This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Concentration of fluoride added to drinking water in fluoridated areas of England'.


Community Dental Health (2016) 33, 292–296 
© BASCD 2016
Received 18 January; Accepted 25 April 2016 
doi:10.1922/CDH_3930Pretty05
Prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in four English 
cities
I.A. Pretty1, N. Boothman1, J. Morris2, L. MacKay1, Z. Liu1, M. McGrady1 and 
M. Goodwin1
1School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, UK; 2Public Health England, UK
Objective:  To  assess  the  prevalence  and  severity  of  dental  fluorosis  in  four  city-based  populations  using  a  robust  photographic  method 
with TF index reporting; and to record the aesthetic satisfaction scores of children in all four cities.  Basic research design: Cross sectional 
epidemiological survey (surveillance).  Participants: 1,904 children aged 11-14 years, in four English cities.  Interventions: Two cities were 
served by community water fluoridation schemes supplying water at 1mg/l F. The other two cities did not have water fluoridation schemes 
and had low levels of fluoride naturally present.  Main outcome measures: The prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis.  Scoring was 
undertaken using high quality digital images by a single calibrated examiner.  Results: Data suggest that the prevalence of fluorosis at levels 
greater than TF2 are broadly similar to previous studies (F 10%, NF 2%), with an apparent increase in the total number of TF1 cases across 
both fluoridated (41%) and non-fluoridated cities (32%) with a commensurate decrease in TF0 (F 39%, NF 63%).   Data suggest that the 
proportion of children expressing dissatisfaction with the appearance of their teeth is the same in fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities 
although the reasons for this may differ.  Conclusions: The levels of fluorosis that might be considered of aesthetic concern are low and 
stable while the increase in TF1 may be due to an increase in self- and professionally-applied fluoride products or the increased sensitivity 
afforded by the digital imaging system.  It is not however a public health problem or concern.  Further monitoring appears justified.  
Key words: dental fluorosis, TF index, water fluoridation, dental health survey, England
Introduction
sessments of fluorosis in English as well as Thai populations 
(McGrady et al., 2012a,b) and were found to be reliable and 
Section 90A of the Water Industry Act (1991, as amended) 
valid when the Thylstrup and Fejerskov (TF) index (1978) 
requires the relevant authority (currently the Secretary of State 
was used and also following assessment with the Dean’s Index 
for England) to monitor the health effects of water fluorida-
(Dean et al., 1950).  Photographic images (typically 35mm 
tion and report at no more than four year intervals.  Enamel 
slides) have been used since the late 1980s and have since 
fluorosis is the only widely accepted risk associated with the 
been replaced with digital images. Previous works (Levine et 
consumption of fluoride.  The assessment of fluorosis has not 
al., 1989; Nunn et al., 1992) have also shown that viewing 
typically been part of the regular National Dental Epidemiol-
high  quality  images  of  teeth  will  generally  enhance  minor 
ogy programme in England.  The methods used in this survey 
enamel defects making them easier to record and therefore 
to assess fluorosis were employed to overcome the potential 
prevalence  estimates  using  such  systems  will  generally  be 
problems  of  inter-  and  intra-examiner  variation  and  assess-
higher than those using clinical field measurements. The use 
ment  bias  associated  with  visual  “on  the  spot”  assessment 
of  polarised  images,  reducing  or  eliminating  the  presence 
and scoring (McGrady et al., 2012a);(Tabari et al., 2000). 
of  flash  artefacts,  the  ability  to  resize  images  and  the  time 
There has been a concerted effort to improve the assess-
available for viewing all contribute to the increased reporting 
ment  of  enamel  fluorosis  in  studies  over  recent  years  with 
rate (Nunn et al., 1992).  
the assessment and introduction of camera systems into 
The reporting of fluorosis prevalence is complex.  The 
epidemiological programs (Boye et al., 2012; Davies et al.
use  of  two  main  indices  (TF  and  Dean’s)  complicates 
2012; McGrady al., N=957 et al., 2000) to reduce bias and 
comparisons between areas; Ireland and the United States 
increase  the  utilization  of  experienced,  but  geographically 
favouring Dean’s index and the rest of Europe and the UK 
remote, examiners.  The use of high quality image capture 
generally reporting TF (Whelton et al., 2004). The use of 
systems confers a number of benefits: images can be viewed 
the  Developmental  Defects  of  Enamel  Index  (DDE)  has 
and  scored  for  analysis,  training,  calibration,  verification, 
also been reported but this does not specifically score for 
etc. in any place and at any time by any number of scorers; 
fluorosis but rather all enamel opacities (Commission on Oral 
scorers can be blinded to the status of the subject; archived 
Health,  1982). A  review  of  fluorosis  in  Europe  (Whelton 
images  can  be  assessed  later  for  longitudinal  assessments; 
et al.,  2004)  found  a  range  of  reported  prevalence  values 
collection of epidemiological data no longer requires a trained 
that depended on the index used, the presence of any sup-
clinician reducing the cost of such surveys.
plemental fluoridation (water, salt, tablets, drops, etc.) and 
Camera  based  systems  have  been  used  in  previous  as-
the conditions under which the examination was undertaken. 
Correspondence to: Iain Pretty, University of Manchester, Dental Health Unit, Williams House, Manchester Science Park, Manchester M15 
6SE, UK. Email: xxxx.x.xxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xx.xx

