate to cater for the
development proposed.
Travel Plan – sustainable travel
26.
The implementation of the Travel Plan shall achieve a minimum of 56% of
pupils travelling to school by bus measured across the full school year
(from September to July) for each of the first seven years following the first
occupation of the main school buildings.
Reason: to ensure the modal split towards public transport is delivered in
practice in the interests of sustainable travel, and to avoid congestion at the
entrance to the school generated by unnecessary car journeys.
Drainage
Updated infiltration and ground condition tests
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
114

27.
The development hereby permitted shall not be commenced until updated
infiltration and ground condition tests have been submitted to and approved
in writing by the Local Planning Authority. The information should include:
1. Location specific infiltration tests for the main infiltrating features including
the basin at the level of the bottom of the finished basin at 83.70m AOD
2. Confirmation of information relating to the ground water and river levels and
whether there are any impacts to the bottom of the basin and its ability of
infiltrate.
3. Updated half drain down times for the infiltration basin using any revised
infiltration results.
4. A minimum infiltration figure of approximately 1.0 x 10-5 m/s in accordance
with BRE Digest 365 to be achieved which if not achieved may mean that
an alternative discharge strategy will need to be considered for the
management of the overland flow and surface water run-off from the
development. If this cannot be achieved a revised drainage strategy will
need to be submitted to and approved by the Local Planning Authority.
Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Final detailed site drainage strategy based on updated infiltration tests.
28.
The development hereby permitted shall not be commenced until the final
detailed site drainage strategy based on updated infiltration tests has been
submitted and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. The
scheme shall be based on the approved Flood Risk Assessment carried
out by MLM reference FS0448-MLM-ZZ-XX-RP-C-9100 Rev P05 dated
January 2018 and the mitigation measures as detailed within the surface
water drainage strategy. The scheme shall include:
1. Providing a minimum attenuation volume of 1932m3 (excluding MUGA and
pitches) to ensure no increase in surface water run-off volumes from the
development for all rainfall events up to and including the 1 in 100 year +
climate change event.
2. Limiting the surface water run-off to a maximum of 7.1l/s with discharge
into the infiltration basin for the 1 in 100 year event.
3. Undertake the drainage strategy to include to the use permeable paving,
swales, and an attenuation tank and infiltration basin as indicated on the
drainage drawing FS0448-MLM-ZZ-XX-DR-C-9013 Rev P04.
4. Confirmation of which SuDS features will be infiltrating and specific
infiltration rates for each feature.
5. Exploration of opportunities for above ground features reducing the
requirement for any underground storage.
6. All calculations, modelling and drain down times for all storage features.
7. Full detailed engineering drawings including cross and long sections and all
components of the scheme, pipe runs etc. this should be supported by a
clearly labelled drainage layout plan showing pipe networks. The plan
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
115

should show any pipe 'node numbers' that have been referred to in network
calculations and it should also show invert and cover levels of manholes.
8. Silt traps for protection for any residual tanked elements.
9. Details of final exceedance routes, including those for an event which
exceeds to 1:100 + cc rainfall event.
Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Confirmation of final overland flow management arrangements
29.
The development hereby permitted shall not be commenced until details of
final design of the overland flow management arrangements have been
submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. The
scheme shall be based on Appendix H – Offsite Runoff Diversion &
Infiltration Basin and drawings FS0448-MLM-ZZ-XX-DR-C-9013 Rev P04
and FS0448-MLM-ZZ-XX-DR-C-9105 Rev P01.
The information should also include:
1. Detailed assessment of the catchment area and characteristics and
modelling of flows for the 1:30, 1:100, and 1:100 + 40% for climate change
events.
2. Updated catchment modelling and include assessment of residual flows
coming down Common Lane impact upon the safe access and egress from
the school site.
3. Details of any exceedance routes including exceedance flooding in the
vicinity of the site which may arise from the channelling of the flow route to
the basin.
Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Final design and engineering details regarding the surface water ditch
30.
The development hereby permitted shall not be commenced until details of
final design and engineering details regarding the surface water ditch have
been submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority.
The scheme shall be based on drawings on FS0448-MLM-ZZ-XX-DR-C-
9106 Rev P01 and FS0448-TLP-ZZ-XX-DR-L-0121 Rev 2.
The information should include:
1. All modelling of the channel and the supporting calculations for the surface
water run-off ditch should be provided to support the proposed scheme.
2. Definition of any residual impact on Lower Luton Road for events over 1 in
30 return period.
3. Details of the impact of the flows from the ditch on the infiltration basin
4. Details of storage volumes within the ditch, including any flood event
hydrographs to show the speed of flow.
5. Longitudinal bed profile and cross sections, plus detailed drawings of
culverts/structures that could affect the flow.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
116

Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Management of surface water during construction
31.
The development hereby permitted shall not be commenced until a
construction management plan to address all surface water runoff and
flooding issues during the construction stage has been submitted to and
approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. The management plan
should include the following:
1. Timeframes for construction activity and explanation of any phasing
approach to the construction.
2. Final plan for the management of surface run-off during any construction
activity on the site to prevent flooding to the site or any disruption to the
Lower Luton Road.
Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Implementation principles
32.
Prior to occupation of the site the development permitted by this planning
permission shall be carried out in accordance with the Flood Risk
Assessment carried out by MLM reference FS0448-MLM-ZZ-XX-RP-C-
9100 Rev P05 dated January 2018 and the following mitigation measures
as detailed within the surface water drainage strategy:
1. Implementing the appropriate drainage strategy based on infiltration using
appropriate above ground SuDS measures as indicated on drainage
strategy drawing FS0448-MLM-ZZ-XX-DR-C-9100 Rev 05.
2. Implement appropriate measures to manage the overland flow route up to
the 1 in 30 year event incorporating a surface water diversion ditch and
infiltration basin to attenuate and manage the flows.
3. Limiting the surface water run-off to the infiltration basin to a maximum of
7.1l/s for the 1 in 100 year + climate change critical storm event so that it
will not exceed the run-off from the undeveloped site and not increase the
risk of flooding off-site. The following discharge rates should be provided as
the maximum for each development area:
▪  Discharge from al  Sports Pitches/MUGA restricted to 2l/s into the 
school surface water drainage network.
▪  Discharge from the remainder of the School site restricted to 5.1l/s into 
infiltration basin.
4. Providing storage to ensure that there is no increase in surface water run-
off volumes for all rainfall events up to and including the 1 in 100 year +
40% climate change event. The following minimum volumes (or such
storage volume agreed with the LPA) should be provided for each
development area:
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
117

▪  Infiltration basin 3250m3  
▪  Permeable paving 440m3  
▪  Swale 30m3  
▪  Attenuation Tank 1462m3  
▪  Sport Pitch 1 870m3  
▪  Sport Pitch 2 1886m3  
▪  Sport Pitch 3 2198m3  
▪  MUGA 372m3  
Total 10,508 m3
The mitigation measures shall be fully implemented prior to full site
occupation and in accordance with the timing / phasing arrangements
embodied within the scheme, or within any other period as may
subsequently be agreed, in writing, by the local planning authority.
Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Detailed drainage strategy for the sports pitches and any landscaped areas on
the site
33.
Prior to occupation of the site, a detailed drainage strategy for the sports
pitches and any landscaped areas on the site must be submitted to and
approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. The scheme shall
include:
1. A maximum discharge of 2 l/s from all pitches to the school surface water
drainage network. This will also require provision of the minimum storage
provisions with locations to be detailed on the final plan.
2. Final design for the drainage of the sports pitches including the locations of
any storage features and any control structures to manage the run-off and
final engineering drawings.
3. Final runoff rates and storage volumes.
4. Details of the final discharge location and means of conveyance for
residual flows to the basin.
Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Completion and sign off for drainage system (possibly phased)
34.
Upon completion of each phase of the drainage works, a complete set of as
built drawings for both site drainage and overland flow route management
should be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning
Authority. The scheme shall also include:
1. Final confirmation of management and maintenance requirements
2. Provision of complete set of as built drawings for both site drainage and
overland flow route management.
3. Details of any inspection and sign-off requirements for completed elements
of the drainage system.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
118

Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Annual maintenance and reporting requirements
35.
Upon completion of the drainage works a management and maintenance
plan for the SuDS features and drainage network must be submitted to and
approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. The scheme shall
include maintenance and operational activities; arrangements for adoption
and any other measures to secure the operation of the scheme throughout
its lifetime.
Reason: to ensure the risk of flooding during the construction phase is
minimised, in accordance with Policy 7 of the Hertfordshire Lead Local
Flood Authority SuDS Policy Statement March 2017
Landscaping
Proposed contours - cross sections and isopachyte drawings
36.
Prior to the commencement of the development, cross section drawings
shall be submitted to show the existing and proposed contours across the
site, furthermore, a composite drawing (isopachyte) shall be submitted to
clearly show where material will be removed and deposited and levels
raised or lowered. The cross sections and composite drawings shall extend
beyond the boundary of the site to include site levels on adjoining land. The
cross section drawings shall include a northwest-southeast section to show
the existing and proposed landform and indicated the gradient of the
slopes.
Reason: to ensure the proposed contours are sympathetic to the character
of the surrounding area and is as far as possible consistent with existing
landscape character of the site, to comply with the strategy and guidelines
for managing change in the Upper Lea Valley Landscape Character Area.
Hard and soft landscaping – enhancement scheme
37.
Prior to the commencement of development a detailed landscaping scheme
shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the local planning
authority; to include:
▪  planting strategies for al  areas of the site; 
▪  details planting schemes (to include type, density, species, and height); 
▪  proposal drawings to show opportunities to create better connections 
between the indoor and outdoor spaces as an extension of classrooms;
▪  proposal drawings showing areas providing shading (tree planting 
and/or canopies);
▪  detailed cross sections to clearly show how the service access from 
Common Lane will be achieved due to the changes in levels;
▪  proposal drawings showing opportunities to better integrate the SuDS 
system within the landscape scheme, including; controlled access via a
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
119

dipping platform, terraced pond profile to create shallow margins,
biodiversity enhancement;
▪  opportunities for rainwater col ection for use in crop science areas and 
incorporation of rain gardens fed by roof water with planting areas
adjacent to buildings;
▪  proposal drawings showing supplementary structural planting on the 
site boundaries;
▪  maintenance regimes 
All landscaping shall be maintained in accordance with the landscaping
scheme for the lifetime of the development unless otherwise agreed in
writing with the local planning authority.
Reason(s): to ensure the landscape strategy is appropriate to deliver a high
standard of landscaping; to ensure an integrated approach is taken to
landscaping and SuDS; to ensure water storage/attenuation areas can
realistically support a diverse range of habitats and species; to provide net
gains in biodiversity in accordance with NPPF objectives (Paragraph 109);
to strengthen boundary planting; and to ensure landscaping is maintained
appropriately.
Ecology
Surveys
38.
Not later than two weeks prior to the commencement of development a site
survey shall be conducted by a qualified ecologist to determine the
presence of badgers being resident on the site. The results of the survey
shall be presented in a report and submitted to the local planning authority
prior to the commencement of development. The report shall include
recommendations for ensuring that the development complies with the
Wildlife Acts and shall include measures to ensure that wildlife is protected
at all times during the construction. The development shall not commence
until such time as appropriate mitigation measures have been agreed in
writing by the local planning authority.
Reason: to avoid any adverse or inadvertent impact upon wildlife and to
ensure the site continues to present opportunities for biodiversity
enhancement in accordance with the NPPF (Paragraphs 109 and 118).
Ecology management plan
39.
Not later than 6 months prior to the first occupation of the main school
buildings, a landscape and ecology management plan shall be submitted to
and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority to include detailed
planting plans. The planting, habitat creation and other landscaping works
agreed as part of the landscape and ecology management plan shall be
carried out in accordance with the approved details within 12 months of the
first occupation of the main school buildings.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
120

