This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Summary Minutes for CHM meeting on 16th & 17th July 2015'.

link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7





















group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Open Access
Research
Postural tachycardia syndrome is
associated with significant symptoms
and functional impairment
predominantly affecting young
women: a UK perspective
Claire McDonald,1 Sharon Koshi,1 Lorna Busner,2 Lesley Kavi,2 Julia L Newton1
To cite: McDonald C,
ABSTRACT
Strengths and limitations of this study
Koshi S, Busner L, et al.
Objective: To examine a large UK cohort of patients
Postural tachycardia
with postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS), to
syndrome is associated with
▪ Description of the demographics and symptom
compare demographic characteristics, symptoms and
significant symptoms and
burden experienced by a large cohort of patients
treatment of PoTS at one centre compared to the
functional impairment
with positional tachycardia syndrome.
predominantly affecting
largest patient group PoTS UK and to verify if their
▪ Cross-sectional ‘opt in’ study using self-report
young women: a UK
functional limitation is similar to patients with chronic
symptom assessment tools.
perspective. BMJ Open
fatigue syndrome (CFS).
▪ Study performed in collaboration with the
2014;4:e004127.
Design: A cross-sectional study assessed the
national PoTS patient support group.
doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-
frequency of symptoms and their associated variables.
004127
Patients and setting: Two PoTS cohorts were: (1)
recruited via PoTS UK, (2) diagnosed at Newcastle
quality of life. Despite this, there is no consistent
▸ Prepublication history for
Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Foundation
treatment.
this paper is available online.
Trust 2009–2012. Patients with PoTS were then
To view these files please
compared to a matched cohort with CFS.
visit the journal online
Main outcome measures: Patients’ detailed
(http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/
demographics, time to diagnosis, education, disability,
bmjopen-2013-004127).
medications, comorbidity and precipitants. Symptom
INTRODUCTION
Received 27 September 2013
assessment tools captured, Fatigue Impact Scale,
Postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS) is a
Accepted 11 October 2013
Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Orthostatic Grading Scale
subset of orthostatic intolerance that is asso-
(OGS), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Health
ciated with the presence of excessive tachy-
Assessment Questionnaire, Cognitive Failures
cardia on standing. Symptoms may be so
Questionnaire.
severe that normal activities of life, such as
Results: 136 patients with PoTS participated (84
bathing, housework and even eating, can be
members of PoTS UK (170 cohort; 50% return) and
52 (87 cohort; 60%) from Newcastle Clinics). The
significantly limited.1 Patients with PoTS
PoTS UK population was significantly younger than the
have been reported to suffer from a degree
clinic patients, with significantly fewer men ( p=0.005).
of functional impairment similar to that seen
Over 60% had a university or postgraduate degree.
in conditions such as chronic obstructive pul-
Significantly more of the PoTS UK cohort were
monary disease and congestive heart failure;
working, with hours worked being significantly higher
yet these patients are frequently misdiag-
( p=0.001). Time to diagnosis was significantly longer
nosed as having severe anxiety, panic dis-
in the PoTS UK cohort ( p=0.04). Symptom severity
order or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
1Institute for Ageing &
was comparable between cohorts. The PoTS total
because of a lack of awareness of the condi-
Health, Campus for Ageing &
group was compared with a matched CFS cohort;
tion and its functional impact by healthcare
Vitality, Medical School,
despite comparable levels of fatigue and sleepiness,
professionals.2
Newcastle University,
autonomic symptom burden (OGS) was statistically
Newcastle Hospitals NHS
significantly higher. The most common treatment
Studies performed in the USA suggest that
Foundation Trust, Newcastle
regime included β-blockers. Overall, 21 treatment
PoTS affects approximately 170/100 000 of
upon Tyne, UK
combinations were described. Up to 1/3 were taking no
the population, and of this total, 25% are dis-
2PoTs UK, www.potsuk.org
treatment.
abled and unable to work. PoTS can affect
any age group, but predominantly presents
Correspondence to
Conclusions: Patients with PoTS are predominantly
Professor Julia L Newton;
women, young, well educated and have significant and
in young and middle age groups.No such
x.x.xxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx
debilitating symptoms that impact significantly on
studies currently exist from the UK.