The recent Cochrane Review of water fluoridation (Iheozor-
Assented participants were provided with lip retrac-
Ejiofor et al., 2015) concluded that there was an association 
tors  to  place,  teeth  were  dried  using  cotton  wool  rolls  (10 
between fluorosis and fluoride level but the evidence was 
seconds)  and  digital  images  taken  using  a  camera  system 
weak due to the between-study variations identified.
designed  for  this  work. The  drying  time  and  imaging  time 
The most recent prevalence studies undertaken in England 
were standardised as far as possible, but given variances in 
using  a  photographic  technique  found  that  the  prevalence 
moisture the objective was to achieve dry teeth as per the TF 
of fluorosis at TF1 was 39% in fluoridated Newcastle upon 
index method. A polarised white light image demonstrating 
Tyne and 24% in non-fluoridated Manchester.  These figures 
the  anterior  maxillary  teeth  was  taken  using  a  stabilisation 
were  broadly  similar  to  earlier  studies  in  Newcastle  and 
frame  enabling  the  subject  to  be  positioned  in  a  consistent 
Northumbria (Tabari et al., 2000).
manner  for  optimal  imaging.  The  image  system  utilised  a 
Fluorosis, at the severity seen in England, is an almost 
single, high-resolution camera with rotating filter wheels and 
exclusively  aesthetic  issue  with  mildly  fluorosed  enamel 
LED arrays to provide flat field illumination without specular 
remaining fully functional and rarely visible but more severe 
reflection. Images were saved as high resolution PNG files 
fluorosis presenting with pitted and stained enamel (Whelton 
for later analysis.
et al., 2004). A recent study (Davies et al., 2012) incorporated 
Subjects  were  asked  to  rate  their  satisfaction  with  the 
into the English National Health Service (NHS) Dental Epi-
aesthetic  appearance  of  their  teeth  using  a  pictorial  scale 
demiological survey attempted to assess the impact of dental 
with a narrative description: 0, Very happy with my teeth, 
opacities on children’s self-perception of their teeth and found 
I wouldn’t change anything about them; 1, Happy with my 
that the professionally assessed and self-assessed metrics did 
teeth; 2, I think my teeth are fine I don’t worry about their 
not always agree.  The aesthetic assessment of teeth is influ-
appearance; 3, I am a little bit worried about how my teeth 
enced by numerous factors, including orthodontic condition, 
look; 4, I am worried about how my teeth look and I might 
the presence of caries, results of trauma and tooth colour. It 
think about speaking to a dentist about it; 5, I don’t like how 
should also be recognised that non-dental, psychosocial factors, 
my teeth look and I will try and get treatment to change them.
will also influence this metric. Determining which of these 
Anonymised white light images were uploaded to a secure 
elements contributes to the overall assessment is complex and, 
website for scoring by a single trained and calibrated examiner 
within epidemiological work, very challenging to measure.
using both the TF and Dean’s index.  Images were presented 
The two purposes of this surveillance work were: to as-
to the examiner ordered randomly and the four maxillary 
sess  the  prevalence  and  severity  of  dental  fluorosis  in  four 
incisors scored when present, with at least two scores for 
city-based  populations  using  a  robust  photographic  method 
each subject.  Data were exported from the website to SPSS 
with  TF  index  reporting;  and  to  examine  differences  in 
for analysis.  Descriptive analyses were undertaken for both 
