This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'CAMHS transformation money'.








 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental 
Health in Cheshire East 
2016-2020 
 
NHS Eastern Cheshire CCG 
NHS South Cheshire CCG 
Cheshire East Council 
 
 
 
 
 

 
OFFICIAL 

CONTENTS  
 
 
 

Section 
Page 

Introduction: shared ambition and commitment to transformation 


Our Vision: LTP ambitions 2016-2020 


What is the local need?  


What children, young people and their families are telling us? 


Key National Drivers - one year on 


What we did in 2015/16 
11 

Monitoring and publishing progress of our ambitions 
15 

What are our plans for 2016-2020 
17 

Our Roadmap – Quick View 
21 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 1 of 22 
 

1.  Introduction: Shared ambition and commitment to transformation 
 
The Government’s wide-ranging report on children and adolescent mental health, Future in 
Mind,  March  2015,  stipulates  that  each  Clinical  Commissioning  Group  (CCG)  area  is 
required  to  produce  a  local  Transformation  Plan.  These  Plans  should  cover  the  whole 
spectrum  of  services  for  children  and  young  people’s  mental  health  and  wel being  from 
health  promotion  and  prevention  work,  to  support  interventions  for  children  and  young 
people  who  have  existing  or  emerging  mental  health  problems,  as  well  as  transitions 
between services. 
 
This  plan  is  a  living  document  intended  to  deliver  whole  care  pathways  at  scale  and  with 
pace to reduce inequity in access, build workforce capacity and capability, seek to close the 
mental health and wellbeing gap, and deliver sustainable improvements in mental health and 
wellbeing  for  all  children,  and  young  people.  The  plan  incorporates  the  full  spectrum  of 
service provision across the full spectrum of need; from universal mental health, to Learning 
Disability  and  difficulty,  Children  Looked  After,  Care  Leavers,  those  in  the  youth  justice, 
abused  or  sexually  exploited  and  draws  upon  extensive  local  needs  assessment  as 
evidenced in the Public Health Annual Report 2015 and Joint Strategic Needs Assessments 
(JSNA) and integrates with a wide range of plans from across the partnership. (Please see 
Appendix 1 & 2) 
 
The Cheshire East Health and Wellbeing Board, oversees the  delivery  and implementation 
of  this  Transformation  Plan,  alongside  the  Local  Children’s  Safeguarding  Board  and  the 
Children’s  Trust.  Strategic  management  is  provided  by  the  Children  and  Young  people 
Mental Health Partnership Strategy Group (see the governance structure in section 6). Wide 
and broad engagement with children, young people, families and carers has taken place to 
inform  the  priorities  and  we  aim  to  continue  to  develop  and  use  mechanisms  to  involve 
children, young people, families and carers throughout the scope of this plan. 
 
Note:  This  document  will  refer  throughout  to  Cheshire  East,  this  being  the  Local 
Authority  boundary  common  to  both  NHS  Eastern  Cheshire  CCG  and  NHS  South 
Cheshire CCG  
 
Future  in  Mind1  describes  an  integrated  whole  system  approach  to  driving  further 
improvements in children and young people’s mental health outcomes with the NHS, public 
health,  voluntary  and  community,  local  authority  children’s  services,  education  and  youth 
justice sectors working together to: 
 
place  the  emphasis  on  building  resilience,  promoting  good  mental  health  and 
wellbeing, prevention and early intervention; 
 
deliver a step change in how care is provided – moving away from a system defined 
in terms of the services organisations provide towards one built around the needs of 
children, young people and their families; 
 
improve  access  so  that  children  and  young  people  have  easy  access  to  the  right 
support  from  the  right  service  at  the  right  time  and  as  close  to  home  as  possible. 
This  includes  implementing  clear  evidence  based  pathways  for  community  based 
care to avoid unnecessary admissions to inpatient care; 
                                                           
1 Future in Mind (2015) Department of Health, NHS England, 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/414024/Childrens_Mental_
Health.pdf 
 
Page 2 of 22 
 

 
deliver a clear joined up approach: linking services so care pathways are easier to 
navigate  for  all  children  and  young  people,  including  those  who  are  most 
vulnerable; 
 
sustain a culture of continuous evidence-based service improvement delivered by a 
workforce with the right mix of skills, competencies and experience; 
 
improve  transparency  and  accountability  across  the  whole  system  -  being  clear 
about  how  resources  are  being  used  in  each  area  and  providing  evidence  to 
support collaborative decision making. 
Over  the  next  4  years,  2016-2020,  work  will  focus  on  realigning  resources  to  the  areas  of 
need,  to  improve  and  enhance  early  intervention,  prevention  and  specialist  mental  health 
services.  Work  will  also  ensure  that  services  deliver  across  changing  demographics  and 
local needs. As part of embedding the new model, significant workforce development will be 
required  to  ensure  shared  decision  making  across  service  boundaries.  This  will  require  a 
variety of training, skill development and transference to ensure the workforce has both the 
capacity and capability to meet the needs of our current and future population.   
 
Since  the  publication  of  our  first  plans  in  October  2015,  collaborative  activity  has  been 
undertaken  to  commence  the  transformation  of  mental  health  services  for  children  and 
young people across Cheshire East. Our revised plans have been written following detailed 
consultation  with  young  people  and  their  families  and  in  partnership  with  Cheshire  East 
Council,  NHS  South  Cheshire  and  NHS  Eastern  Cheshire  CCGs  and  NHS  Cheshire  and 
Wirral NHS Partnership Trust and voluntary and community organisations active in the area 
of mental health. 
 
