This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Briefing given to Therese Coffey on Fly-tipping'.

Sentencing of fly-tipping offenders 
[REDACTED] 
The 2016/17 statistics show that over 50% of all fines from courts for fly-tipping were between £51 
and £200 and around 90% of fines were under £500.  
[REDACTED]  
The maximum fine available in legislation for a fly-tipping offence is potentially unlimited. In 
accordance with the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (EPA 1990) the penalties are on summary 
conviction: imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or a fine or both; and on conviction 
on indictment: imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years or an unlimited fine. The removal in 
2015 of the £5,000 cap for maximum fines that magistrates’ courts can impose, means that the 
maximum fine is potentially unlimited in either court setting.  
There is no minimum fine set out in the EPA 1990 for a fly-tipping offence. Fines set out in 
legislation generally do not include a minimum, because the level of the fine is aligned to the 
individual or organisation’s financial circumstances. [REDACTED] Prison sentences can include a 
minimum term for very serious offences, for example, grievously bodily harm or manslaughter.  
Local authorities can issue a FPN of between £150 and £400 for small scale fly-tipping. It is for the 
local authority to choose the level to set. The FPN was introduced in May 2016 and an additional 
20,000 FPNs were issued in 2016/17 for fly-tipping offences. The maximum possible level of the 
FPN was set at £400 [REDACTED].  
The Sentencing Guideline for Environmental Offences sets out a 12 step process to determine the 
sentence for a fly-tipping offender. Each offence is given an ‘offence category’, which is assigned a 
fine band (table 1 overleaf). The fine bands range from A (low) to F (high) and the level of the fine 
in each band aligns to a proportion of a person’s weekly income. It would be possible for the 
Sentencing Council to amend the fine levels in the Guideline so that lower offence categories are 
assigned higher fine bands. For example, the lowest offence category would be assigned a Band C 
fine, rather than a Band A as it is currently. This would increase the level of fines for each fly-
tipping offender.  
The Sentencing Council is responsible for all sentencing guidelines. The Sentencing Council 
reviewed the Environmental Offences Guideline in 2014. This aimed to increase the fines for more 
serious offences, but not the level of fines in less serious offences in magistrates’ courts because 
the Sentencing Council considered the fine bands for lower offence categories were fair, consistent 
and proportionate.  
[REDACTED]  
Table 1: Sentences for each offence category1 
Offence category 
Starting Point 
Range 
Deliberate 
Category 1 
18 months’ custody 
1 – 3 years’ custody 
Category 2 
1 year’s custody 
26 weeks’ – 18 months’ custody 
                                            
1 https://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/wp-
content/uploads/Final_Environmental_Offences_Definitive_Guideline_web1.pdf 
 

Category 3 
Band F fine 
Band E fine or medium level community order – 26 weeks’ custody 
Category 4 
Band E fine 
Band D fine or low level community order– Band E fine 
Reckless  
Category 1 
26 weeks’ custody 
Band F fine or high level community order – 12 months’ custody 
Category 2 
Band F fine 
Band E fine or medium level community order – 26 weeks’ custody 
Category 3 
Band E fine 
Band D fine or low level community order – Band E fine 
Category 4 
Band D fine 
Band C fine – Band D fine 
Negligent  
Category 1 
Band F fine 
Band E fine or medium level community order – 26 weeks’ custody 
Category 2 
Band E fine 
Band D fine or low level community order – Band E fine 
Category 3 
Band D fine 
Band C fine – Band D fine 
Category 4 
Band C fine 
Band B fine – Band C fine 
Low / No culpability 
Category 1 
Band D fine 
Band C fine – Band D fine 
Category 2 
Band C fine 
Band B fine – Band C fine 
Category 3 
Band B fine 
Band A fine – Band B fine 
Category 4 
Band A fine 
Conditional discharge – Band A fine 
 
[REDACTED] 
During the review of the Environmental Offences Guideline the Sentencing Council flagged that the 
lack of exposure of fly-tipping cases in the courts, in particular in magistrates’ courts, limited the 
level of sentences being handed down. There were 1,571 prosecution cases before the courts in 
2016/17. This is a small proportion in relation to other offences and the number of magistrates’ 
courts across the country. A single magistrate’s court may only rule on a handful of cases a year. 
The Judicial Office is responsible for ensuring magistrates are suitably trained to use the 
Environmental Offences Guideline and are aware of the increase in prevalence of fly-tipping across 
the country.  
[REDACTED]