children’s  dental  aesthetic  satisfaction  scores  in  relation  to 
indices  providing  the  proportion  of  each  index  level  at  the 
water fluoridation.  
highest  score  when  two  or  more  teeth  scored  at  that  level, 
statistical  differences  were  detected,  where  present,  using 
Method
Mann-Whitney U tests.  Scores for aesthetic perception were 
assessed  for  statistical  significance  between  fluoridated  and 
A surveillance approach was adopted across four English cit-
non-fluoridated cities using Mann-Whitney U tests.  Socio-
ies.  Two, Newcastle upon Tyne and Birmingham, were fluori-
economic status was not considered within the analysis due 
dated while Manchester and Liverpool were non-fluoridated. 
to  subject  anonymisation  requirements  characteristic  of  the 
The survey was school-based involving children aged 11 to 
surveillance approach used.
14 years who self-reported life time residency in the city. No 
further checks on residency were undertaken.  Schools were 
Results
pragmatically selected based on prior participation in dental 
surveys, likely lifetime residency of students and class size. 
A total of 1,904 children participated in the survey, with 467 
The examinations were carried out during school terms from 
in  Manchester,  474  in  Liverpool,  513  in  Newcastle  upon 
September 2014 through to August 2015. Children consented 
Tyne and 450 in Birmingham. In total twelve schools were 
to  take  part  and  parents  were  given  the  opportunity  to  opt 
utilised,  four  in  the  non-fluoridated  cities  and  eight  in  the 
out  via  postal  forms  supplied  on  two  occasions. The  eight 
fluoridated cities.  Some 1,89 images were scorable for TF 
inclusion criteria were therefore: aged 11 to 14 years old, i.e. 
index,  and  1,903  for  Dean’s.   A  response  to  the  aesthetic 
in the first three years of secondary school; self-reported life 
question  was  provided  by  1,898  children.  Just  1,465  had 
time residency in the fluoridated or non-fluoridated area; in 
all teeth scored (77.2%), 347 had one tooth un-scorable (or 
good general health; have at least both permanent maxillary 
non-fluoridated opacity) 18.3%, 86 had two teeth un-scorable 
central incisors fully erupted; parents have not opted to ex-
(or non-fluoridated opacity) 4.5%.
clude their child from the survey (see online-only Appendix 
The results of the TF and Dean’s index scores are shown 
1); be cooperative and able to be examined; not have fixed 
in  Tables  1  and  2  respectively.    These  tables  present  the 
orthodontic  appliances;  able  to  provide  their  own  assent  to 
highest  score  of  two  or  more  teeth  from  the  maximum  of 
take part.
four scored, e.g. scores of 1, 4, 3, 3 would result in a score 
A sample size calculation using a two-group continuity 
of  3.  There  were  no  statistically  significant  differences  in 
corrected Chi squared test with a 0.05 two-sided significance 
TF  (p=0.351)  or  Dean’s  scores  (p=0.12)  between  the  two 
level was conducted.  Using 80% power to detect the differ-
fluoridated cities or between the two non-fluoridated cities 
ence between a Group 1 proportion of 20% and a Group 2 
(TF, p=0.85, Dean’s p=0.35).  There was a statistically sig-
proportion 40% (odds ratio of 2.7) would require a sample 
nificant  difference  in  overall  fluorosis  prevalence  between 
size in each group of 249. We oversampled the populations 
the fluoridated and non-fluoridated cities when considering 
to gain broader insight and to allow for non-scorable images.
fluorosis to be TF>0 (p<0.0001) and when TF>2 (p<0.0001). 
293