In  December  2015  the  annual  report  of  the  Director  of  Public  Health2  focused  on  Children 
and  Young  Peoples  Mental  Health,  and  during  2016  the  JSNA3  was  extensively  updated. 
Both of these have been used to inform this updated Transformation Plan.  
During  2015/16,  CCG  Commissioners,  CWP  Service  Managers  and  data  analysts  have 
attended  a  series  of  IAPT  Leadership  and  Demand  and  Capacity  workshops  held  by  the 
North  West  Clinical  Senate  Network  and  NHS  England  North  West  Mental  Health.    The 
workshops provided valuable insights into evidence based theories of system leadership and 
system management. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
2 Cheshire East Annual Public Health Report (2015) 
http://www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/council_and_democracy/your_council/health_and_wellbeing_board/health_
and_wellbeing_board.aspx  

3 Joint Children & Young People’s Mental Health JSNA (2016) : Cheshire East and Cheshire West 
http://www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/social_care_and_health/jsna/starting_and_developing_well.aspx#mentalhea
lthandwellbeing  

Page 3 of 22 
 

2.  Our Vision: LTP ambitions 2016-2020  
By 2020 we will have built on existing practice to ensure:- 
  Every young person in Cheshire East has access to a graduated and timely response to 
emotional health issues, ranging from maintaining a healthy mind to acute crisis  
  That Cheshire East has a joined up system that operates across the THRIVE Model and 
harnesses the capacity of the third sector. 
  All  Cheshire  East  educational  settings  are  better  equipped  to  support  the  Emotional 
Health of their populations working within the getting advice and getting help quadrants 
of the THRIVE model 
  Coordinated  robust  risk  support  is  available  for  the  most  vulnerable  between  partners 
including youth justice. 
  Everyone  in  contact  with  children  and  young  people  feels  equipped  to  actively  support 
their mental health and wellbeing 
  That  access  to  getting  more  help  and  risk  support  is  available  through  local  settings 
including  primary,  acute  and  specialist  care,  is  timely,  and  based  on  clear  pathways  of 
care linked to different types of need. 
  Well  informed  commissioners  with  comprehensive  intelligence  about  needs  and 
provision who strive to co-produce with children, young people and their families leading 
to innovative, creative and responsive support across a range of services from primary to 
inpatient and secure settings. 
 
 
 
Page 4 of 22 
 

link to page 4 link to page 4 3.  What is the local need?  
The Cheshire East JSNA (2016)3 currently includes five relevant sections: 
 
  Perinatal mental health – May 2016 
  Self-injury in young people under 25 years – May 2016 
  Children and young people’s mental health – September 2016 
  Autism spectrum – November 2016 
  Alcohol and drugs – currently in draft – will be published in January 2017 
 
The JSNA highlights that around 3,800 women go through pregnancy each year. Promoting 
positive  mental  wellbeing  among  all  pregnant  women  can  help  to  reduce  levels  of  anxiety 
and  stress,  and  this  will  protect  the  mental  health  of  10-15%  of  unborn  children  during  a 
critical period of brain development. 
 
Up  to  30%  (1,100)  of  women  will  experience  minor  or  moderate  mental  health  problems 
during pregnancy, and around half of them can be safely managed by their midwife and/or 
health  visitor.  The  others  can  be  managed  by  their  GP  or  by  an  IAPT  service.  Serious 
perinatal  mental  health  problems  requiring  referral  to  psychiatric  services  are  much  less 
common, and affect around 3% (110) of pregnant women annually.  
 
The  high risk  of  recurrence  of mental  health  problems  during  pregnancy  and  the  postnatal 
period  justifies  general  practitioners  sharing  information  about  historic  mental  health 
problems  with  midwives  and  health  visitors  either  at  a  pre-conception  stage  or  early  in 
pregnancy. 
 
There is a strong evidence base that shows that infants and toddlers who are born with or 
who  have  emerging mental  health  problems  can  be  systematically  identified  and  managed 
during  their  first  two  to  three  years  of  life.  The  JSNA3  suggests  that  up  to  350  infants  and 
toddlers could benefit annually from a pathway for the early assessment and management of 
emerging  mental  health  problems,  including  autism  spectrum  disorder  and  the  earliest 
manifestations of conduct disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). 
 
Mental wellbeing can be defined as “feeling good and functioning well”. It is often described 
as  a  combination  of  a  child  or  young  person’s  experiences  (such  as  happiness  and 
satisfaction) and their ability to function as an individual and as a member of society. Mental 
wellbeing  is  of  particular  importance  in  very  young  age  groups,  as  experiences  in  infancy 
and the first five years of life have a lasting impact upon a child’s mental wel being. Taking 
actions to improve mental wellbeing in this age group will deliver gains across their whole life 
course.    
 
The  Early  Years  Foundation  Stage  (EYFS)  Profile  shows  that  in  Cheshire  East  there  have 
been steady improvements in young children’s personal, social and emotional development 
since 2013. This suggests that Early Years initiatives are having a positive impact on mental 
wellbeing.  If  these  improvements  can  be  sustained,  it  is  likely  that  there  will  be 
corresponding reductions in the number of primary school age children who develop mental 
health  problems,  followed  by  a  decline  in  their  need  for  mental  health  services  over  the 
longer-term. 
 
