This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Summary Minutes for CHM meeting on 16th & 17th July 2015'.

Original Article
Click here to view the article Editorial comment by J. Nijs
doi: 10.1111/joim.12022
Clinical characteristics of a novel subgroup of chronic
fatigue syndrome patients with postural orthostatic
tachycardia syndrome
I. Lewis1, J. Pairman2, G. Spickett2 & J. L. Newton1,2,3
From the 1Institute for Ageing & Health, Newcastle University; 2Northern CFS Clinical Network, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation
Trust and 3UK NIHR Biomedical Research Centre in Ageing, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK
Abstract. Lewis I, Pairman J, Spickett G, Newton JL
Results. CFS patients with POTS (13%, n = 24) were
(Newcastle
University,
Newcastle;
Newcastle
younger (29  12 vs. 42  13 years, P < 0.0001),
Hospitals
NHS
Foundation
Trust,
Newcastle;
less fatigued (Chalder fatigue scale, 8  4 vs.
Newcastle
University,
Newcastle).
Clinical
10  2, P = 0.002), less depressed (HADS-D,
characteristics of a novel subgroup of chronic
6  4 vs. 9  4, P = 0.01) and had reduced day-
fatigue
syndrome
patients
with
postural
time hypersomnolence (ESS, 7  6 vs. 10  5,
orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. J Intern Med
P = 0.02), compared with patients without POTS.
2013; 273: 501–510.
In addition, they exhibited greater orthostatic
intolerance (OGS, 11  5; P < 0.0001) and auto-
Objectives. A significant proportion of patients with
nomic dysfunction. A combined clinical assess-
chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) also have postural
ment tool of ESS  9 and OGS  9 identifies
orthostatic
tachycardia syndrome (POTS). We
accurately CFS patients with POTS with 100%
aimed to characterize these patients and differen-
positive and negative predictive values.
tiate them from CFS patients without POTS in
terms of clinical and autonomic features.
Conclusions. The presence of POTS marks a distinct
clinical group of CFS patents, with phenotypic
Methods. A total of 179 patients with CFS (1994
features differentiating them from those without
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria)
POTS. A combination of validated clinical assess-
attending one of the largest Department of Health-
ment tools can determine which CFS patients have
funded CFS clinical services were included in this
POTS with a high degree of accuracy, and thus
study. Outcome measures were as follows: (i) symp-
potentially identify those who require further
tom assessment tools including the fatigue impact
investigation and consideration for therapy to
scale, Chalder fatigue scale, Epworth sleepiness
control heart rate.
scale (ESS), orthostatic grading scale (OGS) and
hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS-A and
Keywords: autonomic dysfunction, chronic fatigue
-D, respectively), (ii) autonomic function analysis
syndrome,
dysautonomia,
postural
orthostatic
including heart rate variability and (iii) haemody-
tachycardia syndrome.
namic responses including left ventricular ejection
time and systolic blood pressure drop upon standing.
Abnormalities of the vascular system and its reg-
Introduction
ulation by the autonomic nervous system (partic-
Chronic
fatigue
syndrome
(CFS)
has
a
ularly in response to standing) are commonly
prevalence of 0.2%–4% in the UK [1], and is
found in patients with CFS [5–20] resulting in a
characterized by persistent/recurrent postexer-
high association between CFS and dysautonomia.
tional fatigue for longer than 6 months that
Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS),
cannot be explained by other conditions [2, 3].
a form of dysautonomia, is found in 29% of CFS
CFS affects individuals of all ages, and can
patients [21], whereas fatigue is experienced by
greatly reduce the ability to function on a daily
almost 50% of those with POTS [22].
basis, work or attend school. Despite its impact
on
patients,
the
cause
of
CFS
remains
POTS is diagnosed when symptoms of orthostatic
unknown [4].
intolerance are associated with an increase in heart
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
501

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
rate from the supine to upright position [22].The
3/24; without POTS, 8/155). Therefore, analyses
results of previous studies have suggested that
of the questionnaires were based on only 21 CFS
POTS
underlies
the
orthostatic
intolerance
patients with and 147 without POTS.
observed in the majority of those with CFS [20].
It is currently unclear whether POTS is a separate
The study was approved by the Newcastle and
clinical entity distinct from CFS, or whether patients
North Tyneside local research ethics committee
with POTS form a subset of those with CFS with a
and
all
subjects
provided
written
informed
specific group of particularly marked symptoms.
consent. The symptom assessment question-
naires have been used in previous studies. HRV
In the current study, subjects with CFS underwent
analysis was undertaken by a specialist trained
clinical assessment including a number of symptom
nurse experienced in the use of the Task-forcee
assessment tools, autonomic function analysis and
monitor (CNSystems, Graz, Austria), and able to
measures of haemodynamic response to standing.
offer constant reassurance to put the patient at
The primary aim of this study was to determine
ease.
whether CFS patients with and without POTS can be
differentiated based on symptoms, heart rate vari-
Outcome measures
ability (HRV) and left ventricular ejection time
(LVET). Combining the results of these assessments
Symptom assessment tools
may lead to the identification of a distinct clinical
The following symptom assessment tools were used
subtype of CFS. A secondary aim was to identify a
to evaluate all participants.
clinical tool to aid the prediction of POTS in CFS
patients, which could improve the management of
Fatigue impact scale (FIS). The FIS [23] is a 40-
patients with both conditions.
item generic scale of fatigue impact which is used
to assess fatigue severity. This scale has previously
Methods
been validated and extensively used in CFS
Recruitment of participants
patients. Possible scores range from 0 to 160 with
higher scores representing increased fatigue.