McDonald C, Koshi S, Busner L, et al. BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127
1

link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Open Access
The principal feature of PoTS is orthostatic intoler-
fatigue,
daytime
sleepiness,
orthostatic
symptoms,
ance. This is defined as the provocation of symptoms on
anxiety and depressive symptoms, functional ability and
standing that are relieved by lying down.Those with
cognitive failures.
PoTS frequently present with palpitations, fatigue, light-
headedness, exercise intolerance, nausea, diminished
Fatigue Impact Scale
concentration, tremulousness, syncope and presyncope.5
The Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) assesses perceptions of
In adults, PoTS is currently defined as the presence of
how fatigue affects cognitive, physical and psychosocial
symptoms of orthostatic intolerance associated with a
functions. It is validated for self-completion and used in
heart rate increase of 30 bpm (or a rate that exceeds
a number of fatigue-associated diseases913 and CFS.13 It
120 bpm) that occurs within the first 10 min of standing
comprises 40 items; participants rate how these items
or upright tilt, not associated with other chronic debili-
are affected by fatigue on a five-point scale: 0 (no
tating conditions such as prolonged bed rest or the use
problem) to 4 (extreme problem). Total score is calcu-
of medications known to diminish vascular or autonomic
lated by adding responses from the 40 questions; pos-
tone.In teenagers, the criteria suggest that an increase
sible range 0–160.
in 40 bpm on standing is diagnostic.The aim of this
current study was twofold. First, we wanted to raise
Epworth Sleepiness Scale
awareness of the prevalence and impact of PoTS in
A validated self-report assessment tool that quantifies
healthcare professionals by collating a large cohort of
symptoms of daytime sleepiness.14 Consists of eight
patients with PoTS in the UK. Second, we wanted to see
items, each graded 0–3. Higher scores indicate a greater
whether there were differences between patients with
impact of daytime sleepiness.
PoTS seen in one centre compared with members of the
largest patient support group PoTS UK who provide
Orthostatic Grading Scale
support exclusively for patients with PoTS.
Quantifies the symptoms of orthostatic intolerance due
to hypotension, with questions related to frequency and
METHODS
severity of symptoms and interference with daily activ-
Patients
ities.15 It consists of five items, each graded on a scale of
Postural tachycardia syndrome
0–4. Higher scores indicate a greater impact of ortho-
Two cohorts of patients with PoTS were included in this
static symptoms.
study; the first cohort was recruited via the national
patient support group PoTS UK (http://www.potsuk.
Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale
org.uk) and the second cohort was made up of all those
A validated anxiety and depression measure optimised
diagnosed with PoTS at the Falls and Syncope Service
for use in patients with chronic disease.16 Individual sub-
Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals National Health Service
scales comprise seven items, each with a potential score
(NHS) Foundation Trust between May 2009 and April
0–21. For the purposes of this study, ‘caseness’ for
2012. Both cohorts included only patients where a diag-
depression or anxiety was defined as a score of 11 or
nosis had been reached by a secondary care clinician.
greater for the subscale.
PoTS UK is an independent UK registered small charity.
People join PoTS UK after finding the website through
Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information
search engines or links from other websites. At the time
System, Health Assessment Questionnaire (PHAQ)
of this study, PoTS UK had 170 members. The Newcastle
Assesses the functional and physical ability of partici-
Clinic Cohort comprised 87 patients with PoTS.
pants.17 The PHAQ consists of 20 items that ask patients
to rate their ability to carry out daily activities on a five-
Patients with CFS
point scale of ‘0=without any difficulty’ to ‘4=unable to
Patients with CFS were consecutive patients referred to
do’. Higher scores indicate a worse functional ability
the Newcastle Royal Victoria Infirmary who fulfilled the
and therefore greater functional impairment.
Fukuda 1994 diagnostic criteria for CFS8 who had been
shown on haemodynamic testing to not have PoTS.
Cognitive Failures Questionnaire
Assesses cognitive symptom prevalence by measuring the
Symptom assessment tools
frequency of cognitive slips or failures occurring in
The complete survey form was developed in two parts.
everyday life.18 Consists of 25 items covering failures in
The first part contained questions about demographics,
perception, memory and motor function and asks
age since symptoms began and age at diagnosis, educa-
patients to rate how often these failures occur, on a five-
tion, disability, medications and symptoms at the time of
point Likert scale 0–4 (0=never, 4=very often). The
completing the survey. Next were questions about
responses for the 25 questions are added together to
characteristics of PoTS including comorbidity and poten-
obtain the total Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ)
tial precipitants. Following these, participants completed
score. The higher the score, the greater the cognitive
six validated symptom assessment tools quantifying
impairment.