Table 1. TF index scores (highest score when 2 or more teeth scored at this level), n and %
TF
Manchester (NF)
Liverpool (NF)
Newcastle (F)
Birmingham(F)
All four cities
Index
2015*
2012
2015
2015*
2012
2000†
2015*
2015
n %
n %
n %
n %
n %
n %
n
%
n %
TF0
286 61
638 73
304 64
195 38
410 45
202 46
175
39
960 51
TF1
154 33
209 24
143 30
212 42
355 39
182 42
176
39
685 36
TF2
15 3
16
2
16
3
54 11
79 9
40 9
49
11
134
7
TF3
11 2
4
1
10
2
43 8
53 6
14 3
37
8
101
5
TF4
0 0
0
0
0
0
6 1
8 1
0 0
9
2
15
1
Table 1
TF5 TF in
0 dex0 scores (h
2 igh
0.2 est score w
0 hen0 2 or more tee
0 th 0scored 1at th
0.1 is level)0, n a0nd % 
2
0.4
2 0.1
TF 
TF6
Man
ches
ter (NF)
  Liverpoo0l (NF)
 
Ne
wcastle
 (F

0 0
Birmingham 1(F)  A
0.2 ll four cities 1 0.1
Index
TF8   2015*
  0
201
2  0
2015
  0
2015* 0 0 20102  0
200
0† 0
2015* 1 0.2
2015  1 0.1
T otal 466 
869 
n  473 

%
510  
906 
438 

%
450  


1,899
TF0  286  61 
638  73 
304  64 
195  38 
410  45 
202  46 
175  39 
960  51 
TF1 
NF,  154  33  209
non-fluoridated;     F,  24 
143
fluoridated;      30 
person 
212
level    42 
scores;    355  39
*indicates  use  182
of    42 
polarised light  176  39
images;     † 
685
indicates    36 
clinical 
TF2 
rather  15 
than  3  16 
photographic  2 
16
examination;     3 
2012 
54  11
Manchester   and  79 
2012 

Newcastle 40 
data  9 
from 
49 
McGrady et al
11 
134  7 
., 2012 and 2000 New-
castle data from Tabari et al., 2000
TF3 
11  2 
4  1 
10  2 
43  8 
53  6 
14  3 
37 

101  5 
TF4 
0  0 
0  0 
0  0 
6  1 
8  1 
0  0 


15  1 
TF5 
0  0 
2  0.2 
0  0 
0  0 
1  0.1 
0  0 
2  0.4 
2  0.1 
TF
T
0
able 2.    0
Dean’ s 
0
index    0 
scores (highest  0  0
score  when  0
2   or  0 
more 

teeth 

scored at  0 
this 

level), n and  1
%   0.2 
1  0.1 
TF8 
0  0 
0  0 
0  0 
0  0 
0  0 
0  0 
1  0.2 
1  0.1 
Dean’s Index
Manchester (NF)
Liverpool (NF)
Newcastle (F)
Birmingham (F)
All four cities
Total  466 
  869 
 
