This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Summary Minutes for CHM meeting on 16th & 17th July 2015'.

link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8
Postural Tachycardia Syndrome in Children
and Adolescents
Imad T. Jarjour, MD*,†
Postural tachycardia syndrome is a chronic condition with frequent symptoms of
orthostatic intolerance or sympathetic activation and excessive tachycardia while
standing, without significant hypotension. Orthostatic symptoms include dizziness,
lightheadedness, blurring of vision, near faints, weakness in legs, poor concentration,
nausea, and headaches. Somatic symptoms include fatigue, sleep disorder, widespread
pain, abdominal pain, and menstrual irregularities. Psychological problems may overlap
with physical complaints. This review discusses the normal physiology of orthostatic
change, different pathophysiological mechanisms of postural tachycardia syndrome,
including hypovolemia, venous pooling, autonomic neuropathy, and hyperadrenergic
responses. In addition, an outline for management tailored to the patient’s clinical
syndrome is presented, along with concluding thoughts on future research needs.
Semin Pediatr Neurol 20:18-26 C 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Introduction
absent. In fact, blood pressure (BP) in POTS may increase
upon standing secondary to a hyperadrenergic response.
Orthostatic intolerance (OI) is defined as the symptoms
POTS is a multisystem condition with heterogeneous
and signs of presumed cerebral hypoperfusion or sympa-
clinical features and pathophysiology that can be quite
thetic activation while standing that are relieved by
disabling with significant effect on the daily quality of
recumbence.1,2 Orthostatic symptoms include dizziness,
life.2,4,10,11 Although POTS has been reported in adults
lightheadedness, near syncope, weakness in legs, blurred
for over a century under various names and further
vision or transient ‘‘blackout’’ or ‘‘whiteout’’ of vision,
defined by Schondrof and Low in 1993,3,4 the condition
headache, neck pain, nausea, poor concentration, and
is rarely reported in children. Streeten et al. reported in
occasional syncope. Symptoms of sympathetic activation
1972 a familial syndrome of excessive tachycardia,
include palpitations, chest pain, vasomotor skin changes
hypotension, and narrow pulse pressure upon standing
and warm feeling, tremulousness, and occasional sympa-
in 5 patients, including adolescents. Patients experienced
thetic storms.2
severe OI symptoms with flushing of skin. Marked
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is
improvement was reported after therapy using fludrocor-
increasingly recognized in children and adolescents.
tisone, propranolol, or cyproheptadine.12 Further reports
POTS in adults consists of chronic OI and sustained
of POTS in children appeared more recently.13-15
increment in heart rate (HR) of Z30 beats per minute
This review highlights our current understanding of the
(bpm) or an absolute HR of Z120 bpm or both within 10
pathophysiology of POTS in the pediatric population, the
minutes of active standing or head-up tilt test.3,4 A HR
proposed pediatric diagnostic criteria, the spectrum of
increment of 35 bpm,5,6 or 40 bpm,7-9 is considered
clinical manifestations, the guidelines for diagnostic eva-
excessive in children and adolescents. Patients with POTS
luation and management, and areas for further research.
may sometimes faint, but unlike OI from autonomic
failure, a significant orthostatic hypotension (OH) is
Normal Physiological
Orthostatic Responses
*Department of Pediatrics, Clinic for Autonomic Dysfunction, Texas
Children’s Hospital, Houston, TX 77030-2399.
When we stand up, 500-1000 mL of blood moves from
†Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.
the upper body to the lower body below the heart,
Address reprint requests to Imad T. Jarjour, MD, Department of
Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, 6701 Fannin St, CC 1250,
primarily into the legs and abdomen. The reduced pulse
Houston, TX 77030-2399. E-mail: xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx
pressure activates the baroreflex, which causes the release
18
1071-9091/11/$-see front matter & 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.spen.2013.01.001

link to page 7 link to page 8
Postural tachycardia syndrome
19
Figure 1 (A) Sustained tachycardia, narrow pulse pressure, and no hypotension in hypovolemic POTS during 10
minutes of 701 tilt. (B) Tachycardia, hypertension, oscillations in pulse, and blood pressure, followed by syncope
in hyperadrenergic POTS. Tilt test stopped after 5 minutes. (C) Extreme tachycardia, hypotension, and narrow
pulse pressure during 10 minutes tilt in POTS secondary to autoimmune neuropathy. (Courtesy of Dr. Phillip
Low, Mayo Clinic)
of norepinephrine from sympathetic postganglionic neu-
by up to 10 mmHg from peripheral vasoconstriction and
rons and vagal withdrawal via stimulation of medullary
systolic BP remains unchanged.6,16 Prolonged standing
cardiovascular centers. The result is peripheral vasocon-
beyond a few minutes inhibits the release of vasopressin,
striction, activation of leg muscle pump, and a mild
activates the renin-angiotensin system, and causes plasma
increase in HR of 10-15 bpm. Diastolic BP may increase
loss into the tissues (up to 14% within 20 minutes after

link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 2 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 2 link to page 7 link to page 3 link to page 2 link to page 8 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 20
I.T. Jarjour
standing up). The latter loss in plasma may cause a higher
and narrow pulse pressure (Fig. 1C) can be seen with
hematocrit in upright vs supine positions, up to a few
secondary POTS.12,23
percentage points.17 A normal blood volume relative to
3. Excessive postural tachycardia and POTS:
vascular capacity is critically important for the mainte-
Documented sustained HR increment of Z30 bpm in
nance of normal BP in the upright posture.