2
McDonald C, Koshi S, Busner L, et al. BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127

link to page 4 link to page 4 link to page 5 group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Open Access
Study design
and when they were working, the hours that they were
We used a cross-sectional study design to assess the fre-
able to work were significantly higher ( p=0.001).
quency of symptoms and their associated variables at a
Despite this, a large proportion of the patients with
single point in time. The same survey was sent to all
PoTS had to change their job because of ill health and
members of PoTS UK and PoTS clinic patients in 2012.
had been unable to work because of problems with their
Patients who were 16 years old or older were requested
health.
to complete and return the survey. For the PoTS UK
cohort, surveys were emailed by PoTS UK to all
Overall symptom burden of the groups
members. The survey was featured on the PoTS UK
Symptoms started at a significantly younger age in the
website and in the newsletter. No participant identifiable
PoTS UK cohort (23 vs 28 years of age) and diagnosis
information was provided to the investigators, and there-
age was not significantly different with the PoTS UK
fore no written consent was obtained from participants
population being diagnosed on average at the age of 30
but return of the anonymous questionnaires was consid-
compared with 33 in the PoTS clinic cohort. As a conse-
ered as implied consent for the use of the data. For the
quence, time to diagnosis after the onset of symptoms
PoTS clinic cohort, surveys were mailed to all patients
was significantly longer in the PoTS UK population com-
who had been diagnosed with PoTS. To increase
pared with the group attending a specialist clinic
response, surveys were mailed one additional time to
( p=0.04). When considering the symptom assessment
those who had not returned the initial survey within
tools completed by participants with PoTS, there were
4 weeks. Patients in the Falls and Syncope Service
no significant differences in symptom severity between
provide written informed consent agreeing that they are
the PoTS UK cohort and PoTS clinic cohort, with high
happy to participate in research, audit and service evalu-
levels of fatigue, daytime sleepiness, orthostatic symp-
ation. Results of the symptom assessment tools were
toms, anxiety and depression, particularly high levels of
compared with those completed by a cohort of matched
functional impairment and cognitive symptoms.
patients with CFS attending our clinic.
Around 20% of the total cohort reported having CFS
and just under 20% had Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, but
Analysis
when we considered the PoTS UK population compared
All analyses were carried out using statistical software
with the PoTS clinic cohort, this showed some interest-
(GraphPad, Prism V.5). Descriptive statistics for each of
ing differences, with the PoTS clinic cohort having 42%
the analysed parameters were initially calculated separ-
of the cohort with comorbid CFS/myalgic encephalomy-
ately for the PoTS UK and the clinic cohorts. For con-
elitis (ME) compared with 26% of the PoTS UK having
tinuous parameters, either median and range, or mean
comorbid Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS; table 1).
and SE, were calculated; for categorical variables, per-
centages were calculated.
Comparing the total PoTS group to a matched CFS group
In view of the fact that the PoTS UK and the PoTS clinic
cohort were comparable in terms of symptom severity,
RESULTS
we considered the total group (n=136) and compared
Response rates
this to an age-matched and sex-matched cohort of
A total of 136 patients with PoTS completed and
patients with CFS. The CFS group had a mean±SD age
returned
the
questionnaires.
This
comprised
84
of 36±10 years ( p=ns). Interestingly, despite comparable
members of PoTS UK (170 cohort; 50% return) and 52
levels of symptom burden measured by the FIS and
(87 cohort; 60%)) patients with PoTS attending the Falls
daytime sleepiness measured by the Epworth Sleepiness
and Syncope Service.
Scale, the scores from the Orthostatic Grading Scale
(OGS; autonomic symptom burden) were statistically sig-
Demographics of the two groups
nificantly higher in the PoTS group compared with the
The PoTS UK population was significantly younger than
CFS group. Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale
the PoTS clinic patients, with significantly fewer men
(HADS) scores were significantly higher in the CFS
( p=0.005; table 1). Interestingly, there were proportion-
group despite high levels of symptoms in both groups
ately more smokers in the PoTS UK group but relatively
(figure 1).
similar proportions drinking alcohol and taking caffeine.