Reason: to avoid any adverse or inadvertent impact upon wildlife and to
ensure the site continues to present opportunities for biodiversity
enhancement in accordance with the NPPF (Paragraphs 109 and 118).
Site construction
Soil handling methodology statement
40.
Prior to the commencement of development a soil handling methodology
statement shall be submitted to and approved in writing.
The statement shall (a) provide:
▪  written calculations of the materials balance necessary to achieve the 
approved site levels;
▪  written explanation of how material movements are proposed to take 
place within the site, including how materials will be excavated,
transferred and stored within the site, and subsequently replaced;
▪  written explanation of how distinct materials (i.e. topsoil, subsoil, chalk) 
are to be treated, with particular emphasis on keeping soil resources
separate during excavations, soil movement, and replacement;
And (b) shall include:
▪  levels contour maps and cross sections to show in detail the proposed 
site levels.
The statement shall be prepared in accordance with best practice and by a
person qualified in land management and restoration. The development
shall be carried out in accordance with the approved details. No material
shall be removed from the site unless and until it has been approved in
writing under this condition.
Reason: to ensure the finish site levels are appropriate, to ensure soils are
handled correctly, to minimise the potential damage to soil structure
resulting from soil movements, in the interest of sustainable drainage post
and to minimise the risk of increased surface water runoff for the developed
site.
Sports facilities
Sport pitches - construction and maintenance
41.
Prior to the commencement of development:
(a) a detailed assessment of existing ground conditions shall be submitted
to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority. The
assessment shall address drainage and topography of the land
proposed for the area of the proposed playing pitches;
(b) a detailed playing pitch construction scheme shall be submitted, based
on the results of the assessment under (a) above. The detailed scheme
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
121

shall include a written specification of soils structure, proposed
drainage, cultivation, turf establishment and maintenance, and a
programme for implementation.
The approved scheme shall be implemented prior to the occupation of the
school by any students in Year 12 or above. The sports pitches shall be
maintained in accordance with the approved scheme for the lifetime of the
school.
Reason(s): to ensure ground conditions are taken into consideration in the
design of sports pitches, to ensure the playing fields are constructed to an
acceptable standard, in accordance with national guidance17 enabling
intensive use by the school and community.
Multi use games area – detailed specification
42.
Prior to the commencement of development, a detailed scheme for the
construction of the multi-use games area (to include surfacing, fencing and
line markings) shall be submitted and approved in writing by the local
planning authority. The multi-use games area shall be constructed in
accordance with the approved details.
Reason: To ensure the development is fit for purpose
Community Use Agreement
43.
Prior to the first occupation of the school in Year 13 and above, a
community use agreement for use of the sports hall, activity studio, multi-
use games area, and playing field shall submitted to and approved in
writing by the Local Planning Authority. The community agreement shall set
out key principles in relation to pricing policy, hours of use, access by non-
educational establishment users, management responsibilities and a
mechanism for review. Community access to the sports facilities shall be
provided in accordance with the principles of the agreement for the lifetime
of the school.
The key principles of the agreement shall not be reviewed, amended or
altered other by an application for planning permission to vary the
condition.
Reason: to ensure that community use is provided within a framework
agreement that enables the school to meet its costs of managing the
facilities during community use; and to ensure community use is safe and
well managed.
Hours of use
44.
The permitted hours of use of the all-weather pitch, multi-use games area,
sports hall, and playing fields are:
17 Natural Turf for Sport (Sport England, 2011)
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
122

▪  08:00 to 21:00: Monday to Saturday; and 
▪  09:00 to 19:00: on Sundays and Bank Holidays 
The all-weather pitch, multi-use games area, sports hall, and playing fields
shall not be used outside of these hours.
Reason: in the interests of residential amenity and to prevent neighbours to
the school being adversely affected by the effects of noise.
Sports facilities - noise assessment
45.
The all-weather pitch, multi-use games area shall not be used for the
community use after 6pm until a noise assessment has been carried out to
assess:
(a) background noise,
(b) noise generated by the use of the all-weather pitch, multi-use games
area;
(c) modelling the effects of noise on sensitive receptors, and
(d) mitigation proposals as may be necessary.
The noise assessment shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the
local planning authority prior to any community use of the all-weather pitch,
multi-use games area by the community after 6pm.
Reason: in the interests of residential amenity and to prevent neighbours to
the school being adversely affected by the effects of noise.
Archaeology
46(A)
No demolition/development shall take place/commence until an
Archaeological Written Scheme of Investigation has been submitted to and
approved by the local planning authority in writing. The scheme shall
include an assessment of archaeological significance and research
questions; and:
1. The programme and methodology of site investigation and recording
2. The programme and methodology of site investigation and recording as
required by the evaluation
3. The programme for post investigation assessment
4. Provision to be made for analysis of the site investigation and recording
5. Provision to be made for publication and dissemination of the analysis
and records of the site investigation
6. Provision to be made for archive deposition of the analysis and records
of the site investigation
7. Nomination of a competent person or persons/organisation to undertake
the works set out within the Archaeological Written Scheme of
Investigation.
(B)
The demolition/development shall take place/commence in accordance
with the programme of archaeological works set out in the Written Scheme
of Investigation approved under condition (46A) above;
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
123