In  early  adolescence,  there  is  a  second  opportunity  to  improve  mental  wellbeing.  The 
proportion  of  young  people  with  low  levels  of  subjective  wellbeing  nearly  doubles  between 
the ages of 11 and 15, with the lowest levels being at around 14 to 15 years. The self-injury 
JSNA  section  highlights  the  many  opportunities  to  improve  mental  wellbeing  in  this  age 
Page 5 of 22 
 


group,  to  provide  a  rapid  and  supportive  response  to  young  people  during  a  time  of 
emotional crisis, and to ensure that there are clear pathways to emergency care if needed. 
 
Young  people  in  all  areas  of  Cheshire  East  experience  mental  health  problems. There  are 
no  areas  where  the  occurrence  of  mental  health  disorders  in  children  and  young  people 
under 18 is thought to be below 9%. However, the occurrence of mental illness in children in 
some parts of Crewe and Macclesfield may be up to 50%  higher than in other parts of the 
locality – affecting up to 14% of children and young people. 
 
The most  common mental  health  problems  among  children  and  young  people  are  conduct 
disorders,  emotional  disorders  (anxiety  and  depression)  and  ADHD/hyperkinetic  disorders. 
Self-injury is common among teenagers.    
 
Certain  groups  of  children  and  young  people  are  at  much  higher  risk  of  developing  poor 
mental health. The table illustrates the degree of increased risk faced by children and young 
people from some of these groups: 
 
  
 
 
 
Mental health services for young people in Cheshire are characterised by a complex system 
of  provision,  and  care  is  being  provided  by  NHS  consultants  from  three  specialities  – 
CAMHS, Community Paediatrics, and Adult Psychiatry. True transformation will address the 
Page 6 of 22 
 

connectivity  between  these  specialities  and  the  other  services  that  exist  for  children  and 
young people who are experiencing mental health difficulties. 
 
The JSNA suggests that the key requirements are to reduce teenage referrals to specialist 
services, and then to restructure existing capacity to improve access for younger children.  
 
In  order  to  ensure  our  work  is  informed  by  an  understanding  of  the  impact  of  wider 
inequalities  on  access  and  take  up  of  services  the  C&YP  MHSG  and  its  commissioned 
providers will undertake Equality Impact Analysis of existing service provision, in line with 
Public  Sector  Equality  duties  and  Social  Value  Act  (2012)  responsibilities  to  ensure  plans 
have  taken  into  account  the  need  to  address  health  inequalities  and  social  responsibility 
considerations.(Please see Appendix 3) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 7 of 22 
 

4. What children, young people and their families are telling us? 
 
During 2016 a significant amount of research was undertaken involving children and young 
people,  parent  and  carers,  and  professional  staff  including  GPs,  therapists,  and  clinical 
colleagues  in  order  to  create  a  baseline  understanding  of  need  about  current  and  future 
mental health and wellbeing services.  
The intention of carrying out these areas of work simultaneously is to create a multi-faceted 
vision  for  transformation  for  the  future  that  includes  young  people’s  experiences  and 
expectations, into a workable service delivery plan. 
  Engagement with young people to understand mental health service requirements 
  Analysis  of  awareness  and  expectations  of  young  people  who  have  accessed,  or  are 
accessing, mental health services across Eastern and South Cheshire 
  Exploring  referrals  into  CAMHS,  engaging  with  GPs  &  understanding  Parent/Carer 
needs 
Summary of findings: 
  

  No agreed approach to mental health issues in schools: teacher/pastoral staff reactions 
are inconsistent 
  More early intervention (pre CAMHS referral) services available 
  Pupils feeling undervalued and fearing indiscreet or inappropriate responses  
  Designated  ‘Wellbeing  areas’  having  negative  perceptions  and  are  age-inappropriate. 
Better to have wellbeing services integrated within the school  
  Confusion amongst pupils about school and external support services 
  Inconsistent knowledge/use of CAMHS by schools  
  Inconsistent  approaches  across  schools,  (communication  referral  pathway,  level  and 
availability  of  resources,  parent  engagement)  each  school  addressing  the  issue  of 
mental health in young people differently particularly at  transition points. Use of  shared 
record keeping such as Cheshire Care Record could improve this. 

  Family and Friends are the two key initial ‘go to’ groups if in need of support – important 
for resilience and supporting peer-to-peer networks  
  GPs are the ‘go to’ service that young people are most aware of, therefore we need to 
make  sure  they  are  informed,  educated  and  equipped  around  mental  health  in  young 
people 

  Progress is being made regarding tackling stigma of mental ill-health and this should be 
built upon 
  Any future service re-design should be led by those who do or may use services 
  Commissioners  should  consider  use  of  centralised  referral  processes  (virtual  SPA) 
based within existing infrastructure such as CheCS 
 
For a detailed overview of the research carried out, please see appendices: 
 