There were, however, four in the PoTS UK population
Comparing the symptom burden of patients with PoTS
(5%) compared to none in the PoTS clinic cohort who
with and without comorbid CFS/ME
were taking recreational drugs specifically stated to be
We went on to consider the total PoTS cohort of 136
cannabis. On reviewing the educational level of both
patients and compared those with (n=27) and without
cohorts, it became clear that, taken together, patients
(n=109) comorbid CFS. When we considered the
with PoTS are well educated, with over 60% of the popu-
number of symptoms that they first noticed before being
lation having either a university or a postgraduate
diagnosed with PoTS, those without CFS had significantly
degree. This was comparable between the two cohorts.
more symptoms ( p=0.0004), with the majority of these
Significantly more of the PoTS UK cohort were working
symptoms
being
palpitations,
dizziness,
memory
McDonald C, Koshi S, Busner L, et al. BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127
3

link to page 5 link to page 6 link to page 6 group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Open Access
Table 1 Demographics of the PoTS UK cohort compared with the PoTS clinic cohort
PoTS UK
PoTS clinic
p Value
Total PoTS
N
84
52
136
Age, mean±SD
32±10
36±11
0.04
33±10
Males, n (%)
3 (4)
10 (19)
0.005
13 (10)
BMI, mean±SD
24±5
34±5
0.09
27±5
Smokers, n (%)
12 (14)
2 (4)
0.08
14 (10)
Previous smoker, n (%)
14 (17)
6 (12)
0.5
20 (15)
Alcohol, yes, n (%)
28 (33)
20 (38)
0.6
48 (35)
Caffeine, yes, n (%)
46 (55)
34 (65)
0.3
80 (59)
Drugs, yes, n (%)
4 (5)
0
0.3
4 (3)
Age symptoms started, mean±SD
23±10 n=76
28±12 n=50
0.01
24±11
Age diagnosed, mean±SD
30±10 n=82
33±11 n=48
0.09
31±10
Difference, mean±SD
8.3±10 n=79
5.2±5 n=49
0.04
6.7±7
Symptoms assessment tools
Fatigue Impact Scale
91±32
92±37
0.8
92±34
Epworth Sleepiness Scale
10±5
10±8
0.8
10±5
Orthostatic Grading Scale
13±4
12±4
0.4
13±4
Hospital Anxiety and Depression
14±7
15±9
0.3
15±7
Patient Reported Outcome Measure Health
26±21
26±22
1.0
26±21
Assessment Questionnaire
Cognitive Failures Questionnaire
50±24
51±23
0.7
51±23
Comorbidity
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
6 (7)
22 (42)
0.0001
28 (21)
Ehlers Danlos Syndrome
22 (26)
2 (4)
0.0009
24 (18)
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
9 (11)
5 (10)
1.0
14 (10)
Thyroid
10 (12)
3 (6)
0.4
13 (10)
Heart
4 (5)
0
0.3
4 (3)
Fibromyalgia
7 (8)
2 (4)
0.5
9 (7)
Education
Left school at 16
9 (11)
12 (23)
0.09
21 (15)
Left school at 18
7 (8)
5 (10)
1.0
12 (9)
University degree
33 (40)
23 (44)
0.6
56 (41)
Postgraduate degree
16 (19)
12 (23)
0.7
28 (21)
Other
14 (17)
0
14 (10)
BMI, body mass index.
impairment, breathlessness, light-headedness and muscle
with CFS group. When we reviewed symptoms in the two
aches. Twenty-three (21%) of the patients with PoTS and
groups that would be consistent with the diagnosis of CFS
without CFS were currently receiving disability benefit
(Fukuda), of patients with PoTS who did not describe
compared with 13 (48%) of the patients with PoTS and
comorbid CFS, 43% of them would actually have met the
CFS (table 2). The participants with PoTS with no CFS
diagnostic criteria for CFS. The vast majority of patients
appeared to be more able to exercise, with 44% of the
with PoTS had noticed an infection as the precipitating
patients with PoTS with no CFS currently engaging in any
cause for their symptoms, and interestingly, six of the
form of exercise compared with 29% of the patients with
PoTS without CFS group (seven in total) did not describe
PoTS and with CFS. In those who were not exercising, the
themselves as being ill at all. Scores from the symptom
vast majority in both groups felt that this was because of
assessment tools confirmed that those with PoTS with
fatigue or because they knew it would worsen their symp-
and without CFS had higher levels of orthostatic intoler-
toms. In terms of hours that they had spent performing
ance measured using the OGS compared with the CFS
activities, there was no significant difference between
group (figure 2).