adults, or Z35-40 bmp in children o19 years of age,
and absolute HR of Z120 bpm within 10 minutes of
standing up, or tilt, with no or only modest hypoten-
OI Syndromes
sion (o30 mmHg drop in systolic BP), should be
diagnosed as excessive postural tachycardia, not POTS
According to Wieling and van Lieshout, the orthostatic
(Fig. 1A).3-9 Diagnosis of POTS is based on postural
response upon quick standing in a few seconds from a
tachycardia plus chronic symptoms of OI and exces-
supine position on the examination table can be divided
sive sympathetic activation (Table 1).
into 3 stages while the subject is upright: the initial
4. Excessive orthostatic tachycardia with hypotension
response (the first 30 seconds), the early phase of
and syncope:
circulatory stabilization (1-2 minutes), and prolonged
Some patients may not tolerate the standing or tilt table
orthostasis (more than 5 minutes).18 At Texas Children’s
tests, and develop a gradual drop in BP and start
Hospital we measure supine BP and HR at 5 minutes,
reporting symptoms of near faint, and the standing test
then ask the patient to stand up and remain still with feet
or tilt test would have to be aborted (Fig. 1B). Most
together and measure BP and HR again at 3, 5, 7, and 10
patients with recurrent NMS do not have POTS, and
minutes of standing. We document any symptoms, their
children with POTS never faint, rarely faint, or only
timing, and acral coldness or cyanosis. A careful review of
have near fainting. It helps to think of NMS as an acute
history for various symptoms related to orthostatic
OI disorder in contrast to POTS, a chronic OI
dysfunction or excessive sympathetic activation and the
syndrome.24 It is noteworthy that many of the princi-
active standing test allow clinicians to classify orthostatic
ples of management of POTS are the same for
syndromes accurately in most patients. More prolonged
treating NMS.
standing or tilt testing, or testing after exercise, heat
stress, or food intake, may be needed in some patients.4
There are 4 possible orthostatic syndromes:
Diagnostic Criteria in Pediatric
1. Initial OH (IOH):
This is perhaps one of the most common acute OI
POTS
syndromes in otherwise healthy adolescents and young
There is no consensus to date on the diagnostic criteria of
adults. It is characterized by complaints of feeling
pediatric POTS. This is a work in progress, given the
dizzy and lightheaded, seeing black spots, transient
absence of a gold standard diagnostic testing.
vision loss, and even presyncope or neurally mediated
syncope (NMS) within 5-10 seconds after getting up to
1. Chronic OI:
stand, especially after being supine for a while or
Based on various published reports,9,13,15,25 an essen-
arising from bed in the morning or from a squatting
tial criterion is chronic, frequent daily or near daily
position. The symptoms disappear within 20-30 sec-
symptoms of OI for Z3 months.
onds without having to lie down.16,18,19 Continuous
BP monitoring while the subject arises is needed to
Table 1 Symptoms of Orthostatic Intolerance and Sympa-
document IOH. The diagnosis is based on a drop in
thetic Overactivation in Postural Tachycardia Syndrome
systolic BP 440 mmHg or diastolic BP 420 mmHg or
Orthostatic Symptoms
both within 15 seconds of standing up, with repro-
Dizziness and lightheadedness
duction of OI symptoms upon standing up, along with
Near faint
absence of OH at 3 minutes of standing. Only an active
Blurred vision
standing test, not tilt testing, can detect IOH.19
Blackout or ‘‘whiteout’’ of vision
2. OH:
Weakness in legs
This is defined as a decrease in systolic BP of
Poor concentration
Headache
Z20 mmHg or diastolic BP of Z10 mmHg or both
Nausea
within 3 minutes of standing.20,21 Acute OH is often
due to hypovolemia and is usually associated with
Sympathetic Overactivation
compensatory tachycardia, and may be associated with
Palpitations
near syncope or syncope. Delayed OH does occur
Chest pain
beyond 3 minutes of standing or tilt tests.22 Chronic
Migraine
OH is rare in children and is a key feature of
Tremulousness
autonomic failure in adults with autonomic neuropa-
Anxiety
Pallor
thy, pure autonomic failure, multiple system atrophy,
Excessive sweating
and Parkinson disease. Sustained tachycardia with OH

link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 7 link to page 3 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 4 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 7 link to page 3 link to page 3 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 2 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 2 link to page 8 Postural tachycardia syndrome
21
2. Excessive postural tachycardia:
inaccurately, with patients rising up from supine to sitting
This involves an excessive and sustained HR increment
then standing positions, without adequate baseline
or absolute HR or both, within 10 minutes of standing
supine BP and HR data, or after standing up for only 2-
or tilt. An increment of Z30 bpm and absolute HR
5 minutes.
of Z120 bpm are excessive at age Z19 years. Pub-
Patients are typically females (4:1 ratio), in the age
lished pediatric normative orthostatic HR data show
group of 12-40 years, mostly Caucasian, and have either
higher values for orthostatic HR increments of
acute or subacute onset of orthostatic and sympathetic
either Z35 bpm5,6 or Z40 bpm.7-9 Moreover, a sin-
activation symptoms (Table 1), with extreme fatigue even
gle study using tilt test found a cutoff absolute HR
at rest and a feeling of low energy, with severe gastro-
of Z120 bpm in adolescents who were 13-19 years of
intestinal (GI) dysfunction. There may be a history of
age and Z130 bpm for ages 6-13 years.These pedia-
prior infection with virus or rickettsia, trauma, surgery, or
tric studies lacked standardization of orthostatic tests
extreme athletic activity. Diagnosis of POTS is often
and enrolled different range of ages of subjects in
delayed by 2 or more years. Most pediatric patients with
various countries and ethnic groups.
