This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Summary Minutes for CHM meeting on 16th & 17th July 2015'.


□ ORIGINAL ARTICLE 
Peripheral Sympathetic Nerve Dysfunction in Adolescent
Japanese Girls Following Immunization with
the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine
Tomomi Kinoshita 1, Ryu-ta Abe 1, Akiyo Hineno 1, Kazuhiro Tsunekawa 2,
Shunya Nakane 3 and Shu-ichi Ikeda 1
Abstract
Objective
To investigate the causes of neurological manifestations in girls immunized with the human pap-
illomavirus (HPV) vaccine.
Methods
During the past nine months, 44 girls visited us complaining of several symptoms after HPV vac-
cination. Four patients with other proven disorders were excluded, and the remaining forty subjects were en-
rolled in this study.
Results
The age at initial vaccination ranged from 11 to 17 years, and the average incubation period after
the first dose of the vaccine was 5.47±5.00 months. Frequent manifestations included headaches, general fa-
tigue, coldness of the legs, limb pain and weakness. The skin temperature examined in 28 girls with limb
symptoms exhibited a slight decrease in the fingers (30.4±2.6℃) and a moderate decrease in the toes (27.1±
3.7℃). Digital plethysmograms revealed a reduced height of the waves, especially in the toes. The limb
symptoms of four girls were compatible with the Japanese clinical diagnostic criteria for complex regional
pain syndrome (CRPS), while those in the other 14 girls were consistent with foreign diagnostic criteria for
CRPS. The Schellong test identified eight patients with orthostatic hypotension and four patients with pos-
tural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. The girls with orthostatic intolerance and CRPS commonly experi-
enced transient violent tremors and persistent asthenia. Electron-microscopic examinations of the intradermal
nerves showed an abnormal pathology in the unmyelinated fibers in two of the three girls examined.
Conclusion
The symptoms observed in this study can be explained by abnormal peripheral sympathetic re-
sponses. The most common previous diagnosis in the studied girls was psychosomatic disease. The social
problems of the study participants remained unresolved in that the severely disabled girls stopped going to
school.
Key words: human papillomavirus vaccine, complex regional pain syndrome, orthostatic hypotension,
postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, sympathetic nerve dysfunction
(Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014)
(DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133)

proved in 2006, after which a bivalent vaccine (CervarixⓇ,
Introduction
GSK, Brentford, UK) was introduced. By the end of 2011,
approximately 130 million doses of GardasilⓇ and 44 mil-
The immunization of adolescent girls with the human
lion doses of CervarixⓇ had been distributed worldwide (3).
papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was initiated to prevent uter-
In 2010, both vaccines were widely introduced for applica-
ine and cervical cancer (1, 2). The first quadrivalent vaccine
tion in Japanese girls, and starting in April 2013, those 13 to
(GardasilⓇ, Merck & Co, Whitehouse Station, U.S.) was ap-
16 years of age were legally required to undergo vaccina-
1Department of Medicine (Neurology and Rheumatology), Shinshu University School of Medicine, Japan, 2Department of Plastic Surgery, Shin-
shu University School of Medicine, Japan and 3Department of Clinical Research, Nagasaki Kawatana Medical Center, Japan
Received for publication April 21, 2014; Accepted for publication June 5, 2014
Correspondence to Dr. Shu-ichi Ikeda, xxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxx.xx.xx
2185

Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
tion. The introduction of a new vaccine invariably puts fo-
the same buffer and embedded in epoxy resin. Sections
cus on its effectiveness as well as safety (4). Adverse events
measuring 1 μm in thickness were cut, then stained with 1%
of HPV vaccination commonly include fever, headache and
toluidine blue and examined with light microscopy. Ultrathin
local pain at the injection site. Additionally, a relatively high
sections were then prepared, stained with uranyl acetate and
incidence of chronic limb pain, frequently complicated by
lead citrate and observed under a JEM 1400 electron micro-
violent, tremulous involuntary movements, has been noted in
scope (JOEL, Tokyo, Japan).
Japanese girls following vaccination. In such cases, severe
Detection of autoantibodies to ganglionic acetyl-
spontaneous pain affects one or more extremities and is con-
choline receptor antibodies (gAChR)
sistently accompanied by coldness of the involved limbs,
producing a marked disturbance in daily activities. This con-
Serum was collected from each of the girls with informed
dition is thought to be a form of complex regional pain syn-
consent. Serum antibodies to gAChR were detected using a
drome (CRPS), although this has not yet been confirmed.
luciferase immunoprecipitation assay, as described else-
CRPS is usually classified into two forms (5): CRPS-I,
where (11, 12). This assay system can detect be used to
which occurs without known nerve injury, and CRPS-II,
autoantibodies against two main subunits, α3 and β4, in hu-
which includes nerve injury.
man AChR (13).
CRPS-I, previously called reflex sympathetic dystrophy, is
The study protocol was approved by the local ethics com-
infrequently reported in individuals immunized against hepa-
mittee.
titis B (6) and rubella (7), although a few cases of CRPS-I
following HPV vaccination were recently reported from
Results
Australia (8). CRPS is characterized by persistent pain dis-
proportionate to any inciting event and the presence of at
Clinical picture
least one sign of autonomic dysfunction (9). An abnormal
sympathetic response after the initiating injury is generally
Among the 44 girls examined, four definitely diagnosed
considered to underlie the pathogenesis of this disorder (10).
as having another disease at different hospitals were ex-
In order to clarify the cause of serious limb pain in such
cluded, including two patients with systemic lupus erythe-
cases, we examined adolescent Japanese girls who visited us
matosus, one patient with schizophrenia and one patient
with a possible chief complaint of adverse events after HPV
with measles vaccine-related cerebellitis. The age at initial
vaccination, paying special attention to the possibility of pe-
vaccination among the 40 girls examined ranged from 11 to
ripheral sympathetic nerve dysfunction.
17 years (average age: 13.7±1.6 years), and the average in-
cubation period after the first dose of vaccine was 5.47±5.00
Materials and Methods
months. Clinical manifestations of the 40 girls included
headaches (n=28, 70%), general fatigue (n=21, 53%), cold-
From June 21, 2013 to March 31, 2014, forty four girls
ness of the legs (n=21, 53%), limb pain (n=20, 50%), limb
visited us complaining of several symptoms after HPV vac-
weakness (n=19, 48%), difficulty in getting up (n=19, 48%),
cination, including 31 patients with a history of vaccination
orthostatic fainting (n=17, 43%), a decreased ability to learn
with CervarixⓇ and 13 with a history of receiving GardasilⓇ.
(n=17, 43%), arthralgia (n=17, 43%), limb tremors (n=16,
All subjects underwent complete physical and neurological
40%), gait disturbances (n=16, 40%), disturbed menstruation
examinations and routine laboratory screening, including
(n=14, 35%) and dizziness (n=12, 30%). Headaches and
measurement of the serum levels of C-reactive protein
general fatigue were more prominent in the morning, fre-
(CRP) and creative kinase (CK) as well as thyroid and adre-
quently leading to difficulty in getting up, while persistent
nal gland hormones. If a patient exhibited one or both of the
fatigue required a long period of sleep. The most common
following findings, including hypotension and coldness of
combination of symptoms was limb coldness, pain, tremors
the limbs, they were evaluated with the Schellong test and a
and a gait disturbance. Less frequent but noteworthy com-
digital plethysmogram. The Schellong test was performed in
plaints included the following: 1. polyarthralgia, primarily
conjunction with measurement of the plasma levels of
involving the wrist, knee and ankle joints, that lasted for
catecholamines. A digital plethysmogram was recorded on
several days and subsided spontaneously, although it occa-
the right second finger and right first toe, while checking
sionally recurred; 2. menstrual abnormalities, including
the patient’s skin temperature. In patients with limb weak-
amenorrhea for a few months after immunization; 3. a de-
ness, routine motor and sensory nerve conduction studies
creased ability to learn associated with reduced memory and
were performed on the right ulnar and tibial nerves.
concentration at school and/or while doing homework, thus
resulting in a poor school record.
Histopathological and ultrastructural examinations
of the intradermal nerves