patients with PoTS with and without CFS in terms of
household-related activities, social and recreational activ-
The impact of treatments
ities and family-related activities; however, the PoTS
The treatments that patients with PoTS were using are
without CFS group did appear to have spent significantly
shown in table 3. The most common treatment, either
more hours in work-related activities. Interestingly, 34%
alone or in combination, was β-blockers. Overall, there
of the PoTS without CFS group had spontaneously
was a wide range of different therapies being used with
reported episodes of loss of consciousness in association
21 different combinations described by patients with
with their symptoms compared with 18% of the PoTS
PoTS. In total, 26.5% of patients in PoTS UK and 34.5%
4
McDonald C, Koshi S, Busner L, et al. BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127


group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Open Access
Figure 1 Symptom assessment
tools in the total postural
tachycardia syndrome (PoTS)
group compared with the
age-matched and sex-matched
chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
group. Autonomic symptom
burden and scores from Hospital
Anxiety and Depression Scale are
higher in the PoTS group
compared with the CFS group
while fatigue and daytime
sleepiness are comparable.
Table 2 Comparison between the postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS) with comorbid chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and
PoTS without comorbid CFS
PoTS
PoTS
No CFS
With CFS
p Value
N
109
27
Proportion working n (%)
57 (52)
11 (41)
0.4
When working hours worked (median (IQR))
30 (26–33)
5 (0.2–23)
0.001
Symptoms described
Number of symptoms first noticed (median (IQR))
2 (2.3–2.9)
1 (1.1–2.3)
0.0004
by patients with PoTS
Palpitations n (%)
80 (73)
16 (60)
0.9
Fatigue n (%)
85 (78)
24 (89)
Dizziness n (%)
87 (80)
20 (74)
Memory n (%)
47 (43)
13 (48)
Breathlessness n (%)
63 (58)
14 (52)
Light-headedness n (%)
89 (82)
20 (74)
Muscle aches n (%)
54 (50)
16 (59)
Are you currently engaging in any form of exercise? n (%)
48/109 (44)
8/27 (30)
0.2
If you do not exercise,
Not interested
1/61 (2)
0/20
1.0
why do you not
No time
7/61 (12)
0/20
exercise?
Would like to but cannot because of fatigue
46/61 (75)
16/20 (80)
n (%)
Cannot because symptoms worsen
49/61 (80)
17/20 (85)
In the past 4 weeks,
Household-related activities
5 (6–11)
4 (4–16)
0.5
how many hours have
Social and recreational activities
4 (4–7)
4 (3–7)
0.8
you spent (median
Family-related activities
5 (6–13)
5 (4–12)
1.0
hours/week (IQR))
Work-related activities
3 (11–20)
0 (0.8–12)
0.04
Other symptoms (n
Reports LOC or presyncope
37/109 (34)
5/27 (19)
0.2
(%))
Symptoms consistent with CFS
47/109 (43)
20/27 (74)
0.005
Onset (n (%))
Infection
35/109 (32)
16/27 (59)
0.05
Accident
14/109 (13)
1/27 (4)
Holiday
7/109 (6)
1/27 (4)
Immunisation
6/109 (6)
7/27 (26)
Surgery
10/109 (9)
4/27 (15)
Severe stress
24/109 (22)
8/27 (30)
Other
34/109 (31)
5/27 (19)
I am not ill
6/109 (6)
1/27 (4)
LOC, loss of consciousness.
McDonald C, Koshi S, Busner L, et al. BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127
5

link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8
group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Open Access
DISCUSSION
In this study, we have explored for the first time the
characteristics of patients with PoTS in the UK using a
clinic-based cohort and a population obtained via a
national patient support group. We have shown that
patients with PoTS are predominantly women, young,
well educated and have significant and debilitating symp-
toms that impact significantly on their quality of life.
Despite this, there is no consistent treatment, high levels
of disability and associated comorbidity.
Importantly for patients, we found that although indi-
viduals presented with symptoms at the same age, those
attending a specialist clinic received a diagnosis quicker.
