This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Summary Minutes for CHM meeting on 16th & 17th July 2015'.

link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1 link to page 1
2015 Heart Rhythm Society Expert Consensus Statement
on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Postural Tachycardia
Syndrome, Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia, and
Vasovagal Syncope
Robert S. Sheldon, MD, PhD, FRCPC, FHRS (Chair),Blair P. Grubb II, MD, FACC (Chair),2
Brian Olshansky, MD, FHRS, FACC, FAHA, CCDS,††Win-Kuang Shen, MD, FHRS, FAHA, FACC,4
Hugh Calkins, MD, FHRS, CCDS,Michele Brignole, MD, FESC,*6
Satish R. Raj, MD, MSCI, FRCPC, FHRS,Andrew D. Krahn, MD, FRCPC, FHRS,8
Carlos A. Morillo, MD, FRCPC, FHRS,Julian M. Stewart, MD, PhD,10
Richard Sutton, DSc, FHRS,11 Paola Sandroni, MD, PhD,**12 Karen J. Friday, MD, FHRS,§13
Denise Tessariol Hachul, MD, PhD,†14 Mitchell I. Cohen, MD, FHRS,15
Dennis H. Lau, MBBS, PhD, FHRS,‡16 Kenneth A. Mayuga, MD, FACC, FACP,17
Jeffrey P. Moak, MD,§§18 Roopinder K. Sandhu, MD, FRCPC, FHRS,19 Khalil Kanjwal, MD, FACC20
From 1Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, Alberta, Canada, 2University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio,
3The University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City, Iowa, 4Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, Arizona, 5Johns Hopkins
University, Baltimore, Maryland, 6Ospedali del Tigullio, Lavagna, Italy, 7Libin Cardiovascular Institute of
Alberta, Alberta, Canada; Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, 8Division of
Cardiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 9Department of Medicine, Cardiology
Division, McMaster University Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton, Canada, 10New York Medical
College, Valhalla, New York, 11National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, United
Kingdom, 12Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, 13Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford,
California, 14Heart Institute–University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 15Phoenix
Children’s Hospital, University of Arizona School of Medicine–Phoenix, Arizona Pediatric Cardiology/
Mednax, Phoenix, Arizona, 16Centre for Heart Rhythm Disorders, University of Adelaide; Department of
Cardiology, Royal Adelaide Hospital; and South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide,
Australia, 17Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, 18Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, District
of Columbia, 19University of Alberta, Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Alberta, Canada, and
20Michigan Cardiovascular Institute, Central Michigan University, Saginaw, Michigan.
*
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Representative for the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA);
†Representative for the Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulacion Cardi-
Introduction .............................................
e41
aca y Electrofisiologia (SOLAECE); ‡Representative for the Asia-Pacific
Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS); §Representative for the American Heart
Section 1: Postural Tachycardia Syndrome
e42
Association (AHA); **Representative for the American Autonomic
Section 2: Inappropriate Sinus
Society (AAS); ††Representative for the American College of Cardiology
Tachycardia ............................................
e45
(ACC); §§Representative for the Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology
Section 3: Vasovagal Syncope ..................
e47
Society (PACES)
Section 4: Postural Tachycardia Syndrome
and Vasovagal Syncope in the Young....
e53
Developed in collaboration with and endorsed by the American
Section 5: Future Opportunities ...............
e54
Autonomic Society (AAS), the American College of Cardiology (ACC),
the American Heart Association (AHA), the AsiaPacific Heart Rhythm
Appendix 1 ...............................................
e54
Society (APHRS), the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), the
Pediatric and Congenital Electrophysiology Society (PACES), and the
Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulacion Cardiaca y Electrofisiologia
Introduction
(SOLAECE)-Latin American Society of Cardiac Pacing and Electrophy-
This international consensus statement was written by
siology. Address Correspondence: Robert Sheldon, MD. E-mail address:
xxxxxxx@xxxxxxxx.xx
experts in the field who were chosen by the Heart Rhythm
1547-5271/$-see front matter B 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.hrthm.2015.03.029

link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 e42
Heart Rhythm, Vol 12, No 6, June 2015
Society, in collaboration with representatives from the
based guidance for clinical care. To identify consensus, we
American Autonomic Society (AAS), the American College
conducted surveys of the entire writing group, using a
of Cardiology (ACC), the American Heart Association
predefined threshold for agreement as a vote of 475% on
(AHA), the Asia Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS),
each recommendation. An initial failure to reach consensus
the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA), the
was resolved by subsequent discussion and re-voting. The
Pediatric
and
Congenital
Electrophysiology
Society
final minimum consensus was 76% and the mean was 94%.
(PACES), and the Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimula-
The consensus recommendations in this document use the
cion
Cardiaca
y
Electrofisiologia (SOLAECE)-Latin
commonly used class I, IIa, IIb, and III classifications and the
American Society of Cardiac Pacing and Electrophysiology.
corresponding language according to the most recent statement
This document is intended to help front-line cardiologists,
of the American College of Cardiology.6 Class I is a strong
arrhythmia specialists, and other health care professionals
recommendation, denoting benefit greatly exceeding risk. Class
interested in the care of patients who present with presumed
IIa is a somewhat weaker recommendation, denoting benefit
postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS), inappropriate sinus
probably exceeding risk, and class IIb denotes benefit equiv-
tachycardia (IST), and vasovagal syncope (VVS). It is not
alent or possibly exceeding risk. Class III is a recommendation
intended to be a comprehensive narrative review, as excellent
against a specific treatment, because either there is no net
reviews, chapters, and entire volumes have appeared recently.1–3
benefit or there is net harm. Level A denotes the highest level of
This document has 3 objectives: (1) establish working criteria
evidence, usually from multiple clinical trials with or without
for the diagnosis of POTS, IST, and VVS; (2) provide guidance
registries. Level B evidence is of a moderate level, either from
and recommendations on their assessment and management;
randomized trials (B-R) or well-executed nonrandomized trials
and (3) identify key areas in which knowledge is lacking, to
(B-NR). Level C evidence is from weaker studies with
highlight opportunities for future collaborative research efforts.
significant limitations, and level E is simply a consensus
To maintain this pragmatic focus, we excluded several
opinion in the absence of credible published evidence.
related topics, including a detailed approach to syncope and
When considering the guidance provided in this document,
other syndromes of transient loss of consciousness, the
it is important to remember that there are no absolutes with
impact of syncope on other disorders, most orthostatic
regard to many clinical situations. The writing group was struck
hypotension syndromes, the effects of the autonomic system
by the large number of issues lacking high-level evidence. To
on arrhythmias, the use of syncope scores or syncope units,
this end, the document provides evidence-informed recommen-
and recommendations on training programs and staffing
dations, striking a balance between the need for recommenda-
criteria. A number of sections contain very brief reviews,
tions and the availability of evidence. Health care providers and
given that the material has recently been covered elsewhere.
patients need to jointly make the final decision regarding care in
We refer readers to the excellent European Society of
light of their individual circumstances.
Cardiology guidelines2 and related recent reviews.1,4
The writing group aimed to provide a succinct, evidence-
based document at a uniform level, rather than a comprehen-
Section 1: Postural Tachycardia Syndrome
sive narrative review. As much as possible, we made
Definition
recommendations based on published evidence. There was a
POTS is a clinical syndrome usually characterized by (1)
wide range in terms of the level of evidence available, and we
frequent symptoms that occur with standing, such as light-
included the highest-level evidence for each section. Inevi-
headedness, palpitations, tremor, generalized weakness,
tably, this led to heterogeneity in the level of evidence
blurred vision, exercise intolerance, and fatigue; (2) an
included. Each section, indeed the entire document, is a
increase in heart rate of Z30 beats per minute (bpm) when
compromise among clinical need, succinctness, clarity, and
moving from a recumbent to a standing position (or Z40
level of evidence. The specific wording of definitions,
bpm in individuals 12 to 19 years of age); and (3) the absence
recommendations, and the choice of references were the result
of orthostatic hypotension (420 mm Hg drop in systolic
of prolonged debate, consensus-seeking, and repeated votes.
blood pressure). The symptoms associated with POTS are
Each section was drafted by compact writing groups with
those that occur with standing, such as lightheadedness and
3–5 members who completed the first versions and developed
palpitations; not associated with particular postures, such as
preliminary recommendations. The group assignments were
bloating, nausea, diarrhea, and abdominal pain; and systemic,
based on individual interests and expertise. The recommenda-
such as fatigue, sleep disturbance, and migraine headaches.7
tions and text underwent iterative revisions to resolve differ-
The standing (or orthostatic) heart rate of individuals with
ences, increase clarity, and align the document format with that
POTS is often Z120 bpm,8–13 and undergoes greater
recommended by the American College of Cardiology.5 All
increases in the morning than in the evening. The increases
members of the writing group and peer reviewers provided
in orthostatic heart rate gradually decrease with age and not
disclosure statements of all relationships that might present real
abruptly at age 20. POTS is a systemic illness, with postural
or perceived conflicts of interest, as shown in the Appendices.
tachycardia one of several criteria. Many patients with POTS
The recommendations and definitions in this document are
faint occasionally, although presyncope is much more
based on the consensus of the full writing group following the
common. It is important to note that the diagnoses of POTS
Heart Rhythm Society’s process for establishing consensus-
and vasovagal syncope are not mutually exclusive.

link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 Sheldon et al
HRS Expert Consensus Document on POT/IST/VVS
e43
Definition: Postural Tachycardia Syndrome
Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is defined as a clinical syndrome that is usually characterized by (1) frequent symptoms that occur
with standing such as lightheadedness, palpitations, tremulousness, generalized weakness, blurred vision, exercise intolerance, and
fatigue; (2) an increase in heart rate of Z30 bpm when moving from a recumbent to a standing position held for more than 30 seconds (or
Z40 bpm in individuals 12 to 19 years of age); and (3) the absence of orthostatic hypotension (420 mm Hg drop in systolic blood
pressure).
Epidemiology and Natural History
plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels compared with
The prevalence of POTS is approximately 0.2%, with little
healthy subjects.32 This is a low-flow subtype with inap-
variance among 4 published reports.9,12,14,15 Most patients
propriately high angiotensin II levels.
present with POTS between the ages of 15 and 25 years,and
more than 75% are female.7–9,11–14,16 POTS is also common
Hyperadrenergic POTS
in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.17 The chronic and
usually systemic symptoms and the frustration caused by the
This manifestation, which occurs in up to 50% of patients, is
difficulty in obtaining medical help can significantly lower
associated with systolic blood pressure increases of Z10 mm
the quality of life. Little has been reported on long-term
Hg while standing upright for 10 minutes and plasma
outcomes, although there have been a few reported cases of
norepinephrine levels Z600 pg/mL while standing. There
patients over 50 years of age and no reported mortality. The
is considerable heterogeneity among reporting sites, which
perception is that POTS is a chronic condition with no
could reflect differences among patient populations. These
known mortality, and with eventual improvement. Its course
patients have heart rate increases similar to those of other
probably varies substantially from patient to patient.
patients with POTS but tend to have prominent sympathetic
activation symptoms, such as palpitations, anxiety, tachy-
cardia, and tremor.12 These patients are hypersensitive to
Physiology
isoproterenol and have marked tachycardic responses to
A number of mechanisms have been described in patients
dosages that do not induce hemodynamic changes in healthy
with POTS,18 including autonomic denervation, hypovole-
individuals.33
mia, hyperadrenergic stimulation, deconditioning, and
hypervigilance, which is a careful and at times unusual
Deconditioning
focus on bodily sensations. These mechanisms often appear
Patients with POTS often have poor exercise tolerance and
to co-exist in patients with POTS.
deconditioning.34 Deconditioned patients with POTS have
reduced left ventricular mass, stroke volume, and blood
Peripheral autonomic denervation
volume,35 which improve with exercise training. Stroke
Reports from tertiary care centers have indicated that up to
volume decreases in POTS, with impaired cardiac filling
50% of patients with POTS have a restricted autonomic
when standing.36 This situation suggests that orthostatic
neuropathy of small and distal postganglionic sudomotor
symptoms induced by an initial illness can, in some
bers,19,20 predominantly of the feet and toes.21–23 It is
patients, lead to overinterpretation of the symptoms due to
believed that impaired sympathetic tone (as measured by
hypervigilance, which in turn leads to reduced physical
norepinephrine spillover) reduces venoconstriction, leading
activity and deconditioning. However, it is unclear whether
to venous pooling in the lower limbs and splanchnic beds.24
deconditioning is the primary cause or a secondary
This neuropathic manifestation of POTS requires a high
phenomenon.
cardiac output to compensate for reduced splanchnic and
peripheral resistance and venous pooling.2528 Abnormal
Anxiety and hypervigilance
connective tissue in the dependent blood vessels of patients
Anxiety and somatic vigilance are significantly higher in
with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome can cause veins to distend
patients with POTS, which raises the issue of the role of
excessively in response to ordinary hydrostatic pressures and
somatic hypervigilance in the source of the symptoms.36,37
thus predispose patients to orthostatic intolerance.29 The
Masuki et al36 attempted to dissect the psychological
autonomic denervation might be due to an autoimmune
and physiologic contributions to tachycardia. Detailed phys-
disease in some patients.30,31
iologic and psychometric studies showed that although
anxiety is commonly present in POTS, the heart rate
Hypovolemia
response to orthostatic stress is not caused by anxiety but
Blood volume is reduced in up to 70% of patients with
is instead a response to an underlying physiologic
POTS. Paradoxically, some of these patients have low
abnormality.