POTS have a syndrome rather than a disease, in which no
3. Absence of significant OH:
etiology is found in spite of extensive diagnostic testing.
There is either no OH in POTS or only modest OH
The pathophysiology of POTS varies according to
(o30 mmHg systolic BP change). It is noteworthy that
dynamic physiological, neural, humoral, or fluid balance
cutoff values for orthostatic BP are the same in children
states, as well as possible genetic or acquired disorders.
and adults (systolic BP Z20 mmHg and diastolic
Patients with POTS may belong to one of several
BP Z10 mmHg).6,8
phenotypes based on mechanisms for potential patho-
4. Absence of reversible cause, such as medications.
physiology, and these phenotypes may overlap:
1. Hyperadrenergic POTS:
In addition to OI symptoms (Table 1), patients with this
subset of POTS complain of prominent symptoms of
Clinical Manifestations of POTS
sympathetic activation, such as palpitations, fast HR,
Patients with POTS experience chronic and daily symp-
chest pain, tremulousness, migraine-like headaches,
toms of OI and overactive sympathetic nervous system
anxiety, and vasomotor skin changes, including cold
(Table 1). Additionally, they may have a myriad of other
sweaty
extremities.
They
have
an
increment
somatic symptoms,11,26 including migraine,27,28 nausea,
of Z10 mmHg in systolic BP within 10 minutes of
abdominal pain,29 widespread pain, cognitive dysfunc-
standing up or tilt and an orthostatic plasma norepine-
tion,30 fatigue,13,31 insomnia and nonrefreshing sleep,32
phrine Z600 pg/mL.1,35 The magnitude of absolute
sweating abnormalities,10,26 vasomotor skin dysfunction,
orthostatic HR increment is often Z120 bpm, and pro-
and poor exercise tolerance (Table 2). Moreover, anxiety,
minent oscillations in BP with tilt test are common
depression, and other psychiatric disorders add to the
(Fig. 1B). Compared with normal controls, supine BP is
complexity of this syndrome and contribute to the
not different, but supine diastolic BP and HR are higher
disability and poor quality of life in patients with
than controls.36 Quantitative sudomotor axon test is
POTS.33,34
typically normal. Hyperadrenergic outflow emanates
The prevalence of POTS in adults is estimated at
from the brain and traverses baroreflex mechanisms.37
170 per 100,000,and it is not known how many
Moreover, there is increased sympathovagal index and
children and teens have POTS. It is most likely under-
marked increase of HR response to isoproterenol.1
recognized because pediatric patients may not volunteer
Autonomic, sympathetic storms may occur in this subset
to report orthostatic symptoms. Moreover, orthostatic
of patients, with extreme rise in BP, anxiety, headache,
vital signs may not be checked or are measured
and other features of sympathetic activation. Potential
causes of this subtype are norepinephrine transporter
Table 2 Frequency (%) of Nonorthostatic, Somatic, and
deficiency,38 pheochromocytoma,39 mast cell activation
Gastrointestinal Symptoms in 57 Adolescents With POTS
disorders,40 and baroreflex failure, which may result
Evaluated at Texas Children’s Hospital
from trauma or irradiation to the neck.41
2. Hypovolemic and deconditioned POTS:
Chronic fatigue
79
Patients with POTS have reduced plasma volume. A
Nausea
60
Sleep disorder
56
study of 152 patients with POTS conducted by
Sweating disorder
49
Thieben et al. estimated that nearly 30% had hypovo-
Migraine
46
lemia.10 Venous pooling in the legs and mesenteric
Cognitive dysfunction
44
bed, during standing up or tilt, results in modest
Abdominal pain
42
increments of HR to increase cardiac output (Fig. 1A).
Chronic daily headache
30
This redistribution of blood to the legs may be
Vomiting
26
associated with postural swelling and edema in
Weight loss
26
POTS.42 Patients with hypovolemic POTS complain

link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 2 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 9 22
I.T. Jarjour
of extreme chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia-type
Clinical and Diagnostic
symptoms, with decreased exercise tolerance.43
Evaluations
Deconditioning may coexist with POTS as the
primary etiological factor or may be secondary to
The most important part of the evaluation of patients with
POTS symptoms. There may be a preceding viral
suspected POTS is a careful and detailed history. Explor-
illness or trauma or surgery, followed by reduced
ing potential triggers at the onset, early manifestations at
physical activity and OI symptoms with marked
presentation, course of illness, various test results, intake
somatic hypervigilance. An indirect marker for
of prescription and nonprescription drugs and other
hypovolemia is a low concentration of urinary
therapy, aggravating factors, nutritional and fluid intake,
sodium (24-hour Na o100 mEq).
menstrual history, and psychosocial stressors and school
OI syndromes, such as POTS and NMS, are very
history, is key to an effective understanding of this
common in children and adolescents with chronic
multisystem syndrome. Moreover, the history should
fatigue and the 2 syndromes may overlap or share
include special attention to OI and document how severe
a common pathophysiology in a subgroup of
it is and what the aggravating factors are. Further, a full
patients.13,33,44-46 Young adult female patients with
autonomic nervous system review should help identify
POTS and chronic fatigue syndrome have higher
any symptoms and signs of autonomic neuropathy.