A total of 179 consecutive patients who had
attended the Northern Regional Department of
Cognitive failures questionnaire (CFQ). The CFQ
Health-funded CFS Clinical Service (Newcastle
measures self-reported failures in perception, mem-
upon Tyne, UK) between November 2008 and June
ory and motor function [24]. The questionnaire con-
2011 with a diagnosis of CFS according to the 1994
sists of 25 items, each graded on a scale of 0–4; adding
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
the scores for the individual items creates a total score.
criteria [3] were included in this study. All patients
with secondary causes of fatigue (such as hypo-
Hospital
anxiety
and
depression
scale
thyroidism or diabetes) or who fulfilled the 1994
(HADS). The HADS [25] is a 14-item measure of
CDC exclusion criteria were excluded from the
current anxiety (HADS-A) and depression (HADS-
study (n = 23). The 1994 CDC criteria are the most
D). Caseness for anxiety or depression is revealed
widely used benchmark in research and clinical
by subscores greater than 11.
practice for diagnosing CFS.
Short-form health survey. The 36-item Short Form
In addition to a full clinical evaluation, subjects
(SF-36) is a generic scale of functional impairment
underwent assessment of symptoms and auto-
in eight areas [26]. Scores in each area reflect
nomic nervous system function. Subjects were
function and well-being, and lower values indicate
divided into two groups according to the presence
more impairment.
of POTS; defined as symptoms of orthostatic intol-
erance associated with an increase in heart rate
Self-efficacy. The self-efficacy scale assesses the
from the supine to upright position of >30 beats per
ability to cope with daily stresses [27]. The scale
min (beat to beat) or to a heart rate of >120 beats
consists of 10 items, each graded on a scale of 1–4,
per min on immediate standing or during 2 min of
giving a total score range 10–40.
standing [22].
Chalder fatigue scale. The Chalder fatigue scale
A small proportion of subjects failed to return any
measures self-reported fatigue. It consists of 14 items
symptom assessment questionnaires (with POTS,
which can be separated into two subdomains; the
502
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
Chalder Fatigue mental and physical scales, which
Statistical analysis
measure mental and physical fatigue, respectively.
All statistical analyses were performed using
Pain rating. Widespread muscle and joint pain
GraphPad Prism version 5.00 (Windows, GraphPad
occur in CFS and we therefore asked each subject to
Software, San Diego, CA, USA). All data were
rate their pain on a visual analogue scale. Subjects
normally distributed. Comparisons were, there-
were asked to mark a position on a 10-cm line to
fore, made between proportions in each group
indicate how much pain they were feeling at that
using Fisher’s exact test and between continuous
time, from ‘No pain’ to ‘Worst pain ever’.
variables using the independent two-tailed Stu-
dent’s t-test. The level of significance was set at
Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS). In view of the
P < 0.05. All values are expressed as mean  SD
recently identified association between excessive
unless otherwise stated. The Pearson R correlation
daytime sleepiness and fatigue, all subjects com-
was used to determine the correlation between
pleted the ESS questionnaire (possible score range
variables. The positive predictive value was calcu-
0–24) [28]. This fully validated tool assesses day-
lated by dividing the number of true positives by
time hypersomnolence, with a score  10 being
the sum of the true and false positives. Conversely,
indicative of significant hypersomnolence during
the negative predictive value was calculated by
the day.
dividing the number of true negatives by the sum of
the false and true negatives.
Orthostatic grading scale (OGS). Subjects com-
pleted the OGS, a fully validated self-reported tool
Results
to assess the symptoms of orthostatic intolerance
due to orthostatic hypotension (e.g. severity, fre-
Overall, 179 consecutive CFS patients from the
quency and interference with daily activities) [29].
Newcastle CFS Clinical Service were included in
The OGS consists of five items, each graded on a
the study and underwent a series of demographic,
scale of 0–4; adding the scores for the individual
symptom assessment and autonomic function
items creates a total score of 0–20.
tests. There was a wide variation in age amongst
subjects: 26% were aged  30 years, 45% were 31–
Haemodynamic and autonomic parameters
49 years and 29% were  50 years. In total 18%
Autonomic function was assessed using HRV,
(n = 33) were men and the mean  SD length of
baroreflex sensitivity and the baroreceptor effec-
history of CFS and body mass index (BMI) were
tiveness index (which quantifies the number of
87  79 months and 25  5 kg m 2 respectively.
times the baroreflex is effective in driving the sinus
Table 1 summarizes the characteristics of the CFS
node) [30–32]. Detailed methods have previously
cohort. As expected, the level of fatigue was high
been described [33]. All haemodynamic measure-
throughout the study population measured using
ments were performed following a 10-min period of
both the FIS and the Chalder fatigue scale. The
supine rest for stabilization; during this period
rates of anxiety and depression were 32% (n = 58)
electrocardiography was performed and noninva-
and 30% (n = 54) respectively. There was a high
sive beat-to-beat blood pressure was monitored
prevalence of daytime sleepiness and orthostatic
continuously using a vascular unloading device
symptoms such as feelings of ‘light-headedness’
(Task-forcee).
within the cohort. The degree of functional impair-
ment was high, as was cognitive impairment. The
LVET is the time interval from the opening to the
mean pain rating scores were low, although they
closing of the aortic valve (mechanical systole).
varied over a wide range.
