This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'A303 / Stonehenge Contingent Valuation report'.



A303 Stonehenge
Amesbury to Berwick Down
Valuing Heritage Impacts 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 
P01, S2 
06/02/2017 

link to page 4 link to page 10 link to page 10 link to page 10 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 13 link to page 16 link to page 18 link to page 18 link to page 20 link to page 26 link to page 26 link to page 31 link to page 34 link to page 34 link to page 36 link to page 37 link to page 41 link to page 45 link to page 47 link to page 49 link to page 49 link to page 49 link to page 51 link to page 53 link to page 56 link to page 56 link to page 56 link to page 58 link to page 59 Table of contents 
Chapter 
Pages 

Executive Summary 
1 

Introduction 
7 
2.1 
Background 

2.2 
Objectives 


Literature review 
10 
3.1 
Contingent valuation studies of road schemes 
10 
3.2 
Contingent valuation studies of cultural heritage 
10 
3.3 
Summary 
13 

Valuation Method 
15 
4.1 
Stated preference methods 
15 
4.2 
Contingent Valuation: Methodology 
17 

Contingent valuation methodology: design and implementation 
23 
5.1 
Survey instrument 
23 
5.2 
Valuation scenarios 
28 

Analysis 
31 
6.1 
Data cleaning 
31 
6.2 
Descriptive Statistics 
33 
6.3 
Estimating WTP and WTA 
34 
6.4 
Validity testing 
38 
6.5 
Aggregation of values 
42 
6.6 
Time scale and appraisal period 
44 

Results 
46 
7.1 
Introduction 
46 
7.2 
Average WTP and WTA 
46 
7.3 
Aggregate population level values for the road scheme 
48 
7.4 
Validity test results 
50 

Sensitivity Analysis 
53 
8.1 
Confidence intervals 
53 
8.2 
Certainty of payment 
53 

Conclusion 
55 
10 
References 
56 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025| P01, S2, 06/02/2017 

link to page 35 link to page 37 link to page 39 link to page 41 link to page 42 link to page 45 link to page 47 link to page 49 link to page 49 link to page 51 link to page 53 link to page 54 link to page 56 link to page 57 Table of Tables 
Table 1 
Number of responses removed from survey sample data sets ................... 32 
Table 2 
Descriptive Statistics................................................................................... 34 
Table 3 
Aggregation formula ................................................................................... 36 
Table 4 
Survey pilots ............................................................................................... 38 
Table 5 
Protest responses ....................................................................................... 39 
Table 6 
Variables used in validity tests .................................................................... 42 
Table 7 
Aggregation: Study group to population ...................................................... 44 
Table 8 
Summary statistics of people willing to pay or requiring compensation for 
the removal of the A303 into a tunnel (the road scheme) ............................................... 46 
Table 9 
Mean and Median WTP and WTA values ................................................... 48 
Table 10 
Aggregation to population values ................................................................ 50 
Table 11 
Validity testing: Regression results for WTP .............................................. 51 
Table 12 
Confidence intervals for the aggregate WTP ............................................. 53 
Table 13 
Certainty sensitivity analysis impact on aggregated results ........................ 54 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025| P01, S2, 06/02/2017 


Executive Summary 
1.1.1 
Stonehenge in Wiltshire is one of the best-known and most important 
archaeological sites in the world. The Stonehenge part of the Stonehenge and 
Avebury World Heritage Site (WHS) covers around 26km. The site currently 
suffers considerable intrusion in the form of the A303 road, which passes 
within 165 metres of the famous stone circle and cuts through some other 
features of the WHS such as The Avenue.1 The Government has committed to 
improving the A303 between Amesbury and Berwick Down and, in doing so, 
reducing the impact of the road on the WHS. 
1.1.2 
Highways England is currently progressing through the options identification 
and selection stage of the project. Options considered involve diverting the 
A303 away from the Stonehenge monument, either through a tunnel or via a 
bypass. Diverting the road away from Stonehenge would have a number of 
beneficial effects on the cultural and heritage value of the Stonehenge WHS, 
including reduced noise, increased tranquillity, reduced visual intrusion and 
reduced landscape severance resulting from the existing route. 
1.1.3 
According to Government guidance, every large spending proposal such as 
this requires a five case business case.2  Such a business case aims to set out 
the full benefits and costs of a spending project to enable the decision makers 
to take full account of the impact of a project. This study is part of a wider 
business case for a proposed change in the road layout of the A303. In 
particular, this study considers the impact of the proposed change on the 
heritage experience and non-use heritage values. Other impacts (such as 
economic and environmental) are considered in the overall business case and 
use the methods described in the Department for Transport’s transport 
appraisal guidance (WebTAG). This study is carefully designed to exclude 
those other impacts to avoid double counting. This study focuses exclusively 
on the cultural heritage impacts of removing the A303 from its current location 
within the WHS in terms of noise reduction, increased tranquillity, visual 
amenity and reduced landscape severance. 
1.1.4 
The HM Treasury Green Book (2011) recommends the use of stated 
preference methods for the valuation of goods which do not have actual or 
revealed market prices, such as cultural heritage or biodiversity. The 
contingent valuation method (CV) is a stated preference survey-based 
methodology that seeks to elicit monetary values for non-market goods by 
directly asking individuals about their willingness to pay or willingness to accept 
compensation for a particular change (Bateman et al. 2002). Respondents are 
presented with a hypothetical market that describes in detail the proposed 
change, using baseline conditions as a reference point. The hypothetical 
scenario should be understandable, plausible, and meaningful to respondents 
so that they can give valid and reliable values despite possible lack of 
1 More detail can be found on  http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/?gclid=CPTh- 
amOqdACFUHGGwodrCEBpQ&gclsrc=aw.ds 
2  For more detail on the business case process see: Public sector business cases using the five case 
model (HM Treasury 2013). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 1 

experience with one or more aspects of the scenario (Mitchell and Carson 
1989). 
1.1.5 
We apply CV surveys to elicit monetary values for a hypothetical change in 
noise, tranquillity, visual amenity and landscape severance within the 
Stonehenge WHS, by directly asking individuals about their willingness to pay 
(WTP) or willingness to accept (WTA) compensation for a hypothetical change 
in the layout of the A303 road through the Stonehenge WHS. The CV survey 
instrument design was informed by an extensive review of the valuation 
literature on heritage and cultural goods and services. The study has been 
peer reviewed by an academic expert and quality assured by Department for 
Transport (DfT) and Highways England (HE) economists. 
1.1.6 
The key methodological advantage of CV over other non-market valuation 
approaches is that it can measure use and non-use values and benefits that 
would not be revealed under market conditions. In this case use values stem 
from those visiting the site, those travelling on the A303 and viewing the site 
from the road, and those who experience Stonehenge remotely via other  
media such as the internet, film, books, photographs or social media. Use 
values can include an option value for those deriving value from the possibility 
of using Stonehenge in the future. Non-use values are made up of: altruistic 
values 
– welfare increases from knowing that others living will benefit; bequest 
values 
– welfare increases from knowing that future generations will benefit; 
and existence values – welfare changes from knowing that the road layout 
within the Stonehenge WHS has been changed (even if an individual does not 
experience the changed road layout now or in the future). It is likely that some 
people who have not visited and will not ever visit Stonehenge, or even engage 
with it remotely (e.g. through media), will nonetheless value the positive effects 
of the road layout scenarios if this improves experiences for visitors and others 
who care about Stonehenge. By the same token, non-users may value the 
positive effects for road users of maintaining the current road layout within the 
WHS. 
1.1.7 
This study was designed to assess both use values and non-use values 
associated with the removal of the A303 from its current location within the 
Stonehenge WHS, covering both positive and negative aspects of the 
hypothetical road scenario for users and non-users. 
a) For those who positively valued the road option change, we estimate the
willingness to pay, via an annual tax at the individual level, for the changes
to noise, tranquillity, visual amenity and landscape severance associated
with the removal of the A303 from its current location in the Stonehenge
WHS and its redirection through a tunnel of approximately 2.9km.3
b) For those that negatively valued the road option change, and that therefore
indicated they would not be willing to pay for the tunnel, we estimate the
willingness to accept, via a one-off cash compensation, to put up with the
removal of the A303 from its current location in the Stonehenge WHS and its
redirection through a tunnel of approximately 2.9km.
3  The current A303 would likely be replaced with a narrower footpath or other access way covered with a 
different material than the current tarmac. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 2 

1.1.8 
We conducted three surveys on three sets of stakeholders who may be 
anticipated to hold different types of values for the hypothetical removal of the 
A303 from within part of the Stonehenge WHS: 
 
a) 
Visitors to the Stonehenge WHS (n=432): On-site face-to-face 
interviews (UK resident, aged 16+) estimating the following possible 
values associated with the removal of the road from the Stonehenge 
WHS: 
i. 
Direct use value 
ii. 
Non-use value (associated with effects on other 
cultural heritage within the Stonehenge WHS) 
iii. 
Use and option value for changes in the view of 
Stonehenge from the A303 between Amesbury and 
Berwick Down. 
b) 
Road users (Local residents as proxy) (n=1,001): Online 
survey of people living within a 50-mile radius of Stonehenge with 
quotas on gender and age, estimating the following possible values 
associated with the removal of the road from the Stonehenge WHS: 
i. 
Direct use value 
ii. 
Non-use value (associated with effects on other 
cultural heritage within the Stonehenge WHS) 
iii. 
Use and option value for changes in the view of 
Stonehenge from the A303 between Amesbury and 
Berwick Down. 
c) 
General population (n=2,102): On-line survey of people living 
in the UK (UK residents aged 16+, with quotas on age, gender, and 
region) estimating the following possible values associated with the 
removal of the road from the Stonehenge WHS: 
i. 
Non-use value; 
ii. 
Use values for those who have visited the site recently 
or have photos of it; 
iii. 
Option value for changes in the view of Stonehenge 
from the A303 between Amesbury and Berwick Down. 
 
1.1.9 
The three surveys used the same basic structure and were divided into three 
 
sections. Respondents were provided with information about the route of the 
 
tunnel and the expected impact of the scheme on the World Heritage Site (both 
 
positive and negative). 
 
 
1.1.10 
In total, we received 3,535 completed survey responses composed of visitors 
N=432, Local Population N=1,001, General Population N=2,102. Following the 
surveys, the respondents were redistributed into three study groups of visitors, 
road users, and the general population. This was because some of the general 
population sample were regular road users, whilst some of the local resident 
survey (local residents as a proxy) were not. To ensure that the study groups 
maintained representativeness of their respective populations, the visitor group 
was weighted by age, and the general population group weighted by region, 
gender, age group and income group to ensure representativeness of real- 
world populations. Road users were revealed through their responses to 
survey questions on past usage of the A303 between Amesbury and Berwick 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 3 
 

Down, and in this case we did not have relevant real-world population 
demographic data with which to make comparisons of representativeness. 
1.1.11 
We elicited WTP and WTA values across all three study groups for the 
following hypothetical scenario (from hereon, ‘the road scheme’) (note that the 
full text and information material is in Appendix 1): 
The construction of a dual carriageway between Amesbury and Berwick Down, 
including a 2.9km tunnel underneath the WHS with both portals located within 
the WHS but out of sight from the stone circle.  By removing the road from the 
central portion of the World Heritage Site, those using the road will no longer 
be able to see Stonehenge while driving and those visiting the site will no 
longer be affected by the road. To either side of the tunnel itself, widening the 
road and constructing tunnel portals will have adverse impacts on other 
monuments (e.g. burial sites) within the WHS.
 