link to page 15 e44
Heart Rhythm, Vol 12, No 6, June 2015
Recommendations—Investigation of POTS
Class
Level
A complete history and physical exam with orthostatic vital signs and 12-lead ECG should be
I
E
performed on patients being assessed for POTS.
Complete blood count and thyroid function studies can be useful for selected patients being
IIa
E
assessed for POTS.
A 24-hour Holter monitor may be considered for selected patients being assessed for POTS,
IIb
E
although its clinical efficacy is uncertain.
Detailed autonomic testing, transthoracic echocardiogram, tilt-table testing, and exercise stress
IIb
E
testing may be considered for selected patients being assessed for POTS.
Diagnosis
over more prolonged periods than a simple stand test. A
The evaluation of a patient suspected of having POTS should
hematocrit, ECG, Holter, and echocardiogram are sufficient to
include a complete history and physical examination, orthostatic
screen for a potential cardiovascular or systemic etiology. For
vital signs, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). Selected
most patients, this minimal approach is sufficient to establish a
patients might benefit from a thyroid function test and hematocrit,
diagnosis and initiate treatment. However, if the patient’s
24-hour Holter, transthoracic echocardiogram, and exercise stress
symptoms do not resolve or markedly improve, a more extensive
testing. The clinical history should focus on defining the
evaluation at a center experienced with the autonomic testing of
chronicity of the condition, possible causes of orthostatic
patients with POTS should be considered.
tachycardia, modifying factors, impact on daily activities,
An expanded approach to the evaluation could include a
potential triggers, and family history. Particular attention should
thermoregulatory sweat test to detect autonomic neuropathy
be focused on the patient’s diet and exercise history. The
(which manifests as abnormal patterns of body sweating),
symptoms of POTS are commonly exacerbated by dehydration,
supine and upright plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine
heat, alcohol, and exercise. A full autonomic system review
level tests, a 24-hour urine sample to assess sodium intake,
should assess symptoms of autonomic neuropathy. If orthostatic
and a psychological assessment.14 These tests should not be
vital signs are normal and the clinical suspicion of POTS is high,
performed routinely as there is no evidence that they improve
a tilt-table test might be helpful because it can provide vital signs
the care or the process of care in the majority of patients.
Recommendations—Treatment for POTS
Class
Level
A regular, structured, and progressive exercise program for patients with POTS can be effective.
IIa
B-R
It is reasonable to treat patients with POTS who have short-term clinical decompensations with an
IIa
C
acute intravenous infusion of up to 2 L of saline.
Patients with POTS might be best managed with a multidisciplinary approach.
IIb
E
The consumption of up to 2–3 L of water and 10–12 g of NaCl daily by patients with POTS may be
IIb
E
considered.
It seems reasonable to treat patients with POTS with fludrocortisone or pyridostigmine.
IIb
C
Treatment of patients with POTS with midodrine or low-dose propranolol may be considered.
IIb
B-R
It seems reasonable to treat patients with POTS who have prominent hyperadrenergic features
IIb
E
with clonidine or alpha-methyldopa.
Drugs that block the norepinephrine reuptake transporter can worsen symptoms in patients with
III
B-R
POTS and should not be administered.
Regular intravenous infusions of saline in patients with POTS are not recommended in the absence
III
E
of evidence, and chronic or repeated intravenous cannulation is potentially harmful.
Radiofrequency sinus node modification, surgical correction of a Chiari malformation type I, and
III
B-NR
balloon dilation or stenting of the jugular vein are not recommended for routine use in patients
with POTS and are potentially harmful.

link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 Sheldon et al
HRS Expert Consensus Document on POT/IST/VVS
e45
Treatment
symptoms have worsened significantly. This approach could
also prevent hospitalizations. Long-term infusions of intra-
The treatment of POTS is difficult; there are no therapies that
venous saline are not recommended for routine care, because
are uniformly successful, and combinations of approaches are
they usually require the insertion of a chronic central venous
often needed. Few treatments have been tested with the usual
catheter, with its attendant complications.
rigor of randomized clinical trials, and there is no consensus as
To reduce unpleasant sinus tachycardia and palpitations,
to whether specific treatments should be targeted to subsets of
low-dose propranolol (10–20 mg PO) acutely lowers standing
POTS or whether a uniform approach should be used. This
heart rate and improves symptoms in patients with POTS, while
section provides recommendations on general approaches and
higher doses of propranolol are less well tolerated.42 Long-
highlights treatments with more than minimal evidence. Other
acting propranolol does not improve the quality of life of
approaches (either novel or still under investigation) should be
patients with POTS,43 and other beta-blockers have not been
discussed with centers specializing in the treatment of POTS.
studied. Ivabradine slows sinus rates without impacting blood
Several centers have reported that treatment might be
pressure. Approximately 60% of patients with POTS treated
provided more comprehensively with a collaborative, multi-
with ivabradine in an open-label study had symptom improve-
disciplinary approach that includes physicians, psycholo-
ment.44 However, ivabradine is not currently available in the
gists, nurses, physical therapists, occupational therapists, and
United States. Pyridostigmine is a peripheral acetylcholinester-
recreational therapists.
ase inhibitor that increases synaptic acetylcholine in the
Nonpharmacologic treatments should be attempted first
autonomic ganglia and at peripheral muscarinic receptors.
with all patients. These include withdrawing medications
The drug blunts orthostatic tachycardia and can improve
that might worsen POTS, such as norepinephrine transport
chronic symptoms but is limited by adverse effects such as
inhibitors, increasing blood volume with enhanced salt and

diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramps, nausea, and increased
uid intake, reducing venous pooling with compression
urinary urgency and frequency.45,46
garments, and limiting deconditioning. Patients should
Central sympatholytic agents can be useful in patients with
engage in a regular, structured, graduated, and supervised
the central hyperadrenergic form of POTS but might not be as
exercise program featuring aerobic reconditioning with some
well tolerated in neuropathic POTS. Clonidine is an alpha-2
resistance training for the thighs.35,38 Initially, exercise
agonist that can stabilize hemodynamics in patients with high
should be restricted to non-upright exercises including the
sympathetic nervous system involvement.47 Methyldopa is
use of rowing machines, recumbent cycles, and swimming to
sometimes better tolerated.48 Unfortunately, both drugs can
minimize orthostatic stress on the heart.
cause drowsiness and fatigue and can worsen mental clouding,
a condition that troubles many patients. Modafinil may be
Pharmacologic treatment
considered for the fatigue and cognitive dysfunction (“brain
If nonpharmacologic approaches are not completely effective,
fog”) seen in patients with POTS.49 Modafinil, however, can
pharmacologic therapies may be targeted at specific problems.
worsen the symptoms of tachycardia.49
Patients who are known to or are strongly suspected of having
hypovolemia32 should drink at least 2–3 L of water per day, and
dietary salt intake should be increased to approximately 10–12
Invasive interventions
g/day, if tolerated, using salt tablets, if necessary. Fludrocorti-
Radiofrequency sinus node modification for the sinus tachy-
sone might be useful for boosting sodium retention and
cardia of POTS is not recommended, because it often worsens
expanding the plasma volume, although these pharmacody-
symptoms and occasionally results in the patient requiring a
namic effects might last only 1–2 days, and its effectiveness has
pacemaker.50 Although a number of patients with POTS have
not been tested in randomized clinical trials.39 Midodrine is
been found to have herniation of their cerebellar tonsils (Chiari
metabolized to a peripheral alpha-1 agonist that constricts veins
I), there is no association between cerebellar tonsil herniation
and arteries and might be useful for increasing venous return.
and POTS.51 Nonetheless, a number of neurosurgical centers
Midodrine significantly reduces orthostatic tachycardia but to a
decompress the cerebellar tonsils in an effort to “cure” POTS.52
lesser degree than intravenous saline.40 Midodrine has a rapid
This approach should not be offered until prospective controlled
onset with only brief effects and should be administered 3 times
data have demonstrated its efficacy.
daily. The drug should only be administered during daytime
hours as it can cause supine hypertension.
A related strategy is to augment blood volume with
intravenous saline. Expert centers report anecdotally that 1
Section 2: Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia
L of normal saline infused over 1 hour decreases orthostatic
Definition
tachycardia and improves symptoms for several hours to 2
The syndrome of IST is defined as a sinus heart rate 4100
days.40,41 Although it has not yet been assessed in a clinical
bpm at rest (with a mean 24-hour heart rate 490 bpm not
trial, this approach is recommended as rescue therapy for
due to primary causes) and is associated with distressing
patients who are clinically decompensated and whose
symptoms of palpitations.

link to page 15 link to page 14 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 16 link to page 15 e46
Heart Rhythm, Vol 12, No 6, June 2015
Definition: Inappropriate Sinus Tachycardia
The syndrome of inappropriate sinus tachycardia is defined as a sinus heart rate 4100 bpm at rest (with a mean 24-hour heart rate 490
bpm not due to primary causes) and is associated with distressing symptoms of palpitations.
Epidemiology and Natural History
Physiology
The prevalence of IST was estimated in a middle-aged
The mechanisms leading to IST are not completely under-
population of men and women with and without hyper-
stood,3 but there are several underlying diseases that can
tension.53 Using a definition of a resting heart rate 4100
result in this syndrome, including increased sinus node
bpm and an average heart rate of 490 bpm on 24-hour Holter
automaticity, beta-adrenergic hypersensitivity, decreased
monitoring, the IST prevalence was 1.2% (7 of 604 patients),
parasympathetic activity, and impaired neurohumoral mod-
including both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. Little
ulation.54 β-Adrenergic receptor antibodies can sensitize β-
has been reported on long-term outcomes, although there is no
adrenergic receptors in some patients, while other patients
known mortality. IST is believed to be a chronic condition, but
might have increased sympathetic activity and sensitivity,
whether and how quickly patients improve are unknown.
with or without inherent impaired sinus node automaticity.
Recommendations—Investigation of IST
Class
Level
A complete history, physical exam, and 12-lead ECG are recommended.
I
E
Complete blood counts and thyroid function studies might be useful.
IIa
E
A 24-hour Holter monitoring might be useful.
IIb
E
Urine/serum drug screening might be useful.
IIb
E
It might be worth considering autonomic testing.
IIb
E
It might be worth considering treadmill exercise testing.
IIb
E
Diagnosis
causes, such as drug effects, physiologic and psychological
A thorough medical history review and physical examination
triggers, occult substance abuse, panic attacks, and, of course,
should be performed, focusing on the possible causes of sinus
POTS, should be ruled out, given that control of the sinus rate
tachycardia, such as thyroid disease, medications, and drugs.
can exacerbate its symptoms. IST is rarely associated with
Patients should be examined for hypovolemia; a review of the
tachycardia-mediated cardiomyopathy.55,56
other primary causes of sinus tachycardia is beyond the scope of
There are multiple measures of cardiovascular autonomic
this document. A 12-lead ECG is useful for documenting
reflexes, including heart rate responses to deep breathing,
tachycardia and determining sinus rhythm, which helps differ-
standing, Valsalva,57,58 cold face test (diving test),59 heart
entiate IST from other atrial tachyarrhythmias. A 24-hour Holter
rate variability,59,60 and baroreflex sensitivity.61 These tests
monitor can be useful for confirming the diagnosis. Patients with
should not be used routinely given their unproven clinical
POTS and patients with IST can present similar symptoms, but
usefulness. Treadmill exercise testing might be useful to
IST is induced by both physiologic and emotional stresses, while
document an exaggerated tachycardic response to exertion,59
POTS is generally induced only by orthostatic stress. Other
although this assertion has not been validated.
Recommendations—Treatment for IST
Class
Level
Reversible causes of sinus tachycardia should be sought and treated.
I
E
Ivabradine can be useful for treating patients with IST.
IIa
B-R
Sinus node modification, surgical ablation, and sympathetic denervation are not recommended as
III
E
a part of routine care for patients with IST.
Treatment
controlled clinical trials of any therapeutic intervention that
IST is frequently associated with a significant loss of quality
have demonstrated a substantial improvement in outcomes,
of life. There are no long-term, prospective, placebo-
and symptoms can continue despite heart rate control.