Heart rate and blood pressure response to standing
was assessed in all subjects [30]. Subjects were
Characteristics of the subgroup with POTS
asked to stand in the supine position within 3 s
with assistance if required. Continuous beat-
The CFS cohort was separated into two subgroups
to-beat heart rate and blood pressure measure-
based on the concomitant presence of POTS: 13%
ments were recorded for 2 min whilst standing [3].
(n = 24)
with
(POTS-CFS
group)
and
87%
Systolic blood pressure (SBP) drop upon standing
(n = 155) without POTS (non-POTS-CFS group;
was calculated by subtracting the lowest SBP upon
Table 1). Patients in the POTS group were signif-
standing for 3 min (nadir SBP) from the mean SBP
icantly
younger
(29  12
vs.
42  13 years,
over 20 cardiac beats prior to standing.
P  0.0001), with a greater proportion under the
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
503
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
Table 1 Characteristics of the total CFS cohort and patients with and without POTS based on symptom assessment tools
Cohort
POTS
Non-POTS
P
Total subjects (n)
179
24
155
ns
Male (n,%)
33 (18%)
5 (21%)
28 (18%)
0.8a
Age (years)
40  13
29  12
42  13
<0.0001
Length of history (months)
87  79
73  66
89  81
0.4
BMI (kg m 2)
25  5
25  6
25  5
0.5
POTS (n,%)
24 (13%)
-
-
-
FIS
98  30
101  34
98  30
0.7
Chalder Fatigue (% max)
9  3
8  4
10  2
<0.01
Physical (% max)
6  2
5  3
6  1.6
<0.01
Mental (% max)
3  1
3  2
3  1
<0.01
CFQ
61  20
56  30
62  18
0.3
HADS total
18  7
15  7
18  7
0.04
HADS-A
9  5
8  5
9  4.5
0.5
Normal (%)b
69  3 (39%)
10  2 (48%)
59  3 (41%)
0.7
Borderline (%)b
39  4 (22%)
4  1 (19%)
35  4 (24%)
0.5
Abnormal (%)b
58  5 (32%)
7  3 (33%)
51  5 (35%)
0.6
HADS-D
9  4
6  4
9  4
0.01
Normal (%)b
69  2 (39%)
12  2 (57%)
57  2 (39%)
0.03
Borderline (%)b
45  1 (25%)
6  1 (29%)
39  1 (27%)
0.6
Abnormal (%)b
54  2 (30%)
3  1 (14%)
51  2 (35%)
0.05
SF-36
18  5
17  5
18  5
0.3
Self-efficacy
26  14
25  16
26  13
0.7
Pain rating
4  3
4  3
4  3
0.9
ESS
10  6
7  6
10  5
0.02
Score  10
53%
33%
56%
-
OGS
7  5
11  5
6  4
<0.0001
Score  4
74%
95%
71%
-
Score  9
56%
67%
29%
-
BMI, body mass index; CFS, chronic fatigue syndrome; CFQ, cognitive failures questionnaire; ESS, Epworth sleepiness
scores; FIS, fatigue impact scores; HADS, hospital anxiety and depression scale (A, anxiety; D, depression); OGS,
orthostatic grading scale; POTS, postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome; SF-36, short-form (36-item) health survey.
aFisher’s exact test. bPercentage of subjects with subscores included in the category for caseness for anxiety (A) or
depression (D). Normal = score 0–7; borderline = 8–10; abnormal = 11–21.
Values are given as mean  SD unless stated otherwise. P values calculated from two-tailed Student’s t-test with P < 0.05
considered statistically significant.
age of 30 years (54% vs. 22%) and considerably
with depression (14%, n = 3 vs. 35%, n = 51;
fewer aged above 50 years (4% vs. 30%). There
P = 0.05). There was no difference in the anxiety
were no differences in the proportion of men,
domain of the HADS test between these two
length of CFS history, weight or BMI between the
groups. Patients in the POTS-CFS subgroup were
two groups.
significantly less fatigued according to the Chalder
fatigue scale in both the physical and mental
Table 1 shows the results of the symptom assess-
domains, and also reported significantly lower
ment tools for the two subgroups. Amongst the
levels of daytime sleepiness (Fig. 1a). The presence
POTS-CFS subgroup, there were fewer subjects
of orthostatic symptoms was significantly more
504
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
(a)
= <0.02
(b)
= <0.0001
15
15
10
10
ESS
OGS
5
5
0
0
POTS
Non-POTS
POTS
Non-POTS
Fig. 1 Comparison of CFS-POTS and non-CFS-POTS subgroups with regard to (a) Epworth sleepiness scale, where  10 is
considered abnormal daytime sleepiness that severely impacts on quality of life, and (b) orthostatic grading scale (OGS), a
measure of the prevalence of orthostatic symptoms. Statistics calculated using the two-tailed Student’s t-test with P  0.05
considered statistically significant.
likely in the POTS-CFS group, with two thirds
results were found for both total and the mental
(n = 8) of patients scoring >9 on the OGS (Fig. 1b).
domain of the Chalder fatigue scale.