Figure 2 Orthostatic Grading Scale scores in the postural
We would suggest that this advocates the need for spe-
tachycardia syndrome (PoTS) group with comorbid chronic
cialist care for those with PoTS to reduce the overall
fatigue syndrome (CFS; PoTS +) and PoTS without comorbid
impact of the condition. The average age of diagnosis
CFS (PoTS −) are significantly higher compared with the
was young; however, there was a wide age range with the
group with CFS.
oldest patients with PoTS presenting at age 63. It is
therefore vital that the symptoms are recognised, taken
in the PoTS clinic cohort were taking no treatment or
seriously and treated early.
only salt for their PoTS. When we compared those
The differences between a cohort from one clinic and
taking medication to those not, there were no significant
the national patient support service were interesting.
differences in fatigue severity, daytime sleepiness, cogni-
Most of the current PoTS literature comes from one or
tive or autonomic symptom burden, and nor was the
more specialist referral clinics. The data from our survey
level of functional impairment different (data not
reflect the broader population with PoTS and may there-
shown). Those taking no medication did, however, score
fore be different from the experiences that are usually
higher on HADS compared with those taking medica-
reported in the literature.
tion (mean±SD HAD 17±8 vs 14±7; p=0.01).
The symptom burden for those with PoTS is high and
we have shown it to be comparable to that seen in CFS.
CFS is a chronic condition that is recognised by the
WHO as a neurological disorder and by the Disability
Table 3 Medications used by patients with postural
Discrimination Act 2005 as a disability.19 We would
tachycardia syndrome (PoTS)
suggest that our data highlight that at the current time
Primary
PoTS
those with PoTS suffer to the same extent as those with
treatment
Combination
PoTS UK clinic
CFS but do not receive the same protection from the
No treatment
20 (24%)
17 (32.5%)
law. Our study confirming that patients with PoTS had
β-blocker
Alone
15 (18%)
10 (19%)
even higher autonomic symptom scores measured using
Plus midodrine
4 (5%)
2 (4%)
the OGS might explain in part the high prevalence of
Ivabradine
Alone
4 (5%)
7 (13%)
dysautonomia in unselected cohorts of patients with
Midodrine
0
2 (4%)
CFS.20–22 It is important that more work is carried out to
Fludrocortisone
1 (1%)
1 (2%)
understand the underlying autonomic abnormality in
Sertraline
1 (1%)
0
those with PoTS in order to allow us to develop targeted
Duloxetine
1 (1%)
0
treatments that are effective and go beyond the currently
β-blocker
0
1 (2%)
available simply symptomatic management.
Diltiazem
Alone
1 (2%)
Our finding of high levels of comorbidity, particularly
Fludrocortisone
1 (1%)
0
CFS and EDS, is important as it might point towards an
Midodrine
0
1 (2%)
Verapamil
Alone
0
1 (2%)
underlying overlapping mechanism.23–25 We believe that
Fludrocortisone
Alone
5 (6%)
2 (4%)
more work is needed to understand this spectrum of dis-
β-blocker
5 (6%)
2 (4%)
eases and whether lessons could be learnt from one
Midodrine
5 (6%)
0
disease that could be applied to others. It is possible
Midodrine
Alone
12 (14%)
4 (7.5%)
that the higher prevalence of CFS reported in the PoTS
Buproprion
1 (1%)
0
clinic cohort reflects the research interests of the clin-
Octretide
+ midodrine
2 (2.5%)
0
ician and therefore a referral bias. However, the lower
+ fludro
prevalence of EDS in the clinic cohort has highlighted
Pregabalin
1 (1%)
0
important training needs for the Newcastle clinicians
Clonazepam
1 (1%)
0
and it will be interesting to explore in the future
Antidepressant
3 (4%)
0
whether the prevalence rates of EDS in patients with
Salt only
2 (2.5%)
1 (2%)
PoTS attending the Newcastle clinic increase.
6
McDonald C, Koshi S, Busner L, et al. BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127

link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Open Access
This study has a number of limitations. The preva-
would suggest that increasing awareness of this debilitat-
lence of CFS and EDS was determined by self-report and
ing disease is important to improve understanding, diag-
therefore could be considered to be unreliable. Further
nosis and management of PoTS.
studies are needed that involve clinical characterisation
Contributors JLN and CM developed the idea, delivered the project, analysed
of patients with PoTS to determine directly whether self-
the data and wrote the first draft of the paper. SK delivered the project and
reports are accurate. The response rates were low, par-
provided some analysis of the data. LB and LK coordinated the distribution of
ticularly from the patients’ support group PoTS UK,
surveys to members of PoTS UK.
something which was surprising considering the lack of
Funding Funding was provided for the study by the UK NIHR Biomedical
research and evidence with this group of patients and
Research Centre in Aging.
the strong desire for a greater understanding. It is pos-
Competing interests None.
sible that the membership of PoTS UK, which is in
Ethics approval Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.
excess of 170, is comprised of sufferers but also carers
Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.
and relatives.