Representative case reports
Punch biopsies of the skin were performed. The samples
Case 1 (serial patient number: 37 in tables)
were fixed in 2.5% glutaraldehyde in 0.1 M cacodylate
In August 2013, an 18-year-old woman visited our hospi-
buffer at a pH of 7.4, postfixed in 1% osmium tetroxide in
tal with complaints of continuous headaches and severe gen-
2186



































Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
BP mmHg
 noradrenaline ng/mL
140
5
4.5
118
120
106
4
104
100
100
100
3.5
3
80
80
78
80
76
2.5
70
60
2
1.5
40
1
20
0.5
0.14
0.2
0.22
0.27
0
0
spine
standing
5 min
10 min
15 min
blood pressure
noradrenaline
Figure1.Changes in blood pressure and the plasma level of noradrenaline on the Schellong test in 
Case 1. OH was not detected; however, the basal plasma level of noradrenaline was below the normal 

range, and the increase in the plasma concentration of noradrenaline during positional changes (57% 
increase at five minutes after standing) was low.
eral fatigue. She had received her first dose of CervarixⓇ at
abnormalities. A few months prior to admission, she began
the first week of August, 2011, and a few days later, began
to experience frequent episodes of orthostatic fainting.
to suffer from severe epigastric pain and headaches. She un-
On a physical examination performed at our hospital, the
derwent brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) at a local
patient was 146 cm tall and weighed 45 kg. Her pulse rate
hospital, which showed no abnormalities; however, her
was 72 beats per minute (bpm), with a blood pressure (BP)
headache persisted, accompanied by psychological instability
of 98/50 mmHg in the sitting position. The findings of gen-
and insomnia. Since she was unable to go to school, she
eral physical and neurological examinations were normal,
was referred to a mental clinic and diagnosed as being
except for slight tenderness in the left occipital area. Her
inadaptable. During the first week in October, she received
skin temperature was 23.0℃ in the right first toe and 28.5℃
the second dose of the vaccine and her epigastric pain and
in the right second finger at a room temperature of 23.5℃,
headache worsened; her headache and general fatigue were
and plethysmograms of both toes and fingers disclosed a re-
more remarkable in the morning, and the administration of
duced height of the waves in the toes. The changes in the
several
types
of
drugs,
including
non-steroidal
anti-
patient’s BP and plasma level of noradrenalin on the Schel-
inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), failed to relieve these symp-
long test are presented in Fig. 1. She did not exhibit or-
toms. The patient underwent an endoscopic examination and
thostatic hypotension (OH), although the basal plasma level
was given a diagnosis of superficial gastritis, possibly due to
of noradrenaline was low and the increase in the plasma no-
psychological stress. In mid-February, 2012, she received
radrenaline level was poor after changing positions from a
the third dose the of vaccine. At that time, her daily activity
supine to sitting position. These symptoms were consistent
was severely disturbed by a difficulty in getting up, continu-
with the diagnostic criteria for orthostatic dysregulation
ous heavy headaches and general fatigue. Finally, she
(OD) proposed by the Japan Paediatric Society (14), includ-
stopped going to her regular high school and enrolled in a
ing two major symptoms and four minor symptoms. The
correspondence course at the beginning of May, 2012. She
oral administration of amezinium metilsulfate (amezinium
was also treated by a psychiatrist; however, her symptoms
metilsulfate) (10 mg, two times per day) relieved all of the
did not improve. She subsequently underwent detailed gyne-
patient’s symptoms, and her daily activities significantly im-
cological examinations due to the exacerbation of symptoms
proved.
in the pre-menstrual period, the results of which showed no
Case 2 (serial patient number: 14)
2187



Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
In November 2013, a 15-year-old girl was referred to our
its. The left-sided limb weakness recovered, and she was
hospital due to continuous headaches, limb pain and a gait
discharged. After this event, she frequently began to skip
disturbance. She had received her first dose of CervarixⓇ at
school due to an uncertain inching pain and clumsy move-
the end of February, 2011 and the third dose at the end of
ment in hands, which prevented her from writing or using
September, 2011. Her daily life had remained unchanged for
chopsticks (Fig. 2A). Additionally, she became very sensi-
a while; however, at the beginning of June, 2012 she began
tive to sound and skin stimuli, such as touch and using the
to complain of sharp pain in the eye balls and double vi-
shower in the bathroom, both of which easily induced a
sion, and, in the early morning in mid-July, she fell down
panic state, with involuntary tremulousness of the limbs, and
after waking up due to left-sided limb weakness. She was
she thus visited several hospitals, where she was given a di-
transferred to an emergency hospital, where her conscious-
agnosis of a psychiatric or anxiety disorder. In early July,
ness was found to be clear, and an MRI scan of the brain
2013, she developed severe anorexia, possibly due to very
and routine laboratory tests were all within the normal lim-
uncomfortable sensations in the limbs, and was hospitalized
for two weeks. Although she was treated for an eating disor-
der, her condition did not improve, and after discharge, she
remained at home.
On a physical examination performed at our hospital, the
patient was 150 cm tall and weighed 50 kg. Her pulse rate
A
was 80 bpm, with a BP of 90/55 mmHg in the sitting posi-
tion. Her body temperature was 37.1℃. In general, physical
findings of coldness in both legs were noted, although the
neurological gross power of the limb muscles was normal.
However, violent limb tremors were easily elicited whenever
an examiner touched the patient’s thigh or legs. Due to this
severe tremors, the patient was unable to walk alone. Her
skin temperature was 22.2℃ in the right first toe and 28.4℃
B
in the right second finger at a room temperature of 23.5℃,
and plethysmograms of the toe and finger showed markedly
Figure2.Impaired writing of letters in Case 2. A: On admis-
reduced heights of the waves (Fig. 3A, B). In contrast, the
sion, the patient’s writing was poor due to hand tremulousness. 
findings of peripheral nerve conduction studies were normal.
The irregular lines are noteworthy. B: After treatment, the pa-
Surface electromyograms recorded from the involved limbs
tient’s writing improved considerably. Permission for presen-
indicated that the involuntary movements were not tremors,
tation of these images was obtained from the girl and her par-
but rather myoclonus (Fig. 4, 5). The patient’s reports of
ents.
persistent inching pain, sensory changes with hyperesthesia
Right second finger                           Right first toe
noise
A
ST: 28.4°C
B
ST: 22.2°C
C
ST: 31.8°C
D
ST: 29.5°C
Figure3.Digital plethysmograms in Case 2. A, B: On admission, C, D: After intravenous injection 
of alprostadil. On admission, digital plethysmograms showed a peripheral plateau pattern, with the 

height of wave for the toe being very low. After treatment, the pattern of waves normalized, and the 
skin temperature of the toe dramatically increased. ST is an abbreviation for skin temperature.
2188



Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
lt. Bi
lt. Tri
lt. WF
lt. WE
lt. Quad
lt. Ham
lt. TA
lt. Gast
rt. Bi
rt. Tri
rt. WF
rt. WE
rt. Quad
rt. Ham
rt. TA
150 ȝV
rt. Gast
1 sec
Figure4.Surface electromyograms of the involved right upper and lower limbs in Case 2. Repeti-
tive bursts appear at irregular intervals and the muscle contractions are not synchronous with each 

other, indicating that the involuntary movement is a myoclonic jerk.
EEG
lt. Bi
rt. Bi
lt. Quad
150 ȝV
rt. Quad
1 sec
Figure5.Polygraph (EEG and EMG) in Case 2. The myoclonic EMG discharge of the left biceps 
muscle is not associated with any  particular  EEG  activity.  EEG is  an  abbreviation for electroen-

cephalogram and EMG is an abbreviation for electromyogram.
and motor dysfunction with limb weakness and tremors, as
ing. She was therefore diagnosed with OH. The intradermal
well as our observation of these findings, were consistent
nerve pathology observed in the first toe and second finger
with a diagnosis of CRPS-I, according to the guidelines pre-
is described in a separate section. The intravenous admini-
sented in Table 1. On the Schellong test, her heart rate and
stration of physiological saline (100 mL) and alprostadil (al-
BP changed from 78 bpm and 110/58 mmHg to 102 bpm
prostadil; 5 μg) was employed to treat the leg coldness. The
and 67/48 mmHg, respectively, at eight minutes after stand-
patient subsequently felt warmness in her limbs and the re-
2189

Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
Table1A.Japanese Diagnostic Hallmark for CRPS
A. Disease history must contain more than 2 in the following subjective symptoms 
1. Trophic change in skin, nail or hair 
2. Decreased range of joint motion 
3. Persistent aching pain or shooting pain and/or hyperpathy 
4. Sweating changes 
5. Oedema 
B. Must display at least two at time of evaluation in the following objective findings
1. Trophic change in skin, nail or hair 
2. Decreased range of joint motion 
3. Allodynia or hyperalgesia in pin-pricking 
4. Sweating changes   
5. Oedema 
Table1B.Proposed Clinical Diagnostic Criterion for CRPS
1. Continuing pain which is disproportionate to any inciting event 
2. Must report at least one symptom in three of the four following categories 
Sensory: reports of hyperaesthesia and/or allodynia 
Vasomotor: reports of temperature asymmetry and/or skin colour changes and/or skin 
colour asymmetry 
Sudomotor/oedema: reports of oedema and/or sweating changes and/or sweating 
asymmetry 
Motor/trophic: reports of decreased range of motion and/or motor dysfunction 
(weakness, tremor, dystonia) and/or trophic changes (hair, nail, skin) 
3. Must display at least one sign at time of evaluation in two or more of the following     
categories  
Sensory: evidence of hyperaesthesia and/or allodynia 
Vasomotor: evidence of temperature asymmetry and/or skin colour changes and/or 
skin colour asymmetry 
Sudomotor/oedema: evidence of oedema and/or sweating changes and/or sweating 
asymmetry 
Motor/trophic: evidence of decreased range of motion and/or motor dysfunction 
(weakness, tremor, dystonia) and/or trophic changes (hair, nail, skin) 
4. There is no other diagnosis that better explains the signs and symptoms
sults of digital plethysmograms exhibited a normal pattern
temperature and general malaise gradually resolved; how-
(Fig. 3C, D). After discharge, she continued to receive this
ever, paroxysmal limb tremors subsequently appeared, espe-
treatment at her neighboring hospital, and the limb tremors
cially while lying down, which caused the patient serious
gradually subsided. In addition, the patient again became
anxiety at night, resulting in insomnia. In early March,
able to walk and write (Fig. 2B) and returned to school
2013, she developed severe limb pain and palpitations; the
three months later.
limb pain restricted her shoulder and thigh movement,
Case 3 (serial patient number: 2)
sometimes accompanied by temporal paresis of the hands
In October 2013, a 13-year-old girl was referred to our
and legs, and the palpitations and chest discomfort were re-
hospital due to paroxysmal limb pain with headaches and a
markably exacerbated when the patient changed from a sit-
gait disturbance. She had a history of surgical removal of a
ting to standing position. Both conditions resulted in diffi-
left ovarian tumor at 10 years of age. She received her first
culties in writing and walking. The patient’s condition was
dose of GardasilⓇ at the end of June, 2012, and two weeks
considered to be due to psychosomatic behavior at the hos-
later, began to suffer from a continuous high fever (39.0-
pital and at school. Therefore, she stopped going to school
40.0℃) and headaches. She was evaluated at a local hospi-
and had stayed home since late April, 2013.
tal, where no abnormal findings were detected on a routine
On a physical examination conducted at our hospital, the
laboratory examination, endoscopy or CT. Various NSAIDs
patient was 155 cm tall and weighed 51 kg. Her pulse rate
were prescribed; however, all were ineffective in relieving
was 98 bpm, with a BP of 112/78 mmHg in the sitting posi-
the patient’s symptoms. She was tentatively diagnosed as
tion. Her body temperature was 37.1℃, and her general
having a psychosomatic fever and stopped participating in
physical findings were normal. Neurologically, she com-
all sport activities on campus. At the end of January, 2013,
plained of uncomfortable pain in the legs; however, manual
she received the third dose of the vaccine. Her high body
muscle tests, objective sensory examinations and deep ten-
2190


Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
Figure6.MIBG cardiac scintigram showing a decreased uptake of the isotope in both the early and 
delayed phases. A: The early phase was photographed 15 minutes after isotope injection: the heart to 

mediastinum (H/M) ratio is 1.98. B: The delayed phase was photographed at two hours: the H/M ratio 
was 1.56. Framed or circled areas are targets for counting the radioactivity of the isotope.
don reflex studies were all normal. No limb tremors were
cardiolipin antibodies were detected in the serum (17 U/mL,
noted at that time. The patient was able to walk using a
normal !10 U/mL). Treatment with prednisolone (10 mg/
handrail for short distances, exhibiting a very unsteady pos-
day) and clopidogrel sulfate (clopidogrel; 75 mg/day) was
ture that easily led to squatting. The awkward gait appeared
started; however, all of the patient’s symptoms persisted and
to us to be of hysteric origin. Her skin temperature was
she stopped going to school.
28.8℃ in the right first toe and 30.8℃ in the right second
On a physical examination conducted at our hospital, the
finger at a room temperature of 23.5℃, and plethysmograms
patient was 157 cm tall and weighed 69 kg. Her pulse rate
of both the toes and fingers showed reduced heights of the
was 78 bpm, with a BP of 118/78 mmHg in the sitting posi-
waves in the toes. On the Schellong test, the patient’s heart
tion. She exhibited reddish skin with dryness on the cheek
rate and BP changed from 91 bpm and 105/91 mmHg to
and limbs, possibly due to atopic dermatitis. Additionally,
126 bpm and 98/59 mmHg, respectively, at nine minutes af-
she complained of mild tenderness without swelling in the
ter standing. A cardiac scintigram obtained using 123I-meta-
shoulder, elbow, wrist, knee and ankle joints, and a similar
iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) revealed a reduced uptake of
degree of pain was evoked in both calves by grasping. On a
the isotope (Fig. 6), indicating the loss of post-ganglionic
neurological examination, the patient’s limb power and sen-
nerve terminals containing noradrenaline (15, 16). She was
sations were all normal; however, she was unable to walk
therefore diagnosed as having CRPS-I and postural or-
by herself and was thus confined to a wheelchair. Her skin
thostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) (17) and treated with
temperature was 31.2℃ in the right first toe and 31.4℃ in
the oral administration of bisoprolol fumarate (bisoprolol fu-
the right second finger at a room temperature of 24.5℃, and
marate) at a dose of 2.5 mg daily. Four months later, her
plethysmograms of both the toes and fingers showed re-
gait improved, and she was able to walk with the use of
duced heights of the waves. On the Schellong test, severe
stick, although she did not return to her previous school life.
OH was induced; 10 minutes after standing, she fainted with
Case 4 (serial patient number: 24)
pallor (her BP decreased from 107/73 mmHg to 77/35
In December 2013, a 16-year-old girl was referred to our
mmHg). On laboratory tests, the serum CRP level was 0.20
hospital due to polyarthralgia, leg pain and weakness. She
mg/dL and the serum CK level was 47 IU/L. In addition,
had a history of bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis in
the serum titer of anti-cardiolipin antibodies was 10 U/mL
childhood. She received the first dose of CervarixⓇ in early
(normal !10 U/mL), whereas other auto-antibodies, includ-
October, 2011 and the third dose in early March, 2012. One
ing rheumatoid factor and anti-double strand DNA antibod-
month later, she noticed knee joint pain and general fatigue,
ies, were undetectable. Although a needle electromyogram
with a slightly elevated body temperature. She visited a few
showed normal patterns in both the upper and lower limbs,
orthopedic clinics, failing to obtain a definitive diagnosis.
MRI disclosed an abnormal high signal intensity in both
The arthralgia moved to other joints, and the patient began
calves (Fig. 7A), indicating the presence of myofasciitis.
to suffer from paroxysmal limb tremors in autumn of that
Two weeks after discontinuing the dose of clopidogrel sul-
year. In early January 2013, she developed severe aching in
fate, the patient again underwent MRI of the legs and a
both calves that resulted in the need for a wheelchair. She
muscle biopsy of the left gastrocnemius, which showed that
was examined at a local hospital, where positive anti-
the abnormal signals had disappeared (Fig. 7B) and the his-
2191


Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
A
B
Figure7.MRI findings of the calf muscles in Case 4. A: On admission, both gastrocnemius muscles 
showed high-signal lesions on flair-weighted images with gadolinium enhancement. B: Two weeks 

later, the lesions were undetectable on the same type of images.
tology of the muscle was normal. The intradermal nerve pa-
toms.
thology observed in the same leg area is described in a
On a physical examination conducted at our hospital, the
separate section. The patient was therefore diagnosed as
patient was 162 cm tall and weighed 47 kg. Her pulse rate
having CRPS-I and OH and was transferred to another hos-
was 74 bpm, with a BP of 94/62 mmHg in the sitting posi-
pital for gait rehabilitation.
tion. Her general physical findings were normal, although a
Case 5 (serial patient number: 19)
neurological examination showed slight weakness in both
In February 2014, a 15-year-old Japanese girl visited our
hands and the left leg (grip power: 18 kg in the right hand;
hospital complaining of transient limb weakness and or-
10 kg in the left hand). Her skin temperature was 21.8℃ in
thostatic fainting. At the beginning of May, 2010, she had
the right first toe and 31.1℃ in the right second finger at a
received her first dose of GardasilⓇ in a clinic in the U.S.
room temperature of 27.0℃, and plethysmograms of both
since she was living there at the time. In early December,
the toes and fingers showed reduced heights of the waves in
2010, she received the third dose of the vaccine. A few days
the toes. The findings of peripheral nerve conduction studies
later, she felt pain and weakness in the lower limbs, espe-
of the left median and tibial nerves were normal. On the
cially in the left leg, leading to difficulty in walking. This
Schellong test, the patient’s heart rate and BP changed from
symptom subsided within the following three days; however,
70 bpm and 105/62 mmHg to 109 bpm and 102/52 mmHg,
after one month, she developed numbness and weakness in
respectively, at seven minutes after standing. The WAIS-III
both hands that lasted for two days. Transient weakness re-
disclosed the following scores: FIQ=82, VIQ=88, PIQ=79,
peatedly appeared in both the hands and legs, and the pa-
VC=92, PO=70, WM=85, AS=105. Furthermore, the patient
tient subsequently experienced orthostatic fainting and ab-
had remarkable difficulty in quickly understanding long sen-
dominal discomfort. She returned to Japan in April, 2012
tences. She was therefore diagnosed with CRPS-I and
and was examined at a local hospital, where no specific
POTS, and her slight cognitive decline was thought to be
findings were noted. In addition to recurrent limb weakness,
potentially related to POTS. She was treated with the oral
the patient newly exhibited a decreased ability to learn at
administration of limaprost alfadex at a dose of 5 mg (li-
school; she was unable to memorize different themes simul-
maprost alfadex) three times daily, and her limb symptoms
taneously and her understanding of textbooks was incom-
disappeared.
plete, both of which were noticed by her mother. The pa-
tient and her family were seriously worried about her symp-
2192

Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
Table2.Results of Schellong Test Including the Changes of Plasma Noradrenaline Level
NA at
Increasing
Maximum change
Diagnosis
Patient
Age
supine position  rate of NA
decreased SBP
increased HR
No.
OH
POTS
(ng/mL)
(%)
mmHg
/min
1
13
0.13
15
42
-
+
-
2
13
0.14
129
8
36
-
+
3
13
0.16
106
48
-
+
-
5
13
0.16
44
13
22
-
-
8
14
0.17
65
7
21
-
-
13
15
0.11
45
16
24
-
-
14
15
0.26
42
43
-
+
-
17
15
0.16
100
40
-
+
-
18
15
0.22
100
1
48
-
+
19
15
0.36
67
16
39
-
+
22
16
0.09
122
5
44
-
+
24
16
0.17
59
30
-
+
-
25
16
0.14
86
6
28
-
-
26
16
0.18
50
-
11
-
-
27
16
0.33
64
45
-
+
-
28
17
0.16
119
7
27
-
-
29
17
0.41
49
15
15
-
-
32
18
0.09
166
52
-
+
-
36
18
0.12
58
1
18
-
-
37
18
0.14
57
4
6
-
-
38
18
0.14
43
24
-
+
-
NA: noradrenaline, SBP: systolic blood pressure, HR: heart rate, OH: orthostatic hypotension,
POTS: postual orthostatic tachycardia. Normal plasma level of NA at supine position is 0.15-0.57 ng/mL.
Increasing rate of plasma NA after standing is  more than 60% of basal level after 5 minutes.
Table3.Evaluation Results of Skin Tempera-
Schellong test and the plasma levels of noradrena-
ture and Digital Plethysmogram
line
Patient
Skin temprature (ÛC)
Digital plethysmogram
No.
Twenty-one girls underwent these examinations. OH was
2nd finger 1st toe
2nd finger 1st toe
2
30.8
28.8
normal
Ļ
defined as a decrease of more than 20 mmHg in systolic
3
27.5
28.5
Ļ
Ļ
blood pressure and/or 5 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure
5
30.6
28.4
Ļ
Ļ
within a few minutes after standing (14, 18). POTS was de-
8
27.2
24.7
Ļ
Ļ
10
32.8
35.8
normal
normal
fined as an increase in heart rate of more than 30 bpm
11
30.8
27.6
normal
normal
within the first 10 minutes of standing or tilting the head
13
27.3
23.9
Ļ
Ļ
upwards (17). Since the plasma levels of noradrenaline have
14
28.4
22.2
Ļ
Ļ
16
31.0
28.8
normal
normal
been reported to increase approximately 60-120% when
17
33.6
23.8
normal
normal
changing from a reclining to standing position in normal
18
33.2
24.1
Ļ
Ļ
subjects (19), patients who exhibited an elevation of less
19
31.1
21.8
normal
Ļ
21
30.9
28.0
n.e.
n.e.
than 60% within five minutes were classified as having an
22
33.1
33.5
normal
normal
abnormal response in this study.
23
32.4
29.3
normal
Ļ
OH was detected in eight patients, two of whom demon-
24
31.4
31.2
Ļ
Ļ
25
28.7
26.8
Ļ
Ļ
strated orthostatic syncope during testing. POTS was noted
26
26.0
31.6
normal
Ļ
in the four other girls. A low response in the plasma level of
27
23.9
21.5
Ļ
Ļ
noradrenaline to postural change was seen in 10 girls, in-
28
31.5
27.8
normal
Ļ
29
30.0
24.4
Ļ
Ļ
cluding four with OH (Table 2).
31
33.9
25.7
normal
normal
32
34.2
31.7
normal
normal
Skin temperature and plethysmogram of the right
33
28.6
24.5
normal
normal
first toe and right second finger
34
33.1
24.7
Ļ
Ļ
36
31.2
32.0
Ļ
Ļ
The skin temperature was examined in 28 girls; the aver-
37
28.5
23.0
normal
Ļ
age temperature of the right second finger was 30.4±2.6℃,
40
29.5
24.5
Ļ
Ļ
n.e.: not examined. Ļ: decreased height of waves.The room
while that of the first right toe was 27.1±3.7℃. There is no
at examination of skin temperature was kept at 23-25ÛC.
standard diagnostic criterion for diagnosing a diminished
skin temperature; therefore, a value below room temperature
was judged to be abnormal. The digital plethysmogram find-
ings were evaluated according to the classification of the
wave pattern, as follows (20): peripheral plateau pattern in-
2193

Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
volving a reduced height of the waves in the right second
Final diagnosis
finger, as detected in 13 girls, and a peripheral plateau pat-
tern in the first right toe, as observed in 19 girls (Table 3).
Our final diagnoses in the 40 girls examined are shown in
Table 5. Twenty-nine girls were classified into our catego-
Evaluation of CRPS
rized diagnoses, while the remaining 11 were given a tenta-
The diagnosis of CRPS-I was made based on the patient’s
tive diagnosis based on their symptoms and/or manifesta-
history and clinical examination findings in reference to two
tions. The latter group consisted of three patients with a
different sets of diagnostic criteria: the Japanese clinical di-
simple headache, three patients with polyarthritis, two pa-
agnostic criteria proposed by the research community in
tients with OD-like symptoms, one patient with lumbosacral
2008 (21) (Table 1A), and the criteria used widely in for-
pain, one patient with easy fatigability, chest discomfort and
eign countries (9) (Table 1B), the recent revision of the In-
limb tremulousness and one patient with a fever, headache
ternational Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) criteria
and upper limb paresthesia.
for CRPS originally described in 1999 (22). The limb symp-
toms were compatible with the Japanese criteria for CRPS
Discussion
in four girls and the foreign diagnostic criteria for CRPS in
the remaining 14 girls (Table 4). Limb pain, paresis, tremu-
In the U.S., the routine vaccination of girls 11 to 12 years
lousness and gait disturbances were common manifestations
of age using three doses of GardasilⓇ began on June 1,
in the girls diagnosed based on the revision of the IASP cri-
2006, and by December 31, 2008, more than 23 million
teria. Meanwhile, the girls who displayed these symptoms in
GardasilⓇ doses had been administered. During these 2.5
addition to abnormal sweating fulfilled the Japanese criteria.
years,
the
Vaccine Adverse
Event
Reporting
System
(VAERS) received 12,424 reports of adverse events follow-
Skin biopsy findings
ing immunization (AEFI), for a rate of 53.9 reports per
Biopsies were performed in three girls, including the
100,000 doses. A total of 772 reports (6.2% of all reports)
above Cases 2 and 4 and serial patient No. 18. The skin
were judged to involve serious AEFI cases, including 32 re-
sample of the first toe obtained from the third girl with
ports of death (4). The rate of reporting per 100,000 vaccine
CRPS-I lacked any signs of pathological findings. For ex-
doses was 8.2 for syncope, 7.5 for local site reactions, 6.8
ample, on the light microscopic examination, three small
for dizziness, 5.0 for nausea, 4.1 for headache, 3.1 for hy-
nerve fascicles were identified in one skin sample (Fig. 8A).
persensitivity reactions, 2.6 for urticaria, 0.2 for venous
Some nerve fascicles were located near apocrine glands
thromboembolic events, autoimmune disorders and Guillain-
(Fig. 8B), where sudomotor autonomic unmyelinated nerves
Barré syndrome, 0.1 for anaphylaxis and death, 0.04 for
were surmised to be present. On the electron microscopic
transverse myelitis and pancreatitis and 0.009 for motor neu-
examinations, one fascicle was found to consist of a small
ron disease. A high frequency of syncope was observed im-
number of myelinated nerve fibers (most of them being less
mediately after injection (4). In Japan, a total of 8.75 mil-
than 5 μm in diameter) and a large number of unmyelinated
lion doses, in which CervarixⓇ predominated, were used
nerve fibers. In Case 2, skin samples were harvested from
during the past three years (3). Although similar public re-
the first toe and second finger. On light microscopic obser-
ports are not available in Japan, mass media largely reported
vation, these samples commonly displayed endoneurial
that a significant number of Japanese girls suffered from se-
edema (Fig. 8C, D), which was more remarkable in the toe
vere spontaneous limb pain frequently accompanied by in-
samples (Fig. 8D). On electron microscopic observation, the
voluntary tremulous movements of the involved limbs and/
finger skin contained well-preserved numbers of both myeli-
or gait disturbances following vaccination. Recently, a social
nated and unmyelinated nerve fibers, although electron-
community has been established for these girls in Tokyo,
dense coarse granular materials were seen in some axons of
where information concerning more than 230 affected girls
the unmyelinated nerve fibers (Fig. 9), reflecting degenera-
has been collected (xxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxx.xx.xx). Such neu-
tive changes. In the toe skin, spaces without any structures
rological manifestations have not been previously experi-
occupied a significant portion of the endoneurium, indicat-
enced at our hospital and we therefore investigated the
ing endoneurial edema (Fig. 10A), and the number of un-
pathogenesis of this unique disorder in this study.
myelinated nerve fibers was markedly decreased, accompa-
CRPS
nied by denervated parallel Schwann cell processes and in-
creased collagen pockets (Fig. 10B). Similar changes in in-
CRPS is characterized primarily by pain (with allodynia
tradermal nerves were noted in the calf skin obtained during
and hyperpathia), vasomotor changes, edema and a de-
the muscle biopsy in Case 4 (Fig. 11).
creased range of motion (5). CRPS-I is being increasingly
recognized in children and adolescents (23), with clinical
Detection of autoantibodies to gAChR
features that are generally compatible with those observed in
All 14 girls who exhibited sympathetic dysfunction
adults affected by this syndrome, including a female prepon-
showed negative findings in these examinations.
derance, with the highest incidence of disease around pu-
berty and the lower extremities more often being involved.
2194

Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
S
POT
-
+
-
-
-
+
+
+
-
-
-
-
4
OH
-
+
--
--
--
--
+
+
-
-
-
+
--
--
--
--
--
--
+
--
--
8
OD
++
+
+
---
+
+
---
---
+
---
---
++
+
+
++
+
+
+
+
+
24
 
n,
S
io
el than 
SP)
A
ns
ev
CRP
(I
-
++
++
++
-
-
++
++
+
+
++
+
+
+
-
+
++
+
-
++
-
-
++
-
+
-
+
18
te
er l
)
po
w
o
S
an
CRP
(Jap
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
+
-
-
-
--
-
--
-
-
-
+
-
+
4
d as l
static hy
fine
rtho
eating
: o
Over
sw
-
-
--
--
-
++
--
-
-
--
--
+
-
--
+
-
--
H
e is de
6
y
n, O
ath
atio
erp
ul
e in 1st to
p
eg
ur
Hy
--
+
--
--
+
--
-
-
--
++
--
+
+
+
-
-
+
-
--
+
--
++
--
++
10
sr
rat
mpe
 te
static dy
in
rtho
 sk
d
: o
D
ease
sed
ecr
rea
.
.
.
.
.
Dec
skin temperature in toe
n.e
--
--
-
+
n.e
+
+
+
+
+
n.e
-
--
--
-
+
-
+
--
+
-
+
n.e
n.e
+
11
f pain, O
ns. D
 o
banc
 study
it
tur
aminatio
function
x
Ga
dis
-
+
+
+
-
+
+
+
--
-
-
-
+
+
+
+
--
+
-
-
-
--
+
-
+
-
-
+
+
14
ys
r the
o
r e
u
e D
n f
b
v
 at o
m
*
*
*
Li
tremors
+
+
+
-
-
-
+
+
+
+
-
-
+
+
-
-
+
+
-
-
-
-
+
-
-
atio
12
ed
ci
rv
se
b
sis
 asso
b
m
 o
thetic Ner
are
Li
p
--
+
++
-
-
--
+
-
--
+
+
-
+
16
nal
pa
d be
m
atio
ul
y
rn
s S
b pain
: inte
im
iou
L
++
++
--
-
++
++
+
++
+
++
-
++
+
++
+
--
-
--
-
--
+
-
17
P
v
S
rs that co
A
o
 Ob
e, I
em
g
m
o
eadache
imb tr
H
++
+
+
+++
+
+
+
+
--
++
-
+
-
+
+
-
-
-
---
+
+++
+
+
+
+
+
+
+
+++
19
ndr
: l
, *
s Showin
d
 up
ision
 pain sy
al
er
e v
etting
n
amine
x
ev
ness
ness,
 up
io
 f
eak
 in g
t e
ty
eak
eg
l, doubl
 r
ÛC.
 parethesia
etting
5
ation
b
ex
.: no
2
 nausia,
ness
ficul
 pain
 pain
e bal
m
im
 in g
eak
ia
ia
 dif
ia
 l
ait disturbance
ty
e
entil
ain
ain
ain
e
g
g
g
 g
inal
inal
mpl
r
r
 p
 pain and w
 p
 p
 w
ue,
 pain and w
ue,
l Picture in 29 Girl
b
b
b
b
b
b
er,
itial
mpto
dom
dom
dia, n.e
a
tigu
ve
perv
eadache
y
eadache
eadache
eadache,
ve
eadache
m
im
m
m
tigu
im
rthral
rthral
ncope
: co
atig
rthral
im
ausea
atig
eadache
ev
b
ifficul
y
b
pt at 23-
In
sy
Fa
Fe
H
H
H
H
H
Pain in ey
Fe
H
Li
L
Li
Li
Fa
L
A
A
F
A
L
parethesia N
F
H
F
A
D
S
A
S
car
e ke
f
CRP
,
e o
®
p
ratur
 of Clinic
accine
Ty
v
erix
ry
G
G
G
C
G
C
G
C
C
C
C
G
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
C
G
C
C
C
C
C
C
mpe
a
rv
static tachy
e
 te
g
3
3
3
3
4
 Ce
rtho
m
A
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
17
17
17
18
18
18
18
18
19
19
r     29
 o
o
o
Summ
, C:
®
n r

stual
11
21
31
51
81
asil
4.
nt
12
13
14
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
27
28
29
31
32
34
36
37
38
39
40
 numbe
: po
tal
ard
S
ble
atie
o
T
a
P
No.
: G
O
aminatio
T
   T
G
P
ex
2195


Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
A
B
C
D
Figure8.Light-microscopic findings of epon-embedded  skin tissues  stained with 1% toluidine 
blue. A, B: Findings for the first toe skin in patient No. 18, who was diagnosed with CRPS-I. The pa-

tient’s symptoms were not severe and she was able to walk without difficulty. A: Two small nerve 
fascicles (indicated by arrows) are identified in the dermis. Original magnification ×120. B: One nerve 
fascicle (indicated by an arrow) located the near apocrine glands and this fascicle was surmised to 
contain a sudomotor unmyelinated autonomic nerve. All nerve fascicles in A and B appear normal. 
Original magnification ×280. C, D: Findings in Case 2 showing serious limb symptoms of CRPS-I. C: 
One nerve fascicle in the skin of the second finger showing slight subperineurial edema (indicated by 
arrow). Original magnification ×500. D: One nerve fascicle in the first toe’s skin showing more prom-
inent subperineurial and endoneurial edema (indicated by arrows). Original magnification ×500.
In this study, the diagnosis of CRPS-I was made based on
fibers)
is
the
only
finding
observed
in
the
sural
the patient’s history and clinical examination findings in ref-
nerves (24, 25), and one quantitative analysis of epidermal
erence to two different sets of diagnostic criteria: the Japa-
neurite density revealed reduced (on average by 29%) ax-
nese clinical diagnostic criteria proposed by the research
onal densities at CRPS-affected sites in the limbs (26). Ad-
community (21) and the recent revision of the IASP crite-
ditionally, an intact population of large myelinated fibers
ria (9). The former set of criteria requires the detection of
was observed in the examined nerves in that study, explain-
more diagnostic hallmarks. Our series of girls with chronic
ing why the conduction velocities of neurophysiological pe-
limb pain commonly showed a decreased skin temperature
ripheral nerves are normally preserved in the involved limbs.
and abnormal digital plethysmogram findings, both of which
Among our 18 girls with a confirmed diagnosis of CRPS-I
indicate an impaired vasomotor tone in the affected limbs.
who underwent neurophysiological studies, none showed ab-
Among these patients, only four fulfilled the Japanese diag-
normal electromyography or conduction velocity findings.
nostic clinical criteria for CRPS-I, while the remaining 14,
Our morphologic study results for the intradermal nerves
who lacked signs of sweating abnormalities, skin color
obtained from affected limbs that showed endoneurial edema
changes and/or trophic changes, were diagnosed with CRPS-
and selective degeneration of unmyelinated fibers coincided
I based on the foreign diagnostic criteria. Concerning the
well with the findings mentioned above.
pathogenesis of CRPS, cold skin is thought to be the result
One important disease that must be differentiated from
of vasospasms caused by sympathetic denervation supersen-
CRPS-I in vaccinated patients is macrophagic myofascii-
sitivity (10), and the presence of electron microscopic ab-
tis (27, 28). This disorder develops as an unusual reaction to
normalities in peripheral nerves supports this hypothesis. For
the intramuscular injection of aluminium-containing vaccines
example, the loss of small-diameter unmyelinated fibers (C-
and is characterized by common manifestations of diffuse
2196




Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
ȝP
B
A
10 ȝP
A
B
*
2 ȝP
2 ȝP
Figure9.Electron-microscopic findings of the intradermal 
Figure10.Electron-microscopic findings of the intradermal 
nerves in the second finger in Case 2. A: The number of myelin-
nerves in the first toe of in Case 2. A is a low-magnification im-
ated  and unmyelinated nerves  was  preserved,  although  some 
age of one fascicle with extensive structure-less space in the en-
unmyelinated nerve  axons (indicated  by  arrows) contained 
doneurium, indicating edema. B is a high-magnification image 
electron-dense coarse  granular materials,  possibly indicating 
of the framed area in A: Denervated Schwann cell’s cytoplas-
degeneration. B shows an enlarged image of the unmyelinated 
mic processes are surrounded by proliferating bundles of col-
axon indicated  by the left arrow. Coarse  granular  structures 
lagen fibers (indicated  by  arrows). Both findings indicate  se-
with a diameter ranging from 200 to 500 Å. Their morphology 
vere degeneration of the nerve fascicle. Original magnification 
coincided with that of glycogen granules (49). Original magni-
A ×7,500, B ×1,800.
fication A ×7,500, B ×20,000.
Table5.The  Final Diagnosis of 40 
Girls Examined

Diagnosis             No.
CRPS-1 alone 
5
CRPS-1+OH  
5
A
CRPS-1+OD  
5
CRPS-1+POTS 3
B
OH alone 
 
3
OD alone 
 
7
POTS alone   
1   
Others  
11
logical findings of intramuscular edema with degeneration
Figure11.Electron-microscopic findings of the intradermal 
have been previously reported in one patient with reflex
nerves in the calf in Case 4. A shows a few unmyelinated nerve 
sympathetic dystrophy (29).
axons (indicated  by  arrows) containing electron-dense coarse 
granular materials. B reveals  denervated Schwann cell cyto-
Orthostatic intolerance
plasmic processes. Both findings closely resemble those seen in 
Orthostatic intolerance can be classified into four different
Figs. 8 and 9. Original magnification A ×12,000, B ×20,000.
conditions (30), including idiopathic orthostatic hypotension
(IOH) and similar conditions associated with neurological
myalgia and arthralgia, as well as elevated levels of serum
disorders. The latter group is further divided into two di-
CK and CRP. In our series of girls, two demonstrated myal-
verse forms: peripheral sympathetic neuropathy and central
gia and grasping pain in the calves, and MRI disclosed ab-
nervous system defects in the sympathetic nerve activity.
normal signals in the involved muscles. However, the serum
The fourth type is POTS. IOH and its related disorder, OD,
levels of CRP and CK were normal in both girls, and it was
are recognized to cause a variety of symptoms, such as re-
confirmed in the present Case 4 that the calf lesions on MRI
current dizziness, chronic fatigue, headaches and syncope, in
spontaneously disappeared within a short period and that the
school-aged children and adolescents (14). Approximately
histology of the involved muscle showed no inflammation.
80% of our affected girls had chronic headaches, which may
Such muscular lesions appear to reflect transient vasogenic
have been causally related to IOH or OD in 67% of cases.
edema caused by neurogenic dysregulation, and the histo-
Among these cases, Case 1 was the first in which all of the
2197

Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
patient’s symptoms could be attributed to OD. In addition,
HPV vaccination.
the patient’s peripheral sympathetic nerve response based on
Movement disorders
variations in the plasma noradrenalin level during position
changes was inadequate (31).
One initial adverse event seen in post-vaccinated Japanese
POTS is a disorder of the autonomic nervous system that
girls that was also noticed by mass media was violent limb
develops in adolescents and young people, with females be-
tremulousness and bizarre gait disturbances. CRPS is known
ing predominant. The orthostatic symptoms of POTS include
to be accompanied by various neurologic manifestations, in-
lightheadedness, visual blurring or tunneling, palpitations,
cluding limb paresis, incoordination, tremors, myoclonus
tremulousness and weakness, especially in the legs. Symp-
and dystonia (37). Similarly, tremulousness and limb weak-
toms such as hyperventilation, anxiety, chest wall pain, acral
ness are frequently observed in patients with POTS (38).
coldness and pain occur less frequently (17, 32). Orthostatic
These involuntary movements can be diminished or abol-
stress can easily evoke intense fear or panic in some predis-
ished by successful sympathetic blockade; thus, increased
posed individuals (32). It is also noted that there is a consid-
peripheral afferent input associated with overactivity of the
erable overlap between POTS and chronic fatigue syn-
peripheral sympathetic nervous system appears to play an
drome (33), and patients with both disorders have been re-
important role in the pathogenesis of this condition (34, 35).
ported to complain of cognitive impairments, low energy
Denervated supersensitivity of peripheral adrenoreceptors is
and/or pronounced sleep disturbances, with the inability to
another candidate inducing the above abnormal move-
complete normal educational activities or occupational du-
ments (17, 25). The violent limb tremulousness observed in
ties (34). These symptoms are so severe that the lives of the
the affected girls temporally appeared in the early stage of
patients and their families are seriously disrupted. However,
the disease. Electromyograms recorded in our Case 2 indi-
these complicated conditions are not widely recognized
cated that the involuntary movements closely resembled
among physicians or pediatric specialists, and many patients
myoclonus (39) and may be induced peripherally, since the
are misdiagnosed as having psychiatric diseases (34).
myoclonic electromyographic discharge was not associated
The present Cases 2 and 3, which involved orthostatic in-
with any preceding electroencephalographic activity (40).
tolerance, are representative in that the patients were not
Concerning gait disturbances, symptoms such as limb
adequately diagnosed and/or treated at previous institutes.
pain, tremulousness and weakness are thought to be respon-
For example, the visual symptoms and occurrence of tran-
sible. The limb weakness noted in 15 of our girls was dis-
sient left hemiparesis just after waking up seen in Case 2
proportionate to the patient’s muscle strength on manual
may be caused by OH, while the chest discomfort and psy-
muscle testing and was not attributable to disturbed neural
chological symptoms noted in Case 3 may be produced by
control of the voluntary movement system, including the py-
POTS. Additionally, the patient in Case 5, with a confirmed
ramidal tract and peripheral somatic motor nerves. It is
diagnosis of CRPS-I and POTS, exhibited slight cognitive
therefore supposed that the limb weakness was initially re-
decline, as shown on a conventional WAIS examination.
lated to CRPS or POTS and later enhanced by psychoso-
Similar information regarding a decreased ability to learn
matic conditions, such as severe anxiety and/or prolonged
was collected from 40% of the patients in our series.
asthenia. Consequently, 13 of our 15 girls with gait distur-
Concerning the causative relationship between the above
bances discontinued their normal school lives. A decreased
sympathetic nerve-mediated manifestations and the use of
ability to learn and/or not attending school among post-
HPV vaccines, our patients had three main disorders, includ-
vaccinated girls is an important social problem.
ing CRPS-I, OH and POTS. OH is well known to develop
Etiology
spontaneously in many adolescent girls; however, OH was
accompanied by CRPS-I in the present study. The combina-
It has been reported that some autoimmune neurological
tion of both disorders is rarely seen in the normal popula-
diseases have developed in post-vaccinated girls, including
tion of adolescent Japanese girls. Another orthostatic intoler-
Guillain-Barré syndrome (4), acute disseminated encephalo-
ance disorder, POTS, is classified as an attenuated form of
myelitis (41) and multiple sclerosis (42, 43). Among these
acute autonomic neuropathy or acute pandysautonomia (35),
patients, 69 treated with GardasilⓇ vaccination who subse-
and an autoimmune origin has been implicated in the patho-
quently developed Guillain-Barré syndrome were collected
genesis of this disease. For example, viral infections very
in the U.S. between 2006 and 2009 (44). The onset of
occasionally precede the onset of symptoms (17, 35), and
symptoms was within six weeks after vaccination, and the
the Mayo clinic’s experience with 152 patients with POTS
estimated
weekly
rate
of
reporting
of
post-GardasilⓇ
found that 90.5% of the patient’s had a history of an antece-
Guillain-Barré syndrome within the first six weeks (6.6 per
dent viral infection (32). In addition, an interesting case of a
10,000,000) was higher than that observed in the general
patient who developed POTS after vaccination with Gar-
population. Although CRPS is not generally accepted to be
dasilⓇ was recently reported from the U.S. (36). In contrast,
an autoimmune disorder, our patients with proven CRPS-I
four of the present girls, including those in Cases 3 and 5,
concomitant with OH or POTS had evidence of post-
who were shown to have POTS, lacked any antecedent viral
ganglionic sympathetic neuropathy, such as a decreased
infections; therefore, a possible predisposing factor was
plasma level of noradrenalin (31), abnormal MIBG cardiac
2198

Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
scintigram findings, as observed in the present Case
Nov
20];
Available
from:
http://www.mhlw.go.jp/stf/shingi/
3 (15, 16), and an ultrastructural pathology of intradermal
0000033881.html (in Jananese).
4. Slade BA, Leidel L, Vellozzi C, et al. Postlicensure safety surveil-
unmyelinated nerve fiber degeneration, all of which support
lance for quadrivalent human papillomavirus recombinant vaccine.
that this condition is a form of autonomic neuropathy. Fur-
JAMA 302: 750-757, 2009.
thermore, POTS is now regarded to be an immune-mediated
5. Stanton-Hicks M, Jänig W, Hassenbusch S, Haddox JD, Boas R,
disorder (32). Based on the temporal relationship between
Wilson P. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: changing concepts and
immunization and the development of symptoms, we cannot
taxonomy. Pain 63: 127-133, 1995.
6. Jastaniah WA, Dobson S, Lugsdin JG, Petty RE. Complex re-
deny the possibility that immunization with HPV vaccines
gional pain syndrome after hepatitis B vaccine. J Pediatr 143:
may secondarily induce sympathetically mediated disorders,
802-804, 2003.
including CRPS-I, OH and POTS.
7. Genc H, Karagoz A, Saracoglu M, Sert E, Erdem HR. Complex
Recently, the presence of gAChR antibodies in the serum
regional pain syndrome type-I after rubella vaccine. Eur J Pain 9:
has been noted to be involved in the pathogenesis of various
517-520, 2005.
8. Richards S, Chalkiadis G, Lakshman R, Buttery JP, Crawford NW.
autonomic disorders (45). Such antibodies act against neuro-
Complex regional pain syndrome following immunisation. Arch
nal acetylcholine receptors in the autonomic ganglia and are
Dis Child 97: 913-915, 2012.
frequently found in patients with autoimmune autonomic
9. Harden RN, Bruehl S, Stanton-Hicks M, Wilson PR. Proposed
ganglionopathy. Additionally, two rare cases of Rasmussen
new diagnostic criteria for complex regional pain syndrome. Pain
encephalitis with α7 AChR antibodies have been re-
Med 8: 326-331, 2007.
ported (46). It has also been reported that a low titer of
10. Kurvers HAJM, Jacobs MJHM, Beuk RJ, et al. Reflex sympa-
thetic dystrophy: evolution of microcirculatory disturbance in
gAChR antibodies is detected in the serum in a small num-
time. Pain 60: 333-340, 1995.
ber of patients with POTS (32). In contrast, this autoanti-
11. Burbelo PD, Ching KH, Klimavicz CM, Iadarola MJ. Antibody
body was undetectable in 14 of our girls, including four
profiling by Luciferase Immunoprecipitation Systems (LIPS). J Vis
with POTS. The negative findings observed in our series of
Exp 32: e1549, 2009.
girls with autonomic symptoms indicates that the post-
12. Higuchi O, Hamuro J, Motomura M, Yamanashi Y. Autoantibodies
to low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 in myasthenia
ganglionic peripheral sympathetic nerve lesions produced
gravis. Ann Neurol 69: 418-422, 2011.
autonomic dysfunction in these cases. Finally, the above pe-
13. Skok MV, Voitenko LP, Voitenko SV, et al. Alpha subunit compo-
ripheral sympathetic nerve disorders have not been reported
sition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the rat autonomic
in foreign cohort studies of human HPV vaccines (47, 48)
ganglia neurons as determined with subunit-specific anti-alpha
and it thus remains unclear why Japanese girls are more fre-
(181-192) peptide antibodies. Neuroscience 93: 1427-1436, 1999.
14. Tanaka H, Fujita Y, Takenaka Y, et al. Japanese clinical guidelines
quently involved. It is unlikely that the Japanese environ-
for juvenile orthostatic dysregulation version 1. Pediatr Int 51:
ment plays a role in the pathogenesis of this unique auto-
169-179, 2009.
nomic disorder, as the patient in our Case 5, who received
15. Orimo S, Ozawa E, Nakade S, Sugimoto T, Mizusawa H. 123I-
vaccination in the U.S., developed similar adverse reactions.
meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy in Parkinson’s disease. J
Studies with large-scale investigations and experimental ap-
Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 67: 189-194, 1999.
16. Orirmo S, Amino T, Itoh Y, et al. Cardiac sympathetic denervation
proaches are needed to further answer these questions.
precedes neuronal loss in the sympathetic ganglia in Lewy body
disease. Acta Neuropathol 109: 583-588, 2005.
The authors state that they have no Conflict of Interest (COI).
17. Low PA, Opfer-Gehrking TL, Textor SC, et al. Postural tachycar-
dia syndrome (POTS). Neurology 45 (Suppl 5): S19-S25, 1995.
Acknowledgement
18. American Autonomic Society. Consensus statement on the defini-
tion of orthostatic hypotension, pure autonomic failure and multi-
We are most grateful to Ms. Misuzu Kurashina at our depart-
ple system atrophy. Clin Auton Res 6: 125-126, 1996.
ment for her assistance, Miss Sakiko Ishihara at the Department
19. Ziegler MG, Lake CR, Kopin IJ. The sympathetic-nervous-system
of Rehabilitation in our hospital for conducting the WAIS exami-
defect in primary orthostatic hypotension. N Engl J Med 296:
nation. This work was supported by a grant from the Neuroim-
293-297, 1977.
munological Disease Division, Ministry of Public Health, Labour
20. Okubo S. Digital plethysmogram. In: Kanai’s Manual of Clinical
and Welfare, Japan and a Health and Labour Science Research
Laboratory Medicine. 31st ed. Kanai M, Ed. Kanehara & Co., To-
Grant on Intractable Diseases (Pathogenesis and Diagnostic Ac-
kyo, 1998: 1546-1547 (in Japanese).
curacy of Neuropathic Pain, 23170301 to S.I.) from the Ministry
21. Shibata M. Japanese diagnostic hallmark for CRPS. In: CRPS
(complex regional pain syndrome). Mashimo T, Shibata M, Eds.
of Public Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan.
Shinkou Trading Co., Tokyo, 2009: 68 (in Japanese).
22. Bruehl S, Harden RN, Galer BS, et al. Extensive validation of
References
IASP diagnostic criteria for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome
and proposed research diagnostic criteria. Pain 81: 147-154, 1999.
1. The future II study group. Quadrivalent vaccine against human pa-
23. Wilder RT. Management of pediatric patients with complex re-
pillomavirus to prevent high-grade cervical lesions. N Engl J Med
gional pain syndrome. Clin J Pain 22: 443-448, 2006.
356: 1915-1927, 2007.
24. Ochoa JL, Yarnitsky D. The triple cold syndrome. Cold hyperalge-
2. Jeurissen S, Makar A. Epidemiological and economic impact of
sia, cold hypoaesthesia and cold skin in peripheral nerve disease.
human papillomavirus vaccines. Int J Gynelogical Cancer 19: 761-
Brain 117: 185-197, 1994.
771, 2009.
25. van der Laan L, ter Laak HJ, Gabreëls-Festen A, Gabreëls F, Go-
3. The Ministry of Public Health, Labour and Welfare [Internet]. To-
ris RJA. Complex regional pain syndrome type I (RSD). Pathol-
kyo: Ministry of Public Health, Labour and Welfare [cited 2013
2199