Finally, there were no differences in functional
domains
(SF-36
and
self-efficacy),
cognitive
Autonomic function in the POTS-CFS subgroup
impairment (CFQ) and pain ratings between the
two subgroups.
Due to the high prevalence of autonomic dysfunc-
tion in CFS patients, next we assessed the
We found no significant difference in FIS scores
differences in autonomic dysfunction between the
between the two groups. Whereas there was a wide
POTS-CFS and non-POTS-CFS groups. The two
range of FIS scores, there appeared to be a ‘low
groups underwent HRV analysis during a 10-min
ceiling effect’ with the Chalder fatigue scale
supine rest (Table 2). Compared with subjects in
(Fig. 2a), in which due to the low range of scores
the non-POTS-CFS group, those in the POTS-CFS
on the Chalder fatigue scale, a high proportion of
group had significantly lower, (i) low-frequency HRV
subjects demonstrated maximum fatigue scores,
(LF; predominantly sympathetic), (ii) high-fre-
yet demonstrating highly varied FIS scores. There
quency HRV (HF, predominantly parasympathetic)
was a correlation between the two fatigue measur-
and (iii) very low-frequency HRV (VLF) (Fig. 3).
ing tools (r = 0.1; r2 = 0.03; P = 0.01); however,
62.5% (n = 105) of subjects scored the maximum
The capacity of the left ventricle to respond to
score of 7 on the Chalder fatigue scale (physical),
orthostasis was markedly reduced in patients in
whereas the same subjects reported fatigue on the
the POTS-CFS group (LVET), although these
FIS in the range from 44 to 156 (Fig. 2b). Similar
patients had a higher resting heart rate (Table 2).
(a)
(b)
7
100
FIS
6
Chalder Fatigue
5
80
4
P = 0.02
60
r2 = 0.03
3
r = 0.1
40
2
number
20
1
Chalder Fatigue score 0
0
0
20
40
60
80 100 120 140 160

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
FIS
0–20 21–40 41–60 61–80 81–100101–120121–140141–160
Fig. 2 Comparison of the Chalder fatigue (physical) scale and the fatigue impact scale (FIS). (a) The relationship between
the two fatigue scales. (b) Whereas the majority (n = 105) of subjects scored the maximum possible score on the Chalder
fatigue (physical) scale, there was a broader range of FIS scores. Both scales were split into eight categories.
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
505
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
Table 2 Autonomic function of the total CFS cohort and patients with and without POTS
Cohort
POTS
non-POTS
P
HR (beats per min)
75  12
88.9  15.3
72.5  9.9
<0.0001
Systolic BP (mmHg)
120  18
120  11.5
119.9  17.7
0.7
Diastolic BP (mmHg)
79  13
79.2  12.2
78.3  13.2
0.8
Mean BP (mmHg)
92  14
93.4  11.5
92.1  14.3
0.7
LVET (ms)
281  14
266.1  16.8
283.3  11.6
<0.0001
Total HRV (ms2)
1193  1663
883.9  1504.8
1221.6  1672.2
0.6
LF-HRV (ms2)
410  524
247.4  187.5
430.5  547.5
<0.01
HF-HRV(ms2)
464  963
181.5  218.4
488.9  1002.7
<0.001
VLF-HRV(ms2)
318  708
137.5  138.2
302.3  526.3
<0.001
LF/HF
3  4
2.0  1.4
1.9  2.4
0.1
BRS (ms mmHg 1)
14  11
12  6.6
14.4  11.0
0.5
BEI (%)
69  16
66.3  22.8
69.7  15.4
0.4
Systolic BP drop on active standing (mmHg)
15  11
20  12
14  10
0.01
BEI, baroreflex effectiveness index; BP, blood pressure; BRS, baroreflex sensitivity; HF, high frequency; HR, heart rate;
HRV, heart rate variability; LF, low frequency; LVET, left ventricular ejection time; VLF, very low frequency.
Values are given as mean  SD. P values calculated from two-tailed Student’s t-test with P < 0.05 considered statistically
significant.
Baseline measures of systolic, diastolic and mean
drop in systolic blood pressure compared with the
blood pressures did not differ between the two
non-POTS-CFS subgroup (Fig. 4). Furthermore,
groups, and neither did baroreflex sensitivity or the
the POTS-CFS subgroup had significantly lower
baroreflex effective index.
RR 30:15 ratios, a measure of dynamic, parasym-
pathetic activity during active standing, than the
There was a high level of antidepressant use
subgroup without POTS (with smaller ratios con-
amongst all CFS subjects, regardless of the pres-
sidered abnormal).
ence of depression (Table 3). In addition, there was
no significant difference in autonomic function
Based on the present findings, we have proposed a
between CFS patients taking and not taking
clinical diagnostic tool for the prediction of CFS
antidepressants.
patients with POTS (Table 4). We found that an
OGS score  9 combined with an ESS score  9
During the 3-min period of active standing, the
provides both positive and negative predictive
POTS-CFS subgroup had a significantly greater
values of 100% for POTS.