link to page 16 link to page 14 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 Sheldon et al
HRS Expert Consensus Document on POT/IST/VVS
e47
Patients with IST require significant care and attention due to
recurrence, and the complication rates are significant. These
the nearly ubiquitous psychosocial distress and the complex-
complications include requirements for permanent pacing,
ity of their problems. Close attention and effective commu-
transient or permanent phrenic nerve paralysis, and transient
nication can improve outcomes.62 Lifestyle changes should
superior vena cava syndrome. In addition, sinus node
be discussed early on with all patients. There are very few
modification or ablation might not relieve all IST-
treatments with solid evidence for patients with IST. β-
associated symptoms. There is also no agreement on the
Adrenergic blockers are not usually effective and can cause
optimal approach, including modification or ablation, open
adverse effects. Other treatments have been suggested,
chest versus conventional intravascular access, and mapping
including fludrocortisone, volume expansion, pressure stock-
methods. Finally, there is no evidence of symptomatic
ings, phenobarbital, clonidine, psychiatric evaluation, exer-
improvement over several years. Patients and referring
cise training, and erythropoietin.3
physicians need to be aware that despite the potentially
Ivabradine holds considerable promise for the treatment
substantial symptoms and the patients’ high motivation, the
of IST. The drug blocks the If current and has a dramatic and
consequences of aggressive therapy might seriously out-
generally well-tolerated effect on heart rate. At doses of 5–
weigh any potential benefit. Given the young age of the
7.5 mg twice daily, the drug slows the heart rate by 25–40
patients and the highly invasive nature of ablations, we do
bpm. Several small case series have reported that ivabradine
not recommend that they be part of routine care. However,
reduced heart rate and improved quality of life. Furthermore,
ablations may be offered in highly select circumstances or as
the data suggested that combinations of metoprolol and
part of research protocols.
ivabradine might be safe and effective. The strongest
evidence to date comes from a small, randomized crossover
study in which 21 patients with IST were randomized to
Section 3: Vasovagal Syncope
placebo or ivabradine 5 mg twice daily for a total of 12
Definition
weeks.63 Ivabradine eliminated symptoms in 70% of patients
Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness,
and increased exercise performance. Furthermore, ivabra-
associated with an inability to maintain postural tone, rapid
dine can provide benefits when added to beta-blocker
and spontaneous recovery, and the absence of clinical
therapy.64 Ivabradine is not yet available in all countries,
features specific to another form of transient loss of
although it might appear in the next 2–3 years.
consciousness such as epileptic seizure. “Clinical features”
Several groups have described modification or ablation of
indicates all the information obtained from the history,
the sinus node in IST. In general, primary success rates are
physical signs, and feasible, reasonable, limited investiga-
reasonably good, but there is a high rate of symptom
tions such as an ECG.
Definition: Syncope
Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness, associated with an inability to maintain postural tone, rapid and spontaneous
recovery, and the absence of clinical features specific for another form of transient loss of consciousness such as epileptic seizure.
Vasovagal syncope is a syncope syndrome that usually
medical settings; (2) features diaphoresis, warmth, nausea,
(1) occurs with an upright posture held for more than 30
and pallor; (3) is associated with hypotension and relative
seconds or with exposure to emotional stress, pain, or
bradycardia, when known; and (4) is followed by fatigue.
Definition: Vasovagal Syncope
Vasovagal syncope is defined as a syncope syndrome that usually (1) occurs with upright posture held for more than 30 seconds or with
exposure to emotional stress, pain, or medical settings; (2) features diaphoresis, warmth, nausea, and pallor; (3) is associated with
hypotension and relative bradycardia, when known; and (4) is followed by fatigue.
Epidemiology and Natural History
several groups have reported consistent findings. Vasovagal
The incidence and prevalence of vasovagal syncope are not
syncope is very common; by age 60, 42% of women and
precisely known. Most studies have examined specific
32% of men will have had at least 1 vasovagal syncope,
clinical populations or have not differentiated among the
which is their cumulative incidence.65,66 Vasovagal syncope
various causes of syncope. Furthermore, the term “preva-
is manifested in approximately 1%–3% of toddlers as pallid
lence” is problematic for a syndrome that includes individ-
syncope, and the incidence begins to increase markedly
uals who might faint only once or twice in their lives. It is for
around age 11. The median age of the first syncope is
this reason that the term “cumulative incidence” is preferred.
approximately 14 years, and most people with vasovagal
Taking this approach and by using actuarial methodology,
syncope will have had their first syncope before age 40.67

link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 e48
Heart Rhythm, Vol 12, No 6, June 2015
In specialty clinics, late first presentations of vasovagal
only a subset of patients.78–80 In many patients, the hypo-
syncope occur with some regularity.
tension due to decreased preload alone can reduce cerebral
The proportion of all syncopes represented by vasovagal
perfusion sufficiently to induce presyncope or syncope. In
syncope depends on the setting. In studies of healthy young
some patients, however, decreased preload does not play a
and middle-aged participants living in the community,
dominant role in causing symptoms; instead, peripheral
almost all individuals who faint have vasovagal syncope.
vasodilation plays an important role. Fu and Levine81
Emergency department studies generally feature older
reported a moderate decline in cardiac output with coincident
patients with mean ages around 60–65 years. The estimate
vasodilation in the majority of participants with presyncope
for emergency departments is obscured by the fact that
and no changes in total peripheral resistance during pre-
approximately 35% of patients with syncope remain undiag-
syncope in a minority of participants. Sympathetic vaso-
nosed. Approximately 30%–50% of patients with syncope,
constriction and baroreflex sensitivity prior to the onset of
however, are diagnosed with an autonomically mediated
presyncope were well preserved, and muscle sympathetic
form of syncope, and most of these are vasovagal. A much
nerve activity (MSNA) withdrawal occurred late after the
smaller proportion of cases are due to carotid sinus syncope.
onset of hypotension. The age differences among these
The outcome for patients with vasovagal syncope is
reports suggest that a failure of venous return could be the
generally benign, given that there is no increased mortality.
main factor in older patients, while younger patients might
There is, however, a high rate of recurrence. The overall 1-
also have active vasodilation.
year recurrence rate in many reports is approximately 25%
For many years, vasovagal syncope was thought to be the
35%, and this rate can be predicted by the number of
result of loss of peripheral sympathetic activity, and the
syncopes in the year prior to assessment.68 Those patients
proposed pathophysiologic mechanism leading to vasovagal
with frequently recurring vasovagal syncope often have a
syncope was the blunting or cessation of MSNA.82–84 How-
significant loss of quality of life. Most patients stop fainting
ever, 2 groups have recently reported persistence of MSNA
after assessment and in the absence of specific therapy. The
during vasovagal syncope, bringing into question the role of
reason for this recovery is not known.69–72
sympathetic activity withdrawal as the final physiologic event
that precipitates loss of consciousness.85,86 These studies
Physiology
challenge the hypothesis that abrupt sympathetic nerve activity
The physiology of the vasovagal reflex remains a matter of
withdrawal causes the vasovagal syncope response.
debate. Rising to an upright position increases gravitational
Patients with recurrent postural vasovagal syncope might
forces and leads to the pooling of 500 to 800 mL of blood in
have sympathetic nervous system phenotypes.87 This study
the venous system, in the pelvic and splanchnic circulation,
assessed the sympathetic nervous system by measuring
and in the lower limbs. This abrupt reduction in venous
MSNA, norepinephrine (NE) spillover to plasma, and
return decreases cardiac output and blood pressure, which
sympathetic protein expression. Patients were divided into
are rapidly sensed by the arterial and cardiopulmonary
a low-pressure phenotype (systolic blood pressure o100
baroreceptors, thus triggering sympathetic noradrenergic
mm Hg) and a normal-pressure phenotype (systolic blood
vasoconstriction and venoconstriction accompanied by an
pressure 4100 mm Hg). NE spillover was below normal
increase in heart rate.73 During a vasovagal syncope episode,
during tilt in both phenotypes. NE spillover in the low-
an ineffective reflex response causes venous pooling in the
pressure phenotype was associated with low tyrosine
periphery and/or splanchnic regions.7376 Ultimately, para-
hydroxylase levels, which probably reduced NE synthesis.
doxical vasodilation can occur, leading to further hypoten-
In contrast, the normal blood pressure phenotype features
sion and loss of consciousness.77 This syncope is usually
increased norepinephrine transporter levels consistent with
associated with a vagally mediated relative or absolute
augmented norepinephrine reuptake. MSNA was normal in
reduction in heart rate, a process known as cardioinhibition.
the normal blood pressure phenotype and increased in the
The vasovagal response always includes hypotension and
low blood pressure phenotype group. This outcome suggests
often includes bradycardia with, at times, prolonged asystole
that vasovagal syncope can have 2 distinct physiologic
in the sinus and AV nodes.
groups that can be clinically detected based on supine blood
The initial reduction in blood pressure during vasovagal
pressure. Both phenotypes have reduced NE availability,
syncope provoked by orthostatic stress is driven by a 50%
which ultimately impairs the neurocirculatory response to
decline in cardiac output, with coincident vasodilatation in
orthostatic stress.87

link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 Sheldon et al
HRS Expert Consensus Document on POT/IST/VVS
e49
Recommendations—Investigation of Vasovagal Syncope
Class
Level
Tilt-table testing can be useful for assessing patients with suspected vasovagal syncope who lack a
IIa
B-NR
confident diagnosis after the initial assessment.
Tilt-table testing is a reasonable option for differentiating between convulsive syncope and
IIa
B-NR
epilepsy, for establishing a diagnosis of pseudosyncope, and for testing patients with suspected
vasovagal syncope but without clear diagnostic features.
Implantable loop recorders (ILRs) can be useful for assessing older patients with recurrent and
IIa
B-R
troublesome syncope who lack a clear diagnosis and are at low risk of a fatal outcome.
Tilt testing is not recommended for predicting the response to specific medical treatments for
III
B-R
vasovagal syncope.
Diagnosis
The diagnosis of vasovagal syncope is based on the clinical
cardiac syncope is of less importance, however, for clinics
history, and there are abundant observational and quantita-
specializing in providing assessment and care of patients
tive data in this area. There are 4 categories of key diagnostic
with autonomic disorders. There are 2 general approaches:
features: predisposing situations, prodromal symptoms,
determine whether the patient has the substrate for particular
physical signs, and recovery time and symptoms. Fainting
types of syncope and determine whether the patient has
usually occurs after prolonged standing or sitting but can be
syncope associated with specific heart rhythm abnormalities
triggered even in the supine position by exposure to medical
or characteristics.
or dental situations, pain, and scenes of injury. “Prolonged”
Tilt-table tests feature prolonged passive postural stress to
can mean as little as 2–3 minutes, and the time period is a key
determine whether patients have the autonomic substrate for
feature distinguishing vasovagal syncope from initial ortho-
vasovagal syncope. The vasovagal reflex is often triggered by
static hypotension. Prodromal features include progressive
adjunctive agents such as isoproterenol, nitrates, and clomipr-
presyncope, diaphoresis, a sense of warmth, flushing,
amine. However, with increasingly aggressive protocols comes
nausea, abdominal discomfort, visual blurring, and vision
the likelihood of decreased specificity. A positive response is
loss. While unconscious, the patient is usually motionless.
defined as clinically reminiscent presyncope or syncope asso-
However, fine and coarse myoclonic movements have been
ciated with hypotension and usually bradycardia. Depending on
observed in approximately 10% of cases (even by untrained
the method, most patients with probable vasovagal syncope
individuals), which can result in the condition being erro-
develop presyncope or syncope, while most control patients do
neously diagnosed as epilepsy.88 Videometric analysis and
not. When patient populations with strong presumptive evidence
home videos can prove helpful in difficult cases. Uncon-
(ie, a high pretest probability) for vasovagal syncope are studied,
sciousness usually lasts less than 1–2 minutes, but full
the sensitivity approaches 78%–92%, and the currently recom-
recovery can be sluggish. Patients often feel very tired for
mended protocols have specificities of approximately 90%
minutes to hours after the episode. A careful and focused
compared with the response of asymptomatic patients. The
medical history review will often determine the diagnosis,
use of high doses of isoproterenol during tilts exceeding 10
with no further investigation needed.89
minutes at 801 head-up tilt is accompanied by reduced
Diagnostic scores have been developed based on patients
specificity.98 The tilt test can prove useful for elderly patients
with rigorously defined diagnoses.90–93 Generally, attempts at
due to the difficulties in obtaining an informative history in some
validation have not been conducted with patients as rigorously
older patients and due to its usefulness in identifying the cause of
defined as in the derivation studies.94,95 Although these scores
unexplained falls.99,100
report overall high degrees of accuracy, they likely require
The tilt test has not been prospectively validated with
revision and validation in larger populations. Nonetheless, the
populations with rigorously defined vasovagal syncope. In
scores serve as useful reminders of important diagnostic
addition, there is no “ideal” protocol, given that there is an
points, and they form reproducible criteria for entry into
inexorable trade-off between sensitivity and specificity.
observational, genetic, and randomized, controlled interven-
Furthermore, the supplemental role of tilt testing when added
tional trials.91,96,97
to medical histories reviews by experts, with or without
quantitative diagnostic scores, has not been assessed, and its
Tilt-table testing
indications are a matter of expert consensus.101
The usefulness of investigation strategies depends on the
Tilt testing, when positive, suggests a tendency or
patient mix and the purpose of the investigation. In most
predisposition to vasovagal syncope and does not establish
cardiology settings, it is important to determine whether the
it as the cause of the patient’s syncope. Although the
patients’ syncope is caused by arrhythmia. Ruling out
importance of tilt testing in the investigation of patients with