Intern Med 53: 2185-2200, 2014
DOI: 10.2169/internalmedicine.53.3133
ogy of skeletal muscle and paripheral nerve. Neurology 51: 20-25,
sympathetic dystrophy. Neurology 40: 57-61, 1990.
1998.
38. Jankovic J. Post-traumatic movement disorders: central and pe-
26. Oaklander AL, Rissmiller JG, Gelman LB, Zheng L, Chang Y,
ripheral mechanisms. Neurology 44: 2006-2014, 1994.
Gott R. Evidence of focal small-fiber axonal degeneration in com-
39. Shibasaki H, Motomura S, Yamashita Y, Shii H, Kuroiwa Y. Peri-
plex regional pain syndrome-I (reflex sympathetic dystrophy).
odic synchronous discharge and myoclonus in Creutzfeldt-Jakob
Pain 120: 235-243, 2006.
disease: diagnostic application of jerked locked averaging method.
27. Gherardi RK, Coquet M, Bélec L, et al. Macrophagic myofascii-
Ann Neurol 9: 150-156, 1981.
tis: a reaction to intramuscular injections of aluminium-containing
40. Shibasaki H, Sakai T, Nishimura H, Sato Y, Goto I, Kuroiwa Y.
vaccines. J Neurol 246 Suppl 1: I/19, 1999.
Involuntary movements in chorea-acanthocytosis: acomparison
28. Authier F-J, Cherin P, Creange A, et al. Central nervous system
with Huntington’s chrorea. Ann Neurol 12: 311-314, 1982.
disease in patients with macrophagic myofasciitis. Brain 124: 974-
41. Wildemann B, Jarius S, Hartmann M, Regula JU, Hametner C.
983, 2001.
Acute
disseminated
encephalomyelitis
following
vaccination
29. Kirsch K. Das Sudeck-Leriche Syndrom als Fernstorung (Kliniek
against human papilloma virus. Neurology 72: 2132-2133, 2009.
und Histologie). Z Orthop 116: 199-203, 1978 (in Germany, Ab-
42. Sutton I, Lahoria R, Tan IL, Clouston P, Barnett MH. CNS de-
stract in English).
myelination and quadrivalent HPV vaccination. Mult Scler 15:
30. Polinsky RJ, Ebert MH, Weise V. Pharmacologic distinction of
116-119, 2009.
different orthostatic hypotension syndrome. Neurology 31: 1-7,
43. Chang J, Campagnolo D, Vollmer TL, Bomprezzi R. Demyelinat-
1981.
ing disease and polyvalent human papilloma virus vaccination. J
31. Suzuki T, Higa S, Sakoda S, et al. Orthostatic hypotension in fa-
Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 82: 1296-1298, 2011.
milial amyloid polyneuropathy: treatment with DL-threo-3, 4-
44. Souayah N, Michas-Martin PA, Nasar A, et al. Guillain-Barré syn-
dihydroxyphenylserine. Neurology 31: 1323-1326, 1981.
drome after Gardasil vaccination: data from vaccine adverse event
32. Thieben MJ, Sandroni P, Sletten DM, et al. Postural orthostatic
reporting system 2006-2009. Vaccine 29: 886-889, 2011.
tachycardia syndrome: the Mayo clinic experience. Mayo Clin
45. Vernino S, Lindstrom J, Hopkins S, et al. Characterization of gan-
Proc 82: 308-313, 2007.
glionic acetylcholine receptor autoantibodies. J Neuroimmunol
33. Stewart JM. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in adolescents
197: 63-69, 2008.
with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and chronic fatigue
46. Watson R, Jepson JE, Bermudez I, et al. Alpha 7-acetylcholine re-
syndrome is characterized by attenuated vagal baroreflex and po-
ceptor antibodies in two patients with Rasmussen encephalitis.
tentiated sympathetic vasomotion. Pediatr Res 48: 218-226, 2000.
Neurology 65: 1802-1804, 2005.
34. Karas B, Grubb BP, Boeth K, Kip K. The postural orthostatic
47. Gasparini R, Bonanni P, Levi M, et al. Safety and tolerability of
tachycardia syndrome: a potentially treatable cause of chronic fa-
bivalent HPV vaccine. An Italian post-licensure study. Hum Vac-
tigue, exercise intolerance, and cognitive impairment in adoles-
cin (Suppl): 136-146, 2011.
cents. PACE 23: 344-351, 2000.
48. Arnheim-Dahiström L, Pasternak B, Svanström H, Sparén P, Hviid
35. Schondorf R, Low PA. Idiopathic postural orthostatic tachycardia
A. Autoimmune, neurological, and venous thromboembolitic ad-
syndrome: an attenuated form of acute pandysautonomia? Neurol-
verse events after immunization of adolescent girls with quadriva-
ogy 43: 132-137, 1993.
lent human papillomavirus vaccine in Denmark and Sweden: co-
36. Blitshteyn S. Postural tachycardia syndrome after vaccination with
hort study. BMJ 347: f5906, 2013.
Gardasil. Eur J Neurol 17: e52, 2010.
49. Glycogen. A Textbook of Histology. 9th ed. Bloom W, Fawcett
37. Schwartzman RJ, Kerrigan J. The movement disorder of reflex
DW, Eds. WB Saunders, Philadelphia, 1968: 53.
Ⓒ 2014 The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine
http://www.naika.or.jp/imonline/index.html
2200