markers for sympathetic activation.47 A history of
The physical examination is typically normal except for
chronic fatigue in a child with syncope has a high
excessive postural tachycardia on active standing test.
positive predictive value pointing to NMS as the
Data from a standing test and a careful history does help
cause.48 We found a high prevalence of low iron
make the diagnosis of POTS in the majority of patients.
stores and mild anemia in patients with POTS and
Tilt table testing may be necessary to establish the
NMS,25,49 as well as hypovitaminosis D in patients
diagnosis in some patients. Other clinical signs on
with POTS.50 Similar observations were reported in
examination include the presence of hypermobile joints
adolescents with chronic fatigue and OI.51 Prospec-
with high Beighton score, Gorlin sign where the tongue
tive case control studies are needed to confirm these
may touch the nose, and lax and paper-thin skin.4,57
preliminary findings.
Diagnostic studies of suspected POTS should be guided
3. Neuropathic POTS:
by the medical history and findings on clinical examina-
Patients with this subtype of POTS have partial distal
tion. Initial testing includes complete blood count, serum
autonomic neuropathy, a length-dependent pattern
ferritin, C-reactive protein, electrolytes, blood urea nitro-
affecting mostly longer fibers, with adrenergic and
gen, creatinine, glucose, 25-hydroxy vitamin D, thyroid-
sudomotor denervation, especially in the distal legs. This
stimulating hormone and free T4, and plasma metane-
is demonstrated on autonomic function tests as abnormal
phrines in hyperadrenergic POTS, and an electrocardio-
quantitative sudomotor axon test and thermoregulatory
gram. Further testing for Addison disease or a glucose
test, with distal anhidrosis, and abnormal Valsalva BP
tolerance tests should be done where appropriate. Tests
waves with loss of late phase II.Further evidence
for paraneoplastic autoantibodies, including ganglionic
supporting adrenergic denervation of the legs in POTS
acetylcholine receptor antibody titers, should be consid-
is an impaired norepinephrine spillover in the legs, with
ered in patients with neuropathic POTS, pandysautono-
preserved response in the arm.52 Modest delayed ortho-
mia, and severe GI dysautonomia. Measuring urine methyl
static reductions in systolic BP may occur in this subtype,
histamine within 4 hours of a flushing episode helps
with occasional prominent OH (Fig. 1C). Such cases
diagnose mast cell activation disorder.40 Further cardiac
should be considered a POTS with OH variant.
testing after a cardiology consultation may include echo-
An acute or subacute autonomic neuropathy may be
cardiography, exercise stress tests, tilt tests with use of
caused by autoimmunity, such is the case with
medications to induce syncope, and electrophysiological
autonomic ganglionopathy due to antibodies direc-
studies including holter monitoring. Inappropriate sinus
ted against the nicotinic ganglionic acetylcholine
tachycardia and POTS may have overlapping clinical
receptor.23 Symptoms develop over days or few
manifestations.58 Neuroimaging is rarely useful in sus-
weeks and involve OH, significant GI dysfunction,
pected POTS, but may be necessary depending on the
sicca complex, bladder retention, and anhidrosis.
clinical presentation, such as in suspected Chiari mal-
This autoimmune disorder may be associated with
formation or in intracranial hypotension from cerebrosp-
cancer in adults.53 This form of POTS is rare in
inal fluid leaks. Referral to a gastroenterologist should be
children.54
considered to help evaluate and manage severe GI
4. POTS with joint hypermobility:
dysfunction and gastroparesis. Genetic consultation may
Joint hypermobility syndrome may be associated with
help in familial cases, such as POTS with hypermobile
autonomic dysfunction and is seen frequently in
joints and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
patients with POTS.4,55,56 Hypermobility of joints
Autonomic function tests provide valuable information
can be measured using the Beighton score.57 Genetics
in the evaluation of POTS.26,59,60 These tests are
may play a role in this type of POTS, with significant
described in greater detail by Dr Kuntz in this issue. Tilt
family history.
testing with 601-701 angle does generally yield similar

link to page 9 link to page 7 link to page 8 link to page 2 link to page 9 link to page 7 link to page 9 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 9 link to page 9 Postural tachycardia syndrome
23
results to an accurately performed active standing test,
excessive standing and heat, raising the head of the bed
unless the 2 tests are done on different days or times of the
by 101 (2-4 in), and a program of lower-body isometric
day,61 after therapeutic interventions, or under different
exercises can be a great help as the initial management of
testing conditions (such as time of meals, exercise, heat,
POTS. Moreover, drinking 500 mL of water prior to rising
and medications), when the results may differ. Quantitative
in the morning rapidly helps raise the BP within 5 minutes
sudomotor axon reflex testing is abnormal in distal legs in
and can further help patients with morning OI symp-
nearly 2 of 3 patients with POTS, and distal anhidrosis is
toms.64 Patients with poor exercise tolerance and decon-
suggestive but not diagnostic of partial autonomic neuro-
ditioning may benefit from a progressive exercise
pathy.1,26 Valsalva maneuver may show normal or reduced
program.65 Reconditioning is very important in patients
ratio (HR variability) and BP response may be normal or
with hypovolemic POTS, and compression stockings or
show an increased late phase II and phase IV in hypera-
abdominal binder of 30-40 mmHg pressure may be
drenergic POTS. A markedly increased early phase II with
helpful, however, most patients do not wear them. Some
absent late phase II and phase IV is seen in patients with
patients with POTS faint under certain conditions, such
OH due to autonomic failure, which may be seen in
as prolonged standing in warm temperatures with relative
secondary POTS due to autonomic autoimmune neuro-
hypovolemia. Physical counter maneuvers, such as cross-
pathy (Fig. 1C).62 Sinus arrhythmia with deep breathing is
ing legs, stooping, squatting, and tensing muscles in the
preserved in most patients with POTS.