link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 17 link to page 16 link to page 16 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 e50
Heart Rhythm, Vol 12, No 6, June 2015
syncope of cardiogenic etiology is diminishing, the test
with long quiescent periods without recurrences. Younger
continues to be helpful in clinics devoted to the care of
and older individuals differ markedly, with the latter group
patients with cardiovascular autonomic disorders such as
more likely to have complicating comorbidities and medical
autonomic neuropathy, neurogenic orthostatic hypotension,
therapies than the former group. Despite the apparently
neurally mediated syncope, and POTS.
benign profile of vasovagal syncope, patients with frequent
Tilt-table testing can be helpful in the following specific
episodes occasionally need treatment. When considering
circumstances:
therapy for vasovagal syncope, it is important to weigh the
natural history, the potential for harm, and the marked
 differentiating convulsive syncope from true seizure
reduction in syncope (seen in all control arms of randomized
activity
trials on vasovagal syncope) against symptom severity and
 situations in which, despite careful questioning, the cause
the overall likelihood of treatment efficacy. The likelihood of
of syncope remains unclear
a patient fainting after specialist assessment can be predicted
 establishing a diagnosis of pseudosyncope.
from the number of syncopes in the preceding year. In the
Prevention of Syncope Trial (POST) study,91 patients with
Pseudosyncope is a poorly reported syndrome of apparent
no syncope in the previous year had a 7% likelihood of
syncopal episodes in the absence of cerebral hypoperfusion or
fainting in the next year, while those with at least 1 syncope
hemodynamic changes that might cause cerebral hypoperfusion.
had a 40% likelihood of fainting.68
Reducing the number of medications that cause hypo-
tension can be helpful, provided that it does not worsen
Prolonged electrocardiographic monitoring
conditions such as hypertension and heart failure. Several
The current gold standard for diagnosing syncope due to
narrative and systematic reviews have evaluated the benefits
cardiac arrhythmias is recording an ECG during an episode
of lifestyle and medical therapies.113117 While results have
of clinical syncope. A syncopal episode with suppression of
generally been positive in uncontrolled trials and short-term
both AV and sinus node activity is very likely the result of
controlled trials, those of long-term, placebo-controlled
vasovagal syncope. However, a syncopal episode associated
prospective trials have been less encouraging. Furthermore,
with a normal sinus rhythm can be due to several disorders
only the most motivated patients will commit to medical
such as orthostatic hypotension, vasovagal and carotid sinus
therapy to prevent a handful of yearly syncopal episodes.
reflexes, and even pseudosyncope. The yield depends on the
duration of monitoring and is significantly greater with
implanted monitors. External monitors have a loop memory
Physical counterpressure maneuver
that continuously records and deletes the ECGs, storing them
Two clinical studies have reported that isometric exercise of
when activated. Diagnostic accuracy is approximately 10%–
the large muscles induces a significant blood pressure
25% after 1 month of monitoring. ILRs store ECG evidence
increase during the phase of impending reflex syncope on
when activated by the patient after a syncope episode and
tilt tests, enabling the patient to avoid or delay losing
after automatic detection based on rate or rhythm criteria.
consciousness.118,119 In a randomized, prospective parallel
The devices are implanted subcutaneously under local
clinical trial, a physical counterpressure maneuver was
anesthesia and last up to 3 years.
superior to controls, with a relative risk reduction of
Numerous observational studies have shown that ILRs can
39%.120 However, syncope recurred in a substantial minority
deliver diagnoses for approximately 35% of patients during
of patients, and the study was open label. The maneuvers do
the devices’ lifetime. It is important to note that there have
not work for patients with a minimal or absent prodrome.
been randomized controlled trials of the devices’ clinical
Nonetheless, these maneuvers are risk-free and should
effectiveness, and the results consistently show that for older
constitute a core management strategy for patients with
patients with unexplained syncope, recorders should be used
vasovagal syncope of all severities.120
earlier in the investigation rather than later.102–104 The study
populations of these trials were predominantly composed of
Tilt-training
patients in their 70s and 80s. Compared with conventional
Tilt training has 2 forms. In the first, patients start training
approaches, external ECG monitors provide more and earlier
using repetitive tilt tests under monitored conditions. In the
diagnoses and are cost effective. However, the devices have
second, patients simply practice standing quietly at home for
been shown to improve care in only the subset of patients
prolonged periods of time. While the former might be
who are older, have asystole documented on the ILR, and
beneficial, the latter is not.114 Most of the studies on tilt-
whose tilt test results were negative, probably because many
training were poorly controlled. This treatment is hampered
of the diagnoses are of vasovagal syncope. These patients
by poor patient compliance when conducting the program for
appear to benefit from permanent pacing.105–112
an extended period of time and by an as yet undetermined
biologic mechanism. In the absence of consistently positive
Conservative and Medical Treatment
evidence and the presence of reports of poor long-term
Vasovagal syncope is generally benign, with a natural
compliance, the writing group could not make a recommen-
history that can include clusters of syncopes interspersed
dation on this intervention.

link to page 16 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 Sheldon et al
HRS Expert Consensus Document on POT/IST/VVS
e51
Beta-blocker therapy
to selection or design issues, none of the trials provided
Adequately designed and controlled randomized studies have
high-level evidence for adults. The trials studied children,
found that beta-blockers are not effective for treating vasovagal
used tilt test outcomes as the main measure, studied
syncope. The largest prospective, placebo-controlled, random-
extraordinarily symptomatic patients, or were open label.
ized critical trial of beta-blocker therapy was the POST I trial,
A small and underpowered crossover study reported the
which analyzed the use of metoprolol for patients with tilt-
efficacy of low-dose midodrine in participants who had
positive presumed vasovagal syncope.91 Atenolol was no more
previously been trained in physical counterpressure man-
effective than placebo in preventing recurrent syncope in
euevres.124 In this 23-patient trial, there was only an
another double-blind randomized clinical trial.121 However, in
insignificant trend to benefit from midodrine in the exposure
a meta analysis of a prespecified, prestratified substudy of
arms limited to 3 months. None of the studies were
POST 1 and a large earlier observational study, there was
conventional, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials
evidence of benefit in patients older than 40 years.122 A
of moderately to severely symptomatic patients.125–128 Such
prospective, multicenter, randomized clinical trial is now testing
a study (POST 4) is now ongoing but the results will not be
this effect (POST 5). In the absence of compelling evidence, it
known for several years.129 The major limitations of
seems reasonable to attempt therapy with metoprolol in older
midodrine are the need for frequent dosing, its effects on
patients and avoid using the drug in younger patients.
supine hypertension, and a lack of knowledge of its
teratogenic effects. Caution is advised when administering
Fludrocortisone
the drug to older men due to the potential for urinary
The POST 2 trial compared fludrocortisone to placebo in
retention. In the absence of compelling evidence, it seems
patients with recurrent, apparent, vasovagal syncope and
reasonable to attempt therapy with midodrine for patients
showed only a strong trend to treatment benefit. The trial has
whose symptom severity merits it.
not undergone peer review and has not been published. A
small pediatric trial showed that children who took placebo
had a better long-term outcome with respect to presyncope
and syncope than those who took fludrocortisone.123 In the
Serotonin transporter inhibitors
absence of compelling evidence, it seems reasonable to
There is ample evidence for the involvement of serotonin in the
attempt therapy with fludrocortisone in patients whose
midbrain regulation of heart rate and blood pressure. Based on
symptom severity merits it.
this evidence, there have been several observational studies and
3 small, randomized trials on serotonin transport inhibitors for
Midodrine
the prevention of vasovagal syncope.130132 There remains
Four randomized trials on midodrine have shown a con-
considerable uncertainty about the efficacy of serotonin trans-
sistent risk reduction of approximately 70%. However, due
port inhibitors in preventing syncope.
Recommendations—Lifestyle and Medical Treatment for Vasovagal Syncope
Class
Level
Education, reassurance, and promoting salt and fluid intake are indicated for patients with
I
E
vasovagal syncope, unless contraindicated.
Reducing or withdrawing medications that can cause hypotension can be beneficial for patients
IIa
E
with vasovagal syncope.
Physical counterpressure maneuvers can be useful for patients with vasovagal syncope who have a
IIa
B-R
sufficiently long prodromal period.
The use of fludrocortisone seems reasonable for patients with frequent vasovagal syncope who
IIb
E
lack contraindications for its use.
Beta-blockers may be considered for patients older than 40 years with frequent vasovagal
IIb
B-R
syncope.
The use of midodrine seems reasonable for patients with frequent vasovagal syncope and no
IIb
B-R
hypertension or urinary retention.
Treatment strategy
counterpressure maneuvers. Do not treat patients who have
We therefore recommend the following approach to phar-
not fainted in the past year.
macologic and conservative treatment for established vaso-
For patients with recurrent episodes: Begin conserva-
vagal syncope. For patients with only an occasional syncope:
tively as described above. Examine the patient’s history for
Reassure patients, stress fluid and salt intake, and teach
drugs that might cause hypotension and reduce or withdraw

link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 e52
Heart Rhythm, Vol 12, No 6, June 2015
them if possible. For patients with recurrent episodes of
syncope, was 5% for patients with negative tilt test results and
vasovagal syncope and who are unlikely to respond
55% for those with positive tilt test results, which is similar to
adequately to conservative treatment: It is reasonable to
the results observed in controls without pacing.112 Patients
consider fludrocortisone, midodrine, or beta blockers (if the
with an asystolic response during tilt testing fared no better
patient is older than 40 years) prior to pacing, while
than those with nonasystolic responses. By showing that
recognizing that there is no high-level evidence for their use.
patients with prolonged pauses during syncope but negative
tilt test results benefit most from cardiac pacing, ISSUE-3
Pacemaker Treatment
suggested that a positive tilt test result could be used to select
In general, cardiac pacing has a very limited role in patients
patients who should not undergo permanent cardiac pacing.
with typical vasovagal syncope. Although earlier observa-
tional, open-label, and single-blind studies have been uni-
Unexplained syncope, no prodromes, and normal heart
formly positive, the results of 2 subsequent double-blind
A syncope syndrome with low plasma adenosine levels has
studies in adults were negative.133–138 There are currently no
been described in patients with unexplained syncope, sudden
positive placebo-controlled studies on pacemakers with
onset and no prodrome, and a normal heart and normal ECG.
patients younger than 40 years with vasovagal syncope; for
This syncope is not thought to be due to the vasovagal reflex
these patients, cardiac pacing should be the last choice.
but is included because the population with this type of
Pacing should be considered only in highly selected patients,
syncope shares clinical features with those who have vaso-
such as those significantly older than 40 years and patients
vagal syncope. Patients with unexplained syncope have low
who experience frequent recurrences associated with
plasma adenosine levels, and exogenous injections with
repeated injury, limited prodromes, and documented asys-
adenosine triphosphate or adenosine can cause transient
tole. The fact that pacing can be effective in some patients
complete heart block in these patients more often than in
with syncope does not mean that it is necessary. Establishing
control patients. This outcome occurs without sinus node
a relationship between symptoms and severe bradycardia is
slowing or progressive atrioventricular conduction delay.
essential before considering permanent pacing. Prolonged
During clinical syncope, paroxysmal AV block occurs with
ECG monitoring, usually by an ILR, is usually necessary.
1 or multiple consecutive pauses but with no preceding or
accompanying changes in sinus or AV node function. Cardiac
Suspected or known vasovagal syncope and ECG-documented
pacing effectively prevents syncopal recurrences.112,139,140 In
asystole
a small multicenter trial performed on 80 selected elderly
Typically, the vasovagal reflex is both hypotensive and
patients with unexplained syncope, dual-chamber cardiac
cardioinhibitory, and there is emerging evidence that tilt-
pacing significantly reduced 2-year syncopal recurrence from
table testing identifies patients with predominant reflex
69% in the control group to 23% in the active group.141
hypotension.112 Accordingly, tilt-table testing can be per-
formed to assess hypotensive susceptibility and identify
Pediatric patients
patients who might not respond to permanent cardiac pacing.
Although the documentation of a prolonged asystolic reflex
A small, single-blind randomized trial reported that perma-
during tilt-table testing predicts a similar response during
nent cardiac pacing greatly reduced syncope burden in young
spontaneous syncope, the benefit of pacing for patients with
children, with frequent syncope associated with documented
tilt-positive cardioinhibitory syncope remains unproven.111
asystole.142 These patients were refractory to multiple
In the Third International Study on Syncope of Uncertain
medications and appeared to benefit from cardiac pacing.
Etiology (ISSUE-3; a randomized, double-blind trial), 511
However, this apparently beneficial response is also seen
patients aged 40 years and older with recurrent reflex syncope
ubiquitously in single-blind adult trials, a response that is not
were given an ILR.111 Only 17% of the patients had syncope
reproduced in properly conducted double-blind trials.
with documented asystole, or Z6 seconds of asystole without
syncope. Most of these patients were randomly assigned to
Pacing mode
dual-chamber pacing with rate-drop response or to sensing
Dual-chamber pacing was used in almost all the above-
only. During follow-up, the 2-year estimated syncope recur-
mentioned trials, with a rate-drop response feature in the
rence rate was 57% with the pacemaker off and 25% with the
pacemaker that instituted rapid dual-chamber pacing if the
pacemaker on, with a relative risk reduction of 57%.
device detected a rapid decrease in heart rate. However, no
A recent subanalysis of ISSUE-3 showed that the syncope
comparisons between conventional single-chamber and
recurrence rate for patients with asystole, with or without
dual-chamber pacing have been conducted.