473 
  510 
  906 
  438 
 
450 
 
1,899 
 
NF, non-fluoridated;   F, fluoridated; 
  person lev
el scorens;   *indica
tes use onf polarise
d light ima
ges;   † in
dicates cnlinical  %
rath0er  than 
Normalphotographic  examinatio
293 n;    Man
63   chester a
321nd 2012 Ne
68   wcastle
186  data from
36    McGrad
161 y et al., 
36   2012  and
961  2000 50  
New
½ castle data fro
Questionable m Tabari et al., 2000
145  
31  
129
27 
249
49  
196
44  
719
38  
  1 Very Mild
21
5  
13
3  
40
8  
51
11  
125

  2 Mild
7
2  
11
2  
31
6  
28
6  
77
4  
Table 2
3
Dea
Moderate n’s index scores (hig0hest score 
0   when 2 o
0 r more teeth
0  
 scor7ed), n and
1    %  13
3  
20
1  
Dean'
s Inde
Severe
Manchester(NF)
 
L
0.2   iverpool (0NF)  0   Newcastle
 (F)  Bi
0   rmingha1m (F)  0.2   All fou2r cities 0.1  
  Total

467 %  100   n  474 %  100   n  513 %  100  
n  450
100  

1904
100  

NFNo
,  rmal 
non-fluoridated;   F, 293 
63
fluoridated;    
321 
68   
186 
36   
161 
36   
961 
50   
½  Questionable 
145 
31   
129 
27   
249 
49   
196 
44   
719 
38   
1  Very Mild 
21 
5   
13 
3   
40 
8   
51 
11   
125 
7   
2  Data from the aes
Mild 
thetic survey’

s 1,888 res
2   
pons
11  es (99%
2   
31 
6   
28 
6   
Discussion
77 
4   
res
3  pons
Mode rate in both groups) are s
erate 

ummaris
0   
ed in Figure 1.

0   

1   
13 
3   
20 
1   
There 
4  S was 
evere  no significant dif
1  ference 
0.2in 
    the mean 
0  aesthetic 
0   

While  we  0   
have  pres 1 
ented  0.2  
both   TF 

Index  and  0.1
D    
ean’s 
score 
Total  between  respondents 
467  from  fluoridated 
100   
cities 
474 
and 
100   
513 
Index 
100
data    
it  is 
450 
important  100
to     
190
recognise  4 
that 
100
the     
survey 
non-fluoridated 
NF, non-fluorida cities 
ted;   F, (p=0.572). 
 fluoridated;The 
 
median rank from 
was  designed  to  report  TF  as  a  primary  outcome.  The 
  the scale this was 2 (not worried) in each city, for each 
TF  index  is  histologically  validated  and  represents  the 
  TF  with  the  exception  of TF3  in  non-fluoridated  areas 
biological  presentation  and  development  of  fluorosis 
where 
Figure the 
1. Smedian 
elf-p
was 
erceive 
(a 
 a little 
esth
bit 
etic s worried).
core across fluoridated (F) 
(Thylstrup  and  Fejerskov,  1978).  Prior  to  photographic 
and non-fluoridated (NF) cities 
examination the teeth were dried, as per the TF protocol, 
Percentage frequency distribution of responses 
but the Dean’s examination calls for wet teeth (Dean et 
0
10
20
30
40
al.,  1950).    As  such  the  Dean’s  Index  data  should  be 
 
treated with caution and are included for completeness.
   est
4.9 
The  data  presented  in  Table  1  which,  for  the  cities 
reat 5
ore G
6.8 
of  Manchester  and  Newcastle  contain  fluorosis  data 
    
from 2012, and Newcastle for 2000 demonstrate broadly 
    
5.7 
consistent fluorosis prevalence especially at the levels of 
     4
action sc
7.8 
TF2  or  above.  There  does  appear  to  be  an  increase  in 
tisf         
TF1 compared to the previous studies, and this seems to 
28.8 
issa      3
be related to a decrease in TF0. Caution must be drawn 
    
23.0 
when  considering  the  Newcastle  data  from  2000  as, 
etic d         
while  photographic  techniques  were  used,  the  reported 
30.8 
     2
data for prevalence were from clinical, not photographic 
    