lower body can help abort an impending faint by
Other investigations may be considered. A 24-hour
reducing peripheral pooling of blood, which increases
urinary sodium test is helpful to assess adequacy of fluid
venous return to the heart and thus improves cardiac
and salt intake, with a goal of 1500-2500 mL of urine and
output.
sodium excretion 4170 mmol/24 h.1,63 Measurements
Extreme fatigue can be a major symptom in POTS, and
of norepinephrine while the patient is supine and after
may be difficult to treat, because patients are ‘‘too tired’’ to
15 minutes of standing help confirm a diagnosis of
exercise and ‘ have no energy’’. Iron deficiency, with or
hyperadrenergic POTS.37
without mild anemia, is common in POTS and iron
supplementation may help improve fatigue and exercise
tolerance.25,49,66
Treatment Guidelines
One of the important aspects of managing patients with
POTS is an accurate diagnosis and elimination of second-
Pharmacologic Treatment
ary causes, such as medications. The available scientific
Given the multisystem complaints in POTS and the
evidence for treatment of POTS is based mostly on studies
positive response to nonpharmacologic therapy in some
in adults, with case series and few nonrandomized,
patients, it is important to target major symptoms, such as
controlled trials. Pediatric POTS is a relatively new entity
OI and sympathetic overactivation for a trial of medica-
with heterogeneous clinical presentations, a wide spec-
tions.
There
is
currently
no
Food
and
Drug
trum of symptoms, varying degrees of disability, and
Administration–approved pharmacologic therapy in chil-
premorbid comorbidities, such as migraine, attention
dren with POTS. There are no longitudinal long-term
deficit disorders, and anxiety. Moreover, family dynamics
follow-up data on any pharmacologic therapy in POTS. It
and ability of patients and parents to handle the chal-
is important to be careful when using sympathomimetic
lenges in treatment, and adaptation to functional disabil-
drugs,
calcium
channel
blockers,
phenothiazines,
ities and school attendance play an important role in
b-blockers,
and
tricyclic
antidepressants,
because
effective treatment. Furthermore, a comprehensive initial
patients with POTS may be oversensitive to these drugs
clinical assessment should help identify possible somatic
and they may worsen OI. Thus, ‘‘start low and go slow,’’ is
complaints and psychiatric comorbidity and cognitive
good advice when using new medications in POTS.
dysfunction and prompt referral to appropriate other
Fludrocortisone acetate, a synthetic mineralocorticoid
specialists in cardiology, gastroenterology, psychiatry,
when administered at a low dose of 0.1-0.2 mg daily
and gynecology. A multidisciplinary approach is needed
helps OI in hypovolemic POTS if increased salt and fluid
to address a multisystem, severely disabling condition.
intake are ineffective, by increasing the sensitivity of
Careful education of patients and their family is essential
peripheral a-adrenergic receptors and promoting vaso-
to any successful therapy, whether nonpharmacologic or
constriction. Higher doses (0.4 mg/d) are more likely to
pharmacologic. Therapy must be individualized accord-
cause side effects with long-term therapy, such as hyper-
ing
to
the
findings
of
clinical
assessment
and
tension, due to expansion of intravascular volume with
laboratory tests.
retention of water and salt. Fludrocortisone may help
improve chronic idiopathic nausea in children with
Nonpharmacologic Treatment
chronic OI.67 Fludrocortisone requires time to work, so
2 or more weeks should be allowed between dose
Therapy of OI with daily fluid intake increased to 2-2.5 L,
increases. One side effect is hypokalemia and increased
salt intake of 4-5 g/d, healthy nutrition, avoidance of
potassium intake in diet is encouraged.

link to page 7 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 8 24
I.T. Jarjour
b-Blockers may help improve orthostatic symptoms by
of POTS, they may represent only the tip of an iceberg of
blocking adrenergic dilator effects on veins. Low doses of
numerous symptoms. Other features, including sympa-
propranolol, 10 mg daily, are recommended as initial
thetic overactivation, somatic and GI dysfunction, wide-
therapy, titrating the dose up to 10 mg t.i.d.1 Another
spread pain, and psychological complaints, may cause
option is using more b-selective blockers, such as
significant functional disability. Moreover, heterogeneity
metaprolol. b-Blockers are useful in hyperadrenergic
in presentation and pathophysiology and absence of any
POTS, once pheochromocytoma and mast cell activation
disease state in the majority of patients add to the
are excluded as likely causes. Midodrine, an a-1 adre-
complexity in evaluation and treatment of this chronic
nergic agonist, is an effective therapy for OI in POTS.
and potentially incapacitating syndrome.
Saline infusion or midodrine improved the orthostatic
POTS is common among adolescents and early diag-
tolerance with tilt.68 A study of Chinese children with
nosis is key to starting effective nonpharmacologic and, if
POTS found decreased symptoms with midodrine ther-
needed, pharmacologic therapy. Moreover, management
apy to a greater extent than metaprolol, with or without
should include education, empowering of patient,
conventional therapy.69 Midodrine effects start within 30-
addressing physical, psychological, and social issues,
60 minutes and last for 2-4 hours. It is given every
and tailoring therapy to address the greatest needs first.