link to page 14 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 link to page 17 Sheldon et al
HRS Expert Consensus Document on POT/IST/VVS
e53
Recommendations—Pacemakers for Syncope
Class
Level
Dual-chamber pacing can be effective for patients 40 years of age or older with recurrent and
IIa
B-R
unpredictable syncope who have a documented pause Z3 seconds during clinical syncope or an
asymptomatic pause Z6 seconds.
Tilt-table testing may be considered to identify patients with a hypotensive response who would
IIb
B-NR
be less likely to respond to permanent cardiac pacing.
Pacing may be considered for pediatric patients with recurrent syncope with documented
IIb
B-R
symptomatic asystole who are refractory to medical therapy.
Dual-chamber pacing may be considered in adenosine-susceptible older patients who have
IIb
C
unexplained syncope without a prodrome, a normal ECG, and no structural heart disease.
Section 4: Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and
Given that the medical history usually provides a clear
Vasovagal Syncope in the Young
diagnosis and that tilt testing has imperfect sensitivity and
specificity in pediatric patients, such testing is usually not
The relatively limited pediatric literature on this topic has
indicated. An ECG is a simple and well-tolerated test to
meant that most insights and treatments for POTS and
screen for relatively uncommon but dangerous causes of
vasovagal syncope have come from the adult medical
syncope, including myocarditis, inheritable cardiomyopa-
literature. This section provides a high-level view of the
thies, long QT, and other inherited or acquired causes of
features shared by adults and children and comments on the
arrhythmia. Prolonged ambulatory cardiac rhythm monitor-
evidence, research, and treatments specific to children and
ing (external loop event monitor or an ILR) is reasonable if
adolescents.
the clinical history suggests an inheritable arrhythmia or
cardiomyopathy or severe bradycardia or if the patient is
Diagnosis of POTS and Vasovagal Syncope
refractory to medical therapy.
Although the cornerstone for the diagnosis of pediatric
POTS is the medical history, an orthostatic test is required
to confirm the diagnosis. The diagnostic standard for tilt-
table testing for POTS in young people requires symptoms of
Treatment of Children with Vasovagal Syncope or
orthostatic intolerance and an orthostatic increase in heart
POTS
rate of at least 40 bpm, which is greater than in adults.11 The
There are no quantitative data on the outcome of pediatric
10-minute standing tests for POTS provided reasonable
patients with vasovagal syncope or POTS. The number of
accuracy in a small study on adults, but these tests have
syncopal episodes varies widely, and many young patients
not been validated for pediatric populations.143 A 24-hour
appear to stop fainting in late adolescence. This fact dulls
Holter monitor can be performed to distinguish POTS
enthusiasm for specific medical treatment of young people,
from IST.
particularly the use of pacemakers. There is little evidence
Symptoms resulting from vasovagal syncope are usually
that any treatment helps children with vasovagal syncope or
more clearly articulated in young patients than in much older
POTS, and physicians rely on insights from adult medical
adults, and establishing the diagnosis is usually straightfor-
literature. In general, it is reasonable to reassure patients and
ward. Syncope during exercise usually raises concern about a
their families, promote salt and fluid intake, and teach
rare cardiac electrical or structural cause, but the most
physical counterpressure techniques. Two randomized clin-
common cause of exercise-related syncope in pediatric
ical trials reported that midodrine improved either hemody-
populations is still vasovagal syncope.144 Nonetheless,
namic changes to orthostasis or clinical symptoms in patients
patients with exercise-induced syncope should be assessed
with POTS.145,146 A small randomized trial reported that
for cardiomyopathy and arrhythmia as the cause of the
midodrine was effective in preventing recurrent syncope.128
syncope. Pseudosyncope should be suspected when patients
Two randomized studies of children with syncope found
present with very frequent (at least daily) or prolonged
placebo more effective than fludrocortisone and salt in
syncope, with similar symptoms to vasovagal syncope.
preventing syncope123 and placebo more effective than
Many of these patients also have an earlier history of bona
metoprolol in preventing syncope.147 Finally, a small,
fide vasovagal syncope, and untangling the medical history
double-blind study reported that pacing improved symptoms
requires particular care.
in very young patients with frequent vasovagal syncope.142

link to page 18 link to page 21 e54
Heart Rhythm, Vol 12, No 6, June 2015
Recommendations—POTS and Vasovagal Syncope in the Young
Class
Level
Pediatric patients presenting with suspected vasovagal syncope or POTS should undergo a detailed
I
E
medical history review and physical examination and undergo a 12-lead ECG.
Pediatric patients with suspected POTS should undergo orthostatic testing.
I
E
Tilt-table testing is reasonable for highly selected pediatric patients with suspected vasovagal syncope.
IIa
C
It seems reasonable to treat selected pediatric patients with vasovagal syncope with midodrine.
IIb
B-R
It seems reasonable to treat pediatric patients with vasovagal syncope or POTS with interventions that
IIb
E
are recommended for adults with these disorders.
Section 5: Future Opportunities
trials for any of these syndromes. Given the apparent
The writing group identified numerous opportunities for
heterogeneity of presentations among reporting sites, it will
better understanding the causes, diagnosis, risk stratification,
be important for external validity and clinical implementa-
and treatment of these disorders. The first and formative step
tion that studies be conducted across a number of represen-
is to agree on uniform definitions for the syndromes, which
tative sites. However, this approach quickly leads to a critical
the Heart Rhythm Society provides in this document. Once
and perhaps insurmountable problem: the wide range of
validated, these definitions will provide uniform criteria for
regulatory regimens among provinces, states, and countries.
inclusion of patients in clinical studies. Many subsequent
It will take imagination and persistence to develop solutions
studies will require multiple centers, and the formation of
to this fractious impediment to clinical research, which is
standing networks to address these problems is warranted.
conducted to improve the care of our patients.
Indeed, there are semipermanent networks already in place in
Europe (eg, the ISSUE group) and North America (eg, the
Appendix 1
POST group). Agreeing on priorities, common terms, and
See pages e58–e63 page for Tables A and B.
data fields is an important first step, and an international
registry with common terms seems highly desirable.
There is relatively little known about the natural history of
References
these 3 syndromes, although it is widely suspected that they are
1.
Saklani P, Krahn A, Klein G. Syncope. Circulation 2013;127:1330–1339.
2.
Moya A, Sutton R, Ammirati F, et al. Guidelines for the diagnosis and
chronic disorders with waxing and waning severity. This
management of syncope (version 2009). Eur Heart J 2009;30:2631–2671.
knowledge could be acquired at relatively low cost if the
3.
Olshansky B, Sullivan RM. Inappropriate sinus tachycardia. J Am Coll Cardiol
studies were integrated into daily clinical practice. Similarly and
2013;61:793–801.
4.
Brignole M, Hamdan MH. New concepts in the assessment of syncope. J Am
despite professional guidelines, there is little evidence on the
Coll Cardiol 2012;59:1583–1591.
optimum strategy for assessing patients who might have these
5.
Jacobs AK, Anderson JL, Halperin JL. The evolution and future of ACC/AHA
disorders. Given the disparate natures of health care systems,
clinical practice guidelines: a 30–year journey: a report of the American College
of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. J

these studies might best be performed internationally with
Am Coll Cardiol 2014;64:1373–1384.
networks of investigators, accruing locally relevant information
6.
Blomstrom-Lundqvist C, Scheinman MM, Aliot EM, et al. ACC/AHA/ESC
leading to solidly grounded, evidence-based guidelines.
guidelines for the management of patients with supraventricular arrhythmias—
executive summary. a report of the American College of Cardiology/American

None of the syndromes have investigative approaches that
Heart Association task force on practice guidelines and the European Society of
make much use of recent advances in information technology
Cardiology committee for practice guidelines (writing committee to develop
in medical care. We lack portable, beat-to-beat blood pressure
guidelines for the management of patients with supraventricular arrhythmias)
developed in collaboration with NASPE-Heart Rhythm Society. J Am Coll

monitors, and these could easily be integrated into current and
Cardiol 2003;42:1493–1531.
cutting-edge technologies.
7.
Thieben MJ, Sandroni P, Sletten DM, Benrud-Larson LM, Fealey RD, Vernino
There is still a large gap in our understanding of the causes
S, Lennon VA, Shen WK, Low PA. Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome:
the Mayo clinic experience. Mayo Clin Proc 2007;82:308–313.

of the physiologic disturbances underlying these syndromes.
8.
Schondorf R, Low PA. Idiopathic postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome: an
These questions include fundamental issues such as whether
attenuated form of acute pandysautonomia? Neurology 1993;43:132–137.
POTS is a syndrome with varied manifestations or a collection
9.
Low PA, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Textor SC, Benarroch EE, Shen WK, Schondorf
R, Suarez GA, Rummans TA. Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS).

of related syndromes. Similarly, is vasovagal syncope a single
Neurology 1995;45:S19–S25.
syndrome with a range of molecular, physiologic, and clinical
10.
Freeman R, Wieling W, Axelrod FB, et al. Consensus statement on the
manifestations or a collection of related syndromes? Are there
definition of orthostatic hypotension, neurally mediated syncope and the
postural tachycardia syndrome. Auton Neurosci 2011;161:46–48.

genetic causes for these syndromes or are they secondary to life
11.
Singer W, Sletten DM, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Brands CK, Fischer PR, Low PA.
events? Should therapy be targeted to specific subgroups, or is a
Postural tachycardia in children and adolescents: what is abnormal? J Pediatr
single approach sufficient?
2012;160:222–226.
12.
Garland EM, Raj SR, Black BK, Harris PA, Robertson D. The hemodynamic
To date, there are no effective therapies that have passed
and neurohumoral phenotype of postural tachycardia syndrome. Neurology
the scrutiny of even moderately sized, randomized clinical
2007;69:790–798.

Sheldon et al
HRS Expert Consensus Document on POT/IST/VVS
e55
13.
Low PA, Sandroni P, Joyner M, Shen WK. Postural tachycardia syndrome
syndrome: preliminary cross-sectional findings. Health Psychol 2003;22:
(POTS). J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2009;20:352–358.
643–648.
14.
Robertson D. The epidemic of orthostatic tachycardia and orthostatic intoler-
38.
Winker R, Barth A, Bidmon D, Ponocny I, Weber M, Mayr O, Robertson D,
ance. Am J Med Sci 1999;317:75–77.
Diedrich A, Maier R, Pilger A, Haber P, Rudiger HW. Endurance exercise
15.
Schondorf R, Benoit J, Wein T, Phaneuf D. Orthostatic intolerance in the
training in orthostatic intolerance: a randomized, controlled trial. Hypertension
chronic fatigue syndrome. J Auton Nerv Syst 1999;75:192–201.
2005;45:391–398.
16.
Freeman R, Wieling W, Axelrod FB, et al. Consensus statement on the
39.
Rowe PC, Calkins H, DeBusk K, et al. Fludrocortisone acetate to treat neurally
definition of orthostatic hypotension, neurally mediated syncope and the
mediated hypotension in chronic fatigue syndrome: a randomized controlled
postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res 2011;21:69–72.
trial. JAMA 2001;285:52–59.
17.
Lewis I, Pairman J, Spickett G, Newton JL. Clinical characteristics of a novel
40.
Jacob G, Shannon JR, Black B, Biaggioni I, Mosqueda-Garcia R, Robertson
subgroup of chronic fatigue syndrome patients with postural orthostatic
RM, Robertson D. Effects of volume loading and pressor agents in idiopathic
tachycardia syndrome. J Intern Med 2013;273:501–510.
orthostatic tachycardia. Circulation 1997;96:575–580.
18.
Benarroch EE. Postural tachycardia syndrome: a heterogeneous and multi-
41.
Gordon VM, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Novak V, Low PA. Hemodynamic and
factorial disorder. Mayo Clin Proc 2012;87:1214–1225.
symptomatic effects of acute interventions on tilt in patients with postural
19.
Peltier AC, Garland E, Raj SR, Sato K, Black B, Song Y, Wang L, Biaggioni I,
tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res 2000;10:29–33.
Diedrich A, Robertson D. Distal sudomotor findings in postural tachycardia
42.
Raj SR, Black BK, Biaggioni I, Paranjape SY, Ramirez M, Dupont WD,
syndrome. Clin Auton Res 2010;20:93–99.
Robertson D. Propranolol decreases tachycardia and improves symptoms in the
20.
Singer W, Spies JM, McArthur J, Low J, Griffin JW, Nickander KK, Gordon V,
postural tachycardia syndrome: less is more. Circulation 2009;120:725–734.
Low PA. Prospective evaluation of somatic and autonomic small fibers in
43.
Fu Q, Vangundy TB, Shibata S, Auchus RJ, Williams GH, Levine BD. Exercise
selected autonomic neuropathies. Neurology 2004;62:612–618.
training versus propranolol in the treatment of the postural orthostatic
21.
Low PA, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Textor SC, Schondorf R, Suarez GA, Fealey RD,
tachycardia syndrome. Hypertension 2011;58:167–175.
Camilleri M. Comparison of the postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) with
44.
McDonald C, Frith J, Newton JL. Single centre experience of ivabradine in
orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure. J Auton Nerv Syst 1994;50:
postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Europace 2011;13:427–430.
181–188.
45.
Raj SR, Black BK, Biaggioni I, Harris PA, Robertson D. Acetylcholinesterase
22.
Vogel ER, Sandroni P, Low PA. Blood pressure recovery from Valsalva
inhibition improves tachycardia in postural tachycardia syndrome. Circulation
maneuver in patients with autonomic failure. Neurology 2005;65:1533–1537.
2005;111:2734–2740.
23.
Sandroni P, Novak V, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Huck CA, Low PA. Mechanisms of
46.
Kanjwal K, Karabin B, Sheikh M, Elmer L, Kanjwal Y, Saeed B, Grubb BP.
blood pressure alterations in response to the Valsalva maneuver in postural
Pyridostigmine in the treatment of postural orthostatic tachycardia: a single-
tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res 2000;10:1–5.
center experience. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2011;34:750–755.
24.
Jacob G, Costa F, Shannon JR, Robertson RM, Wathen M, Stein M, Biaggioni I,
47.
Gaffney FA, Lane LB, Pettinger W, Blomqvist CG. Effects of long-term
Ertl A, Black B, Robertson D. The neuropathic postural tachycardia syndrome.
clonidine administration on the hemodynamic and neuroendocrine postural
N Engl J Med 2000;343:1008–1014.
responses of patients with dysautonomia. Chest 1983;83:436–438.
25.
Stewart JM, Medow MS, Montgomery LD, McLeod K. Decreased skeletal
48.
Shibao C, Arzubiaga C, Roberts LJ 2nd, Raj S, Black B, Harris P, Biaggioni I.
muscle pump activity in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome and low
Hyperadrenergic postural tachycardia syndrome in mast cell activation disor-
peripheral blood flow. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 2004;286:H1216–H1222.
ders. Hypertension 2005;45:385–390.
26.
Stewart JM, Medow MS, Glover JL, Montgomery LD. Persistent splanchnic
49.
Taneja I, Bruehl S, Robertson D. Effect of modafinil on acute pain: a randomized
hyperemia during upright tilt in postural tachycardia syndrome. Am J Physiol
double-blind crossover study. J Clin Pharmacol 2004;44:1425–1427.
Heart Circ Physiol 2006;290:H665–H673.
50.
Shen WK, Low PA, Jahangir A, Munger TM, Friedman PA, Osborn MJ,
27.
Stewart JM, Montgomery LD. Regional blood volume and peripheral blood