1.1.12 
Respondents were presented with this hypothetical scenario including maps 
and photos (see Appendix 1 for the full survey and information material) and 
told that the project would be funded through national taxes. Respondents 
were first asked if they would, in principle, be willing to pay an increase in 
annual taxes over a three-year period to support the alternative road scheme. 
Those respondents that stated they would be willing to pay something for the 
alternative road option were then directed to the WTP valuation question. 
1.1.13 
Those who indicated that they would not be willing to pay anything for the 
alternative road scheme were asked a willingness to accept (WTA) 
compensation question for the removal of the current A303 using a hybrid 
wellbeing-contingent valuation WTA question developed in previous cultural 
valuation studies (Bakhshi et al. 2015). The WTA question involved asking 
respondents if the proposed road scheme would reduce their life satisfaction. 
Those who indicated that the road scheme would reduce their life satisfaction 
were asked about the minimum they would be willing to accept in 
compensation, using the same payment card range as the WTP question. 
1.1.14 
In designing the CV survey instrument we implemented best practice related to 
question wording and ordering, payment format, payment vehicle, prompts, 
use of images, entreaty scripts (reminders of budget constraints and requests 
to answer the WTP or WTA question realistically) to reduce the impact of 
hypothetical bias, and follow-up questions on motivations for WTP and WTA 
(Bateman et al. 2002; Bakhshi et al. 2015). 
1.1.15 
We apply validity testing to assess the WTP findings and provide supporting 
evidence that the WTP results reflect the welfare changes associated with the 
road scheme. The credibility of estimated values from CV studies is most 
commonly assessed by examining their theoretical validity (Bateman et al. 
2002). Theoretical validity examines whether the relationship between WTP 
and other indicators are in accordance with prior expectations. Some of these 
indicators are predictors from economic theory, such as the positive 
association between income and WTP predicted by microeconomic theory 
(Bateman and Willis 2001), or the higher values held by those with positive 
attitudes towards heritage conservation. The validation tests confirmed that 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 4 

WTP is associated with the key drivers of WTP (such as income and frequency 
of visits to Stonehenge), and in the expected direction (e.g. those with higher 
incomes report higher mean WTP). 
1.1.16 
We provide summary results of the contingent valuation of the hypothetical 
reduction in noise, increased tranquillity, increased visual amenity and reduced 
landscape severance associated with the removal of the A303 from part of the 
Stonehenge WHS. The main result is a total net benefit of £1.3bn resulting 
from the road scheme. The total net benefit aggregates those willing to pay for 
the road scheme, net of those requiring compensation for it. The aggregated 
net benefit sits within a 95% confidence interval of £1.1bn and £1.4bn. The 
values elicited comprise two drivers of welfare; (i) the use value derived from 
changes to the heritage experience; and (ii) the non-use value which people 
place on the existence of the altered WHS including bequest value to future 
generations. It is not possible to separate these values into use and non-use 
values. 
Executive Summary Table: Aggregate net value of road scheme 
Lower bound of 95% 
Upper bound of 95% 
Mean 
confidence interval 
confidence interval 
Visitors 
£20million 
£25million 
£29million 
Road 


£42million 
£49million 
£56million 



General 





£1.1billion 
£1.2billion 
£1.3billion 





Total 
£1.1billion 
£1.3billion 
£1.4billion 
1.1.17 
To conclude, the study applies best practice stated preference methods 
(contingent valuation) to elicit the total net benefits associated with the 
hypothetical reduction in noise, increased tranquillity, increased visual amenity 
and reduced landscape severance associated with the removal of the A303 
from part of the Stonehenge WHS for three population groups: Stonehenge 
visitors, road users, and the UK resident general population (aged 16 and 
over). Individual mean WTP and WTA values, as well as the number of zero 
responses, are in line with comparable results from heritage studies in the UK 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 5 

and international studies of World Heritage Sites. Validity tests show that WTP 
values are consistent with theoretically consistent drivers of value (Bateman et 
al. 2002), with additional sensitivity analyses performed on respondent 
certainty levels. Surveys were carefully designed following best practice to 
reduce known biases in CV surveys (Bakhshi et al. 2015). 
1.1.18 
While the values elicited in this study cannot be directly translated into 
cashable benefits, they represent the value that the improvements achieved by 
the road scheme will have for users and non-users of the WHS. They therefore 
form a key component of the overall cost-benefit analysis of this scheme. They 
have been conducted in strict adherence to the Green Book guidance on 
appraisal and evaluation. 
1.1.19 
The comparison of these aggregate values with the earlier CV study that 
valued the benefits of removing the A303 and placing it in a tunnel in the 
Stonehenge WHS, by Maddison and Mourato (2001), shows comparable 
values once inflation, growth and factors specific to the studies such as survey 
mode are accounted for. This adds to the validity of the values in this CV study. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 6 


Introduction 
2.1 
Background 
2.1.1 
Stonehenge in Wiltshire is one of the best-known and most important 
archaeological sites in the world. The Stonehenge part of the Stonehenge and 
Avebury World Heritage Site (WHS) covers around 26km2. Stonehenge is the 
most recognised monument, but the wider landscape contains features of 
similar archaeological importance. The site currently suffers considerable 
intrusion in the form of the A303 road, which passes within 165 metres of the 
famous stone circle and cuts through some other features of the WHS such as 
The Avenue.4 The Government has committed to improving the A303 between 
Amesbury and Berwick Down and, in doing so, reducing the impact of the road 
on the WHS. However, the current road layout also provides the public with a 
view of the stone circle from the road. As a result, a full CBA of the proposed 
policy is required. 
2.1.2 
Highways England is currently progressing through the options identification 
and selection stage of the road scheme. Options considered included the 
diversion of the A303 away from the Stonehenge monument, either through a 
tunnel or via a bypass. In January 2017, Highways England commenced a 
consultation on their plans for the Scheme. Highways England’s proposed 
solution is to build a 1.8 mile (2.9 kilometre) tunnel under the World Heritage 
Site (WHS). Diverting the road away from Stonehenge would reduce the noise, 
visual intrusion and the landscape severance that results from the existing 
route, whilst increasing tranquillity. 
2.2 
Objectives 
2.2.1 
The unique nature of the A303 Stonehenge project, creates a significant 
challenge to appraisers when considering the value for money of the scheme. 
Impacts on the WHS are clearly central to the development and identification of 
a preferred scenario for the scheme. The objective of enhancing and protecting 
the WHS is likely to result in higher construction costs than for a ‘typical’ 
highway improvement project. Whilst it is reasonably easy to quantify 
construction costs, it is much more challenging to quantify some of the key 
potential benefits of the scheme. In this context, there is a possibility, therefore, 
that the cost-benefit analysis of the scheme provides a skewed picture of value 
for money with the potential benefits being under-represented. 
2.2.2 
According to Government guidance every large spending proposal such as this 
requires a full business case.5  Such a business case aims to set out the full 
benefits and costs of a spending project to enable the decision makers to take 
full account of the impact of a project. This study is part of a wider business 
case for a proposed change in the road layout of the A303. In particular, this 
study considers the impact of the proposed change on the heritage experience 
4 More detail can be found on  http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/?gclid=CPTh- 
amOqdACFUHGGwodrCEBpQ&gclsrc=aw.ds 
5  For more detail on the business case process see: Public sector business cases using the five case 
model (HM Treasury 2013). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 7 

and non-use heritage values. Other impacts (such as economic and 
environmental) are considered in the overall business case and use the 
methods described in the DfT’s transport appraisal guidance (WebTAG). This 
study is carefully designed to exclude those other impacts to avoid double 
counting. For example, if respondents include the reduction in the journey time 
along the A303, once it has been moved into a tunnel, into their WTP value, 
this would be counted twice because time benefits are picked up in the 
WebTAG assessment as part of the wider cost-benefit analysis. Figure 1 
illustrates how these considerations fit together. This study attempts to focus 
exclusively on the cultural heritage impacts of removing the A303 from its 
current location within the WHS in terms of noise reduction, increased 
tranquillity, visual amenity and reduced landscape severance.6  Impacts of a 
project such as this are complex. At the time of this study comprehensive 
information on the routing of the tunnel and its portals was not available. The 
construction of a tunnel is likely to have impacts on other elements of the 
WHS, most of which may not even be visible in the current state. While the 
removal of the A303 will increase the tranquillity and visual amenity around the 
WHS its further impacts may become apparent while exploratory work is 
conducted. These archaeological impacts are outside of the scope of this study 
but will be addressed in the consultation process. 
2.2.3 
The aim of this research is to produce a set of robust and defensible estimates 
for non-market benefits associated with the removal of the A303 from its 
current location within the Stonehenge WHS (hereon, ‘the road scheme’). 
Simetrica was commissioned by AAJV (Arup Atkins Joint Venture) on behalf of 
Highways England to conduct this study. The Simetrica project team consisted 
of 
, Director, 
 (London School of 
Economics and Simetrica), 


 


 and 
. The study 
builds on Susana Mourato’s previous study in 1998 published in 2001 . All 
survey materials were reviewed and approved by a project steering group, 
including members of Highways England, DfT, Defra, English Heritage, Natural 
England, and Historic England. 
2.2.4 
HM Treasury’s Green Book is founded on the economic concept of cost-benefit 
analysis (CBA). What distinguishes economic approaches to appraisal and 
evaluation is that the outcomes of an action are what matter, and these 
outcomes are measured ultimately in terms of their welfare implications. 
2.2.5 
There are two ways of converting an impact on welfare into a monetary figure, 
which enables different policies to be appraised and evaluated on a consistent 
basis: Compensating surplus (CS) is the amount of money, paid or received, 
that will leave the agent in their initial welfare position following a change in the 
good; and Equivalent surplus (ES) is the amount of money, to be paid or 
received, that will leave the agent in their subsequent welfare position in 
absence of a change in the good. CS can be interpreted in terms of people's 
willingness to pay (WTP) for welfare-enhancing outcomes and willingness 
to accept (WTA) 
welfare-decreasing outcomes. In contrast, ES can be 
6 Willingness to pay studies can be subject to biases, including strategic bias. See section 4.2 for details 
on potential biases and how they have been addressed in this study. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 8 


interpreted as peoples’ WTA to forego a welfare enhancing outcome and 
WTP to avoid welfare-decreasing outcomes. 
2.2.6 
Where market prices do not exist for goods and services (termed ‘non-market’ 
goods) economists have traditionally turned to direct elicitation of WTP and 
WTA through non-market valuation methods such as survey-based stated 
preference 
valuation methods (HM Treasury 2011). The contingent 
valuation method (CV) 
is a stated preference survey-based methodology that 
seeks to elicit monetary values for non-market goods by directly asking 
individuals about their willingness to pay or willingness to accept compensation 
for a particular change (Bateman et al. 2002). Respondents are presented with 
a hypothetical market that describes in detail the proposed change under 
valuation, using baseline conditions as a reference point. The hypothetical 
scenario must be understandable, plausible, and meaningful to respondents so 
that they can give valid and reliable values despite possible lack of experience 
with one or more aspects of the scenario (Mitchell and Carson, 1989). 
Respondents are then asked how much they would be prepared to pay or 
accept for the change described. 
2.2.7 
The methods used for this study were subject to a review process by analysts 
from Highways England and the DfT and were discussed with an independent 
peer reviewer, Professor Danny Campbell from Stirling University. 
Note: the size of the bars in this figure are examples of the size of the impact and are not based on data. 
The yellow arrow indicates the specific benefits considered by the study. 
Benefits assessed in the A303 business case 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 9 