(a)
= <0.01
(b)
= <0.001
500
600
)
400
)
2
2
400
300
200
200
LF-HRV (ms
100
HF-HRV (ms
0
0
POTS
Non-POTS
POTS
Non-POTS
Fig. 3 Comparison of CFS-POTS and non-CFS-POTS subgroups with regard to autonomic nervous system function: (a) low-
frequency heart rate variability (LF-HRV; predominantly sympathetic) and (b) high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV;
predominantly parasympathetic). Statistics calculated using the two-tailed Student’s t-test with P  0.05 considered
statistically significant.
506
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
Table 3 Depression in CFS patients according to the HADS-
= <0.02
D and use of antidepressant medication
25
POTS
Non-POTS
20
Normal (n,%)
2/12 (17%)
17/57 (30%)
15
Borderline (n,%)
1/6 (17%)
10/40 (25%)
Abnormal (n,%)
2/3 (67%)
19/50 (38%)
10
Total
5/21 (24%)
46/147 (31%)
5
Systolic BP (mmHg)
Subscores for caseness for depression on the HADS-D in
POTS-CFS
and
non-POTS-CFS
subgroups.
Nor-
0
mal
POTS
Non-POTS
= score 0–7; borderline = 8–10; abnormal = 11–21.
Percentages show number of patients receiving antide-
pressants out of the total number of patients in each
Fig. 4 Comparison of CFS-POTS and non-CFS-POTS sub-
HADS-D category.
groups with regard to systolic blood pressure drop upon
standing.
Statistics
calculated
using
the
two-tailed
Student’s t-test with P  0.05 considered statistically
Discussion
significant.
In
a
large
cohort
of
well-characterized
CFS
further investigation and consideration for thera-
patients, 13% were found to have POTS. There
pies that target heart rate control.
are number of novel findings presented here. First,
we describe a distinct clinical subgroup of CFS
Patients in the POTS-CFS subgroup were signifi-
patients with POTS who are younger, report
cantly younger. This is in contrast to a previous
reduced depression and daytime sleepiness, and
study in which no such difference in age was found
have significantly more orthostatic symptoms and
between CFS patients with and without POTS [21].
a reduced capacity of the left ventricle to respond to
However, fewer subjects were included in the
such orthostasis, coupled with a much greater
previous study (63 vs. 179) and the mean age was
systolic blood pressure drop upon standing, com-
higher (47  12 vs. 40  13 years). Therefore,
pared with the total cohort. In terms of underlying
based on our results from this large CFS cohort,
autonomic differences, the POTS-CFS group had
we believe that CFS patients with POTS are likely to
reduced sympathetic and parasympathetic func-
be younger than those without POTS. The POTS-
tion. Secondly, due to its ‘low ceiling effect’, the
CFS subgroup had a lower level of depression, with
Chalder fatigue scale is not a good indicator of
higher rates in the older, non-POTS-CFS subgroup.
change in fatigue levels in patients with CFS.
In addition, there was a high rate of use of
Thirdly, a combination of validated clinical assess-
antidepressant medication amongst all CFS sub-
ment tools such as heart rate response to standing
jects, regardless of the presence of depression
and OGS and ESS scores can be used to predict
(according to the HADS). This may reflect a poor
with high accuracy CFS patients with POTS, and
sensitivity of the test or unwarranted belief
thus potentially identify those who may require
amongst
the
wider
medical
community
that
Table 4 Clinical diagnostic tools for the prediction of POTS in patients with CFS based on symptom assessment tools (ESS
and OGS)
POTS
non-POTS
Reach criteria
Fail to reach criteria
Reach criteria
Fail to reach criteria
PPV
NPV
ESS  9
14
7
64
82
18%
92%
OGS  4
20
1
103
41
16%
98%
OGS  9
14
7
43
101
25%
94%
OGS  4 and ESS  9
13
0
23
0
36%
NA
OGS  9 and ESS  9
7
0
0
37
100%
100%
ESS, Epworth sleepiness scale; NA, not applicable; NPV, negative predictive value; OGS, orthostatic grading scale; PPV,
positive predictive value.
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
507
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
antidepressants are an effective treatment option
the highest possible score on the Chalder fatigue
for fatigue and CFS.
scale.
We found high rates of daytime sleepiness amongst
We demonstrated here that although there is some
the cohort of CFS patients. This is in agreement with
correlation between the Chalder fatigue scale and
the findings of three previous studies of high mean
the FIS, there remains a marked discrepancy
scores on the ESS in CFS patients (10.5, 8.8 and
between what individuals report using the two
10.5, respectively [34–36]). Whereas the non-POTS-
scales in terms of fatigue. Subjects who reported
CFS group in the present study demonstrated levels
the maximum possible Chalder fatigue score of 7
of daytime sleepiness typical of CFS patients, the
also scored a range of FIS scores from 44 to 156.
POTS-CFS group reported much reduced levels.