Appendix  3  –  Engagement  with  young  people  to  understand  mental  health  service 
requirements 
Appendix  4  –  mental  health  needs  assessment  (MHNA)  of  adopted  children  and  young 
people in Cheshire East x 
Appendix 5 – Analysis of awareness and expectations of young people who have accessed, 
or are accessing, mental health services across East and South Cheshire x 
Appendix  6  –  Exploring  referrals  into  CAMHS,  engaging  with  GPs  and  understanding 
parent/carer needs 
Page 8 of 22 
 

link to page 3 5.  Key national drivers - one year on 
 
Since  the  publication  of  Future  in  Mind  in  20151,  the  publication  of  the  NHS  Five  Year 
Forward  View  for  Mental  Health  Task  Force  Strategy  Report  (2016)4  has  highlighted  the 
following  key  recommendations  as  clear  deliverables  for  Children  and  Young  People’s 
Mental Health by 2021: 
 
  At least 35% of CYP with a diagnosable MH condition receive treatment from an NHS-
funded community MH service  and nationally 70,000 additional CYP will be treated over 
the 2014/15 baseline 
 
  Bed use in paediatric and adult wards will be eliminated completely 
 
  Bed  use  of  Specialist  in-patient  beds  for  children  and  young  people  with  an  eating 
disorder should reduce substantially 
 
  By  2020/21,  in-patient  stays  for  children  and  young  people  will  only  take place  where 
clinically appropriate, and will have the minimum possible length of stay, and will be as 
close to home as possible and be commissioned on a ‘place-basis’  
 
  CCGs  will  have  collaborative  commissioning  plans  with  NHS  England’s   specialised 
commissioning teams by December 2016 
 
  Creation of a national Prevention Concordat programme, led by Public Health England, 
will enable all Health and Wellbeing Boards to support local needs  and produce mental 
health Prevention Plans 
 
  Emphasis  on  the  mental  health  and  wellbeing  of  staff  across  the  NHS  and  all  those 
working with people with mental health problems 
 
  Implement  new  access  and  waiting  time  standards,  and  plan  for  improvement  against 
the standard beginning from 2017/18 
 
  Perinatal mental health support; 30,000 more women per year to receive support 
 
  Prioritisation  of  mental  health  support  for  anyone  with  long  term  physical  health 
conditions 
 
  Reduce suicides by 10% 
 
  The  championing  of  digital  innovations to improve access  and choice to mental  health 
support. 
 
In  line  with  findings from  Future  in  Mind, The  Mental  Health  Taskforce  Report  made  clear, 
that  75%  of  people  experiencing  mental  health  problems  are  not  using  health  services, 
possibly  due  to  stigma,  inadequate  provision  and  people  using  their  own  resources  to 
manage their mental  health.   The  action for  a  Prevention  Concordat  Programme for  Better 
Mental Health
 will aim to galvanise local and national action around the prevention of mental 
illness and facilitate every local area to put in place effective planning arrangements led by 
Health  and  Wellbeing  Boards,  CCGs  and  Local  Authorities.    The  programme  will  cover 
                                                           
4 NHS Five Year Forward View for Mental Health Task Force Strategy Report (2016) 
https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/Mental-Health-Taskforce-FYFV-final.pdf  
Page 9 of 22 
 

prevention in the  widest sense from promotion of good mental health through to living  well 
with mental health problems and everything in between. 
 
 
 
 
Page 10 of 22 
 

link to page 4 6.  What we did in 2015/16 
 
A timeline of key achievements in 2015/16 includes: 
 
The  development  of  the  Joint  Children  &  Young  People’s  Mental 
Health  JSNA  (2016):  Cheshire  East  and  Cheshire  West
3.    This 
section  of  the  local  JSNA  was  developed  in  partnership  across 
Cheshire  East  Council,  NHS  Eastern  Cheshire  CCG  and  NHS  South 
Cheshire 
CCG: 
http://www.cheshireeast.gov.uk/social_care_and_health/jsna/jsna.aspx  
 
Key  Points  from  the  Children  &  Young  People  Mental  Health  JSNA 
include: 
  Inadequate  support  for  mothers  mental  health  during  and  after 
Children  &  Young 
pregnancy  
People’s 
Mental    Little use of CAMHS by the under-fours 
Health JSNA 
  Inconsistency  in  what  the  upper  age  for  CAMHS  should  be  – 
reinforced by our CYP research 
  Many  services  are  not  being  “joined-up”  for  young  adults  – 
reinforced by our CYP research 
  Poor  support  for  teenagers  who  self-injure  –  reinforced  by  A&E 
data 
  Many  young  people  with  autism  spectrum  disorder  or  a  learning 
disability not receiving effective support 
 
(See section 3 for further detail of need) 
 
The  delivery,  review  and  evaluation  of  Phase  1  of  EHS.  Work  was 
initially  funded  by  a  DoE  bid  secured  by  NHS  South  Cheshire  CCG 
and  NHS  Eastern  Cheshire  CCG.  A  Pilot  programme  working  with  6 
Secondary Schools across Cheshire East.  The pilot was delivered in 
partnership  by  a  number  of  CAMHS  providers  which  include  Visyon, 
Just Drop In, Children’s Society and Cheshire and Wirral Partnership 
Phase 

of  NHS Trust.  This included a CAMHS link role and the development of 
Emotionally 
systems,  promising  approaches  and  tools  to  enable  schools  to 
Health 
Schools  improve  their  support  to  children  with  emotional  health  needs.  The 
(EHS) 
pilot  programme  has  been  independently  evaluated  by  Salford 
University.    The  evidence  from  the  evaluation  has  been  used  in 
conjunction with performance data and learning from schools, CAMHS 
providers and commissioners, to develop an enhanced programme for 
wider  delivery  across  Cheshire  East  (Phase  2  of  EHS)  from  January 
17 
 