Stanton MS, Packer DL, Rea RF, Hammill SC. Is sinus node modification
ow in postural tachycardia syndrome. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol
appropriate for inappropriate sinus tachycardia with features of postural
2004;287:H1319–H1327.
orthostatic tachycardia syndrome? Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2001;24:
28.
Tani HSW, McPhee BR, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Low PA. Splanchnic and
217–230.
systemic circulation in the postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res
51.
Garland EM, Robertson D. Chiari I malformation as a cause of orthostatic
1999;9:231–232.
intolerance symptoms: a media myth? Am J Med 2001;111:546–552.
29.
Wallman D, Weinberg J, Hohler AD. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and Postural
52.
Prilipko O, Dehdashti AR, Zaim S, Seeck M. Orthostatic intolerance and
Tachycardia Syndrome: a relationship study. J ournal Neurol Sci 2014;340:
syncope associated with Chiari type I malformation. J Neurol Neurosurg
99–102.
30.
Wang XL, Ling TY, Charlesworth MC, Figueroa JJ, Low P, Shen WK, Lee HC.
Psychiatry 2005;76:1034–1036.
53.
Still AM, Raatikainen P, Ylitalo A, Kauma H, Ikaheimo M, Antero Kesaniemi
Autoimmunoreactive IgGs against cardiac lipid raft-associated proteins in
patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Transl Res 2013;162:

Y, Huikuri HV. Prevalence, characteristics and natural course of inappropriate
34–44.
sinus tachycardia. Europace 2005;7:104–112.
31.
Li H, Yu X, Liles C, et al. Autoimmune basis for postural tachycardia syndrome.
54.
Chiale PA, Garro HA, Schmidberg J, Sanchez RA, Acunzo RS, Lago M, Levy
JAMA 2014;3:e000755.
G, Levin M. Inappropriate sinus tachycardia may be related to an immunologic
32.
Raj SR, Biaggioni I, Yamhure PC, Black BK, Paranjape SY, Byrne DW,
disorder involving cardiac beta adrenergic receptors. Heart Rhythm 2006;3:
Robertson D. Renin-aldosterone paradox and perturbed blood volume regu-
1182–1186.
lation underlying postural tachycardia syndrome. Circulation 2005;111:
55.
Winum PF, Cayla G, Rubini M, Beck L, Messner-Pellenc P. A case of
1574–1582.
cardiomyopathy induced by inappropriate sinus tachycardia and cured by
33.
Abe H, Nagatomo T, Kohshi K, Numata T, Kikuchi K, Sonoda S, Mizuki T,
ivabradine. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 2009;32:942–944.
Kuroiwa A, Nakashima Y. Heart rate and plasma cyclic AMP responses to
56.
Romeo E, Grimaldi N, Sarubbi B, D’Alto M, Santarpia G, Scognamiglio G,
isoproterenol infusion and effect of beta-adrenergic blockade in patients with
Russo MG, Calabro R. A pediatric case of cardiomyopathy induced by
postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol 2000;36
inappropriate sinus tachycardia: efficacy of ivabradine. Pediatr Cardiol 2011;32:
(Suppl 2):S79–S82.
842–845.
34.
Parsaik A, Allison TG, Singer W, Sletten DM, Joyner MJ, Benarroch EE, Low
57.
Brady PA, Low PA, Shen WK. Inappropriate sinus tachycardia, postural
PA, Sandroni P. Deconditioning in patients with orthostatic intolerance.
orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, and overlapping syndromes. Pacing Clin
Neurology 2012;79:1435–1439.
Electrophysiol 2005;28:1112–1121.
35.
Fu Q, Vangundy TB, Galbreath MM, Shibata S, Jain M, Hastings JL, Bhella PS,
58.
Ewing DJ, Irving JB, Kerr F, Wildsmith JA, Clarke BF. Cardiovascular
Levine BD. Cardiac origins of the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.
responses to sustained handgrip in normal subjects and in patients with diabetes
J Am Coll Cardiol 2010;55:2858–2868.
mellitus: a test of autonomic function. Clin Sci Mol Med 1974;46:295–306.
36.
Masuki S, Eisenach JH, Johnson CP, Dietz NM, Benrud-Larson LM, Schrage
59.
Morillo CA, Klein GJ, Thakur RK, Li H, Zardini M, Yee R. Mechanism of
WG, Curry TB, Sandroni P, Low PA, Joyner MJ. Excessive heart rate response
”inappropriate” sinus tachycardia. Role of sympathovagal balance. Circulation
to orthostatic stress in postural tachycardia syndrome is not caused by anxiety.
1994;90:873–877.
J Appl Physiol 2007;102:896–903.
60.
Castellanos A, Moleiro F, Chakko S, Acosta H, Huikuri H, Mitrani RD,
37.
Benrud-Larson LM, Sandroni P, Haythornthwaite JA, Rummans TA, Low PA.
Myerburg RJ. Heart rate variability in inappropriate sinus tachycardia. Am
Correlates of functional disability in patients with postural tachycardia
J Cardiol 1998;82:531–534.

e56
Heart Rhythm, Vol 12, No 6, June 2015
61.
Leon H, Guzman JC, Kuusela T, Dillenburg R, Kamath M, Morillo CA.
84.
Jardine DL, Melton IC, Crozier IG, English S, Bennett SI, Frampton CM, Ikram
Impaired baroreflex gain in patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia.
H. Decrease in cardiac output and muscle sympathetic activity during vasovagal
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2005;16:64–68.
syncope. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 2002;282:H1804–H1809.
62.
Marrouche NF, Beheiry S, Tomassoni G, Cole C, Bash D, Dresing T, Saliba W,
85.
Cooke WH, Convertino VA. Association between vasovagal hypotension and
Abdul-Karim A, Tchou P, Schweikert R, Leonelli F, Natale A. Three-
low sympathetic neural activity during presyncope. Clin Auton Res 2002;12:
dimensional nonfluoroscopic mapping and ablation of inappropriate sinus
483–486.
tachycardia. Procedural strategies and long-term outcome. J Am Coll Cardiol
86.
Vaddadi G, Esler MD, Dawood T, Lambert E. Persistence of muscle
2002;39:1046–1054.
sympathetic nerve activity during vasovagal syncope. Eur Heart J 2010;31:
63.
Cappato R, Castelvecchio S, Ricci C, et al. Clinical efficacy of ivabradine in
2027–2033.
patients with inappropriate sinus tachycardia: a prospective, randomized,
87.
Vaddadi G, Guo L, Esler M, Socratous F, Schlaich M, Chopra R, Eikelis N,
placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover evaluation. J oAm Coll Cardiol
Lambert G, Trauer T, Lambert E. Recurrent postural vasovagal syncope:
2012;60:1323–1329.
sympathetic nervous system phenotypes. Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol 2011;4:
64.
Ptaszynski P, Kaczmarek K, Ruta J, Klingenheben T, Cygankiewicz I, Wranicz
711–718.
JK. Ivabradine in combination with metoprolol succinate in the treatment of
88.
Sheldon R. How to differentiate syncope from seizure. Card Electrophysiol Clin
inappropriate sinus tachycardia. J Cardiovasc Pharmacol Ther 2013;18:
2013;5:423–431.
338–344.
89.
van Dijk N, Boer KR, Colman N, Bakker A, Stam J, van Grieken JJ, Wilde AA,
65.
Ganzeboom KS, Mairuhu G, Reitsma JB, Linzer M, Wieling W, van Dijk N.
Linzer M, Reitsma JB, Wieling W. High diagnostic yield and accuracy of
Lifetime cumulative incidence of syncope in the general population: a study of
history, physical examination, and ECG in patients with transient loss of
549 Dutch subjects aged 35–60 years. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2006;17:
consciousness in FAST: the Fainting Assessment study. J Cardiovasc Electro-
1172–1176.
physiol 2008;19:48–55.
66.
Serletis A, Rose S, Sheldon AG, Sheldon RS. Vasovagal syncope in medical
90.
Sheldon R, Hersi A, Ritchie D, Koshman ML, Rose S. Syncope and structural
students and their first-degree relatives. Eur Heart J 2006;27:1965–1970.
heart disease: historical criteria for vasovagal syncope and ventricular tachy-
67.
Sheldon RS, Sheldon AG, Connolly SJ, Morillo CA, Klingenheben T, Krahn
cardia. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2010;21:1358–1364.
AD, Koshman ML, Ritchie D. Investigators of the Syncope Symptom Study and
91.
Sheldon R, Rose S, Connolly S, Ritchie D, Koshman ML, Frenneaux M.
the Prevention of Syncope Trial. Age of first faint in patients with vasovagal
Diagnostic criteria for vasovagal syncope based on a quantitative history. Eur
syncope. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2006;17:49–54.
Heart J 2006;27:344–350.
68.
Sumner GL, Rose MS, Koshman ML, Ritchie D, Sheldon RS. Prevention of
92.
Sheldon R, Rose S, Ritchie D, Connolly SJ, Koshman ML, Lee MA, Frenneaux
Syncope Trial I. Recent history of vasovagal syncope in a young, referral-based
M, Fisher M, Murphy W. Historical criteria that distinguish syncope from
population is a stronger predictor of recurrent syncope than lifetime syncope
seizures. J Am Coll Cardiol 2002;40:142–148.
burden. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2010;21:1375–1380.
93.
Sheldon RS, Koshman ML, Murphy WF. Electroencephalographic findings
69.
Chen LY, Gersh BJ, Hodge DO, Wieling W, Hammill SC, Shen WK.
during presyncope and syncope induced by tilt table testing. Can J Cardiol
Prevalence and clinical outcomes of patients with multiple potential causes of
1998;14:811–816.
syncope. Mayo Clin Proc 2003;78:414–420.
94.
Romme JJ, van Dijk N, Boer KR, Bossuyt PM, Wieling W, Reitsma JB.
70.
Brignole M, Menozzi C, Bartoletti A, et al. A new management of syncope:
Diagnosing vasovagal syncope based on quantitative history-taking: validation
prospective systematic guideline-based evaluation of patients referred urgently
of the Calgary Syncope Symptom Score. Eur Heart J 2009;30:2888–2896.
to general hospitals. Eur Heart J 2006;27:76–82.
95.
Exposito V, Guzman JC, Orava M, Armaganijan L, Morillo CA. Usefulness of
71.
D’Ascenzo F, Biondi-Zoccai G, Reed MJ, Gabayan GZ, Suzuki M, Costantino
the Calgary Syncope Symptom Score for the diagnosis of vasovagal syncope in
G, Furlan R, Del Rosso A, Sarasin FP, Sun BC, Modena MG, Gaita F.
the elderly. Europace 2013;15:1210–1214.
Incidence, etiology and predictors of adverse outcomes in 43,315 patients
96.
Alboni P, Brignole M, Menozzi C, Raviele A, Del Rosso A, Dinelli M, Solano
presenting to the Emergency Department with syncope: an international meta-
A, Bottoni N. Diagnostic value of history in patients with syncope with or
analysis. Int J Cardiol 2013;167:57–62.
without heart disease. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001;37:1921–1928.
72.
Barón-Esquivias GEF, Pedrote A, Cayuela A, Gómez S, Aguilera A, Campos A,
97.
Sud S, Klein GJ, Skanes AC, Gula LJ, Yee R, Krahn AD. Predicting the cause of
Fernández M, Valle JI, Redondo M, Fernández JM, Martínez A, Burgos J,
syncope from clinical history in patients undergoing prolonged monitoring.
Martínez-Rubio A. Long-term outcome of patients with vasovagal syncope. Am
Heart Rhythm 2009;6:238–243.
Heart J 2004;147:83–89.
98.
Natale A, Akhtar M, Jazayeri M, Dhala A, Blanck Z, Deshpande S, Krebs A, Sra
73.
Mosqueda-Garcia R, Furlan R, Tank J, Fernandez-Violante R. The elusive
JS. Provocation of hypotension during head-up tilt testing in subjects with no
pathophysiology of neurally mediated syncope. Circulation 2000;102:2898–2906.
history of syncope or presyncope. Circulation 1995;92:54–58.
74.
Glick G, Yu PN. Hemodynamic changes during spontaneous vasovagal
99.
Del Rosso A, Ungar A, Maggi R, Giada F, Petix NR, De Santo T, Menozzi C,
reactions. Am J Med 1963;34:42–51.
Brignole M. Clinical predictors of cardiac syncope at initial evaluation in
75.
Hargreaves AD, Muir AL. Lack of variation in venous tone potentiates
vasovagal syncope. Br Heart J 1992;67:486–490.