Further research is needed to examine this effect of
However, only scores of 10–24 on the ESS reflect
the Chalder fatigue scale. However in the meantime
significant daytime sleepiness [29], therefore our
problems may arise in the clinical setting as those
findings support previous conclusions that CFS is
with a maximum score at baseline will not be able
not primarily a disease of hypersomnolence.
to record a change in fatigue during or following
treatment and will therefore appear to be unre-
Patients in the POTS-CFS subgroup demonstrated
sponsive to therapy.
greater autonomic dysfunction than those in the
non-POTS-CFS group, with reduced levels of LF-
This study has some limitations. Due to the small
HRV, HF-HRV, VLF-HRV and RR 30:15 (a marker
size of the POTS-CFS subgroup (n = 24), compar-
of parasympathetic function). Greater autonomic
isons between these patients and non-POTS-CFS
dysfunction is consistent with our findings of a
remained difficult and thus, studies to confirm our
higher burden of orthostatic symptoms in the same
findings in other centres are needed. In addition,
patients, with greater orthostatic symptoms corre-
we used a number of questionnaires, and as such
lating with reduced LF-HRV and HF-HRV.
their accurate completion is affected by the moti-
vation of the patient. However the questionnaires
Greater autonomic dysfunction in the POTS-CFS
were short and have been used in numerous
subgroup supports the notion that CFS is a disor-
previous studies. In addition, in our experience,
der of the central nervous system, with hypersen-
CFS patients tend to be more cooperative and
sitivity in the form of central sensitization being
willing to help in research studies than patients
evident in CFS [37–45]. Central sensitization in
with other illnesses, partly due to the widespread
CFS may explain some of the symptoms of this
negative impression of CFS. However, this may in
condition,
including
postexertional
malaise,
turn introduce a degree of selection bias as more
whereby the autonomic nervous system is unable
symptomatic patients such as those with concur-
to respond appropriately to the physical stressors
rent POTS may report increased symptoms. This
of exercise [46–48].
reinforces the need to reproduce our findings at
other centres.
In addition to greater autonomic dysfunction, we
observed more severe cardiovascular dysfunction in
We aimed to determine whether CFS patients with/
patients with POTS, with greater reductions in sys-
without POTS could be differentiated based on
tolic blood pressure upon standing and significantly
clinical and autonomic features to identify whether
reduced left ventricular performance (LVET). These
the presence of POTS reflects a distinct subgroup
findings are consistent with previous evidence of
of these patients. Utilizing a large, well-character-
impaired cardiac function and reduced mass and
ized cohort of CFS patients, we have characterized
blood pool volumes [49–54] in CFS patients.
for the first time a subgroup with POTS.
The observed ‘low ceiling effect’ with the Chalder
In conclusion, CFS patients with POTS reflect a
fatigue scale in this study was consistent with
distinct subgroup of those with CFS; they are
previous findings [55–57]. Goudsmit et al. noted
younger, predominantly female and report reduced
that 50% of CFS patients scored the highest
daytime hypersomnolence and depression. Fur-
possible score on this scale, whereas 77% scored
thermore, patients with POTS show greater ortho-
the two highest possible scores. The authors noted
static intolerance and symptoms that affect their
a marked overlap between patients who rated
quality of life. We propose that this is due to a
themselves as moderately or severely ill, yet scored
greater
underlying
autonomic
dysfunction,
508
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
treatment of which will improve functional impair-
of cardiac autonomic response during head-up tilt in chronic
ment and quality of life in this subgroup of
fatigue syndrome. Autonom Neurosci 2004; 113: 55–62.
patients.
15 Yamamoto Y, LaManca JJ, Natelson BH. A measure of heart rate
variability is sensitive to orthostatic challenge in women with
chronic fatigue syndrome. Exp Biol Med 2003; 228: 167–74.
Conflict of interest statement
16 Pagani M, Lucini D. Chronic fatigue syndrome: a hypothesis
focusing on the autonomic nervous system. Clin Sci 1999; 96:
No conflict of interest to declare.
117–25.
17 Stewart J, Weldon A, Arlievsky N et al. Neurally mediated
hypotension and autonomic dysfunction measured by heart
Acknowledgements
rate variability during head-up tilt testing in children with
chronic fatigue syndrome. Clin Auton Res 1998; 8: 221–30.
The study was funded by ME Research UK, Perth,
18 Timmers HJ, Wieling W, Soetekouw PM, Bleijenberg G, Van
UK.
Der Meer JW, Lenders JW. Hemodynamic and neurohumoral
responses to head-up tilt in patients with chronic fatigue
syndrome. Clin Auton Res 2002; 12: 273–80.
19 Peckerman A, La Manca JJ, Krishna KA et al. Abnormal
References
impedance
cardiography
predicts
symptom
severity
in
chronic fatigue syndrome. Am J Med Sci 2003; 326: 55–60
1 Chronic fatigue syndrome / Myalgic encephalomyelitis (or
20 Stewart JM. Autonomic nervous system dysfunction in ado-
encephalopathy); diagnosis and management, NICE Clinical
lescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and
Guideline (2007); CG53
chronic fatigue syndrome is characterized by attenuated
2 Carruthers BM, Jain AK, De Meirleir KL et al. Myalgic
vagal baroreflex and potentiated sympathetic vasomotion.
encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome: clinical work-
Pediatr Res 2000; 48: 218–26.
ing case definition, diagnostic and treatment protocols.