Literature review 
3.1 
Contingent valuation studies of road schemes 
3.1.1 
The key piece of research which guides this study is a contingent valuation 
study which assessed the heritage value of the removal of two roads – the 
A344 and the A303 – within the Stonehenge WHS, conducted by Maddison 
and Mourato (2001b). The data was collected in 1998 on a face-to-face basis, 
both on site and in households across the country.7  Respondents were asked 
to consider their WTP for the change or WTP to retain the status quo situation, 
in terms of a household tax. The net weighted average value was then 
aggregated using the total number of households in the UK. The majority of 
respondents (by a narrow margin) in 1998 would prefer to retain the existing 
scenario, but of these the majority did not express a positive WTP to retain it. 
Those who preferred the construction of the tunnel had higher levels of positive 
WTP. This study design was partly used as a benchmark for the current study. 
The net aggregate WTP for replacing the A303 with the construction of a 
tunnel was £149m. Appendix 2 explains the difference in the total valuation to 
our study. The main reasons for this difference are subsequent levels of 
inflation and that aggregation occurred on the household rather than individual 
level.8  In addition, the CV method has been developed further and the use of 
online panels via the internet allows for significantly larger surveys making 
studies more robust. 
3.1.2 
Sieber and Melichar (2014) used the CV method in their valuation of a road 
improvement in the Czech Republic. They focussed on one particular aspect of 
the road improvement – reduction of noise – and had to ensure that the 
information provided to survey respondents ensured this focus. The validity 
tests conducted showed that variability of WTP accorded with theoretically 
consistent drivers, such as demographic characteristics and where people 
lived. Mean WTP was estimated at 98 Koruna, which converts to £2.98 at 2015 
prices. 
3.2 
Contingent valuation studies of cultural heritage 
3.2.1 
This project is not just concerned with the valuation of a road scheme in 
general but the impact of a road on cultural heritage. The A303 Stonehenge 
scheme is unique in that it seeks, as a key objective, to enhance a heritage 
assets. To assess these multifaceted effects, we also reviewed the literature 
on cultural heritage. Contingent valuation studies have been applied to a wide 
range of heritage sites within the UK (Willis 1994; Eftec 2005), Europe 
(Mourato et al. 2014; Mourato et al. 2002; Del Saz Salazar and Montagud 
Marques 2005; Ruijgrok 2006), and beyond (Kim et al. 2007; Lee 2014; Báez- 
Montenegro et al. 2012), 
7  The A344 was removed in 2013. Part of the old road is now used as a footpath, the rest has been 
completely removed and grassed over. 
8 The literature on aggregating contingent valuation upon review, points in the direction of aggregating on 
an individual level. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 10 

3.2.2 
In 2003, Noonan (2003) provided a review of the state-of-the-art CV methods 
in the cultural and heritage sector. Noonan considered 116 studies which used 
CV or Dichotomous Choice Experiments (DCE) and assessed the differences 
in methods with respect to their impact on WTP. Of 53 CV studies of cultural 
sites published at the time, five were related to heritage sites (Boxall et al. 
2003; Mourato et al. 2002; Creigh-Tyte 2000; Eftec 2005; Lockwood 1996) and 
19 to historical sites (Noonan, 2003). The most common form of payment 
mechanism used across all studies were payment card and dichotomous 
choice methods.9  Noonan showed that, in 2003, the UK was one of the leaders 
in applying CV studies to assess the value of cultural goods, just behind the 
US. 
3.2.3 
In 2014 Bakhshi, Fujiwara, Mourato, Lawton and Dolan conducted a CV study 
of cultural heritage in the UK focussing on museums and galleries (Bakhshi et 
al. 2015). This report also updated Noonan’s literature review related to 
museums and galleries. The authors undertook an explicit comparison 
between two methods of economic valuation: contingent valuation (CV) and 
subjective wellbeing valuation (SWV). The study found that CV performed well 
in measuring use and non-use/option values for cultural institutions, when 
undertaken using best-practice techniques for addressing well-known biases 
and implementation challenges. It demonstrated once more that CV can be a 
useful tool in assessing the value that cultural heritage creates, in the absence 
of markets, producing very realistic values. It should be noted that, in the 
current study, subjective well-being valuation would not have been suitable 
because it is based on experienced utility, requiring participants to experience 
both the current road and the tunnel options and compare their well-being. This 
is clearly not feasible in this case. 
3.2.4 
A persistent problem in CV studies is that estimates of WTA typically exceed 
that of WTP, which violates the underlying theory of economic preference 
satisfaction (Hausman 2012). Bakhshi et al. (2015) elicit the value of avoiding 
the closure of a cultural institution (with case studies of London’s Natural 
History Museum and the Tate Liverpool gallery) for one year using a WTA 
approach, via a one-off cash compensation. The authors define this mostly as 
a use value and an option value, as closure would prevent access and future 
access to the institution but not, say, on-going research and conservation. The 
study addresses the well-known WTP-WTA disparity (Horowitz and McConnell 
2002; Shogren et al. 1994), often described as an endowment effect, whereby 
people ascribe more value to things merely because they own them (Daniel 
Kahneman and Tversky 1979; Loewenstein and Adler 1995). The study 
addresses this by assessing whether constraining the WTA scenario by setting 
it explicitly in the context of changes in life satisfaction produces reasonable 
WTA values relative to WTP. The hypothesized mechanism for this is that 
respondents are asked explicitly to think about the WTA question within the 
framework of economic theory, i.e. they are compensated directly for changes 
in their welfare, in this case life satisfaction. Importantly, compensation is only 
offered for those that say their life satisfaction would be negatively affected in 
the first place, from the institutional closure. The study finds that the hybrid 
9 More detail on the reasons for choosing CV compared to Dichotomous Choice Experiments in section 6. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 11 

wellbeing-contingent valuation WTA approach, based on life satisfaction and 
combining elements of both CV and SWV, delivers plausible values. 
3.2.5 
The Stonehenge WHS is listed in the UNESCO’s list of World Heritage Sites. 
Sites included in this list must be of outstanding universal value.10 We reviewed 
some of the literature which considered other WHS. Tuan and Navrud (2007) 
conduct a study valuing the My Son WHS in Vietnam (a large complex of 
religious temples). They focus on the international relevance of this WHS to 
residents and foreign visitors in order to estimate benefits for visitors and 
assess optimal entrance fees to maximize revenues for the site. They are able 
to demonstrate the applicability of the CV method to value these sites by 
comparing CV results with the results of choice modelling, which reflects the 
same underlying preference structures. The mean WTP for preserving the My 
Son WHS in Vietnam (a large complex of religious temples) was about US$7 
per adult foreign visitor, as a one-time increase in entrance fee, and about 
US$2 per household in the region, as a one-time local tax. 
3.2.6 
Kim et al. (2007) estimate use value of a WHS in Korea using a dichotomous 
choice CV. The study explicitly stated that the WHS status of the site 
recognised it as a representative heritage resource “indicating excellence of 
Korean national tradition and culture”. The results from this study revealed the 
economic value of the World Heritage Site to domestic users or tourists in 
levels exceeding its financial benefits. The mean WTP values were 5706 Won 
($5.70) in a log-linear model, and 6005 Won ($6.00) in a log-logit model. 
Taking into account only domestic visitors, the aggregate use value from the 
log-linear model was estimated to be approximately US$1.93 million (at 2007 
prices), while the aggregate use value from the log-logit model was estimated 
as US$2.01 million. 
3.2.7 
More recently, Mourato et al. (2014) elicited visitor (UK resident and foreign) 
and general population WTP to support conservation and maintenance of built 
heritage interiors from climate change damage in the UK. Visitors to three 
heritage sites (Ham House, Knole House, and St Joseph and the English 
Martyrs Roman Catholic Church) were surveyed using a payment card 
mechanism, as part of a wider benefits transfer study of ten heritage sites in 
the European Union (EU). A top-up entry fee mechanism was used in the case 
of visitors to Ham and Knole, and an annual donation was adopted in the case 
of the parishioners visiting St Joseph’s Church. The general population surveys 
focused on the protection of all built heritage interiors in the UK and used and 
annual tax payment mechanism. Mean WTP a top-up entry fee for Ham House 
and Knole was £2.46 and £2.47, respectively. Mean WTP for St. Joseph’s 
Church was £24.12, as a yearly donation. Mean WTP annual taxes for the 
protection of all built heritage interiors in the UK was £33.40 for the general 
population. 
3.2.8 
A further challenge to valuing the heritage impact of a road is the size of the 
site. As outlined in the introduction, it is not just the stone circle’s value that 
might be affected by the road options but also the value of the site surrounding 
10 Selection criteria for UNESCO WHS are listed on the UNESCO’s website: 
http://whc.unesco.org/en/criteria/ 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 12 

it which includes ‘the Avenue’, currently severed by the A303, and a number of 
other monuments and burial sites. One relevant study is the valuation of the 
setting of the ancient city of Valdivia in Chile (Báez and Herrero 2012). The 
authors use a CV approach with a clear description of the whole site. Baez and 
Herrero include foreign tourists in the valuation. The mean WTP for each 
tourist is 6,558 Chilean pesos (£7.93). This value reflects each tourist’s mean 
willingness to pay for the guided walking tour, and is taken as an estimation of 
the direct use value of Valdivia’s historical heritage, rather than the heritage 
impacts of a road. However, their study is of interest because it values an 
existing man-made structure, over a considerable area of land and combines 
the results of the CV study with a wider cost-benefit-analysis. 
3.3 
Summary 
3.3.1 
The studies we reviewed support the choice of the CV method in the case of a 
complex valuation project such as the heritage impact of the removal of the 
A303 from the WHS of Stonehenge and Avebury. We see that previous CV 
studies on UNESCO WHS in developing countries have focussed on the 
international relevance to both resident and foreign visitors. However, the focus 
in these studies was on maximising potential revenue for the sites. In the 
overwhelming majority of studies of cultural heritage, measures of WTP have 
been elicited; Bakhshi et al. (2015) is a notable exception, with their estimation 
of WTA, using the hybrid CV-SWV method. 
3.3.2 
The key piece of research which guides this study is Maddison and Mourato’s 
(2001) CV study of the heritage value of the removal of two roads - the A344 
and the A303 - within the Stonehenge WHS. We note that Maddison and 
Mourato considered the removal of two roads at the time but the A344 has 
since been removed. The study assumed a two-year period of payments, did 
not include a road user sample, and included foreign visitors within the survey. 
Given the long time period since the Maddison and Mourato study, it is not 
possible to simply ‘uprate’ these values to 2016 prices. Significant changes 
have since occurred in the Stonehenge site (with the removal of the A344 road 
and the construction of the new visitor centre); there have been changes in the 
tunnel project (which is no longer 2km as in 1998, but almost 3km); and, more 
generally, there have been many societal changes that might affect 
preferences and values (e.g. financial crisis, Brexit). 
3.3.3 
The most recent UK heritage valuation studies are contained in the Mourato et 
al. (2014) benefits transfer study. WTP ranges from £2.46 to £33.40. We note 
that this study used top-up entry fees, donations and taxes, and elicited values 
for sites of regional or local importance, in contrast to the broader international 
relevance of a WHS. This study also valued a very different good (changes to 
case study interiors) compared to removal of a main road from within a WHS. 
3.3.4 
The studies presented here outline the complexities for the contingent 
valuation of cultural heritage, but also highlight the flexibility of the CV method 
to isolate a particular aspect of a road programme or site to assess. The most 
relevant study for the present valuation study is the Maddison and Mourato 
(2001) study which elicited WTP in form of a tax to support the removal of the 
A303 and A344 roads from the Stonehenge WHS. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 13 

3.3.5 
The Bakhshi et al. (2015) study provides the most relevant methodological 
structure to guide the current survey design. This study has been 
recommended as best practice for CV valuation in the cultural sector by the 
Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) and the Arts and Humanities 
Research Council (AHRC).11  In addition, the Bakhshi et al. study provides a 
novel hybrid wellbeing-contingent valuation WTA question that has been found 
to reduce the well-known disparity between WTA and WTP. 
11  
http://www.ahrc.ac.uk/newsevents/news/the-individual-experience-at-the-heart-of-cultural-value/ 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 14 