4 hours, but not after 6 PM (or less than 4 hours before
There are many questions surrounding pediatric POTS.
sleep) to avoid supine hypertension. Other side effects
First, a consensus should be reached on a diagnostic
include parasthesias (scalp tingling and itching) and
criteria and a classification paradigm. Second, defining
goose bumps. Midodrine is useful in neuropathic POTS
the phenotype paves the way to multicenter, prospective,
in combination with fludrocortisone. Starting dose is
randomized clinical trials to evaluate short-term and
2.5 mg b.i.d. or t.i.d. up to 10 mg t.i.d. Another medica-
long-term effectiveness and safety of pharmacologic and
tion that helps decrease hyperadrenergic effects in POTS,
nonpharmacologic interventions targeting specific symp-
especially those with sympathetic storms, is the a-2
toms of POTS. Third, identifying the biological and
receptor agonist clonidine, which works by inhibiting
behavioral basis for psychosocial and educational chal-
central venous system sympathetic outflow.
lenges would help us manage a major source of functional
Pyridostigmine, a cholinesterase inhibitor, increases
disability in POTS. Fourth, stratifying the diagnostic
orthostatic BP while the patient is standing without
evaluation based on clinical presentations and subtypes
worsening the supine BP. Starting dose is 30 mg twice
would improve the yield of useful results. Finally, it is
daily. Side effects are excessive cholinergic activity such as
important to provide the patients and families with hope.
abdominal cramps and diarrhea.70 Other therapies with
We need more data on the long-term outcome in pediatric
anecdotal evidence for use in pediatric POTS include
POTS. Outcome studies in adults show very good out-
erythropoietin, octreotide, selective serotonin reuptake
comes in the majority of patients.10 Despite our limited
inhibitors, methylphenidate, serotonin-norepinephrine
scientific knowledge in pediatric POTS, whenever science
reuptake inhibitors (venlafaxine), and analog of vasopres-
fails compassionate care must prevail.
sin (desmopressin).
Patients with neuropathic type of POTS who are ser-
References
opositive for autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy or
1. Low PA, Sandroni P, Joyner M, et al: Postural tachycardia syndrome
neuropathy may respond well to immunotherapy.71 There
(POTS). J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 20:352-358, 2009
are case reports of good treatment response to intravenous
2. Stewart JM: Orthostatic intolerance in pediatrics. J Pediatr 140:
immunoglobulin followed by immunosuppressive com-
404-411, 2002
3. Schondrof R, Low PA: Idiopathic postural orthostatic tachycardia
bined therapy or plasma exchange. This is a new era in
syndrome: An attenuated form of acute pandysautonomia? Neurol-
neuroscience and prospective, well-designed studies are
ogy 43:132-137, 1993
needed. Moreover, patients who develop POTS following
4. Mathias CJ, Low PA, Iodice V, et al: Postural tachycardia syndrome-
viral infections with neuropathic features and who test
current experience and concepts. Nat Rev Neurol 8:22-34, 2012
negative for known autoantibodies may be considered
5. Yamaguchi H, Tanaka H, Adachi K, et al: Beat-to-beat blood
pressure and heart rate responses to active standing in Japanese
putative cases of autoimmune neuropathy and some centers
children. Acta Paediatr 85:577-583, 1996
choose to treat them with immunotherapy. There are no
6. Weiling W, Karemaker JM: Measurement of heart rate and blood
long-term follow-up data in pediatric or adult patients with
pressure to evaluate disturbances in neurocardiovascular control. in
POTS with respect to the efficacy of various interventions
Mathias CJ, Bannister R (eds.), Autonomic Failure. A Textbook of
on quality of life or specific aspects of the syndrome, such
Clinical Disorders of the Autonomic Nervous System, ed 4 Oxford:
Oxford University Press, 196-210, 2006
as chronic pain, OI, fatigue, and gastroparesis.
7. Horam WJ, Roscelli JD: Establishing standards of orthostatic
measurements in normovolemic adolescents. Am J Dis Child 146:
848-851, 1992
Concluding Remarks and Future
8. Skinner JE, Driscoll SW, Porter CB, et al: Orthostatic heart rate and
blood pressure in adolescents: Reference ranges. J Child Neurol
Research
25:1210-1215, 2010
9. Singer W, Sletten DM, Opfer-Gehrking TL, et al: Postural tachycardia
Although chronic OI symptoms and excessive tachycardia
in children and adolescents: What is abnormal? J Pediatr 160:
upon standing up or tilt are the essential clinical features
222-226, 2012

Postural tachycardia syndrome
25
10. Thieben MJ, Sandroni P, Sletten DM, et al: Postural orthostatic
35. Kanjwal K, Saeed B, Karabin B, et al: Clinical presentation and
tachycardia syndrome: The Mayo Clinic experience. Mayo Clin
management of patients with hyperadrenergic postural orthostatic
Proc 82:308-313, 2007
tachycardia syndrome. A single center experience. Cardiol J 18:
11. Ojha A, Chelimsky TC, Chelimsky G: Comorbidities in pediatric
527-531, 2011
patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. J Pediatr
36. Garland EM, Raja SR, Black BK, et al: The hemodynamic and
158:20-23, 2011
neurohumoral phenotype of postural tachycardia syndrome. Neu-
12. Streeten DH, Kerr CB, Kerr LP, et al: Hyperbradykininism: A new
rology 69:790-798, 2007
orthostatic syndrome. Lancet 7786:1048-1053, 1972
37. Robertson D: The epidemic of orthostatic tachycardia and ortho-
13. Stewart JM, Gewitz MH, Weldon A, et al: Patterns of orthostatic
static intolerance. Am J Med Sci 317:75-77, 1999
intolerance: The orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and adolescent
38. Shannon JR, Flattem NL, Jordan J, et al: Orthostatic intolerance and
chronic fatigue. J Pediatr 135:218-225, 1999
tachycardia associated with norepinephrine-transporter deficiency.