21 Hoad A, Spickett G, Elliott J, Newton J. Postural orthostatic
J Chron Fatigue Syndrome 2003; 11: 7–115.
tachycardia syndrome is an under-recognised condition in
3 Fukuda K, Straus SE, Hickie I et al. The Chronic fatigue
chronic fatigue syndrome. Q J Med. 2008; 101: 961–5.
syndrome: a comprehensive approach to its definition and
22 Thieben MJ, Sandroni P, Sletten DM et al. Postural ortho-
study. International chronic fatigue syndrome study group.
static tachycardia syndrome: the mayo clinic experience.
Ann Intern Med 1994; 121: 953–9.
Mayo Clin Proceed 2007; 82: 308–13.
4 Naschitz JE, Yeshurun D, Rosner I. Dysautonomia in chronic
23 Fisk JD, Ritvo PG, Ross L, Haase DA, Marrie TJ, Schlech WF.
fatigue syndrome: facts, hypotheses, implications. Med
Measuring the functional impact of fatigue: initial validation
Hypotheses 2004; 62: 203–6.
of the fatigue impact scale. Clin Infect Dis 1994; 18: S79–83.
5 Winkler AS, Blair D, Marsden JT, Peters TJ, Wessely S, Cleare
24 Broadbent DE, Cooper PF, FitzGerald P, Parkes KR. The
AJ. Autonomic function and serum erythropoietin levels in
cognitive failures questionnaire (CFQ) and its correlates.
chronic fatigue syndrome. J Psychosom Res 2004; 56: 179–83.
Br J Clin Psychol 1982; 21: 1–16.
6 Newton JL, Okonkwo O, Sutcliffe K, Seth A, Shin J, Jones
25 Zigmond AS, Snaith RP. The hospital anxiety and depression
DEJ. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in chronic fatigue
scale. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1983; 67: 361–70.
syndrome. Q J Med 2007; 100: 519–26.
26 Ware JE Jr, Sherbourne CD. The MOS 36-item short-form
7 Rowe PC, Calkins H. Neurally mediated hypotension and
health survey (SF-36). I. Conceptual framework and item
chronic fatigue syndrome. Am J Med 1998; 105: 15–21S.
selection. Med Care 1992; 30: 473–83.
8 Schondorf R, Freeman R. The importance of orthostatic
27 Schwarzer R, Jerusalem M. Generalized Self-Efficacy scale.
intolerance in the chronic fatigue syndrome. Am J Med Sci
In: Weinman J, Wright S, Johnston M, ed. Measures in health
1999; 317: 117–23.
psychology: A user’s portfolio. Casual and control beliefs.
9 Schondorf R, Benoit J, Wein T, Phaneuf D. Orthostatic
Windsor, UK: NFER-NELSON, 35–7).
intolerance in the chronic fatigue syndrome. J Autonom Nerv
28 Johns MW. A new method for measuring daytime sleepiness:
Sys 1999; 75: 192–201.
the Epworth sleepiness scale. Sleep 1991; 14: 540–5.
10 Freeman R, Komaroff AL. Does the chronic fatigue syndrome
29 Schrezenmaier C, Gehrking JA, Hines SM, Low PA, Benrud
involve the autonomic nervous system? Am J Med 1997; 102:
LM, Sandoni P. Evaluation of orthostatic hypotension: rela-
357–64.
tionship of a new self-report instrument to laboratory-based
11 Karas B, Grubb BP, Boehm K et al. The postural orthostatic
measures. Mayo Clin Proc 2005; 80: 330–4.
tachycardia syndrome: a potentially treatable cause of
30 Anonymous . Assessment: clinical autonomic testing report of
chronic fatigue, exercise intolerance, and cognitive impair-
the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee
ment in adolescents. PACE 2000; 23: 344–51.
of
the
American
Academy
of
Neurology.
Neurology
12 LaManca JJ, Peckerman A, Walker J et al. Cardiovascular
1996;46:873–80.
response during head-up tilt in chronic fatigue syndrome.
31 Anonymous . Heart rate variability: standards of measure-
Clin Physiol 1999; 19: 111–20.
ment, physiological interpretation and clinical use. Task
13 De Becker P, Dendale P, De Meirleir K, Campine I, Vanden-
Force of the European Society of Cardiology and the North
borne K, Hagers Y. Autonomic testing in patients with chronic
American Society of Pacing and Electrophysiology. Circulation
fatigue syndrome. Am J Med 1998; 105: 22–26S.
1996;93:1043–65.
14 Yoshiuchi K, Quigley KS, Ohashi K, Yamamoto Y, Natelson BH.
32 Steptoe A, Vogele C. Cardiac baroreflex function during
Use of time-frequency analysis to investigate temporal patterns
postural change assessed using non-invasive spontaneous
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
509
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510

I. Lewis et al.
CFS patients with POTS
sequence analysis in young men. Cardiovasc Res 1990; 24:
drome but not in chronic low back pain: an experimental
627–32.
study. J Rehabil Med 2010; 42: 884–90.