Valuation Method 
4.1 
Stated preference methods 
4.1.1 
Stated preference methods such as contingent valuation (CV) and discrete 
choice experiments (DCE) are recommended methods in the HM Treasury 
Green Book. DCE is applied by economists in situations that are multi- 
dimensional in nature and where it is important to find the value attached to the 
various dimensions of interest. Respondents are presented with a series of 
policy scenarios, grouped into ‘choice sets’ that describe the alternatives on 
offer. Respondents are then asked to identify their most preferred scenario, 
amongst the scenarios contained in a choice set. Willingness to pay (or to 
accept) is therefore inferred indirectly by analysing the choices and trade-offs 
made between the various attributes. 
4.1.2 
Contingent valuation (CV) surveys elicit the monetary value of non-market 
goods and services (measured as CS or ES, recall section 2.2) by directly 
asking people what value they attach to them (Bateman et al. 2002).12 By 
means of an appropriately designed questionnaire, a hypothetical market is 
described where the good or service in question can be traded. A sample of 
people (representative of the population of interest) are then directly asked 
about their WTP or WTA for a change in the level of provision of the good or 
service. CV is used to value full policy changes rather than changes in specific 
attributes of a policy or good (e.g. full change (removal) of the A303 from part 
of the WHS) rather than questions about attributes of the road scheme (e.g. 
width of the road or where the portals of the tunnel should be situated). For a 
review of the advantages and disadvantages of DCE vis-à-vis CV see Hanley, 
Mourato and Wright (2001). 
4.1.3 
In sum, we do not apply DCE in the current study for two main reasons. First, 
DCE is aimed at valuing attributes rather than complete policy changes and in 
the current study we are interested in the overall value of the road scheme 
rather than the values of their constituent parts and CV, rather than DCE, is 
designed to pick up overall value. Second, in the case of the A303 the 
hypothetical road scheme (and attributes associated with it) are fixed and it 
would not make sense to vary the level of the attributes (many of the attribute 
combinations would not be possible). Therefore, DCE is not a suitable 
valuation method for the removal of the A303 into a tunnel and CV presents 
itself as the best available method for this study. 
4.1.4 
In line with standard economic theory, WTP and WTA when correctly elicited 
from CV (i.e. they are unbiased estimates) map onto the technically correct CS 
and ES measures of welfare change as follows: 
12  Bateman, I. J., Carson, R. T., Day, B., Hanemann, M., Hanley, N., Hett, T., et al. (2002). Economic 
Valuation with Stated Preference Techniques: A Manual. Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 15 

Compensating surplus 
Equivalent surplus 
WTA to forego the positive 
Welfare gain 
WTP for the positive change 
change 
WTP to avoid the negative 
Welfare loss 
WTA the negative change 
change 
4.1.5 
In the context of this study people who value the removal of the road will have 
a positive WTP value, whilst people who value the road as it currently is will 
have a non-positive WTA value. 
4.1.6 
We measure welfare changes (both losses and gains) as compensating 
surplus (CS) measures. There is some debate as to what measure of welfare 
change is appropriate to use in CBA and CV since a given welfare gain or loss 
can be framed both in terms of CS and ES and the results will not always be 
the same. Due to issues related to budget constraints, substitution effects and 
the endowment effect, CS for a welfare loss can be much higher than the ES 
for the same welfare loss (Ericson and Fuster 2014; Brown and Gregory 1999). 
This is known as the WTP-WTA disparity and WTA has been found to be up to 
seven times larger than WTP (to avoid) for the same outcome (Horowitz and 
McConnell 2002). It is fairly typical to use CS for both welfare losses and gains 
in CBA (US EPA 2000) but the WTP-WTA disparity must be dealt with. One 
possible method for dealing with this is to downward calibrate WTA figures by 
WTA-WTP ratios identified in the literature (see Horowitz and McConnell 
2002). As noted above, we use a different approach here whereby we employ 
a hybrid wellbeing-contingent valuation WTA  question developed by our 
research team for the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) 
economic valuation of the Natural History Museum and Tate Liverpool to elicit 
WTA compensation for removal of the A303 via a one-off cash compensation 
(Bakhshi et al. 2015). 
4.1.7 
The hybrid method asks respondents to think explicitly about compensation in 
terms of compensating for their welfare losses (in terms of changes in their 
wellbeing). The hybrid contingent-wellbeing valuation WTA has been shown to 
reduce the well-known disparity between WTP and WTA for two studies of 
cultural institutions (Bakhshi et al. 2015).  In sum, the hybrid WTA method is 
employed here for welfare losses (those that value maintaining the A303 road 
in its current location) so that CS measures for welfare gains and losses can 
be measured and aggregated consistently. 
4.1.8 
Finally, CV questionnaires also contain a wealth of additional questions to gain 
information on a respondent’s socio-demographic characteristics, their 
attitudes towards the good, and the reasons behind their stated valuations. The 
responses to these questions are typically used to model the determinants of 
WTP (or WTA). In particular, the importance of income as a driver of WTP 
relates to: (i) the marginal utility of income, such that each additional pound has 
greater value for those on a lower income, meaning that higher income    
groups are willing (able) to pay more for the same welfare gain, and; (ii) the 
capping effect of income, which constrains budgets and reduces the amount 
that a low income respondent is able to pay. For extensive discussion of 
income effects see Horowitz and McConnell (2002). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 16 

4.2 
Contingent Valuation: Methodology 
4.2.1 
We outline below the main elements of our CV design, in terms of elicitation 
method (the type of question used to elicit monetary values), measurement of 
use and non-use values, choice of payment vehicle (the hypothetical means by 
which payments will be made, such as taxes, donations, and entry fees), and 
bias reduction strategies. 
Elicitation method 
4.2.2 
The valuation questions can be presented in a number of different ways, 
including open-ended, bidding game, payment card, and dichotomous choice 
elicitation formats. 
4.2.3 
Open-ended questions represent the simplest direct elicitation technique 
where respondents simply state the amount they would be willing to pay. 
However, a number of problems have been associated with this technique, 
including large non-response rates, protest bids, and outliers that skew the 
data (Bateman et al. 2002; Mitchell and Carson 1989). At the opposite end of 
the spectrum, single-bounded dichotomous choice questions allow the 
researcher to randomly present a monetary figure to the respondent (Arrow 
and Solow 1993). This simplifies the cognitive task and is thought to provide 
incentives for truthful revelation of WTP (if their WTP is higher, say, than the 
amount offered, it is in their interest to accept this value). However, this 
approach may also encourage a larger number of protest bids than open- 
ended mechanisms. It also provides data only in a range above or below which 
we can be certain the respondent is willing to pay. Double-bounded 
dichotomous choice 
improves on this method by asking a follow-up question: 
if the respondent indicates that they would pay the initial amount (e.g., £2), 
would they pay the next amount up (i.e. £3)? Alternatively, if the respondent 
indicated that they would not pay the initial amount of £2, would they be willing 
to pay the next amount down (i.e., £1)? Although this improves on the single- 
bounded dichotomous choice approach, both mechanisms introduce so-called 
anchoring bias, by suggesting to the respondent the appropriate range of 
values to be elicited (Arrow and Solow 1993). Payment card approaches 
present respondents with a range of monetary amounts from which they are 
asked to pick their willingness to pay. This eliminates anchoring (and starting 
point) bias and provides a visual aid to the cognitive process of valuing the 
good (Bateman et al. 2002; Maddison and Foster 2003; Maddison and Mourato 
2001b). However, this approach is in turn vulnerable to range bias, whereby 
respondents may scale their responses to the range of numbers they are 
presented with (Whynes, Wolstenholme, and Frew 2004). To reduce the effect 
of range bias we tested the value ranges in the payment card in the pilot 
surveys (see below) and also included an open-ended ‘other amount’ option. 
4.2.4 
Dichotomous choice (DC) elicitation methods are more consistent with welfare 
economic theory, in terms of mimicking consumer experience and incentivising 
truth telling. However, DC requires a large enough sample size to provide at 
least 100 respondents per bid level. For a sample of n=400 this would provide 
only 4 bid levels. Moreover, if we have a high proportion of respondents with a 
zero WTP (as in the Bakhshi et al. 2015 cultural valuation study), this will 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 17 

further reduce the subsample answering the dichotomous choice question, 
which is problematic. 
4.2.5 
Given the particular characteristics of this study we decided to use a payment 
card method 
for both the tunnel and status quo valuations. The payment card 
method provides a balance the theoretical ideal with the practical constraints of 
the project (specifically, the small sample size, limited piloting time, and 
potentially high zero response) (Bateman et al., 2002). 
Use and non-use values 
4.2.6 
The key methodological advantage of CV over other non-market valuation 
approaches such as revealed preference methods is that it can measure 
values and benefits that would not be revealed under market conditions, such 
as non-use values. Importantly, it also offers the opportunity to measure 
benefits associated with changes that have not yet happened, that is, future 
changes. 
4.2.7 
In this case use values stem from those visiting the site, those travelling on the 
A303 and viewing the site from the road, and those who experience 
Stonehenge remotely via other media (internet, film, books, photographs, 
social media, etc.) Use values can include an option value for those deriving 
value from the possibility of using Stonehenge in the future. Non-use values 
are made up of: altruistic values – welfare increases from knowing that others 
living will benefit; bequest values – welfare increases from knowing that future 
generations will benefit; and existence values – welfare changes from knowing 
that the road layout within the Stonehenge WHS has been changed (even if an 
individual does not experience the changed road lay out now or in the future). It 
is likely that some people who have not visited and will not ever visit 
Stonehenge, or even engage with it remotely (e.g. through media), will 
nonetheless value the positive effects of the road layout scenarios if this 
improves experiences for visitors and others who care about Stonehenge. By 
the same token, non-users may value the positive effects for road users of 
maintaining the current road lay out within the WHS. 
4.2.8 
We note that although valuation distinctions (between use and non-use) exist, 
it is very difficult to disentangle the different components of value from people’s 
stated WTP and WTA values. This is because whilst non-use value can be 
ascertained from non-users (alongside possible option values for future use), 
users will typically hold both use and non-use value for the non-market good, 
and both of these contribute to their overall WTP/WTA responses. Therefore, it 
is not possible to distinguish between use and non-use value in the responses 
of visitors to Stonehenge or users of the A303. 
Elicitation of values 
4.2.9 
A range of hypothetical scenarios and payment vehicles that have been 
applied in previous studies were considered for the Stonehenge WHS WTP 
question. We outline below the advantages and disadvantages of each: 
a) Increased entrance charge to Stonehenge: Advantages:
Compulsory, incentive compatible payment mechanism.
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 18 

Disadvantages: Misleading because a national road scheme is not 
just paid for by visitors to Stonehenge. 
b) Voluntary donationAdvantages: Applicable to all survey
populations. Disadvantages: Donations and other voluntary payment
vehicles can lead to ‘free-riding’, as people are aware that they do not
have to pay a donation to gain the benefit so long as others are
willing to pay.
c) Annual taxAdvantage: Compulsory, incentive compatible, and
applicable to all survey samples. Disadvantage: Taxable period has
to be constrained, for example, to apply only over the period of tunnel
construction.
d) One-off taxAdvantages: Compulsory, incentive compatible, and
applicable to all survey samples. Disadvantages: One-off tax is
unrealistic, because the costs occur over a number of years while the
tunnel is constructed and the public do not realistically ever pay a
one-off tax.
e) Road taxAdvantages: Compulsory, incentive compatible.
Disadvantages: Open to protest responses, because those who
drive may feel they should not bear all of the cost, while those who do
not are able to free-ride.
f) Road toll. As above for Road tax.
4.2.10 
The final payment vehicle used in the scenario of WTP for the construction of a 
tunnel to replace the A303 is a hypothetical increase in an individual’s annual 
national tax
. The project team and external peer reviewer were in agreement 
that a non-voluntary national tax increase over three years is the most 
realistic payment vehicle option for this survey, and the least likely to be 
subject to free-rider and hypothetical bias. The payment of the tax over three 
years reflects the expected construction time of the alternative tunnel option 
and hence realistically links increased tax payment with the costs of the road 
works. It is also a time horizon that respondents are arguably used to 
considering in their own private planning, without being unrealistically short, as 
a one-off payment would have been, or too long, as an unlimited tax would 
have been. 
4.2.11 
For those respondents who value the current status quo of keeping the road in 
its current location we employ a hybrid subjective wellbeing-contingent 
valuation WTA question, framed as a hypothetical one-off cash compensation 
payment. Given that the change (removal of the road) happens at one point in 
time, it is assumed that the compensation demanded to restore the individual 
to their initial welfare position (compensating surplus) is evaluated across the 
life course, and not as a continuous payment. This also accounts for 
adaptation effects, whereby individuals adapt for losses in their life and return 
to close to their original welfare position over a certain period of time, 
depending on the magnitude of the loss (Frederick and Loewenstein 1999). 
Bias reduction 
4.2.12 
There are a number of well-known potential biases in CV that can be 
problematic if not adequately addressed in the survey instrument and analysis 
(Bateman et al. 2002; Pearce, Atkinson, and Mourato 2006). These include: 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 19 