patients referred urgently to a general hospital: the EGSYS score. Heart
76.
Manyari DE, Rose S, Tyberg JV, Sheldon RS. Abnormal reflex venous function
2008;94:1620–1626.
in patients with neuromediated syncope. J Am Coll Cardiol 1996;27:1730–1735.
100.
Rafanelli M, Ruffolo E, Chisciotti VM, Brunetti MA, Ceccofiglio A, Tesi F,
77.
Thomson HL, Atherton JJ, Khafagi FA, Frenneaux MP. Failure of reflex
Morrione A, Marchionni N, Ungar A. Clinical aspects and diagnostic relevance
venoconstriction during exercise in patients with vasovagal syncope. Circu-
of neuroautonomic evaluation in patients with unexplained falls. Aging Clin
lation 1996;93:953–959.
Exp Res 2014;26:33–37.
78.
Verheyden B, Liu J, van Dijk N, Westerhof BE, Reybrouck T, Aubert AE,
101.
Blanc JJ. Clinical laboratory testing: what is the role of tilt-table testing, active
Wieling W. Steep fall in cardiac output is main determinant of hypotension
standing test, carotid massage, electrophysiological testing and ATP test in the
during drug-free and nitroglycerine-induced orthostatic vasovagal syncope.
syncope evaluation? Prog Cardiovasc Dis 2013;55:418–424.
Heart Rhythm 2008;5:1695–1701.
102.
Farwell DJ, Freemantle N, Sulke N. The clinical impact of implantable loop
79.
Gisolf J, Westerhof BE, van Dijk N, Wesseling KH, Wieling W, Karemaker JM.
recorders in patients with syncope. Eur Heart J 2006;27:351–356.
Sublingual nitroglycerin used in routine tilt testing provokes a cardiac output-
103.
Krahn AD, Klein GJ, Yee R, Hoch JS, Skanes AC. Cost implications of testing
mediated vasovagal response. J Am Coll Cardiol 2004;44:588–593.
strategy in patients with syncope: randomized assessment of syncope trial. J Am
80.
Verheyden B, Gisolf J, Beckers F, Karemaker JM, Wesseling KH, Aubert AE,
Coll Cardiol 2003;42:495–501.
Wieling W. Impact of age on the vasovagal response provoked by sublingual
104.
Krahn AD, Klein GJ, Yee R, Norris C. Final results from a pilot study with an
nitroglycerine in routine tilt testing. Clin Sci 2007;113:329–337.
implantable loop recorder to determine the etiology of syncope in patients with
81.
Fu Q, Levine BD. Pathophysiology of neurally mediated syncope: Role of
negative noninvasive and invasive testing. Am J Cardiol 1998;82:117–119.
cardiac output and total peripheral resistance. Auton Neurosci 2014;184:24–26.
105.
Krahn AD, Klein GJ, Norris C, Yee R. The etiology of syncope in patients with
82.
Morillo CA, Eckberg DL, Ellenbogen KA, Beightol LA, Hoag JB, Tahvanainen
negative tilt table and electrophysiological testing. Circulation 1995;92:1819–1824.
KU, Kuusela TA, Diedrich AM. Vagal and sympathetic mechanisms in patients
106.
Krahn AD, Klein GJ, Yee R, Takle-Newhouse T, Norris C. Use of an extended
with orthostatic vasovagal syncope. Circulation 1997;96:2509–2513.
monitoring strategy in patients with problematic syncope. Reveal Investigators.
83.
Mosqueda-Garcia R, Furlan R, Fernandez-Violante R, Desai T, Snell M, Jarai Z,
Circulation 1999;99:406–410.
Ananthram V, Robertson RM, Robertson D. Sympathetic and baroreceptor
107.
Moya A, Brignole M, Menozzi C, Garcia-Civera R, Tognarini S, Mont L, Botto
reflex function in neurally mediated syncope evoked by tilt. J Clin Invest
G, Giada F, Cornacchia D, International Study on Syncope of Uncertain
1997;99:2736–2744.
Etiology (ISSUE) Investigators. Mechanism of syncope in patients with isolated

Sheldon et al
HRS Expert Consensus Document on POT/IST/VVS
e57
syncope and in patients with tilt-positive syncope. Circulation 2001;104:
129.
Raj SR, Faris PD, McRae M, Sheldon RS. Rationale for the prevention of
1261–1267.
syncope trial IV: assessment of midodrine. Clin Auton Res 2012;22:275–280.
108.
Moya A, Brignole M, Sutton R, et al. Reproducibility of electrocardiographic
130.
Theodorakis GN, Leftheriotis D, Livanis EG, Flevari P, Karabela G, Aggelo-
findings in patients with suspected reflex neurally-mediated syncope. Am J
poulou N, Kremastinos DT. Fluoxetine vs. propranolol in the treatment of
Cardiol 2008;102:1518–1523.
vasovagal syncope: a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Euro-
109.
Solano A, Menozzi C, Maggi R, Donateo P, Bottoni N, Lolli G, Tomasi C, Croci
pace 2006;8:193–198.
F, Oddone D, Puggioni E, Brignole M. Incidence, diagnostic yield and safety of
131.
Takata TS, Wasmund SL, Smith ML, Li JM, Joglar JA, Banks K, Kowal RC,
the implantable loop-recorder to detect the mechanism of syncope in patients
Page RL, Hamdan MH. Serotonin reuptake inhibitor (Paxil) does not prevent the
with and without structural heart disease. Eur Heart J 2004;25:1116–1119.
vasovagal reaction associated with carotid sinus massage and/or lower body
110.
Brignole M, Sutton R, Menozzi C, Garcia-Civera R, Moya A, Wieling W,
negative pressure in healthy volunteers. Circulation 2002;106:1500–1504.
Andresen D, Benditt DG, Vardas P, International Study on Syncope of
132.
Di Girolamo E, Di Iorio C, Sabatini P, Leonzio L, Barbone C, Barsotti A.
Uncertain Etiology (ISSUE) 2 Group. Early application of an implantable loop
Effects of paroxetine hydrochloride, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, on
recorder allows effective specific therapy in patients with recurrent suspected
refractory vasovagal syncope: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled
neurally mediated syncope. Eur Heart J 2006;27:1085–1092.
study. J Am Coll Cardiol 1999;33:1227–1230.
111.
Brignole M, Menozzi C, Moya A, et al. Pacemaker therapy in patients with
133.
Connolly SJ, Sheldon R, Roberts RS, Gent M. The North American Vasovagal
neurally mediated syncope and documented asystole: Third International Study
Pacemaker Study (VPS). A randomized trial of permanent cardiac pacing for the
on Syncope of Uncertain Etiology (ISSUE-3): a randomized trial. Circulation
prevention of vasovagal syncope. J Am Coll Cardiol 1999;33:16–20.
2012;125:2566–2571.
134.
Sutton R, Brignole M, Menozzi C, Raviele A, Alboni P, Giani P, Moya A. Dual-
112.
Brignole M, Donateo P, Tomaino M, et al. Benefit of pacemaker therapy in
chamber pacing in the treatment of neurally mediated tilt-positive cardioinhi-
patients with presumed neurally mediated syncope and documented asystole is
bitory syncope: pacemaker versus no therapy: a multicenter randomized study.
greater when tilt test is negative: an analysis from the third International Study
The Vasovagal Syncope International Study (VASIS) Investigators. Circulation
on Syncope of Uncertain Etiology (ISSUE-3). Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol
2000;102:294–299.
135.
Ammirati F, Colivicchi F, Santini M, Syncope D, Treatment Study I. Permanent
2014;7:10–16.
cardiac pacing versus medical treatment for the prevention of recurrent vasovagal
113.
Sutton R, Brignole M, Benditt DG. Key challenges in the current management
syncope: a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial. Circulation 2001;104:52–57.
of syncope. Nat Rev Cardiol 2012;9:590–598.
136.
Connolly SJ, Sheldon R, Thorpe KE, Roberts RS, Ellenbogen KA, Wilkoff BL,
114.
Kuriachan V, Sheldon RS, Platonov M. Evidence-based treatment for vasovagal
Morillo C, Gent M, VPS II Investigators. Pacemaker therapy for prevention of
syncope. Heart Rhythm 2008;5:1609–1614.
syncope in patients with recurrent severe vasovagal syncope: Second Vasovagal
115.
Vyas A, Swaminathan PD, Zimmerman MB, Olshansky B. Are treatments for
Pacemaker Study (VPS II): a randomized trial. JAMA 2003;289:2224–2229.
vasovagal syncope effective? A meta-analysis. Int J Cardiol 2013;167:
137.
Raviele A, Giada F, Menozzi C, Speca G, Orazi S, Gasparini G, Sutton R,
1906–1911.
Brignole M. Vasovagal Syncope and Pacing Trial Investigators. A randomized,
116.
Brignole M, Disertori M, Menozzi C, et al. Management of syncope referred
double-blind, placebo-controlled study of permanent cardiac pacing for the
urgently to general hospitals with and without syncope units. Europace 2003;5:
treatment of recurrent tilt-induced vasovagal syncope. The vasovagal syncope
293–298.
and pacing trial (SYNPACE). Eur Heart J 2004;25:1741–1748.
117.
Sutton R. Treatment of reflex syncope. J Med Diagn Meth 2013;2.
138.
Sud S, Klein GJ, Skanes AC, Gula LJ, Yee R, Krahn AD. Implications of
118.
Krediet CT, van Dijk N, Linzer M, van Lieshout JJ, Wieling W. Management of
mechanism of bradycardia on response to pacing in patients with unexplained
vasovagal syncope: controlling or aborting faints by leg crossing and muscle
syncope. Europace 2007;9:312–318.
tensing. Circulation 2002;106:1684–1689.
139.
Deharo JC, Guieu R, Mechulan A, Peyrouse E, Kipson N, Ruf J, Gerolami V,
119.
Brignole M, Croci F, Menozzi C, Solano A, Donateo P, Oddone D, Puggioni E,
Devoto G, Marre V, Brignole M. Syncope without prodromes in patients with
Lolli G. Isometric arm counter-pressure maneuvers to abort impending vaso-
normal heart and normal electrocardiogram: a distinct entity. J Am Coll Cardiol
vagal syncope. J Am Coll Cardiol 2002;40:2053–2059.
2013;62:1075–1080.
120.
van Dijk N, Quartieri F, Blanc JJ, Garcia-Civera R, Brignole M, Moya A,
140.
Brignole M, Deharo JC, De Roy L, Menozzi C, Blommaert D, Dabiri L, Ruf J,
Wieling W, PC-Trial Investigators. Effectiveness of physical counter pressure
Guieu R. Syncope due to idiopathic paroxysmal atrioventricular block: long-
maneuvers in preventing vasovagal syncope: the Physical Counter pressure
term follow-up of a distinct form of atrioventricular block. J Am Coll Cardiol
Manoeuvres Trial (PC-Trial). J Am Coll Cardiol 2006;48:1652–1657.
2011;58:167–173.
121.
Madrid AH, Ortega J, Rebollo JG, Manzano JG, Segovia JG, Sanchez A, Pena
141.
Flammang D, Church TR, De Roy L, Blanc JJ, Leroy J, Mairesse GH, Otmani
G, Moro C. Lack of efficacy of atenolol for the prevention of neurally mediated
A, Graux PJ, Frank R, Purnode P, ATP Multicenter Study. Treatment of
syncope in a highly symptomatic population: a prospective, double-blind,
unexplained syncope: a multicenter, randomized trial of cardiac pacing guided
randomized and placebo-controlled study. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001;37:554–559.
by adenosine 5’-triphosphate testing. Circulation 2012;125:31–36.
122.
Sheldon RS, Morillo CA, Klingenheben T, Krahn AD, Sheldon A, Rose MS.
142.
McLeod KA, Wilson N, Hewitt J, Norrie J, Stephenson JB. Cardiac pacing for
Age-dependent effect of beta-blockers in preventing vasovagal syncope. Circ
severe childhood neurally mediated syncope with reflex anoxic seizures. Heart
Arrhythm Electrophysiol 2012;5:920–926.
1999;82:721–725.
123.
Salim MA, Di Sessa TG. Effectiveness of fludrocortisone and salt in preventing
143.
Plash WB, Diedrich A, Biaggioni I, Garland EM, Paranjape SY, Black BK,
syncope recurrence in children: a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized
Dupont WD, Raj SR. Diagnosing postural tachycardia syndrome: comparison of
trial. J Am Coll Cardiol 2005;45:484–488.
tilt testing compared with standing haemodynamics. Clin Sci 2013;124:109–114.
124.
Romme JJ, van Dijk N, Go-Schon IK, Reitsma JB, Wieling W. Effectiveness of
144.
Colivicchi F, Ammirati F, Biffi A, Verdile L, Pelliccia A, Santini M. Exercise-
midodrine treatment in patients with recurrent vasovagal syncope not respond-
related syncope in young competitive athletes without evidence of structural
ing to non-pharmacological treatment (STAND-trial). Europace 2011;13:
heart disease. Clinical presentation and long-term outcome. Eur Heart J
1639–1647.
2002;23:1125–1130.
125.
Samniah N, Sakaguchi S, Lurie KG, Iskos D, Benditt DG. Efficacy and safety of
145.
Ross AJ, Medow MS, Rowe PC, Stewart JM. What is brain fog? An evaluation
midodrine hydrochloride in patients with refractory vasovagal syncope. Am J
of the symptom in postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res 2013;23:
Cardiol 2001;88(A7):80–83.
305–311.
126.
Perez-Lugones A, Schweikert R, Pavia S, et al. Usefulness of midodrine in
146.
Chen L, Wang L, Sun J, Qin J, Tang C, Jin H, Du J. Midodrine hydrochloride is
patients with severely symptomatic neurocardiogenic syncope: a randomized
effective in the treatment of children with postural orthostatic tachycardia
control study. J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2001;12:935–938.
syndrome. Circ J 2011;75:927–931.
127.
Ward CR, Gray JC, Gilroy JJ, Kenny RA. Midodrine: a role in the management
147.
Zhang Q, Jin H, Wang L, Chen J, Tang C, Du J. Randomized comparison of
of neurocardiogenic syncope. Heart 1998;79:45–49.
metoprolol versus conventional treatment in preventing recurrence of vasovagal
128.
Qingyou Z, Junbao D, Chaoshu T. The efficacy of midodrine hydrochloride in
syncope in children and adolescents. Med Science Monitor 2008;14:
the treatment of children with vasovagal syncope. J Pediatr 2006;149:777–780.
CR199–CR203.