Interestingly, 24% of patients with PoTS from PoTS
Data sharing statement Additional unpublished anonymised data can be
UK and 33% of the clinic cohort were taking no medica-
made available to those who approach the main authors.
tion for their PoTS. This was a surprise to us and we
Open Access This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with
would suggest that it is an important observation for
the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license,
which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-
clinicians managing patients, that is, medication might
commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided
not always be the answer, but it might also be that the
the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://
current available treatments are associated with high
creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
levels of unacceptable side effects that are not tolerated
by patients with PoTS. This, together with the 21 differ-
ent treatment regimes described, strongly underlines the
need for more evidence regarding treatments in PoTS
REFERENCES
and the urgent need for randomised controlled trials.
1.
Grubb BP. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Circulation
2008;117:2814–17.
This is similar to the findings from the largest published
2.
Grubb BP, Row P, Calkins H. Postural tachycardia, orthostatic
US series from the Mayo Clinic.26 The most frequently
intolerance and the chronic fatigue syndrome. In: Grubb BP,
Olshansky B, eds. Syncope: mechanisms and management. 2nd
used medication appears to be β-blockers, which provide
edn. Malden, MA: Blackwell/Future Press, 2005:225–44.
symptomatic control of the heart rate. With a better
3.
Schondorf R, Low PA. Idiopathic postural tachycardia syndrome.
understanding of the characteristics of patients with
Ann Neurol 1990;28:271.
4.
Low P, Opfer-Gehrking T, Textor S, et al. Postural tachycardia
PoTS and the associated comorbidity and autonomic
syndrome (POTS). Neurology 1995;45:519–25.
abnormalities present on objective testing, it is hoped
5.
Karas B, Grubb BP, Boehm K, et al. The postural tachycardia
syndrome: a potentially treatable cause of chronic fatigue, exercise
that better treatments can be developed. These treat-
intolerance and cognitive impairment. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol
ments will need to not only provide symptomatic relief
2000;22:344–51.
but also look at reducing the perpetuation of symptoms
6.
Grubb BP, Kanjwal Y, Kosinski D. The postural tachycardia
syndrome: a concise guide to diagnosis and management.
on those affected acutely and perhaps even stopping
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2006;14:108–12.
establishment of PoTS after the acute precipitating
7.
Freeman R, Wieling W, Axelrod FB, et al. Consensus statement on
the definition of orthostatic hypotension, neurally mediated syncope
event.
and the postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res
It is becoming increasingly clear that historically many
2011;21:69–72.
8.
Fukuda K, Straus SE, Hickie I, et al. International chronic fatigue
patients with PoTS were given a diagnosis of CFS/ME. A
syndrome study group. The chronic fatigue syndrome: a
recent cross-sectional study performed by us has con-
comprehensive approach to its definition and study. Ann Int Med
firmed that 27% of those with a diagnosis of CFS have
1994;121:953–9.
9.
Fisk JD, Ritvo PG, Ross L, et al. Measuring the functional impact of
PoTS.27 This is important when the public health impli-
fatigue: initial validation of the fatigue impact scale. Clin Infect Dis
cations of CFS/ME, and fatigue in its more general
1994;18:S79–83.
10.
Prince MI, James OF, Holland NP, et al. Validation of a fatigue
sense, are considered.
impact score in primary biliary cirrhosis: towards a standard for
At present, only limited data are available on the prog-
clinical and trial use. J Hepatol 2000;32:368–73.
nosis of patients with PoTS. One recent retrospective
11.
Jones DE, Bhala N, Burt J, et al. Four year follow up of fatigue in a
geographically defined primary biliary cirrhosis patient cohort. Gut
study has suggested that the outcome is benign,28
2006;55:536–41.
although we would argue that our study suggests that the
12.
Jones DE, Gray JC, Newton J. Perceived fatigue is comparable
between different disease groups. QJM 2009;102:617–24.
effects that PoTS has for individuals affected is far from
13.
Newton JL, Okonkwo O, Sutcliffe K, et al. Symptoms of autonomic
benign and is associated with considerable morbidity.
dysfunction in chronic fatigue syndrome. QJM 2007;100:519–26.