14. Tanka H, Yamaguchi H, Matushima R, et al: Instantaneous ortho-
N Engl J Med 342:541-549, 2000
static hypotension in children and adolescents: A new entity of
39. Lenders JW, Eisenhofer G, Mannelli M, et al: Pheochromocytoma.
orthostatic intolerance. Pediatr Res 46:691-696, 1999
Lancet 366:665-675, 2005
15. Karas B, Grubb BP, Boehm K, et al: The postural orthostatic
40. Shibao C, Arzubiaga C, Roberts LJ 2nd, et al: Hyperadrenergic
tachycardia syndrome: A potentially treatable cause of chronic
postural tachycardia syndrome in mast cell activation disorders.
fatigue, exercise intolerance, and cognitive impairment in adoles-
Hypertension 45:385-390, 2005
cents. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 23:344-351, 2000
41. Ketch T, Biaggioni I, Robertson R, et al: Four faces of baroreflex
16. Stewart JM: Transient orthostatic hypotension is common in
failure hypertensive crisis, volatile hypertension, orthostatic tachy-
adolescents. J Pediatr 140:418-424, 2002
cardia, and malignant vagotonia. Circulation 105:2518-2523, 2002
17. Robertson D: The pathophysiology and diagnosis of orthostatic
42. Stewart JM, Weldon A: Vascular perturbations in the chronic
hypotension. Clin Auton Res 18:2-7, 2008 (suppl 1)
orthostatic intolerance of the postural orthostatic tachycardia
18. Weiling W, van Lieshout JJ: Maintenance of postural normotension
syndrome. J Appl Physiol 89:1505-1512, 2000
in humans. in Low PA, Benarroch EE (eds.), Clinical Autonomic
43. Masuki S, Eisenach JH, Johnson CP, et al: Excessive heart rate
Disorders, ed 3 57-67, 2008
response to orthostatic stress in postural tachycardia syndrome is
19. Wieling W, Krediet CTP, van Dijk N, et al: Initial orthostatic hypoten-
not caused by anxiety. J Appl Physiol 102:896-903, 2007
sion: Review of a forgotten condition. Clin Sci 112:157-165, 2007
44. Stewart JM: Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in adolescents
20. Consensus statement on the definition of orthostatic hypotension,
with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and chronic fatigue
pure autonomic failure, and multiple system atrophy. Neurology
syndrome is characterized by attenuated vagal baroreflex and
46:1470, 1996.
potentiated sympathetic vasomotion. Pediatr Res 48:218-226, 2000
21. Freeman R, Wieling W, Axelrod FB, et al: Consensus statement on
45. Tanaka H, Matsushima R, Tamai H, et al: Impaired postural cerebral
the definition of orthostatic hypotension, neutrally mediated
hemodynamics in young patients with chronic fatigue with or
syncope and the postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res
without orthostatic intolerance. J Pediatr 140:142-147, 2002
21:69-72, 2011
46. Freeman R: The chronic fatigue syndrome is a disease of the autonomic
22. Gibbons CH, Freeman R: Delayed orthostatic hypotension a fre-
nervous system. Sometimes. Clin Auton Res 12:231-233, 2002
quent cause of orthostatic intolerance. Neurology 67:28-32, 2006
47. Okamoto LE, Raja SR, Peltier A, et al: Neurohumoral and
23. Vernino S, Low PA, Fealey RD, et al: Autoantibodies to ganglionic
haemodynamic profile in postural tachycardia and chronic fatigue
acetylcholine receptors in autoimmune autonomic neuropathies. N
syndromes. Clin Sci 122:183-192, 2012
Engl J Med 343:847-855, 2000
48. Jarjour IT, Jarjour LK: The diagnostic value of co-morbid conditions
24. Stewart JM: Postural tachycardia syndrome and reflex syncope:
in neutrally mediated syncope. Ann Neurol 60:S147, 2006 (suppl
Similarities and differences. J Pediatr 154:481-485, 2009
3) [Abstract]
25. Jarjour IT, Jarjour LK: Low iron storage in children and adolescents
49. Jarjour IT, Jarjour LK: Low iron stores in postural tachycardia
with neutrally mediated syncope. J Pediatr 153:40-44, 2008
syndrome in adolescents. Clin Auton Res 19:277, 2009 [Abstract]
26. Hernandez A, Jarjour IT, Jarjour LK: Pediatric postural tachycardia
50. Jarjour IT, Jarjour LK: Hypovitaminosis D in postural tachycardia
syndrome. A children’s hospital experience. Neurology 78: (suppl 1)
syndrome in adolescents. Ann Neurol 66:S129, 2009 (suppl 13)
[P05.205 (Abstract)] 2012
[Abstract]
27. Khurana RK, Eisenberg L: Orthostatic and non-orthostatic head-
51. Antiel RM, Caudill JS, Bukhardt BE, et al: Iron Insufficiency and
ache in postural tachycardia. Cephalalgia 31:409-415, 2011
hypovitaminosis D in adolescents with chronic fatigue and ortho-
28. Mack KJ, Johnson JN, Rowe P: Orthostatic intolerance and the
static intolerance. South Med J 104:609-611, 2012