hypothetical bias, where respondents overstate the amount they are willing to 
pay in the hypothetical situation, in relation to what they would pay in reality; 
insensitivity to scope, where WTP is insensitive to the scope of the proposed 
change; focusing bias where the survey focuses respondents attention on the 
scenario in a way that does not reflect how people would actually experience 
these conditions or states in real life; protest values, where respondents have 
a principled objection to providing a monetary value; framing and information 
bias 
when people react to information in different ways depending on how it is 
presented and on the level of detail provided in the information; and strategic 
bias
, where respondents seek to ‘game’ the study by providing values that 
they think will influence an actual resource allocation recommendation. Finally, 
differences between WTP and WTA can also occur, which violates the 
underlying theory of economic preference satisfaction (Hausman 2012). We 
outline below the main types bias that we expect might affect the current study, 
and the best-practice measures taken to deal with them. 
4.2.13 
Strategic bias refers to the act of when someone wishes to preserve a status 
quo or to achieve a specific change and purposefully influences the survey 
results (e.g. by stating an extremely high or low WTP/WTA value) in order to 
help achieve their wish. Strategic bias can, therefore, lead to over or under 
statement of WTP or WTA (Throsby and Withers 1986). The results in this 
study could have been affected by a number of different strategic biases, some 
of them balancing each other out. For example, respondents who want to 
preserve the status quo might have been tempted to exaggerate the necessary 
compensation and those who feel strongly about the need to remove the road 
may give an exaggerated WTP. The payment cards were capped at £200 and 
open-end responses above £250 were removed as unrealistically high and 
indicators of strategic bidding (see section 6.1 for discussion of rationale for 
excluding respondents from the study samples). 
4.2.14 
Strategic bias can also manifest in the self-selection into the survey of types of 
individuals seeking to influence the results. Ipsos Mori interviewers addressed 
this through measures to reduce the risk of self-selection by individuals aiming 
to influence the survey (choosing every third person exiting the site and 
avoiding those who directly approached them (this did not occur)). 
4.2.15 
For online surveys, we removed respondents who completed the survey 
quickly (‘speedsters’, see section 6.1). Speedsters are removed on the 
assumption that they are completing the survey for strategic purposes (for 
example monetary or political incentives), or a lack of understanding/ interest 
encouraging quick completion and are not giving fully considered and truthful 
answers. 
4.2.16 
Framing and information bias refer to the issue of when people react to 
information in different ways depending on how it is presented and on the level 
of detail provided in the information. The way the information is provided in a 
CV survey, therefore, has the potential to impact on WTP/WTA results. With 
this in mind, the information provided in our surveys was clearly set out in a 
neutral manner, describing both the positive and negative effects of the 
different road options. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 20 

4.2.17 
The information provided in the surveys was tested within all three surveys 
during the pilots to ensure it was sufficiently clear to allow respondents to 
answer the questions (Ajzen, Brown, and Rosenthal 1996). During the pilot, we 
asked whether respondents felt the information was easy to understand and 
which benefits would arise from the road. This question tested whether they 
had understood the information at hand and whether they had been able to 
isolate the heritage effect within the survey (i.e., whether they were stating 
WTP for heritage effects or for aspects of road use, safety, travel time). 
4.2.18 
A bias caused by insensitivity to scope means that respondents are not 
responsive to the characteristics of the good valued (Carson 1997). Some 
degree of insensitivity to scope might have occurred when using CV to value 
different designs of the tunnel, with different lengths, different types of 
entrances and so on. However, here we just focus on a single generic 2.9 km 
tunnel, without providing a detailed description of its particular features. 
Insensitivity of scope should therefore be less of an issue. 
4.2.19 
We also asked respondents about their motivations for not being willing to 
pay/accept. This allows us to identify potential protest bids associated with the 
information or tax payment vehicle presented, which provides us with more 
confidence that respondents’ stated values reflect the values they place in the 
heritage aspects of the road scheme. 
4.2.20 
Focusing bias occurs in CV studies when at the time of preference elicitation 
people are focusing only on the salient aspects of the condition or issue at 
hand (i.e. the road options) and this may not reflect in any way how people 
would actually experience these conditions or states in real life (Kahneman et 
al. 2006; Schkade and Kahneman 1998). This can lead to an overstatement of 
their WTP or WTA values. 
4.2.21 
We addressed the potential for focusing bias in our surveys through use of 
reminder statements and information about other service providers to ensure 
that respondents give full consideration to substitutes; and highlight other 
possible uses of an individual’s time and money so that the value of the 
presence/absence of the A303 within the Stonehenge WHS is conceived of in 
the wider context of people’s lives, experiences, and available budget, helping 
to avoid focussing biases. 
4.2.22 
The criticism of CV that has perhaps received greatest attention is 
hypothetical bias (Arrow and Solow 1993; Champ and Bishop 2001; 
Hausman 2012), where individuals’ stated WTP may be significantly larger 
than actual WTP due to the hypothetical nature of the survey. This arises 
mostly when a voluntary payment mechanism is used. In the case of this study 
respondents had to compare the real situation of the existing road with a 
hypothetical situation of a tunnel with limited information on its position. The 
information provided to respondents included photoshopped images of the site 
without the road, but not of the potential tunnel portals. 
4.2.23 
To address this we included a certainty question in the surveys (e.g. “How 
certain are you that you would really pay the amount indicated if asked?”) 
(Champ and Bishop 2001). This allows us to provide sensitivity analysis on 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 21 

alternative levels of WTP associated with certainty of response, which is 
recommended when CV results are used in CBA (Haab et al. 2013). We aimed 
to use a payment vehicle which was as realistic as possible, a national tax over 
three years. We also use cheap talk entreaties (i.e. a script that explicitly 
describes this bias and asks respondents to avoid it) and oath scripts (i.e. 
asking respondents to agree to promise that they will respond to questions 
honestly), which were used effectively in our recent study for the AHRC 
(Bakhshi et al. 2015). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 22 


Contingent valuation methodology: design and 
implementation
 
5.1 
Survey instrument 
5.1.1 
We applied best-practice methods for contingent valuation, developed from our 
review of the literature and our own prior work. We designed one on-site visitor 
survey and two online surveys of local road users and the UK general 
population. While international visitors and non-residents will also be affected 
by the changes, these are excluded from the valuation study in line with HM 
Treasury Green Book guidance.13
5.1.2 
The Stonehenge visitor face-to-face survey was run in the field between 15th 
September and 7th October 2016. The road user survey was run online 
between 17th September and 3rd  October 2016. The general population survey 
was run online between 22nd September and 5th October 2016. Each survey 
took about 15 to 20 minutes to complete. The initial number of respondents 
across all three surveys was 3,535. Survey instruments are provided in 
Appendix 1. 
5.1.3 
We conducted three surveys on three sets of stakeholders who may be 
anticipated to hold different types of values for the hypothetical removal of the 
A303 from within part of the Stonehenge WHS (Figure 2). For instance, visitors 
and the general population may hold different use and non-use values for the 
Stonehenge WHS. Stonehenge is of national importance and well known and 
recognised across the UK. People who have never visited or seen Stonehenge 
are likely to have either learnt about it at school, seen it on national media or 
heard about it in another context. A WHS is a site of international significance 
and its maintenance is therefore of interest to the whole population. In addition, 
infrastructure investment such as the proposed tunnel will be funded from 
general taxation and is of interest to all taxpayers.  People living in the area 
around Stonehenge may have different preferences for the road scheme 
associated with their higher frequency of using the A303 on a regular basis. 
a) Visitors to the Stonehenge WHS (n=432): On-site face-to-face interviews
(UK resident, aged 16+) estimating the following possible values
associated with the removal of the road from the Stonehenge WHS:
i.
Direct use value
ii.
Non-use value (associated with effects on other cultural heritage
within the Stonehenge WHS)
iii.
Use and option value for changes in the view of Stonehenge from
the A303 between Amesbury and Berwick Down.
Road  users  (Local  residents  as  proxy)  (n=1,001):  Online  survey  of  people 
living within a 50-mile radius of Stonehenge with quotas on gender and 
13 The Green Book (page 21) recommends to assess impacts on foreign nationals separately where 
reasonable and if they affect the result of the appraisal overall. In this case conducting a survey of foreign 
visitors in potentially multiple languages would not have been reasonable given the time constraint. In 
addition, the payment method (see below) would have to be refined for foreign visitors who don’t pay 
income tax in the UK. Impacts on local businesses affected by tourism should be addressed in a different 
part of the appraisal. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 23 

age,   estimating   the   following   possible   values   associated   with   the 
removal of the road from the Stonehenge WHS: 
iv.
Direct use value
v.
Non-use value (associated with effects on other cultural heritage
within the Stonehenge WHS)
vi.
Use and option value for changes in the view of Stonehenge from
the A303 between Amesbury and Berwick Down.
General population (n=2,102): On-line survey of people living in the UK (UK 
residents aged 16+, with quotas on age, gender, and region) estimating 
the following possible values associated with the removal of the road 
from the Stonehenge WHS: 
vii.
Non-use value;
viii.
Use values for those who have visited the site recently or have
photos of it;
ix.
Option value for changes in the view of Stonehenge from the A303
between Amesbury and Berwick Down.
5.1.4 
The three surveys used the same basic structure and were divided into three 
sections. Respondents were provided with information about the route of the 
tunnel and the expected impact of the scheme on the World Heritage Site (both 
positive and negative). 
Survey B - Road Users 
(Local population as proxy) 
•Quota sample - 50-mile radius of 
Stonehenge 
•N = 1,001
Survey A - Visitors 
Survey C - General 
•On-site visitor survey (weighted) 
population 
•N = 432
•UK quota sample panel 
•N = 2,102
WTP/WTA 
analysis - for 
individual 
study groups 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 24 