The  Children  and  Young  people’s  Trust  ‘Supporting  the  Mental 
Health of Children & Young People Strategy (2016-2018)’ 
has been 
developed  based  on  local  need  and  national  guidance.    Strategic 
Supporting 
the  priorities from the strategy include: 
Mental  Health  of    Putting  front-line  mental  health  care  and  support  into  every 
Children  &  Young 
community: New Approaches to Care and Support; 
People 
Strategy    Support all women who experience anxiety and depression during 
(2016-2018) 
pregnancy; 
  Diagnose  and  treat  young  children  with  mental  health  problems 
during their second year of life 
Page 11 of 22 
 

  Improve  awareness  and  support  for  young  people  with  autism 
spectrum disorder and learning disability 
  Help teenagers to deal with the dark feelings that can lead to self-
injury 
  Bring  together  all  emotional  health  and  wellbeing  services  for 
young people, possibly up to the age of 25 
 
The  development  of  Phase  2  Emotionally  Healthy  Schools,  based 
on learning from phase 1.  There are 5 key components to phase 2 of 
EHS, as follows:  
1.  Access  to  specialist  mental  health  advice  (single  point  of  access) 
and  a  brokerage  model  to  support  professionals  working  with 
Children and Young people (CYPMH Link Programme
2.  Access to tools ‘Tools for Schools’ piloted through phase 1 and 
support to professionals to implement 
3.  Education specialist Leadership 
4.  Systems and processes to identify and support children and young 
people  in  the  different  THRIVE  groups  (Vulnerable  Children’s 
Project

5.  Development  of  ‘Getting  Advice’  quadrant  including  on-line 
platform 
 
Components 1 (CYPMH Link) and 2 (Tools for Schools) have been 
commissioned by Cheshire East Council, as part of the MoU with NHS 
Eastern  Cheshire  CCG  and  NHS  South  Cheshire  CCG  and 
commenced  from  January  2017.  Component  3  Education  specialist 
Leadership  and  component  5  Development  of  ‘Getting  Advice’ 
quadrant  of  the  THRIVE  model  are  in  co-production  phase. 
Component 4 (Vulnerable Children’s Project) has been extended to 
Sustaining 
July 2017. 
Emotionally 
 
Healthy 
Schools  The key aims of the commissioned programmes are:  
Post Pilot Phase 
 
CYP MH Link
 – 
  Pathways, Assessment & Threshold Development, 
  Mental Health Service Consultation sessions, 
  Group Facilitated Reflection, 
  Training, 
  Liaison between schools, primary care and other providers. 
 
Tools  for  Schools  -  Interventions  within  the  Tools  for  Schools 
Programme will aim to: 
  Develop leadership and management that support and champions 
efforts to promote  emotional health and wellbeing, 
  Support  curriculum,  teaching  and  learning  to  promote  resilience 
and support social and emotional learning, 
  Enable the student voice to influence decisions, 
  Interventions  to  support  staff  development  to  support  their  own 
wellbeing and that of students, 
  Support  identifying  need  and  monitoring  impact  (e.g.  tools  to 
support whole school surveys of wellbeing – either anonymously or 
identifiable with consent), 
  Support working with parents/carers, 
  Support interventions linked to appropriate referral, 
Page 12 of 22 
 


  Support  an  ethos  and  environment  that  promotes  respect  and 
values diversity. 
 
Following  a  review  of  local  governance  arrangements  the  Children 
and  Young  Peoples  Mental  Health  Strategy  Group  
has  been 
developed.  Membership of this group includes Cheshire East Council 
(Public  Health  and  Children’s  Prevention  leads),  NHS  Eastern 
Cheshire  CCG,  NHS  South  Cheshire  CCG,  CAMHS  providers 
(Voluntary and Community Sector and Health) and School leadership 
representatives.  This is the accountable group for the delivery of the 
Local Transformation Plan, which includes phase 2 of EHS. 
Review 
of 
Governance 

Children 
and 
Young 
Peoples 
Mental 
Health 
Strategy Group 
 
A  Parenting/Perinatal  Programme  is  in  the  early  stages  of 
Early 
Help 
-  development by Cheshire East Council with partners.  The aim is that 
(Parenting/ 
the programme will be delivered early 2017. 
Perinatal) 
 
A  Hub  &  Spoke  Eating  Disorders  Service  across  Cheshire  is  in  full 
operation  (one  spoke  is  in  Eastern  Cheshire  and  one  spoke  is  in 
CYP 
Eating  central  Cheshire),  and  is  meeting  mandated  targets  for  service 
Disorders Service 
delivery.  Development  of  the  community  provision  is  taking  place 
 
alongside young people and their families. 
 
NHS Eastern Cheshire CCG Commissioning and NHS South Cheshire 
Early  Intervention  CCG  an  EIP  service  delivering  a  16+  service  for  those  experiencing 
in Psychosis (EIP)  first  episode  in  psychosis  and  that  all  referrals  are  offered  NICE-
 
recommended treatment (from both internal and external sources)  
 
Getting 
Help 
–  NHS  Eastern  Cheshire  have  commenced  a  ‘Getting  Help’  service 
Developing 
the  which operates in connection with CAMHS in Eastern Cheshire and is 
Page 13 of 22 
 

THRIVE  Model  in  the  first  step  in  implementing  the  THRIVE  methodology  locally.  The 
Cheshire East 
introduction  of  this  provision  has  allowed  the  primary  mental  health 
 
care waiting lists to be re-opened.  
 