(C)
The development shall not be occupied until the site investigation and post
investigation assessment has been completed in accordance with the
programme set out in the Written Scheme of Investigation approved under
condition (46A) and the provision made for analysis and publication where
appropriate.
Reason: to ensure the archaeological remains are adequately protected in
accordance with NPPF policies aimed at protecting the historic
environment.
Preservation of archaeological remains in situ – mitigation strategy
47.
Prior to the commencement of any the development, a detailed mitigation
strategy for the preservation in situ of the archaeological remains at the site
shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning
Authority. The mitigation strategy shall address:
▪  the range in depth of the archaeology - the methodology must take 
this into account so that it is clear the proposed strategy will be
suitable for shallow remains as well as those that are more deeply
buried;
▪  additional information regarding the loading pressure placed upon the 
underlying deposits during and after soil placement on top of the
remain and the type of machine(s) used to carry out the works;
▪  a method statement setting out clear working arrangements 
demonstrating how the operator(s) charged with carrying out the work
will comply with the risk management strategy;
▪  management plan - setting out how the area of the cemetery would be 
managed as part of the school's grounds, to ensure that the existence
and protection of the site was documented and actively managed, to
avoid accidental damage to the remains from works associated with
maintenance, services or longer term development.
Reason: to ensure the archaeological remains are treated as if they were
of national importance and that any harm is avoided in accordance with
policies in the NPPF (Paragraphs 132-134,139) directed towards
preserving the historic environment.
Ecology
48.
Prior to the commencement of development a detailed ecological
management plan for the site shall be submitted to and approved in
writing by the local planning authority. The ecological management plan
shall include:
▪  detailed proposals for habitat creation and management at a micro 
level seeking to maximise the range of potential habitats within the site;
and
▪  detailed management and maintenance proposals (including 
schedules) to cover a minimum five year period, to be reviewed
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
124

annually and renewed at the end of the five year period on an annual
rolling basis.
The ecological management plan shall be implemented in accordance
with the approved details within 18 months of the first occupation of the
main school buildings and maintained in accordance with the approved
maintenance schedules on an annual basis.
Reason: to ensure adequate provision of mitigation for ecological effects
and to develop opportunities to develop habitat corridors within the site
with potential to create linkages with wider ecological systems; and to
comply with the aims of NPPF in terms of conserving and enhancing the
natural environment (Section 11: Paragraphs 109 and 118).
Energy Use
49.
Prior to first occupation of the main school building an energy use
statement shall be submitted to an approved in writing by the local
planning authority. The energy balance statement shall demonstrate how
the development will reduce carbon dioxide emissions and energy usage
(over the lifetime of the development) in accordance with the following
energy hierarchy:
1.
reduce energy usage: through the adoption of sustainable design
principles;
2.
energy efficient source(s) of supply: through decentralised energy
systems/combined heat and power or other renewable energy generation
methods; and
3.
harnessing renewable energy: solar photovoltaic panels or other
renewable energy generation methods.
The measures set out in the energy balance statement approved by the
local planning authority shall be implemented prior to the full occupation of
the school, and in any event not later than 2025.
Reason: to develop the available opportunities to harness improvements
against the baseline Target Emission Rate for carbon dioxide emissions
set out in Building Regulations; in accordance with Neighbourhood Plan
policy ESD15 (Carbon Dioxide Emissions).
Informative(s)
(a)
All vegetation removal shall be take place outside of the bird nesting
season March to October unless it has been inspected by a qualified/
experienced ecologist within 48 hours of removal;
(b)
The design of the grass cricket wicket should consider relevant guidance
i.e. ECB TS6 document on performance standards for non-turf cricket
pitches for outdoor use
(c)
Due to the nature of the development site, the LLFA wish to be notified
of phases of the construction activity and appropriate arrangements to be
made for inspections of the completed drainage features. Details regarding
timeframes should be provided of the works to the surface water diversion
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
125

ditch and when these are likely to commence in relation to the
development.
Land to the north of the Lower Luton Road, Harpenden 5/2733-17 (CC0978)
126