e58
Table A
Writing Group Author Disclosure Table
Consultant/Advisory
Equity Interests/
Writing Group
Employment
Board/Honoraria
Speakers' Bureau
Research Grant
Fellowship Support
Stock Options
Others
Robert S. Sheldon,
Libin Cardiovascular
None
None
None
None
None
None
MD, PhD, FHRS
Institute of
Alberta, Alberta,
Canada
Blair P. Grubb II, MD
University of Toledo,
1; Biotronik;
None
1; Medtronic, Inc.
None
None
None
Toledo, Ohio
Medtronic, Inc.
Richard Sutton, DSc,
National Heart and
3; Medtronic, Inc.
1; St. Jude Medical
3; Medtronic
None
3; Boston Scientific
None
FHRS
Lung Institute,
Corp.
Imperial College,
5; Advanced
London, United
Circulatory
Kingdom
Systems, Inc.
Julian M. Stewart,
New York Medical
None
None
5; National
None
None
None
MD, PhD
College, Valhalla,
Institutes of
New York
Health
Satish R. Raj, MD,
Libin Cardiovascular
1; Medtronic, Inc.;
None
1; Dysautonomia
None
None
Officers/Trustees: 0;
MS, MSCI, FHRS
Institute of
GE Healthcare;
International
Association of
Alberta, Alberta,
Lundberk
5; National
Clinical and
Canada
Institutes of
Translational
Vanderbilt
Health
Sciences;
University School
American
of Medicine,
Autonomic
Nashville,
Society;
Tennessee
Dysautonomia
International
Medical Advisory
Board;
Dysautonomia
Information
Network; Red Lily
Heart
Foundation; POTS
UK
Hugh Calkins, MD,
Johns Hopkins
None
None
3; Medtronic, Inc.;
None
None
None
Rhythm,
FHRS, CCDS
University,
St. Jude Medical
Baltimore,
Maryland
Vol
Carlos A. Morillo,
McMaster University
1; Sanofi Aventis;
1; Boehringer
3; St. Jude Medical
None
None
None
MD, FHRS
Population Health
Biotronik
Ingelheim; Sanofi
4; Medtronic, Inc.;
12,
Research
Aventis
Boston Scientific
No
Institute,
Corp.
Hamilton, Canada
2; Boehringer
2; Merck
6,
Ingelheim; Merck
Pharmaceuticals
June
Pharmaceuticals
2015

Sheldon
et
al
Table A (continued )
Consultant/Advisory
Equity Interests/
HRS
Writing Group
Employment
Board/Honoraria
Speakers' Bureau
Research Grant
Fellowship Support
Stock Options
Others
Expert
Brian Olshansky, MD,
The University of
1; Boston Scientific
None
None
None
None
None
FHRS, CCDS
Iowa Hospitals,
Corp; Boehringer
Iowa City, Iowa
Ingelheim;
Consensus
Medtronic, Inc.;
BioControl
Medical Ltd;
Sanofi Aventis;
Docume
Amarin; Daiichi
Sankyo; Biotronik;
On-X; Lundbeck
nt
Mitchell I. Cohen,
Phoenix Children’s
None
None
None
None
None
None
on
MD, FHRS, CCDS
Hospital,
University of
POT/IST/VVS
Arizona School of
Medicine–
Phoenix, Arizona
Pediatric
Cardiology
Consultants/
Mednax, Phoenix,
Arizona
Win-Kuang Shen,
Mayo Clinic,
None
None
None
None
None
None
MD, FHRS
Phoenix, Arizona
Andrew D. Krahn,
University of British
1; Medtronic, Inc.;
None
1; Boston Scientific
None
None
None
MD, FHRS
Columbia,
Bayer Healthcare,
Corp.
Vancouver,
LLC; Boehringer
2; St. Jude Medical
Canada
Ingelheim
Roopinder K.
University of
None
None
None
None
None
None
Sandhu, MD, FHRS
Alberta, Alberta,
Canada
Kenneth A. Mayuga,
Cleveland Clinic
None
None
None
None
None
None
MD
Foundation,
Cleveland, Ohio
M. Khalil Kanjwal,
John Hopkins
None
None
None
None
None
None
MD
University,
Baltimore,
Maryland
e59

e60
Table A (continued )
Consultant/Advisory
Equity Interests/
Writing Group
Employment
Board/Honoraria
Speakers' Bureau
Research Grant
Fellowship Support
Stock Options
Others
Karen J. Friday, MD
Stanford University
None
None
None
None
None
Arbor
School of
Pharmaceuticals
Medicine,
(Stepson)
Stanford,
California
Denise Tessariol
Heart Institute–
None
None
None
None
None
None
Hachul, MD, PhD
University of Sao
Paulo Medical
School, Sao Paulo,
Brazil
Paola Sandroni, MD,
Mayo Clinic,
1; Lundbeck
None
None
None
None
None
PhD
Rochester,
Minnesota
Michele Brignole,
Ospedali del
None
None
None
None
None
None
MD
Tigullio, Lavagna,
Italy
Jeffrey P. Moak, MD
Children's National
None
None
None
None
None
None
Medical Center,
Washington,
District of
Columbia
Dennis H. Lau,
Centre for Heart
None
None
None
4; National Health
None
None
MBBS, PhD
Rhythm Disorders,
and Medical
University of
Research Council
Adelaide;
of Australia
Department of
Heart
Cardiology, Royal
Adelaide Hospital;
and South
Rhythm,
Australian Health
and Medical
Research
Vol
Institute,
Adelaide,
12,
Australia
No
Number Value: 0 ¼ $0; 1 ¼ o$10,000; 2 ¼ 4$10,000 to o$25,000; 3 ¼ 4$25,000 to o$50,000; 4 ¼ 4$50,000 to o$100,000; 5 ¼ 4$100,000
6,
June
2015

Sheldon
Table B
Peer Reviewer Disclosure Table
et
al
Consultant/Advisory
Equity Interests/Stock
Peer Reviewers
Employment
Board/Honoraria
Speakers' Bureau
Research Grant
Fellowship Support
Options
Others
HRS
C. Chris Anderson, MD,
Providence Center for
None
None
None
None
None
None
Expert
CEPS
Congenital Heart
Disease, Spokane,
Washington
Consensus
Heather L. Bloom, MD
Atlanta VA Medical
1; Biotronik; Motive
None
None
None
None
None
Center, Decatur,
Medical; Medical
Georgia
Legal Consulting
David J. Bradley, MD
University of Michigan–
None
None
None
None
2; Medtronic
None
C.S. Mott Children’s
Docume
Hospital, Ann Arbor,
Michigan
David J. Callans, MD
Hospital of the
1; Biosense Webster,
None
None
1; Boston Scientific
None
None
nt
University of
Inc.; Biotronik;
Corp.; St. Jude
on
Pennsylvania, Merion
Medtronic, Inc.; St.
Medical, Medtronic,
POT/IST/VVS
Station,
Jude Medical;
Inc.
Pennsylvania
Hansen Medical;
Impulse Dynamics
USA
2; Boston Scientific
Corp.
Gisela Chelimsky, MD
Medical College of
1; Grand Rounds NY
None
None
None
None
Spouse-Advisory
Wisconsin,
Board: 1;
Milwaukee,
Lundbeck;
Wisconsin
Ironwood
Pharmaceuticals
Mina K. Chung, MD,
Cleveland Clinic,
0; Zoll Medical Corp.;
1; American
5; National
Royalty Income: 1;
FHRS
Cleveland, Ohio
Amarin; Biotronik
College of
Institutes of
Up to Date; Jones
1; National Institutes
Cardiology
Health
& Bartlett
of Health; Japanese
Foundation
Publishers
Society of
Electrocardiography
James P. Daubert, MD,
Duke University
1; Medtronic, Inc.; St.
None
5; Boston
3; Medtronic, Inc.;
None
None
FHRS
Medical Center,
Jude Medical; Boston
Scientific
Boston Scientific
Durham, North
Scientific Corp.;
Corp.;
Corp.; Biotronik, St.
Carolina
Sorin Group; Cardio
Biosense
Jude Medical;
Focus, Inc.; Gilead
Webster, Inc.;
Biosense Webster,
Sciences, Inc.;
Medtronic,
Inc.; Bard
Biosense Webster,
Inc.; Gilead
Electrophysiology
Inc.; Biotronik;
Sciences, Inc.
Sanofi Aventis
e61

e62
Table B (continued )
Consultant/Advisory
Equity Interests/Stock
Peer Reviewers
Employment
Board/Honoraria
Speakers' Bureau
Research Grant
Fellowship Support
Options
Others
Susan P. Etheridge, MD,
University of Utah,
None
None
None
None
None
Officers/Trustees: 0;
FHRS, CEPS
Department Pediatric
American College
Cardiology, Salt Lake
of Cardiology EP
City, Utah
Committee; SADS
Foundation;
Pediatric and
Congenital
Electrophysiology
Society Executive
Committee
Wayne H. Franklin, MD,
University of Illinois
None
None
None
None
None
Ownership/
MPH
Chicago, Chicago,
partnership/
Illinois
principal: 1;
SafeCG
Roy Freeman, MD
Zachary D. Goldberger,
Harborview Medical
None
None
None
None
None
None
MD, FHRS, FACC
Center, Seattle,
Washington
Bulent Gorenek, MD,
Eskisehir Osmangazi
None
None
None
None
None
None
FACC, FESC
University, Eskisehir-
Turkey
Huon H. Gray, MD, FACC
University Hospital of
None
None
None
None
None
None
Southampton,
Southampton,
United Kingdom
Julia H. Indik, MD,
University of Arizona,
None
None
None
None
None
None
PhD, FHRS
Sarver Heart Center,
Tucson, Arizona
Jose A. Joglar, MD,
UT Southwestern
None
None
None
None
None
None
FACC
Medical Center,
Dallas, Texas
Heart
Robert Macfadyen, MD
University of
None
None
None
None
None
None
Melbourne, Ballarat
Rhythm,
Clinical School,
Melbourne, Australia
Srinivas Murali, MBBS,
Temple University
1; Actelion, Inc.
1 ; Actelion,
3; Cariokinetics,
None
None
Officers/Trustees: 0;
FACC
School of Medicine
Inc.; Bayer,
Actelion, Inc.;
American College
Vol
and Allegheny Health
Inc.
Sunshine
of Cardiology;
Network, Pittsburgh,
Heart
American Heart
12,
Pennsylvania
Association
No
Luigi Padeletti, MD,
Carregi Hospital,
1; Biotronik; St. Jude
None
None
None
None
None
PhD
Florence, Italy
Medical
6,
2; Boston Scientific
June
Corp.; Medtronic,
Inc.
2015
3; Sorin Group

Sheldon
Table B (continued )
Consultant/Advisory
Equity Interests/Stock
Peer Reviewers
Employment
Board/Honoraria
Speakers' Bureau
Research Grant
Fellowship Support
Options
Others
et
al
Swee Chye Quek, MBBS,
National University of
None
None
None
None
None
None
FACC
Singapore, Singapore
HRS
David Robertson, MD
Vanderbilt University,
None
None
None
None
None
Spouse Salary
Nashville, Tennessee
Support:
Expert
American Heart
Association
Aurora Ruiz, MD
Juan A Fernandez
None
None
None
None
None
None
Consensus
Hospital, cardiology
and in Instituto
Fleni, Buenos
Aires, Argentina
Docume
Martin K. Stiles,
Waikato Hospital,
1; Boston Scientific
None
None
2; St. Jude Medical;
None
None
MBCHB, PhD
Cardiology, New
Corp.; Medtronic,
Medtronic, Inc.;
Zealand
Inc.
Johnson and
nt
Johnson
Hung-Fat Tse, MD, PhD
University of Hong
1; Boston Scientific
1, Boston
None
1; Boston Scientific
None
None
on
Kong, Hong Kong,
Corp.; Medtronic,
Scientific
Corp.; Medtronic,
POT/IST/VVS
China
Inc.; Bayer; BMS;
Corp.;
Inc.; Biotronik; BMS;
Pfizer; MSD; Takeda;
Medtronic,
Pfizer
Otsuka
Inc.; Bayer;
3; St. Jude Medical;
3; St. Jude Medical;
BMS; Pfizer;
AstraZaneca; Sanofi
AstraZaneca; Sanofi
MSD; Takeda
3; St. Jude
Medical;
AstraZaneca;
Sanofi
Alejandro Villamil, MD
Hospital Santojanni,
None
None
None
None
None
None
Buenos Aires,
Argentina
Paul J. Wang, MD,
Stanford University
1; Medtronic, Inc.;
None
2; Medtronic,
2; Medtronic, Inc.;
1; Vytronus
None
FHRS, CCDS
School of Medicine,
Atricure, Inc.
Inc.
Boston Scientific
Stanford, California
Corp.; Biosense
Webster, Inc.; St.
Jude Medical
Frank J. Zimmerman,
The Heart Institute or
None
None
None
None
None
None
MD, CEPS
Children, Oak Lawn,
Illinois
Number Value: 0 ¼ $0; 1 ¼ o$10,000; 2 ¼ 4$10,000 to o$25,000; 3 ¼ 4$25,000 to o$50,000; 4 ¼ 4$50,000 to o$100,000; 5 ¼ 4$100,000
e63

Document Outline