headache patient. Semin Pediatr Neurol 17:109-116, 2010
52. Jacob G, Costa F, Shannon JR, et al: The neuropathic postural
29. Chelmisky G, Boyle JT, Tusing L, et al: Autonomic abnormalities
tachycardia syndrome. N Engl J Med 343:1008-1014, 2000
in children with functional abdominal pain: Coincidence or
53. Mckeon A, Lennon VA, Lachance DH, et al: Ganglionic acetylcho-
etiology? J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 33:47-53, 2001
line receptor autoantibody. Arch Neurol 66:735-741, 2009
30. Ocon AJ, Messer ZR, Medow MS, et al: Increasing orthostatic stress
54. Murali HR, Mack KJ, Kuntz NL: Acquired orthostatic intolerance
impairs neurocognitive functioning in chronic fatigue syndrome
and alpha-3 ganglionic acetylcholine antibodies in an adolescent
with postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Sci 122:227-238, 2012
girl. Clin Auton Res 19:298, 2009 [Abstract]
31. Galland BC, Jackson PM, Sayers RM, et al: A matched case control
55. Rowe PC, Barron DF, Calkins H, et al: Orthostatic intolerance and
study of orthostatic intolerance in children/adolescents with
chronic fatigue syndrome associated with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.
chronic fatigue syndrome. Pediatr Res 63:196-202, 2008
J Pediatr 135:494-499, 1999
32. Bagai K, Song Y, Ling JF, et al: Sleep disturbances and diminished
56. Gazit Y, Nahrin AM, Grahame R, et al: Dysautonomia in the joint
quality of life in postural tachycardia syndrome. J Clin Sleep Med
hypermobility syndrome. Am J Med 115:33-40, 2003
7:204-210, 2011
57. Smits-Engelsman B, Klerks M, Kirby A: Beighton score: A valid measure
33. Raj V, Haman KL, Raj SR, et al: Psychiatric profile and attention
for generalized hypermobility in children. J Pediatr 158:119-123, 2011
deficits in postural tachycardia syndrome. J Neurol Neurosurg
58. Brady PA, Low PA, Shen WK: Inappropriate sinus tachycardia,
Psychiatry 80:339-344, 2009
postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, and overlapping syn-
34. Benrud-Larson LM, Sandroni P, Haythornthwaite JA, et al: Corre-
dromes. Pacing Clin Electrophysiol 28:1112-1121, 2005
lates of functional disability in patients with postural tachycardia
59. Al-Shekhlee A, Lindenberg JR, Hachwi R, et al: The value of
syndrome: Preliminary cross-sectional findings. Health Psychol 22:
autonomic testing in postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton
643-648, 2003
Res 15:219-222, 2005

26
I.T. Jarjour
60. Sukul D, Chelimsky TC, Chelimsky G: Pediatric autonomic testing:
blind randomised placebo controlled trial. Br Med J 326:
Retrospective review of a large series. Clin Pediatr 51:17-22, 2012
1124-1127, 2003
61. Brewster JA, Garland EM, Biaggioni I, et al: Diurnal variability in
67. Fortunato JE, Shaltout HA, Larkin MM, et al: Fludrocortisone
orthostatic tachycardia: Implications for the postural tachycardia
improves nausea in children with orthostatic intolerance (OI). Clin
syndrome. Clin Sci 122:25-31, 2012
Auton Res 21:419-423, 2001
62. Low PA, Schondorf R, Rummans TA: Why do patients have
68. Gordon VM, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Novak V, et al: Hemodynamic and
orthostatic symptoms in POTS? Clin Auton Res 11:223-224, 2001
symptomatic effects of acute interventions on tilt in patients with
63. El-Sayed R: Salt supplement increases plasma volume and ortho-
postural tachycardia syndrome. Clin Auton Res 10:29-33, 2000
static tolerance in patients with unexplained syncope. Heart
69. Chen L, Wang L, Sun J, et al: Midodrine hydrochloride is effective
75:134-140, 1996
in the treatment of children with postural orthostatic tachycardia
64. Shannon JR, Diedrich A, Biaggioni I, et al: Water drinking as a
syndrome. Circ J 75:927-931, 2011
treatment for orthostatic syndromes. Am J Med 112:355-360, 2002
70. Raj SR, Black BK, Biaggioni I, et al: Acetylcholinesterase inhibition
65. Fu Q, Vangundy TB, Shibata S, et al: Exercise training versus
improves tachycardia in postural tachycardia syndrome. Circula-
propranolol in the treatment of the postural orthostatic tachycardia
tion 111:2734-2740, 2005
syndrome. Hypertension 58:167-175, 2011
71. Iodice V, Kimpinski K, Vernino S, et al: Efficacy of immunotherapy
66. Verdon F, Burnand B, Stubi CL, et al: Iron supplementation
in seropositive and seronegative putative autoimmune autonomic
for
unexplained
fatigue
in
non-anaemic
women:
Double
ganglionopathy. Neurology 72:2002-2008, 2009

Document Outline