 
 
 

 
Page 14 of 22 
 

7.  Monitoring and publishing progress of our ambitions 
The  co-design  and  co-production  with  children,  young  people,  their  families  and  wider 
stakeholders as critical friends will continue to shape a new set of outcome measures to be 
agreed.  As part of this process a system wide outcomes framework  which is based on the 
THRIVE model and incorporates health, care and education outcomes for both children and 
young people will be used to support contractual arrangements, commissioning models and 
monitoring delivery of services going forward.  
 
The  Mental  Health  Five  Year  Forward  View  dashboard  Toolkit  (2016)5  will  be  utilised  in 
relation  to  the  core  elements  of  the  mental  health  programme  transformation  and  some  of 
the  metrics  to  date  that  will  be  measure  local  commissioning  on  a  national  scale. We  will 
adopt and embed this dashboard tool as part of our performance management processes to 
improve  commissioning  quality,  intelligence  reporting  and  monitoring  our  local  direction  of 
travel progress, in line with national expectations.   
 
Learning  from  national  pilot  outcomes  will  further  help  to  shape  our  future  commissioning 
decisions  and  set  ambitious  performance  metrics.    Along  with  the  shared  learning,  new 
national  prevalence  data  to  help  with  demand  and  capacity  planning  in  2018,  along  with 
Public  Health  England  fingertips  profiles,  CHIMAT  and  local  improved  data  collection  for 
Prevention  Concordat  will  support  financial  modelling  for  sustainable  transformation  based 
on  evidenced  need.   All  new  care  models  will  measure  impacts  across  prevention,  quality, 
efficiency  and  be  adapted  if  not  working  to  invest  in  results  that  show  impact  across  the 
THRIVE quadrants: 
 
  Getting Advice:   
Resilience measures 
  Get Help:   
 
Change measures 
  Getting More help: 
Impact on life 
  Risk Support: 
 
Risk management measures. 
 
In addition to our local roadmap (Please see Appendix 7) the work in Cheshire East will also 
mirror and be aligned to the National Roadmap, which brings together the proposed mental 
health pathway and infrastructure development programme to deliver the Five Year Forward 
View. By using the national roadmap as a guide locally we shall ensure that our referral to 
treatment pathways meet mandated standards. 
Pathway 
2015/16 
2016/17 
2017/18 
2018/19 
2019/20 
   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Early  intervention  in   
 
 
 
 
ment
psychosis 
reat
CAMHS: 
 
 
 
 
 
t
community 
eating 
 
disorder services 
ot
Perinatal 
mental   
 
 
 
 
 
health 
 
al

Crisis Care 
 
 
 
 
 
CAMHS: 
 
 
 
 
 
hways
eferr
t
emergency,  urgent, 
R
pa
routine 
                                                           
5 Mental Health Five Year Forward View dashboard Toolkit (2016) 
https://www.england.nhs.uk/mentalhealth/taskforce/imp/mh-dashboard/  
Page 15 of 22 
 

Acute mental health   
 
 
 
 
care 
Self harm 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CAMHS: 
school   
 
 
 
 
refusal 
Attention 
deficit   
 
 
 
 
hyperactivity 
disorder 
Autistic 
spectrum   
 
 
 
 
disorder (jointly with 
learning disability) 
Secondary 
care   
 
 
 
 
recovery 
(will 
include  a  range  of 
condition 
specific 
pathways) 
 
National  Roadmap  -  Proposed  mental  health  pathway  and  infrastructure  development 
programme 
Source:  NHS  Five  Year  Forward  View  for  Mental  Health  Taskforce  Strategy  Report 
(2016:36) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 16 of 22 
 

8.  What are our plans for 2016-2020 
 
Priority themes:  
 
Life course approach 
As we continue with our whole system, life course approach, increased involvement from the 
third  sector  and  community  groups  will  be  essential  to  improve  the  mental  health  and 
wellbeing of children, young people and families. Simplifying the provider system, agreeing 
outcomes  and  standards  to  deliver  across  the  THRIVE  quadrants  will  require  holistic, 
integrated  and  evidence  based  care  for  biological,  psychological  and  social  needs  of  our 
children and young people to be met.   
 
Parity of Esteem 
The  number  of  children  and  young  people  living  with  long  term  mental  health  conditions, 
which  includes  medically  unexplained  symptoms,  needs  to  be  met  to  help  contribute  to 
reduced demand on other services, such as A&E, but most importantly equally deliver Parity 
of  Esteem,  Health  and  Social  Care  Act  (2012).
     A  community  based  ‘Get  Help’  drop  in 
model of delivery with psychiatrist provision will be a move away from clinical environments 
to community settings, with sustainable recovery pathways integrated with condition specific 
pathways and vulnerability pathways.    
 
Self-care and awareness 
More emphasis on developing social media related campaigns and mental health apps will 
provide low cost, easily scalable interventions through accredited online provision, live chat, 
text  or  telephone  help  as  part  of  the  THRIVE  ‘Get  Help’  offer.   Ongoing co-production  and 
co-design  approaches  with  children  and  young  people  will  help  to  shape  future  media 
provision/campaigns and  self-care management.  A centrally held directory of services that 
is  accessible,  current,  along  with  branding  of  one  service  with  access  to  shared  care 
records,  with  consent,  will  support  the  single  front  door  approach  and  overall  THRIVE 
delivery. 
 