Survey structures 
5.1.5 
Sample sizes are in line with existing UK Government guidance on stated 
preference surveys.14 Following DfT guidance we set a target sample size of 
40015 for the visitor survey. This is within the lower range of sample size that is 
required for analysis of factors associated with WTP (socio-demographic 
factors, experience, visit behaviour etc.), but above the minimum n=300 
sample size suggested in the literature for visitor samples of this size (given 
our estimate of 0.55m annual UK resident visitors to Stonehenge)16. 
5.1.6 
For the face-to-face visitor surveys Ipsos Mori were chosen as the fieldwork 
provider because they have extensive experience in delivering complex 
fieldwork surveys to time and addressing issues such as non-response bias. 
Ipsos Mori applied loose quotas on gender and age based on other heritage 
sites.17 Interviewer protocols were designed to avoid self-selection by strategic 
respondents (1 in every 3 were approached). We sought to reduce attrition 
during the survey by stating up front the length of the survey and offering 
shelter during the survey as well as an incentive of £5 for completion of the 
survey. 
5.1.7 
Online surveys were designed by Simetrica and delivered by the online panel 
provider Toluna. Toluna provide a representative online panel of the UK 
population, allowing quotas for age, gender, and region to be set at the local 
and national level. Sample selection is made randomly using the specified 
profile criteria. Panelists are awarded a small monetary incentive for each 
survey completed, and are restricted from taking the same survey more than 
once. Toluna takes account of predicted response rates by target demographic 
and country to avoid over-contacting panellists and to ensure that they do not 
introduce awareness bias in responses.18
5.1.8 
The three surveys used the same basic structure and were divided into three 
sections (the questions in the valuation sections differed between the different 
surveys): 
a) Section A. Background questions on: respondents’ visit to
Stonehenge (survey A only); travel; attitudes towards the existing
14 Pearce and özdemiroglu (2002) provide guidance for the UK Government on estimating sample sizes 
for stated preference surveys (p45).  Given that approximately 0.55million people visited Stonehenge in 
2014, Assuming that 0.2 of the population is present in the true sample, a minimum sample size of around 
n=300 is required at the 5% confidence level. Pearce, D., & özdemiroglu, E. (2002). Economic valuation 
with stated preference techniques
. London, UK: Department for Transport, Local Government and the 
Regions. 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/191522/Economic_valuatio 
n_with_stated_preference_techniques.pdf 
15  The target sample size for the visitor survey was 400. Ipsos achieved 432 within the time available. 
16  English Heritage estimate annual visitor numbers to the Stonehenge site in 2015 of 1.3 million of which 
540,000 are UK residents. Personal correspondence with English Heritage. 
17  A loose quota in the context of a face to face survey is a request to the interviewers to ensure they 
reflect some of the diversity of the audience, i.e. in this case the visitors to the site within the sample they 
are selecting. They are not required to exactly adhere to a specific percentage, but for example to make 
sure that they have about 50% men and 50% women in their sample. 
18  From  (Toluna 2016) 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 25 

road; experience of other heritage sites; and attitudes towards 
Stonehenge and heritage conservation. 
b) Section B. Contingent valuation: Questions on willingness to pay
for a road scheme to remove the A303 from its current location within
the WHS; and the willingness to accept compensation for the removal
of the road (see section 5.2 for full discussion of contingent valuation
scenarios).
c) Section C. Demographics: Theoretical drivers of WTP/WTA
developed from the literature, including income, education level, and
labour force status (Bateman et al. 2002).
5.1.9 
The information presented to respondents in CV surveys is important for the 
quality of the study (Boyle 2002). The layout, order in which information is 
presented and the quality of the information can affect the answers (For more 
information on bias reduction please see paragraphs under the Bias Reduction 
sub-section of section 4.2). 
5.1.10 
In this study, we also had to bear in mind that the design of the road was at a 
relatively early stage. For example, at the time of undertaking the research, the 
precise design and location of tunnel portals was yet to be determined. The 
survey therefore focused on the removal of the A303 and provided only limited 
information on precise alignment and design aspects of the tunnel. Due to the 
early stage of development of the scheme, respondents were shown the 
approximate position of the new tunnel portals and road leading up to the 
tunnel. The map provided and the description of the tunnel scenario in the 
questionnaire stated clearly that the tunnel portals and the new dual 
carriageway leading up to the tunnel would be within the WHS and would affect 
some elements within the site some of them not known. Whilst the precise 
location of the proposed scheme was not presented, the information was 
judged as being sufficient for respondents to consider the primary impacts of 
the scheme given the current state of information. This was confirmed by the 
results of the pilot study, in which the majority of respondents said that they felt 
that they had sufficient information to answer the questions. 19
5.1.11  There was a degree of uncertainty as to the precise alignment and design of 
the road at the time the study was undertaken. This lack of information did not 
allow us to provide full information on the design and location of the portals to 
the survey respondents. The steering group discussed and agreed that further 
information would have been misleading because the heritage and 
archaeological impacts of the tunnel and its portals are not yet known. In 
practice, the impacts of the scheme on heritage and archaeology are highly 
complex and aspects of this require expert interpretation. As such, there are 
also practical barriers to the level of detail that can be provided to respondents. 
While this introduces additional elements of hypothetical bias, this was 
considered proportionate to the focus of the study on the visual amenity, noise 
reduction and reconnection of the landscape around Stonehenge.20 Therefore, 
it should not be interpreted that this study captures or seeks to capture every 
aspect of the scheme’s impacts on heritage and archaeology. As discussed in 
19  For the full questionnaire and the maps provided see Appendix 1. 
20  See also section 2.2 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 26 

section 2.2 the wider assessment of the scheme includes detailed 
archaeological investigation and expert heritage assessment. 
5.1.12 
The following information was provided as part of the survey material: 
a) Current route and impacts of the A303 road (including impact of noise
on ranquillity, visual amenity and landscape severance), including a very
brief description of the history and archaeology of Stonehenge and the
WHS.
b) Overhead map of A303 in relation to heritage sites within the WHS and
photographs of the site as it currently is.
c) Diagrams and descriptive text for an alternative scenario: a 2.9 km
tunnel through which the A303 road would pass.
d) Information on the impact of the removal of the road into a tunnel on
tranquillity, visual amenity and landscape severance.
e) A clear statement that no policy scenario has been chosen yet.
5.1.13 
The survey included follow-up questions on familiarity with the information 
provided and on the opinion of the respondents of the effect of the road on 
Stonehenge. 
5.1.14 
The material presented also included a clear statement that this study is not a 
public consultation, but that the information collected via the study would feed 
into a public consultation currently planned for January 2017. All survey 
materials were agreed by the steering group. The survey itself was agreed with 
DfT and HE analysts and the academic peer reviewer. The information material 
is in Appendix 1. 
5.1.15 
In all surveys, we used payment card mechanisms to elicit WTP in terms of an 
increase in annual taxes over a three-year period. WTP values were elicited 
using a payment card with 35 values ranging from £0 to £200, including an 
open-end ‘other’ amount option to reduce anchoring bias set by the payment 
range (I. J. Bateman et al. 2002). 
5.1.16 
Those who indicate that the removal of the A303 road from within part of the 
Stonehenge WHS would reduce their life satisfaction are shown a payment 
card and asked the minimum they would be willing to accept in compensation, 
using the same payment card range as the WTP question. 
5.1.17 
In all surveys, respondents were asked a certainty question on the WTP 
amount which they had stated (Bedate et al., 2009; Champ and Bishop 2001). 
The last section of the survey included follow-up questions that asked the 
reasons for their willingness, or not, to pay - allowing us to identify protest 
responses in ex-post analysis – as well as standard sociodemographic 
questions (Bateman et al. 2002). In designing the contingent valuation 
scenarios we implemented best practice related to question wording and 
ordering, payment format, payment vehicle, prompts and use of images 
(Bateman et al. 2002; Bakhshi et al. 2015). Survey instruments are provided in 
Appendix 1. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 27 

5.2 
Valuation scenarios 
5.2.1 
The CV study has been carefully designed to value the impact of the A303 
road between on Stonehenge and the WHS. This assessment focuses 
exclusively on the cultural heritage impacts of removing the A303 from its 
current location within the WHS, in terms of noise reduction, increased 
tranquillity, visual amenity and reduced landscape severance, which cannot be 
assessed through standard market-based economic valuation techniques. 
5.2.2 
This study was designed to assess both use values and non-use values 
associated with the removal of the A303 from its current location within the 
Stonehenge WHS, covering both positive and negative aspects of the 
hypothetical road scenario for users and non-users. 
a.
For those who positively valued the road option change, we estimate the
willingness to pay, via an annual tax at the individual level, for the
changes to noise, tranquillity, visual amenity and landscape severance
associated with the removal of the A303 from its current location in the
Stonehenge WHS and its redirection through a tunnel of approximately
2.9km.21
b.
For those that negatively valued the road option change, and that
therefore indicated they would not be willing to pay for the tunnel, we
estimate the willingness to accept, via a one-off cash compensation, to
put up with the removal of the A303 from its current location in the
Stonehenge WHS and its redirection through a tunnel of approximately
2.9km.
5.2.3 
It is appropriate to apply different welfare measures to a policy change 
depending on whether they lead to gains or losses to the individual (Kim et al. 
2015; Bateman et al. 2002). Where a change from the status quo leads to 
welfare improvements for the individual, resulting from noise reduction, 
increased tranquillity, visual amenity and reduced landscape severance, we 
elicit WTP to measure the compensating surplus for obtaining the improvement 
produced by the removal of the A303 from within part of the Stonehenge WHS. 
Where a change from the status quo leads to a loss of welfare, in terms of the 
ability to view Stonehenge from the road, we elicit WTA to measure 
compensating surplus to restore their welfare to the state it was in before the 
removal of the road. This ensures that we are capturing both positive and 
negative values associated with the alternative road scenario. We use life 
satisfaction here as the measure of welfare change for the purposes of CS and 
ES (following Bakhshi et al. 2015). This is in line with guidelines in the Green 
Book and in the OECD guidelines (2013) on measuring wellbeing. For a full 
discussion and rationale for using life satisfaction as a measure of welfare see 
Fujiwara and Dolan (2015). This part of the CV survey is important because 
users and non-users may value the ability/opportunity to see the stone circle 
21  The current A303 would be replaced with a narrower footpath covered with a different material than the 
current tarmac. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 28 

from the road and the loss of this opportunity may be perceived as a negative 
aspect of the scheme for them.22
5.2.4 
As explained in section 2 all other impacts (such as economic and 
environmental) are considered in the overall business case and use the 
methods described in the DfT’s transport appraisal guidance (WebTAG). It is, 
therefore, important to this study to exclude those other impacts to avoid 
double counting with the other elements in the business case (see Figure 1 
above). We exclude these elements as far as possible through clear definition 
of the heritage good being valued, in terms of noise reduction, increased 
tranquillity, visual amenity and reduced landscape severance. The information 
provided on the status quo and the alternative road option focuses only on 
those aspects which we aim to measure, such as the impact of the road on the 
experience at the site. We exclude all reference to congestion and other traffic 
outcomes (except briefly in the introduction to the policy content)23. 
5.2.5 
Respondents were provided with information about the route of the tunnel and 
the expected impact of the scheme on the World Heritage Site (both positive 
and negative).24 We were unable to give very detailed information to 
respondents because at the time of the study, the precise route alignment and 
tunnel portal positions were yet to be determined (we set out the information 
provided to respondents and the full survey instruments in the Appendix 1). 
The following scenarios were presented to respondents: 
a) the status quo (the current A303 road and route within the Stonehenge
WHS)
b) the construction of a dual carriageway between Amesbury and Berwick
Down, including a 2.9km tunnel underneath the WHS with both portals
located within the WHS but out of sight from the stone circle.  By
removing the road from the central portion of the World Heritage Site,
those using the road will no longer be able to see Stonehenge while
driving and those visiting the site will no longer be affected by the road.
To either side of the tunnel itself, widening the road and constructing
tunnel portals will have adverse impacts on other monuments (e.g.
burial sites) within the World Heritage Site.
5.2.6 
Respondents were first asked if they would in principle be willing to pay an 
increase in annual taxes over a three-year period to support the alternative 
scheme using the following text. 
“For the next set of questions, please imagine a situation where the tunnel 
scenario was selected and was paid for by an increase in national taxes, for three 
years. Please think for a moment about how much the proposed scenario to 
remove the A303 from the World Heritage Site would be worth to you and your 
household, if anything.  Would you be prepared to pay something, even if only a 
very small amount, to support the construction of a tunnel route?”
 
22  Vehicles here refer to any form of transport that can legally view Stonehenge from the A303 
23 The survey material which was provided to the participants includes a clear statement that the heritage 
site itself is not in any danger to ensure people are not valuing Stonehenge as such. 
24  More detail on the role of information provided to participants in a CV study in Burgess et al (Burgess, 
Clark, and Harrison 2000) 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 29 

5.2.7 
Those people that state they would be willing to pay something for the 
alternative road option are then directed to the WTP questions. In order to 
reduce the risk of strategic bias25 and hypothetical bias26, before the payment 
card questions we used the following entreaty (cheap talk) script, which has 
been shown to be effective in previous studies (Chakraborty and Harbaugh 
2010; Cummings and Taylor 1999) as well as our own studies (Bakhshi et al. 
2015; D. Fujiwara, Lawton, and Mourato 2015). The entreaty script reminds 
individuals of their budget constraints and existence of alternatives: 
“Studies have shown that many people answering surveys such as this one, say 
they are willing to pay more than they would actually pay in reality. So please 
think about this question as if it were a real decision and you were actually 
making a payment for real. Please do not agree to pay an amount if you think you 
cannot afford it, if you feel you have paid enough already, or have other things to 
spend your money on. Also, this question is just about the proposed road 
scheme. We are not asking you about how much you value the Stonehenge site. 
Remember, Stonehenge is not in danger, this is a change to the lay out of the 
road around it.”
 