33 Tan MP, Newton JL, Chadwick TJ, Parry SW. Changes in
47 Van Oosterwijck J, Nijs J, Meeus M et al. Pain inhibition and
baroreflex sensitivity in response to home orthostatic training
post-exertional malaise in myalgic encephalomyelitis ⁄ chronic
in vasovagal syncope. Hypertension 2008; 52: 747.
fatigue syndrome: an experimental study. J Intern Med 2010;
34 Mariman A, Vogelaers D, Hanoulle I, Delesie L, Pevernagie D.
268: 265–76.
Subjective sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in a large
48 Luo ZD, Cizkova D. The role of nitric oxide in nociception.
sample of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Acta
Curr Rev Pain 2000; 4: 459–66.
Clin Belg 2012; 67: 19–24.
49 Peckerman A, La Manca J, Krishna A, Chemitiganti R,
35 Olson LG, Cole MF, Ambrogetti A. Correlations among
Qureishi B, Natelson B. Abnormal impedance cardiography
Epworth sleepiness scale scores, multiple latency tests and
predicts symptom severity in chronic fatigue syndrome. Am
psychological symptoms. J Sleep Res 1998; 7: 248–53.
J Med Sci 2003; 326: 55–60.
36 Neu D, Hoffmann G, Moutrier R, Verbanck P, Linkowski P, Le
50 Miwa K, Fujita M. Small heart syndrome in patients with
Bon O. Are patients with chronic fatigue syndrome just ‘tired’
chronic fatigue syndrome. Clin Cardiol 2008; 31: 328–33.
or also ‘sleepy’. J Sleep Res 2008; 17: 427–31.
51 Hurwitz B, Coryell V, Parker M et al. Chronic: fatigue
37 Meeus M, Nijs J, Van de Wauwer N, Toeback L, Truijen S.
syndrome: illness severity, sedentary lifestyle, blood volume
Diffuse noxious inhibitory control is delayed in chronic fatigue
and evidence of diminished cardiac function. Clin Sci 2010;
syndrome: an experimental study. Pain 2008; 139: 439–48.
118:2125–35.
38 Bell I, Baldwin C, Schwartz G. Illness from low levels of
52 Miwa K, Fujita M. Cardiac function fluctuates during
environmental chemicals: relevance to chronic fatigue syn-
exacerbation and remission in young adults with chronic
drome and fibromyalgia. Am J Med 1998; 105: 74S–82S.
fatigue syndrome and “small heart”. J Cardiol 2009; 54: 29–
39 Aaron L, Buchwald D. Chronic diffuse musculoskeletal pain,
35.
fibromyalgia and co-morbid unexplained clinical conditions.
53 Hollingsworth KG, Hodgson T, Macgowan GA, Blamire AM,
Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 2003; 17: 563–74.
Newton JL. Impaired cardiac function in chronic fatigue
40 Meeus M, Nijs J, Huybrechts S, Truijen S. Evidence for
syndrome using magnetic resonance cardiac tagging. JIM
generalized hyperalgesia in chronic fatigue syndrome: a case
2012; 271: 264–70.
control study. Clin Rheumatol 2010; 29: 393–8.
54 Hollingsworth KG, Jones DE, Taylor R, Blamire AM, Newton
41 Vecchiet J, Cipollone F, Falasca K et al. Relationship between
JL. Impaired cardiovascular response to standing in chronic
musculoskeletal symptoms and blood markers of oxidative
fatigue syndrome. Eur J Clin Invest 2010; 40: 608–15.
stress in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Neurosci
55 Morriss R, Wearden AJ, Mullis R. Exploring the validity of the
Lett 2003; 335: 151–4.
Chalder fatigue scale in chronic fatigue syndrome. J Psycho-
42 Vecchiet L, Montanari G, Pizzigallo E et al. Sensory charac-
som Res 1998; 45: 411–7.
terization of somatic parietal tissues in humans with chronic
56 Stouten B. Identification of ambiguities in the 1994 chronic
fatigue syndrome. Neurosci Lett 1996; 208: 117–20.
fatigue syndrome research case definition and recommenda-
43 Costa D, Tannock C, Brostoff J. Brainstem perfusion is
tions for resolution. BMC Health Serv Res 2005; 5: 37.
impaired in chronic fatigue syndrome. QJM 1995; 88: 767–73.
57 Goudsmit EM, Stouten B, Howes S. Fatigue in Myalgic
44 Tirelli U, Chierichetti F, Tavio M et al. Brain positron emission
Encephalomyelitis. Bulletin of thr IACFS/ME 2008; 16: 4–
tomography (PET) in chronic fatigue syndrome: preliminary
10.
data. Am J Med 1998; 105: 54S–8S.
45 Nijs J, Meeus M, Van Oosterwijck J et al. In the mind or in the
Correspondence: Professor Julia L. Newton, Institute for Ageing
brain? Scientific evidence for central sensitisation in chronic
and Health, Medical School, Framlington Place, Newcastle-upon-
fatigue syndrome. Eur J Clin Invest 2012; 42: 203–12.
Tyne, NE2 4HH, UK.
46 Meeus M, Roussel N, Truijen S, Nijs J. Reduced pressure pain
(fax: +44 191 222600; e-mail: xxxxx.xxxxxx@xxx.xx.xx).
thresholds in response to exercise in chronic fatigue syn-
510
ª 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine
Journal of Internal Medicine, 2013, 273; 501–510