We  will  encourage  local  organisations  and  employers  to  sign  up  to  the  national  Time  to 
Change Employer Pledge6  , to improve workplace practice and employer understanding of 
mental health conditions, and greater inform preventative stress management approaches. 
 
Crisis Care 
A  mental  health  crisis  for  children  and  young  people  may  require  compliance  with  child 
protection  and  safeguarding  legislation.  Crisis  Care  Concordat  plans  will  need  to  cover 
mental health and link to locally approved robust safeguarding arrangements.  Children and 
young people and their families will need the best help and clinical interventions, as close to 
home, as possible, when dealing with mental health crisis.   This includes the need to ensure 
that  there  is  enough  capacity  to  stop  children  and  young  people  (or  vulnerable  adults), 
undergoing mental health assessments in police cells.  Section 136 and Street Triage Care 
arrangements  will  need  to  be  reflective  of  children  and  young  people  no  longer being 
detained in police cells from April 2017, following detention under Section 135 or 136 of the 
Mental Health Act. 
 
We will seek to embed The Future in Mind recommendations for crisis care:  
  Ensuring  the  support  and  intervention  for  young  people  being  planned  in  the  Mental 
Health Crisis Care Concordat is implemented.   
                                                           
6 Time to Change, Employer Pledge, https://www.time-to-change.org.uk/get-involved/get-your-workplace-
involved/employer-pledge  

Page 17 of 22 
 

  Implementing  clear  evidence-based  pathways  for  community-based  care,  including 
intensive  home  treatment  where  appropriate,  to  avoid  unnecessary  admissions  to 
inpatient care 
  Include  appropriate  mental  health  and  behavioural  assessment  in  admission  gateways 
for inpatient care for young people with learning disabilities and/or challenging behaviour 
  Promoting implementation of best practice in transition, including ending arbitrary cut-off 
dates based on a particular age. 
 
Liaison Psychiatry Services in Accident and Emergency  
The  national  development  of  all  age  liaison  mental  health  services  in  Accident  and 
Emergency  (A  &  E)  Departments,  should  improve  access  to  appropriate  mental  health 
support  in  A&E  for  children  and  young  people  experiencing  mental  health  crisis.    It  is 
mandatory that that the views and experience of children and young people are taken fully 
into account as urgent and crisis care services are transformed and improved.  In particular 
they should be involved on the co-production of further access and waiting time standards.  
We  will  adopt  many  of  the  recommendations  in  the  Healthy  London  Partnership7.  This 
document  also  contains  a  directory  of  best  practice  examples  from  across  the  UK.    From  
2017/18  commissioners  will  be  developing  an  all  age  liaison  psychiatry  service  that  meets 
the requirements of Core 24 in collaboration with Local authority partners. This will include a 
review of the Children and Young People’s Self Harm pathway 
 
Integrated Commissioning 
 Integrating collaborative commissioning arrangements with NHS England will need to move 
at  pace  in  relation  to  specialist  health  and  justice  pathways,  and  transition  planning  in 
2017/18.   Working  with  our  partners  across  Cheshire  Constabulary  and  Cheshire  Fire  and 
Rescue Service and the use of Safe Havens will all play a part of Crisis Care, youth justice, 
transition pathways and the THRIVE offer across Cheshire East.  
 
Transition and integrated mental health and wellbeing 
Our local CCG plans to deliver the primary care General Practice Forward View (2016) will 
be integrated in design to support transitional services for vulnerable ages and be a part of 
the  THRIVE framework across  Cheshire  East.    Continuity  of  service  for  those  transitioning 
from improved children and young people pathways to adult, or from inpatient or secure care 
pathways  will  be  scoped  as  part  of  local  Multispecialty  Community  Providers  plans.      The 
specific condition needs of children and young people with long term conditions will need to 
be included in workforce plans.  The Adult IAPT access rate set to increase to 25% by 2020 
will  need  to  include  vulnerable  transitional  needs  and  accessible,  cost  effectiveness  short 
term  group  work  across educational  locations.   Whole  population  based  budgets  based  on 
GP registered lists to improve the underlying health and life chances of children and young 
people  will  be  part  of  the  plan  to  tackle  inequalities,  and  system  variance  across  Cheshire 
East. 
 
The  NEF  5  Ways  to  Wellbeing8,  social  prescribing  concepts  and  Asset  Based  Community 
Development  models  of  delivery  incorporating  outcome  frameworks  of  the  NHS,  Public 
Health  and  Social  Care  sectors  will  be  aligned  with  THRIVE approach  to  grow  community 
resilience  –  “community  manages  itself.”    The  future  development  of  the  Cheshire  East 
Prevention Concordat
 will enable use of the best data available to plan and commission the 
right mix of provision to meet local mental health and wellbeing need.  The JSNA will require 
                                                           
7 Healthy London Partnership, Children and Young People Programme: 
Improving care for children and young people in mental health crisis in London: Recommendations for 
transformation of services  
https://www.myhealth.london.nhs.uk/system/files/Improving%20the%20care%20of%20CYP%20with%20ment
al%20health%20crisis%20in%20London%20-%20Emerging%20findings%20November%202015.pdf  

8 NEF 5 Ways to Wellbeing http://neweconomics.org/2008/10/five-ways-to-wellbeing-the-evidence/  
Page 18 of 22 
 

a focus on mental health with co-morbid drug and alcohol, parenting programmes, housing, 
worklessness  and  suicide  prevention  plans  with  a  strong  multi-agency  approach. 
Opportunities  to  access  the  Public  Health  England,  Life  Chances  Fund,  to  improve 
assessment, care, support for co-morbid substance misuse and mental health will need real 
time data to evidence need.   
 