5.2.8 
In addition, the questionnaire includes follow up certainty and motivation 
questions to understand how certain a respondent is about their willingness to 
pay and the reasons why they state they are willing to pay. 
5.2.9 
For those who indicated that they would not be willing to pay anything for the 
alternative road scheme, we ask a willingness to accept (WTA) compensation 
question for the removal of the current A303 using the following hybrid 
wellbeing-contingent valuation WTA question. 
“You indicated that you would not be willing to pay any additional taxes to fund 
the rerouting of the A303. In a hypothetical situation, imagine that the government 
chose to proceed and remove the A303 from its current location. The A303 would 
be redirected and you would no longer be able to view Stonehenge from the road. 
We would like you to think about how this decision would affect you, if at all. How 
would it affect your overall level of life satisfaction if the A303 was removed from 
its current location?”
 
5.2.10 
For those who indicate that the removal of the A303 from its current location 
would reduce their life satisfaction, we present the following question: 
“Assuming nothing else in your life would change, imagine that in order to compensate 
you for not being able to use the A303 in its current location you were given a publicly 
funded cash compensation. How much money would you have to receive, as a one-off 
payment, to give you the same life satisfaction that you have now (not better or worse 
but just the same) once the A303 is removed from its current location. Note that 
whatever compensation amount you receive will mean that money cannot be used on 
other public services.”
 
25  For detail on the potential biases see also section 4.2. Strategic bias: The wish to preserve a status quo 
or to achieve a specific change can lead to overstatement of WTP or WTA. (Throsby and Withers 1986) 
26 Hypothetical bias: When judging a hypothetical situation, people are often overestimating the impact. 
People often have not considered in detail how they would value unfamiliar goods. See section 4.2. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 30 


Analysis 
6.1 
Data cleaning 
6.1.1 
This section sets out the data cleaning steps we took to generate a robust and 
reliable data set and ensure sample representativeness to allow aggregation of 
WTP/WTA to the relevant national populations. 
a) ‘Speedsters’ who answered the online surveys in less than 4 minutes
were excluded from the data.27 This is because a proportion of those
who complete the survey quickly are likely to be those that want to
provide a pre-determined view of the road scheme (to influence policy)
and have not read through and considered all of the materials properly.
Speedsters may be motivated by the incentive to complete the
maximum amount of surveys in a short time, thus reducing the reliability
of their WTP bid function.
b) In order to be conservative, we defined “other” responses as extreme
outlier WTP and WTA values above the £250 level. This was based on
a prior decision to cap WTP/WTA values at 25% of the highest amount
on the payment card. We note that this led to the exclusion of only 14
responses (one of £500, four between £1,000-£5,000, and nine from
£10,000-£35million).
c) Those who did not indicate a monetary amount in an open-end
response (i.e. gave some qualitative text comments) were also
excluded.
d) Inconsistent follow-up responses (those who indicated that their stated
WTP was motivated by a belief that they would not really need to pay)
were excluded (following best practice, see Bateman et al. 2002).
e) Respondents who ascribed to an “other” gender or did not state their
region were excluded since their inclusion would not make it possible to
apply weights based on region and gender.
6.1.2 
Overall, we removed 216 observations as per Table 1. This reflects about 6% 
of responses across all three surveys. 
27  The four-minute threshold is based on the dropping of speedsters based on a five-minute threshold in 
(Maddison and Mourato 2001a). The difference in threshold is proportionate to the differences in survey 
length and have been discussed with the peer reviewer. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 31 

Table 1 
Number of responses removed from survey sample data sets 
Survey A 
Survey B (Local 
Survey C 
(Visitors) 
population) 
(General 
Total 
population) 
Total number of respondents 
432 
1,001 
2,102 
3,535 
Incomplete 




Speedsters 

48 
94 
142 
Inconsistent follow-up 

11 
23 
37 
Unacceptable WTP or WTA 

14 
16 
30 
values 
Gender: “Other” 




Region missing 




Number of responses 
3 
78 
135 
216 
removed 
Number of responses kept 
in analysis 
429 
923 
1,967 
3,319 
(survey sample) 
Note: These figures relate to the survey sample populations (which is distinct from the study group 
sample sizes). 
Missing data 
6.1.3 
A significant proportion of people in the visitor survey (20%) were unwilling to 
reveal their income, noticeably higher than the local (10%) and general 
population (12%) surveys. This is a common finding for face to face surveys, 
where respondents may be biased by interviewer presence. Income is a key 
variable for population-weighting WTP and WTA calculations along with 
gender, age and region. For the individuals who did not answer the question on 
income within the general population study group, we imputed their income 
levels based on the distribution of income in the study group, on a one-off 
random basis when generating the variable used to weight the mean results. 
The peer reviewer notes that this approach can be biased, unless the 
randomisation is repeated at least 10,000 times. However, as conducting this 
exercise would have had led to 10,000 iterations of the population-weighting 
variable, it would have been complex to robustly implement and hence 
disproportionate to the evaluation process. 
Study groups 
6.1.4 
We reconstructed the two populations of the road user and general population 
surveys into study groups based on whether respondents in the general 
population indicated that they had used the A303 in the past year, as illustrated 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 32 



in Figure 3. Initially, we conducted survey B with the aim to isolate people most 
likely to be regular users of the A303. The criterion for inclusion into the sample 
for this survey was to live within 50 miles of Stonehenge. The respondents to 
survey B included people who had used the A303 as well as people who had 
not used the road. We also found that a number of respondents in the General 
population survey (survey C) had used the road. The study group of road users 
contains 465 road users from survey B, and 467 road users from survey C. 
The general population study group is made up of 458 non-road users from 
survey B and 1,500 non-road users from survey C. Note that with the 
reconstruction of the two populations the general population study group 
required re-weighting to ensure representativeness with the UK population. 
We therefore constructed weights formed by the demographic categories of 
gender, age and income for each region in the United Kingdom for the general 
population survey (given that income is a known driver of WTP/WTA we need 
to ensure that our sample is representative of the population income 
distribution). It was unnecessary to weight the road users, as the group 
revealed themselves directly from both surveys. As a result, the road user 
study group is the best available estimate of the demographic characteristics of 
the wider road user population. 
Assigned to: Road 
N = 465 
users 
Survey B - 
Have you used 
Local population 
the A303? 
Assigned to: 
General 
N = 458 
population 
Assigned to: Road 
N = 467 
Survey C - 
users 
Have you used 
General 
the A303? 
population 
Assigned to: 
General 
N = 1,500 
population 
Composition of road user and general population study groups28
6.2 
Descriptive Statistics 
6.2.1 
Table 2 shows the population weighted descriptive statistics of the study 
groups. 
28 Note: These figures relate to the study group sample size. Please note that 92 individuals ‘didn’t know’ 
whether they had used the A303 in the past 12 months. These individuals were added to the general 
population. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 33 

Table 2 
Descriptive Statistics 
General 
Visitors Study 
Road Users 
population study 
Group - 
Study group 
group (non-use) – 
Weighted 
Weighted 
Female (%) 
53% 
46% 
53% 
Age (mean) 
47 
45 
45 
Household income (£, mean) 
£49,166 
£41,730 
£26,437 
No response to income question 
20% 
10% 
12% 
(%) 
Dependent children under 16 
17% 
39% 
30% 
years (%) 
Married/with partner (%) 
69% 
61% 
49% 
University education (%) 
50% 
44% 
36% 
In employment (full-time, part- 
time, self-employed) 
69% 
64% 
51% 

London 
3% 
7% 
8% 
Health (good, very good, 
92% 
83% 
72% 
excellent) (%) 
Ethnicity (BME) 
4% 
10% 
10% 
Member (English 
Heritage/National 
Trust/Stonehenge 
56% 
33% 
10% 
preservation 
organisation) (%) 
Driving license (%) 
89% 
87% 
70% 
Total 
429 
932 
1958 
6.2.2 
The visitor and road user surveys show a significantly higher household 
income level than the general population, a better health status and a very high 
membership in a heritage related organisations such as English Heritage. The 
visitor survey specifically had a lower percentage of Black and Minority Ethnic 
visitors when compared to the general population and road users. 
6.3 
Estimating WTP and WTA 
6.3.1 
Figure 4 sets out the process by which respondents were allocated to a WTP 
or WTA payment/compensation card. 
6.3.2 
All respondents were asked whether they would be willing to pay a tax levied 
over three years to fund the improvement of the heritage experience at the 
Stonehenge WHS via the removal of the A303. If they answered this question 
with ‘yes’ or ‘maybe’ they were shown a payment card. Those who said ‘yes’ / 
‘maybe’ and selected £0, or those who said `no’ were then channelled to the 
WTA branch and first asked whether the removal of the road would have an 
impact on their life satisfaction. If they said that the removal of the A303 would 
reduce their life satisfaction they were shown the willingness to accept card to 
elicit the value of this reduction. Those who indicated that the road scheme 
would not affect their life satisfaction, or who indicated that it would reduce 
their life satisfaction but selected £0 were allocated the value zero. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 34 

6.3.3 
We calculated non-parametric mean and median WTP from the mid-point 
between the amount chosen on the card and the next amount up, and mean 
and median WTA from the mid-point between the amount chosen on the card 
and the next amount down. The use of the mid-point estimate is a practical 
step to avoid having to use a continuous WTP or WTA card, as recommended 
by Bateman et al. (2002). This is theoretically consistent with the statistical 
theory for calculating WTP from interval data (Cameron and Huppert 1989). It 
means that for a person who, say, chose the value £10 (when the next value is 
£15) we can say that they are willing to pay £10 but not £15. However, we do 
not know where their willingness to pay sits in between the end points of 
£10.00 to £14.99). To address this Bateman et al. (2002) recommends using 
the mid-point, i.e. in this case this would be £12.50. 
6.3.4 
Within the study group samples, we calculated the mean WTP. Using the 
mean WTP rather than the median is good practice in CV studies (Darling et al 
2000). The mean is relevant if the context of the valuation exercise is cost 
benefit analysis because it represents an average WTP for the population 
which can be aggregated (by the population size) to derive the total WTP 
across the population. In general it is recommended that if aggregated WTP for 
benefits outweighs costs, a project should proceed (Pearce and Özdemiroglu 
2002). 
6.3.5 
We note that it is standard practice in the calculation of individual mean and 
median WTP/WTA to include zero responses (Bateman et al. 2002). This 
ensures that those who do not hold any value in the non-market good are 
included in the estimation process, and helps to avoid unrealistic and 
overestimated mean WTP/WTA figures. In the current case, the zero values 
are not included in the calculation of mean individual WTP and WTA (that refer 
to those with positive values only) but are instead included in the aggregation, 
when calculating population-level values. We feel this approach provides a 
clearer picture of the influence of zero answers. Specifically, we elicit both 
positive WTP values and ‘negative’ values, via WTA compensation questions, 
for the road tunnel scheme. Those who are not willing to pay are given the 
opportunity to state a WTA compensation value. This is somewhat equivalent 
to a negative WTP for the tunnel. Consequently, the valuation of the road 
scheme is not bounded at zero (as is the case in most CV studies). This leaves 
a third group of individuals who are neither willing to pay nor willing to accept 
compensation. We assume that this group represents those individuals who do 
not hold any value (positive or negative), and are likely to be indifferent to the 
proposed the road scheme. In other words, their welfare is unaffected by the 
road scheme, be it because the heritage impacts do not form part of their utility 
(welfare) function, or that the utility gains of the scheme are exactly offset by 
the utility losses. We deal with this zero-response group in the aggregation 
process. We calculate the proportion of positive WTP/WTA responses for each 
study group, and extrapolate positive WTP/WTA values to the same proportion 
in the relevant population (section 7.1). Figure 4 sets out the process to 
allocate respondents to the three groups. Following this logic, Table 3 
demonstrates how each type of possible response is accounted for in 
aggregation. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 35 