Our experience suggests that some patients never
14.
Johns M. Sleepiness in different situations measured by the Epworth
Sleepiness Scale. Sleep 1994;17:703–10.
recover, and that a subset will worsen over time.
15.
Schrezenmaier C, Gehrking JA, Hines SM, et al. Evaluation of
In conclusion, PoTS is a condition that is associated
orthostatic hypotension: relationship of a new self-report instrument
to laboratory-based measures. Mayo Clin Proc 2005;80:330–3.
with significant symptoms that impact on quality of life.
16.
Zigmond AS, Snaith RP. The hospital anxiety and depression scale.
Currently, there are no evidence-based treatments for
Acta Psychiatr Scand 1983;67:361–70.
17.
Bruce B, Fries JF. The Stanford health assessment questionnaire
PoTS, and its underlying pathogenesis, natural history
(HAQ): a review of its history, issues, progress, and documentation.
and associated features are not fully understood. We
J Rheumatol 2003;30:167–78.
McDonald C, Koshi S, Busner L, et al. BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127
7

group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Open Access
18.
Broadbent DE, Cooper PF, FitzGerald P, et al. The Cognitive
24.
Barron DF, Cohen BA, Geraghty MT, et al. Joint hypermobility is
Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) and its correlates. Br J Clin Psychol
more common in children with chronic fatigue syndrome than in
1982;21:1–16.
healthy controls. J Pediatr 2002;141:421–5.
19.
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis
25.
Rowe PC, Barron DF, Calkins H, et al. Orthostatic intolerance and
(encephalopathy); diagnosis and management. http://www.nice.gov.
CFS associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. J Pediatr
org (accessed Mar 2013).
1999;135:494–9.
20.
Rowe PC, Calkins H. Neurally mediated hypotension and chronic
26.
Thieben MJ, Sandroni P, Sletten DM, et al. Postural orthostatic
fatigue syndrome. Am J Med 1998;105:15S–21S.
tachycardia syndrome: the Mayo Clinic experience. Mayo Clin Proc
21.
Schondorf R, Freeman R. The importance of orthostatic intolerance
2007;82:308–13.
in the chronic fatigue syndrome. Am J Med Sci 1999;317:117–23.
27.
Hoad A, Spickett G, Elliott J, et al. Postural orthostatic tachycardia
22.
Schondorf R, Benoit J, Wein T, et al. Orthostatic intolerance in the
syndrome is an under-recognized condition in chronic fatigue
chronic fatigue syndrome. J Auton Nerv Syst 1999;75:192–201.
syndrome. QJM 2008;101:961–5.
23.
Nijs J, Aerts A, De Meirleir K. Generalized joint hypermobility is
28.
Sousa A, Lebreiro A, Freitas J, et al. Long-term follow-up of
more common in chronic fatigue syndrome than in healthy control
patients with postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res
subjects. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2006;29:32–9.
2012;22:151–3.
8
McDonald C, Koshi S, Busner L, et al. BMJ Open 2014;4:e004127. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127


group.bmj.com
 on June 11, 2015 - Published by 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/
Downloaded from 
Postural tachycardia syndrome is associated
with significant symptoms and functional 
impairment predominantly affecting young
women: a UK perspective
Claire McDonald, Sharon Koshi, Lorna Busner, Lesley Kavi and Julia L
Newton
2014 4: 
BMJ Open 
doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2013-004127
Updated information and services can be found at: 
 
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/6/e004127
These include:
Supplementary Supplementary material can be found at: 
Material
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/suppl/2014/06/13/bmjopen-2013-004
 
127.DC1.html
References
This article cites 26 articles, 7 of which you can access for free at: 
#BIBL
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/6/e004127
 
Open Access
This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the Creative
Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 3.0) license, which 
permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work
non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, 
provided the original work is properly cited and the use is
non-commercial. See:  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
Email alerting
Receive free email alerts when new articles cite this article. Sign up in the
service
box at the top right corner of the online article. 
Topic
Articles on similar topics can be found in the following collections 
Collections
 (402)
Cardiovascular medicine
 (192)
Patient-centred medicine
 (98)
Press releases
Notes
To request permissions go to:
http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions
To order reprints go to:
http://journals.bmj.com/cgi/reprintform
To subscribe to BMJ go to:
http://group.bmj.com/subscribe/

Document Outline