Providing  accessible  locations,  with  the  right  resources  at  the  right  time  by  a  children  and 
young  people  focussed  workforce  with  the  right  skills,  competencies  and  experience  will 
mobilise  a  shared  vision,  created,  and  agreed  by  all,  with  sound  governance,  and 
commitment to meet future lower and higher intensity needs and demands.   
 
Data and intelligence 
NHS  services  in  Cheshire  are  largely  unable  to  provide  robust  information  about  their 
diagnostic  workload  and  clinical  outcomes.  Voluntary,  community  and  faith  sector  services 
are generally able to provide better information about case-mix and outcomes. 
 
Information systems should support regular reporting with high data quality, to address need 
and  to  support  quality  improvement.  Any  hidden  waits  for  treatment  following  assessment 
will  need  to  be  transparently  reported  by  providers.  System  service  resilience  planned 
around holiday periods will need to be forward planned by providers to ensure waiting time 
standards  and  recovery  outcomes  metrics  are  continuously  met  as  part  of  business 
continuity. 
 
Data  collection  and  quality  measures  to  improve  recording  of  case-mix  and  clinical 
outcomes,  dual  diagnosis,  complex  needs,  risk  factors,  risk  stratification  and  population 
segmentation approaches will inform refreshed JSNA updates and thereby support evidence 
based commissioning decisions. 
Utilising resources/workforce planning 
Strong leadership, effective communication, quality measures, financial balance, stakeholder 
involvement,  interagency  cooperation,  informed  JSNA  intelligence,  robust  project 
management and commissioning to contract or adjust new models of integrated care will be 
partnership actions to deliver sustainable landscape change. 
Promoting and maintaining good mental health 
  Improve access to high quality acute maternal acute mental health services  
  improve Early Years initiatives for children who are eligible for free school meals, and 
maintain  a  comprehensive  range  of  parenting  initiatives  that  are  accessible  to  young 
children in all geographical areas  
  improve  the  emotional  wellbeing  of  looked  after  children,  and  children  and  young 
people who are in particular risk groups (see table in section 3 above) 
  commission  selective  prevention  programmes  for  young  children  at  high  risk  of 
conduct disorder  
  diagnose and treat very young children with emerging mental health problems  
 
Reduce self-injury in teenagers 
  reduce school bullying and provide support for sexual orientation and other worries  
  encourage active participation of pupils in sports and other forms of regular exercise  
  support  parents  to  promote  good  sleep  patterns  and  reduce  gaming  and  social 
communication at night time 
  raise awareness about how to access local services, including school-based support, 
services provided by the voluntary sector, and reliable online resources  
 
Improve access to care and support 
Page 19 of 22 
 

  children and young people requiring mental health care currently use services in Crewe, 
Macclesfield and Congleton. Services should be available in age-appropriate locations 
closer to where they live 
  all  children  and  young  people  should  have  ready  access  to  a  counsellor  (and 
overcome their dislike of special areas designated to mental health in schools/colleges or 
reluctance to approach pastoral staff)  
  bring  together  all  emotional  health  and  wellbeing  services  for  young  people
possibly up to the age of 25. Youth information, advice and counselling services should 
provide  social  welfare  legal  advice  alongside  mental  health  interventions  in  accessible 
young  person  friendly  settings.  Services  should  not  be  located  in  buildings  associated 
with authority or with services that carry stigma  
  enable young people to transition to adult mental health services when it is right for 
them as an individual, possibly up to the age of 25 
 
 
 
 
Page 20 of 22 
 

9. Our Roadmap – the ‘Quick View’  
For our detailed plans, please see Appendix 7 
 
Roll out “Tools for Schools” project  
 
Roll out “MH Links” project 
 
THRIVE “Getting Help” pilot 
 
Development of CYPIAPT Workforce 
 
Redesign of service specification for CAMHS 
 
Workforce redesign – including staffing resilience/workforce development 
 
Development of perinatal mental health pathways from universal services inc. 
2017/18 
acute services 
 
Development of a single point of contact for information and advice 
 
Develop access to (on-line) counselling services 
 
Implementation of Self Harm pathway 
 
Review local CYP MH commissioning arrangements – exploring lead 
commissioner models and mapping against local need  
 
Comprehensive workforce review as part of Strategic Clinical Network 
business planning 
  
Implementing new models of care for THRIVE 
 
Recommissioning of YP Substance Misuse Services 
 
Develop all age dedicated MH Crisis and liaison Response appropriate to 
2018/19 
CYP 
 
Recommissioning of 0-19 services 
 
Brokerage of Counselling Services for educational settings 
 
Full parity of esteem in all settings 
 
0-25 delivery of an integrated MH service with a single point of access and 
2019/20 
locally accessible points of access  
 
Stronger linkage between needs analysis and resources for MH 
 
 
 
Page 21 of 22