34.3 
ed aesth
assessments.  TF  scores  higher  than  three  were  seen, 
    
eiv
especially  in  Birmingham,  although  they  were  few  in 
    
23.0 
     1
number  and  likely  to  be  a  result  of  failure  to  disclose 
21.9 
f-perc     
past  residency  status  (where  water  fluoride  levels  may 
Sel    
be  >1ppm),  perhaps  as  a  wish  to  conform  or  not  to  be 
ne 
6.7 
F,    N=923, Mean Rank=957
0
excluded  from  participation.  It  is  also  impossible  to 
No
6.2 
NF, N=965,
N=957  Mean Rank=943
exclude causes such as excessive or inappropriate use 
  of supplemental fluorides.
 Figure 1. Self-perceived aesthetic scor  e across fluoridated 
(F) and non-fluoridated (NF) cities
294

The  increase  from  TF0  to  TF1  might  be  attributable 
Conclusion
to the increased exposure to fluorides, such as from fluo-
ride toothpaste or professional fluoride applications.  The 
This  surveillance  work  provides  further  cross-sectional 
children  in  this  survey  were  aged  between  11  to  14  and 
epidemiological  data  on  the  prevalence  and  severity  of 
would have been 4 and 7 years old when the first edition of 
dental  fluorosis  in  English  adolescents  in  fluoridated 
Delivering Better Oral Health was published in 2007 (DH, 
and  non-fluoridated  communities.    There  is  a  possible 
2007) that advocated for increased use of professional ap-
increase  in  the  mildest  forms  of  fluorosis  that  appear 
plied fluorides and risk based recommendations for higher 
to  shift  from  cases  of  non-fluorosis  although  this  may 
concentration toothpastes (2800ppm). The risk period for 
be related to the superior image quality and assessment 
fluorosis of the anterior maxillary teeth is generally agreed 
undertaken in this work.   
to be from birth to the age of three (Evans and Darvell, 
If  the  increase  in  very  mild  fluorosis  from  TF0  to 
1995), so the increase is unlikely to be associated with the 
TF1 in both fluoridated and non-fluoridated communities 
introduction of new guidance on other forms of fluoride. 
is  real  and  not  artefact,  the  increase  is  unlikely  to  be 
In  considering  any  possible  trend  in  the  prevalence  of 
related to water fluoridation as the schemes continued to 
fluorosis,  it  should  be  noted  that  previous  photographic 
operate across the time periods when the children were 
studies  have  employed  conventional  or  digital  35mm 
at  risk.    The  proportion  of  aesthetically  objectionable 
cameras.  The images obtained from the current system, 
fluorosis, between 9% and 10.5% within the fluoridated 
due  to  the  stabilisation  frame  and  illumination  array  are 
communities, is unlikely to represent a public health is-
of higher quality and hence the ability to detect the small 
sue.  We  must  recognise  that  the  use  of  TF3  or  greater 
changes  associated  with  TF1  is  increased;  therefore  the 
is a professional measure of fluorosis, one that is scored 
change we observed might be due to changes in method 
following  tooth  drying  and  assessed  from  clinical  im-
and not a true increase. The images are also polarised to 
ages  taken  with  polarised  light.    The  use  of  increased 
remove  specular  reflection  –  the  impact  of  polarisation 
self-reported outcomes in relation to aesthetic impact is 
on overall detection is not known – anecdotally it would 
to  be  recommended  Chankanka  et al. (2010). There is 
appear  to  have  little  impact  on  scoring  but  does  reduce 
no evidence from this survey of an increase in levels 
the number of un-scorable images within datasets. In ad-
of  fluorosis  that  might  be  of  aesthetic  concern.    Future 
dition to the caution that is needed regarding any possible 
surveillance and epidemiological studies should employ 
trend, it is important to bear in mind that the teeth in this 
