This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Intelligence logos'.

Internal review of response to request under the Freedom of 
Information (FoI) Act 2000 by Steve Elibank (reference 15954)  
 
Responding Unit:  Information Management Service (IMS) 
 
Chronology 
 
Original FoI request: 
 
12 August 2010 (under reference 15802) 
 
Clarification letter:   
 
23 August 2010 
 
Clarification provided: 
 
30 August 2010 
 
Acknowledgement: 
  1 
September 
2010 
 
20 day apology letter: 
 
28 September 2010 
 
IMS response: 
 
 
6 October 2010 
 
Request for internal review: 
6 October 2010 
 
Subject of request 
 
1. 
Mr Elibank submitted a request for information under the Freedom of 
Information Act 2000 (“the Act”). Mr Elibank asked for information 
about the logos of MI5, MI6 and the Joint Terrorism Analysis Centre 
(JTAC). Mr Elibank was asked to clarify his request, which he did on 30 
August. Mr Elibank’s clarified request is included at Annex A of this 
report.  
 
The response by IMS 
 
2. 
The response from IMS neither confirmed nor denied whether the 
Home Office holds the information requested by virtue of section 23(5) 
of the Act, which relates to information supplied by, or relating to, 
bodies dealing with security matters. 
 
3. 
The response explained that this section of the Act exempts the 
department from its duty to say whether or not it holds the information 
requested, adding that as a consequence of section 23(5) being an 
absolute provision no further consideration is required.  
 
The request for an internal review 
 
4. 
Mr Elibank requested an internal review of the handling of his request. 
Mr Elibank stated that ‘the logos of JTAC and MI5 cannot be secret 
security matters. This is surely obvious.’  
 

Procedural issues 
 
5. 
Mr Elibank’s clarified request was recorded as having been received on 
31 August (the first working day following the date the request was 
submitted, which was a bank holiday). Accordingly the deadline for IMS 
to respond was 28 September. The response to Mr Elibank was sent 
on 6 October and was therefore in breach of section 10(1) of the Act, 
which requires a request to be responded to within 20 working days.  
 
6. 
I note however that a letter was sent to Mr Elibank on 28 September 
apologising for his request not being responded to within the time limit 
required by the Act.  
 
7. 
Mr Elibank’s request was acknowledged, which although not a 
requirement of the Act, is considered good practice to do. 
 
8. 
Mr Elibank was informed in writing of his right to request an 
independent internal review of the handling of his request, as required 
by section 17(7)(a) of the Act. 
 
9. 
The response also informed Mr Elibank of his right of complaint to the 
Information Commissioner, as set out in section 17(7)(b) of the Act. 
 
Consideration of the response 
 
10. 
I have considered the original Information Management Services 
response. 
 
11. 
Mr Elibank requested information held by the Home Office in relation to 
some of the bodies whose information is protected from disclosure 
under section 23 of the Act. Whilst the logos of these bodies are 
available in the public domain, no information has been officially 
disclosed regarding the commissioning and design of these logos, or 
the extent to which the Home Office (as parent department for the 
Security Service and JTAC) was or was not involved in this process. 
 
12. 
Section 23 is an absolute exemption which was designed to protect 
from disclosure any information relating to the section 23 bodies, 
regardless of whether or not such a disclosure would be damaging. 
Previous case law has established that confirmation or denial as to 
whether such information is held in itself represents the disclosure of 
information about the section 23 bodies.  
 
13. 
Unless it is in the public domain, confirmation or denial as to whether 
such information is held by the Home Office would therefore involve the 
disclosure of exempt information. It is for this reason that the Home 
Office upholds its decision to neither confirm nor deny whether the 
information you requested is held, by virtue of section 23(5) of the Act. 
 
Advice and assistance 

14. Not 
applicable. 
 
Conclusion 
 
15. 
Having considered the response provided by IMS I am satisfied that 
the Unit were correct in their citing of section 23(5) of the Act. 
 
16. 
The Unit’s response of 6 October was provided to Mr Elibank outside 
the 20 working day limit and so was in breach of section 10(1) of the 
Act.  
 
17. 
I am satisfied that sections 17(7)(a) and (b) of the Act were complied 
with.   
 
18. 
As indicated in the response sent to the original request made under 
the Act, the response in this report should not be taken as conclusive 
evidence that the information requested is or is not held by the Home 
Office.  
 
Information Access Team 
Home Office 
2 November 2010 


Annex A 
 
Thank you for your request for clarification. The internet page I referred to has 
since been taken offline for some reason, so please re-interpret my enquiry as 
per below. 
 
For the logos of MI5 (Security Service), MI6 (Secret Intelligence Service) and 
JTAC respectively: 
 
— When was the current logo, corporate style, graphics and branding 
 
implemented? 
 
— Who designed it? 
 
— How much were the designers paid for their services? 
 
— Were other designers consulted? Was there competition? If so, who 
 
was involved, and was any payment made to unsuccessful firms? 
 
— Are there any "alternate" versions of the branding (as in, any 
 
which were designed but not taken up), and if so, please supply an 
 
electronic copy. 
 
— Please provide me with a copy of your logo guidelines, branding 
  manual or equivalent document. 
 
— Please provide a vector/EPS/SVG copy of the logo. I am well aware 
 
of the need for brand management, and this is solely for branding 
 
research purposes. 
 
I am aware that much of this information may be "owned" by other 
government organisations, but if you happen to hold it as well (which I would 
consider likely) then the FOI Act requires you to divulge it.