This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Confiscated items at Ipswich courts'.


 
 
Disclosure Team 
Ministry of Justice 
102 Petty France  
London 
 
 
SW1H 9AJ 
 
 
Tom Potter 
xxxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx  
 
 
 
 
2 January 2018 
 
Dear Mr Potter  
 
Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Request – 171130003 
 
Thank you for your request received on 28 November 2017 in which asked for the following information 
from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ):   
 

“… please provide the number of items seized from people at the doors of both Ipswich 
Crown Court and South East Suffolk Magistrates' Court, Ipswich, from January 2015 to 
November 2017. Please also provide a breakdown of which items have been seized from 
each court and the precise number of each item…” 
 

 
Your request is being handled under the FOIA. 
 
I can confirm that the MoJ holds the information that you have requested and I have provided it in the 
attached tables. 
 
Please note that we do not automatically confiscate items under the Courts Act.  We have a robust security 
system that identifies prohibited items and we ask people to surrender them at the point on entry to our 
buildings. Under S.54 (2) of the Courts Act, we confiscate items, when people refuse to surrender them 
when asked to do so. Such actions are taken where we have security concerns, as part of the measures 
we take to protect court users, the Judiciary, and staff. We do not separately record items surrendered or 
seized. The information provided to you about prohibited items therefore makes no distinction between 
items surrendered or confiscated. 
 
All items confiscated or seized that are not considered an offensive weapon, are returned to the individual 
on leaving the court. The only exceptions are blades less than three inches, for example pen knives, which 
are only returned following a request in writing. Any articles that could be considered an offensive weapon 
are not returned but referred to the Police. 
 
HMCTS takes the issue of security within courts extremely seriously and has a robust security and safety 
system to protect all court users and the Judiciary.  This system includes mandatory bag searches, metal 
detectors and surveillance cameras, as well as court security officers who have legislative powers to 
protect all those in the court building. The powers of the court security officers include the ability to restrain 
and remove people from the building should there be a need. Our security system is continually monitored 
to ensure that it is effective and proportionate, and mitigates against the risks faced. 
 
Appeal Rights  
 
If you are not satisfied with this response you have the right to request an internal review by responding in 
writing to one of the addresses below within two months of the date of this response.  
 
xxxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
 
Disclosure Team, MoJ, 10.38, 102 Petty France, London, SW1H 9AJ 
 
Page 1 

 
 
You do have the right to ask the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) to investigate any aspect of your 
complaint. However, please note that the ICO is likely to expect internal complaints procedures to have 
been exhausted before beginning their investigation. 
 
 
Yours sincerely  
 
 
 
London and South East Regional Support Unit | HM Courts and Tribunals Service
Page 2 

 
 
Knives 
Ipswich Magistrates' Court 
Sharps2 
Tools 
Cameras 
Recorders  Alcohol  Others3  TOTALS 
< 3" Blade1 
2015 
19 
13 
27 


12 
51 
133 
2016 
12 

16 



35 
88 
20174 


15 



23 
51 
 
 
Ipswich Crown Court 
Knives 
Tools 
Cameras 
Sharps 
Liquids5 
Dictaphones 
Alcohol 
Others 
2015 


10 





2016 

  
11 





2017 








 
  
                                                
1 Knives less than 3” are usually pen knives on key rings, or cutlery 
2 Sharps include, for example, nail scissors, craft needles, steel combs, medical needles 
3 Other items include any that court staff consider could be used as a weapon.. 
4 Statistics are from January to October 2017, only. Statistics for November 2017 are not available yet. 
5 Liquids that are not soft drinks e.g. vape, perfume 
Page 3