high  quality  image  capture  and  assessment  to  enable 
survey will, through drying, appear to have more fluorosis 
meaningful comparators with these data.
than they would normally display in social circumstances. 
However  the  drying  method  and  timings  for  the  studies 
Acknowledgements
were the same as utilised in the current survey.
The  consistencies  in  reported  fluorosis  free  subjects 
The  authors  wish  to  acknowledge  the  assistance  of  the 
between the two fluoridated and two non-fluoridated cities 
Newcastle community dental service, especially Deborah 
suggest external validity of the survey and there were no 
Howe,  Oral  Health  Promotion  Lead,  for  all  her  help 
statistical differences at either TF>0 or TF>2 between the 
recruiting  schools  and  data  collecting.  We  would  also 
cities in each cohort.
like to thank the schools who participated in this survey. 
The results from the evaluation of aesthetic impact 
Declaration  of  interest:  Professor  Pretty  is  the  co-
suggest  that  the  presence  of  fluorosis  in  the  two  cities 
director of the Dental Health Unit that receives funding 
benefiting from optimally fluoridated water may not affect 
from  the  Colgate  Palmolive  Company.  This  work  was 
children’s self-perception of their teeth.  The presence of 
funded by a restricted grant from Public Health England. 
other factors contributing to aesthetic loss, such as trauma 
and  orthodontic  condition  should  be  similar  across  the 
References
populations,  although  data  from  earlier  studies  suggest 
that  caries  will  be  lower  in  the  fluoridated  communi-
Albino,  J.E.,  Cunat,  J.J.,  Fox,  R.N.,  Lewis,  E.A.,  Slakter, 
ties (McGrady et al.,  2012a;b).   Aesthetic  assessment  is 
M.J.  and  Tedesco,  L.A.  (1981):  Variables  discriminating 
complex, and oral health has been shown to be a signifi-
individuals who seek orthodontic treatment. Journal of 
Dental Research 60,  1661-1667.
cant factor in physical attractiveness (Ament and Ament, 
Ament,  P.  and  Ament,  A.  (1970):  Body  image  in  dentistry. 
1970).  While  data  suggest  that  appearance  (as  opposed 
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry 24,  362-366.
to  functional  deficit)  is  a  major  driver  for  those  seeking 
Boye, U., Foster, G.R., Pretty, I.A. and Tickle, M. (2012): 
orthodontic care the data concerning fluorosis is less clear 
Children’s views on the experience of a visual examina-
(Albino et al., 1981).  
tion  and  intra-oral  photographs  to  detect  dental  caries  in 
TF scores of 3 and above are generally considered to be 
epidemiological  studies.  Community Dental Health 29
aesthetically objectionable (Hawley et al., 1996; Riordan, 
284-288.
1993).  Given the apparent increase in TF1 (although the 
Chankanka, O., Levy, S.M., Warren, J.J. and Chalmers, J.M. 
cautionary  notes  regarding  image  sensitivity  should  be 
(2010): A literature review of aesthetic perceptions of 
dental fluorosis and relationships with psychosocial aspects/
considered) it is useful to note that these are not con-
oral  health-related  quality  of  life. Community Dentistry 
sidered  by  children  or  their  parents  as  an  aesthetic  issue 
and Oral Epidemiology 38,  97-109.
(Clark et al., 1993). The results from the current survey 
Clark, D.C., Hann, H.J., Williamson, M.F. and Berkowitz, 
suggest  that,  in  this  age  group,  the  presence  of  fluorosis 
J. (1993): Aesthetic concerns of children and parents in 
(on a population level) does not appear to cause aesthetic 
relation  to  different  classifications  of  the  Tooth  Surface 
concern or, where it does cause concern there is an equal 
Index of Fluorosis. Community Dentistry and Oral Epi-
level of dissatisfaction due to other factors, such as caries. 
demiology  21,  360-364.
295

Commission on Oral Health (1982): An epidemiological index 
McGrady,  M.G.,  Ellwood,  R.P.,  Maguire,  A.,  Goodwin,  M., 
of  developmental  defects  of  dental  enamel  (DDE  Index). 
Boothman, N. and Pretty, I.A. (2012a): The association 
Commission on Oral Health, Research and Epidemiology. 
between  social  deprivation  and  the  prevalence  and  sever-
International Dental Journal 32, 159-167.
ity  of  dental  caries  and  fluorosis  in  populations  with  and 
Davies, G.M., Pretty, I.A., Neville, J.S. and Goodwin, M. 
without water fluoridation. BMC Public Health 12, 1122.
(2012):  Investigation  of  the  value  of  a  photographic  tool 
McGrady,  M.G.,  Ellwood,  R.P.,  Srisilapanan,  P.,  Korwanich, 
to measure self-perception of enamel opacities. BMC Oral 
N.,  Worthington,  H.V.  and  Pretty,  I.A.  (2012b):  Dental 
Health 12, 41.
fluorosis  in  populations  from  Chiang  Mai,  Thailand  with 
Dean, H.T., Arnold, F.A., Jr., Jay, P. and Knutson, J.W. (1950): 
different  fluoride  exposures  -  paper  1:  assessing  fluorosis 
Studies on mass control of dental caries through fluorida-
risk,  predictors  of  fluorosis  and  the  potential  role  of  food 
tion  of  the  public  water  supply.  Public Health Report  65
preparation. BMC Oral Health 12, 16.
1403-1408.
Nunn, J.H., Murray, J.J., Reynolds, P., Tabari, D. and Breckon, J. 
Department  of  Health,  DH  (2007):  Delivering Better Oral 
(1992): The prevalence of developmental defects of enamel 
Health. London: DH.
in 15-16-year-old children residing in three districts (natural 
Evans, R.W. and Darvell, B.W. (1995): Refining the estimate of 
fluoride, adjusted fluoride, low fluoride) in the north east of 
the critical period for susceptibility to enamel fluorosis in 
England. Community Dental Health 9, 235-247.
human maxillary central incisors. Journal of Public Health 
Riordan,  P.J.  (1993):  Perceptions  of  dental  fluorosis.  Journal 
Dentistry 55, 238-249.
of Dental Research 72, 1268-1274.
Hawley, G.M., Ellwood, R.P. and Davies, R.M. (1996): Dental 
Tabari,  E.D.,  Ellwood,  R.,  Rugg-Gunn, A.J.,  Evans,  D.J.  and 
caries, fluorosis and the cosmetic implications of different 
Davies, R.M. (2000): Dental fluorosis in permanent incisor 
TF  scores  in  14-year-old  adolescents.  Community Dental 
teeth  in  relation  to  water  fluoridation,  social  deprivation 
Health 13, 189-192.
and toothpaste use in infancy. British Dental Journal 189
Iheozor-Ejiofor, Z., Worthington, H.V., Walsh, T., O’Malley, L., 
216-220.
Clarkson,  J.E.,  Macey,  R., Alam,  R.,  Tugwell,  P.,  Welch, 
Thylstrup, A. and Fejerskov, O. (1978): Clinical appearance of 
V.  and  Glenny,  A.M.  (2015):  Water  fluoridation  for  the 
dental fluorosis in permanent teeth in relation to histologic 
prevention of dental caries. Cochrane Database Systematic 
changes.  Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology 6
Reviews 6, CD010856.
315-328.
Levine,  R.S.,  Beal,  J.F.  and  Fleming,  C.M.  (1989): A  photo-
Whelton,  H.P.,  Ketley,  C.E.,  McSweeney,  F.  and  O’Mullane, 
graphically  recorded  assessment  of  enamel  hypoplasia  in 
D.M. (2004): A review of fluorosis in the European Union: 
fluoridated  and  non-fluoridated  areas  in  England.  British 
prevalence, risk factors and aesthetic issues. Community 
Dental Journal 166, 249-252.
Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology 32 Suppl 1, 9-18.
296