Table 3 
Aggregation formula 
Aggregation Formula 
Annual tax (WTP over 
NPV Mean positive WTP × 
three years) 
% Share of study group that has a positive WTP× 
Population size; 
minus 
Compensation (one off 
Mean positive WTA × 
WTA) 
% Share of study group that has a positive WTA 
× Population size;
plus 
£0 ×  % Share of study group that is WTP & WTA=
WTP and WTA = £0 
0 × Population size (Always zero)
6.3.6 
At the end points (i.e. the green box and orange boxes in Figure 4) the 
responses of the survey respondents were weighted by income, gender and 
age for the WTP and WTA calculations and sensitivity analysis (see section 8). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 36 



19 (0.6%) 
Get a midpoint 
estimate of their 
WTP 
Get WTA&WTP=0 
State their WTP 
2,076 (62.5%) 
State their WTA 
Get a midpoint 
Life Satisfaction 
estimate of their 
affected by 
WTA 
removal of road? 
4 (0.2%) 
Get WTA&WTP=0 
Are you willing to 
102 (3.1%) 
pay ? 
98 (2.9%) 
Get WTA&WTP=0 
State their WTA 
Life Satisfaction 
Get a midpoint 
affected by 
estimate of their 
removal of road? 
WTA 
Get WTA&WTP=0 
63 (1.9%) 
957 (28.8%) 
Flowchart to WTP and WTA questions (study group sample 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 37 

6.4 
Validity testing 
6.4.1 
It is a best-practice requirement to conduct a range of validity tests for CV 
studies (Bennett, Morrison, and Blamey 1998). There are a number of ways to 
test the validity of the results. Here, we discuss content validity and theoretical 
validity. 
Content validity 
6.4.2 
Content validity tests look at the adequacy, realism and neutrality of the survey 
instrument as well as at respondents’ understanding, perception and reactions 
to the questionnaire. Additionally, the rate of protest provides valuable 
information on how respondents reacted to the scenarios. 
6.4.3 
We conducted stakeholder meetings at the project inception stage with the 
steering group to agree the valuation scenarios for the contingent valuations 
(for both the visitor and online surveys). We then undertook extensive testing 
of the draft survey instruments with input from the fieldwork provider, Ipsos 
Mori. We used a face-to-face pilot survey followed by in-depth cognitive 
debriefing about all parts of the questionnaire with 15 visitors at Stonehenge; 
and online pilot surveys with some cognitive follow-ups on key parts of the 
questionnaire with 100 panel respondents in total, in both cases mimicking the 
conditions in which the final surveys would be implemented. 
6.4.4 
We provide pilot reports on each survey in Appendix 3. Table 4 summarises 
the pilot survey results. 
Table 4 
Survey pilots 
Survey A 
Survey B 
Survey C 
Number of respondents 
(who completed 
15 
54 
46 
debrief 
questionnaire) 
14th-15th September 
20th-21st September 
Date 
12th September 2016 
2016 
2016 
6.4.5 
Feedback from survey pilot respondents indicated that the instrument was of 
an appropriate length, clear and easy to answer.  The pilots led to only a few 
small changes in the questionnaire and WTP/WTA payment card range. This 
included minor changes to wording and added values to the lower end of the 
payment range (i.e. the card starts with £0.05 and £0.10 instead of the 
previous level of £0.20). 
6.4.6 
In terms of protest answers, we asked those with a non-positive WTP or WTA 
follow-up questions on their reasons for their answer. Table 5 shows that 
around 15% of respondents across all three surveys could potentially be 
classified as protesters, i.e. stated they would not be WTP or WTA when in fact 
they might value the change being proposed. In order to be conservative, 
these respondents are not excluded from any calculations. The majority of 
protest responses (12.6% of the total survey sample) indicated that they did 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 38 

not give a positive WTP/WTA due to the annual tax payment vehicle. In other 
words, they may have given a positive WTP if another payment vehicle (road 
tax, local tax, donation, or visitor fees) had been provided. Pre-empting our 
results in section 7, 85% of those who were not WTP also indicated that the 
removal of the A303 would not reduce their life satisfaction. We may assume 
that these individuals do have a positive WTP value for the road scheme, but 
are unwilling to give a positive WTP bid due to their protest over the tax 
payment mechanism. This could suggest that the current WTP figures 
represent a slight underestimation. 
6.4.7 
Other responses accord with what would typically be defined as protests, such 
as political views on reducing road use, uncertainties related to the current 
political climate, and protests related to perceived risk of damage within the 
WHS from tunnel construction (stating that there should be a longer tunnel). 
Overall, the relatively small protest rates within these three categories 
(highlighted in bold in the table, 3.8%) bode well for the validity of our 
estimated WTP measures. It should be noted that the interpretation of protests 
is subjective and therefore, the valuation presented by these protest 
respondents may be a valid representation of the utility impact of the road 
scheme. 
Table 5 
Protest responses 
Across all surveys 
Number of responses 
% 
There should be a longer tunnel scenario 
14 
0.4% 
We should be reducing road use, not building 
43 
1.3% 
more roads 
Any changes to the road layout should be paid for 
106 
3.2% 
through local council tax 
Any changes to the road layout should be paid for 
192 
5.8% 
through road tax 
Any changes to the road layout should be paid for 
31 
0.9% 
through voluntary donations 
Any changes to the road layout should be paid for 
88 
2.7% 
through increases in visitor fees 
I do not feel confident stating a value that I 
would be willing to pay in the 
70 
2.1% 
current uncertain political climate 
Total 
544 
15.4% 
Total survey sample 
3535 
Notes: Unweighted figures summed across the three surveys: visitor, road user, and general population. 
Non-protest responses not shown in table (‘I have more important things to think about’; ‘I 
would prefer to keep the A303 in its current location but do not require compensation’; ‘I am not 
willing to pay increased taxes over a period of three years’; ‘I do not care about Stonehenge’). 
Traditional protest categories highlighted in bold.
 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 39 

Theoretical validity and certainty of payment 
6.4.8 
The two main validity tests advocated by the literature are theoretical validity 
tests and certainty of payments (Bateman et al. 2002). We test both in the 
same model. 
6.4.9 
The credibility of estimated values from CV studies is commonly assessed by 
examining their theoretical validity (Bateman et al. 2002). Testing for 
theoretical validity is typically done by estimating a bid function, exploring how 
WTP responds to respondent characteristics and other variables collected in 
the survey to test whether the relationship between WTP and other indicators 
is in accordance with expectations. Some of these indicators are predictors 
from economic theory, while others reflect empirical regularities, which seem 
intuitively correct, from introspection and reasoned thought, and which have 
been found to hold across a large number of studies (Bateman et al. 2002). An 
example of the former is a positive relationship between WTP and income. An 
example of the latter is the effect on WTP of indicators such as interest in local 
history. Put another way, if key variables are found to be either statistically 
insignificant or, most importantly, to be associated with WTP in unexpected 
and illogical ways, this casts doubt on the theoretical validity of results. 
Typically, the following ordinary least squares regression (OLS) model is used 
as the base for all the WTP analyses: 
WTPi = α + βnXi + εi
(1) 
6.4.10  where WTPi is the amount the individual i has stated they are willing to pay, α 
is the deterministic factor and ε is the error term containing unobserved factors 
that determine willingness to pay (Wooldridge 2010). In Xi controls for the n 
observed determinants of willingness to pay (Bateman et al., 2002). 
Regressions for validity tests only included those respondents who had 
responded to the income question due to the importance of income as a 
theoretical driver of WTP (Bateman et al., 2002) (recall section 4.1). 
6.4.11 
We test the distribution of residuals for heteroskedasticity using robust 
standard errors and for normality using kernel density estimates, and tested for 
multicollinearity using VIF tests (Appendix 4). 
6.4.12 
We test for differences in WTP between those who indicated that they were 
“certain” that they would pay (at least 3 on a 5-point scale with 1 being “Not 
certain at all” and 5 “Very Certain”) and those that were either “uncertain” or 
“somewhat certain”. We would anticipate that those who report greater 
certainty in their stated WTP value would hold higher values, since being 
uncertain about the WTP amount may lead people to state a lower amount. 
6.4.13 
Specifically, we estimate the following model using OLS regression based on 
(1) to test for theoretical validity and the impact of certainty: 
(2) 
WTPi = α + β1Cert1 +βnXi + εi
where WTPi is the amount individual i states they are willing to pay; Certi is the 
individual’s stated certainty to pay that value; Xi is a vector of control variables 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 40 

for the determinants of WTP; and 𝜀𝑖  is the error term under the standard 
assumptions in OLS (Wooldridge 2010). 
6.4.14 
We process hypothetical bias by recoding WTP bids that fail to provide 
sufficient assurance of certainty as zero responses. Low certainty is defined in 
this case as those rating their certainty as 1 or 2 on a 5-point certainty scale, 
where 1 is not at all certain. This allows us to maintain all subjects in the 
sample while excluding low certainty responses from WTP analysis (following 
Champ et al. 1997). This allows us to perform sensitivity analysis by comparing 
aggregate values at different certainty levels (Haab et al. 2013). 
6.4.15 
The set of variables included in equation 2 is presented in Table 6. In our 
choice of predictors of WTP, we followed the recommendations of Bateman et 
al. (2002), which are common practice in modern applications of CV. In 
particular, we include a range of socio-economic variables (i.e. gender, age, 
children, education and income), variables relating to usage (number of visits 
to Stonehenge and seeing Stonehenge from the road) and attitudinal 
variables (member of English Heritage/National Trust). For some variables 
there are no clear priors on the sign of the impact; that is, for example, in some 
of these cases the relationship with WTP could plausibly be positive or 
negative (e.g. having dependent children). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 41 

Table 6 
Variables used in validity tests 
Variable 
Description 
Female 
Dummy variable (1-female; 0-male) 
Log age 
Log of age (mid-point of intervals) 
Log income 
Log of annual household income before tax (mid-point of intervals) 
Children 
Dummy variable (1- dependent children under 16; 0-otherwise) 
Married/with partner 
Dummy variable (1- married or with partner; 0-otherwise) 
University education 
Dummy variable (1- university degree or higher; 0- otherwise) 
In employment (full time, 
Dummy variable (1- full time, part time or self-employed worker; 0- 
part time, self- 
otherwise) 
employed) 
Dummy variable (1- excellent, very good or good health; 0- fair or poor 
Health 
health) 
Ethnicity 
Dummy variable (1- all other ethnicities; 0- white) 
Student 
Dummy variable (1-student; 0-otherwise) 
Retired 
Dummy variable (1-retired; 0-otherwise) 
Number of times visited 
Number of visits to Stonehenge 
Stonehenge 
Dummy variable (1-very likely or likely to visit Stonehenge again; 0 – 
Likely 
otherwise) 
Dummy variable (1- Member of English Heritage / National Trust / 
Member 
Stonehenge preservation organisation; 0- otherwise) 
Driver’s license 
Dummy variable (1- has a driver’s license; 0-otherwise) 
Familiar with the impact of 
Dummy variable (1- Very or extremely familiar with information 
the A303 on 
regarding the impact of the A303 on WHS; 0- Not at all, 
WHS 
slightly or Moderately familiar with information) 
Dummy variable (1- very certain or certain regarding WTP (3-5 on a 
Certainty 
scale of 1-5); 0- quite uncertain or not certain at all regarding 
WTP) 
Road User 
Dummy variable (1- In road user study group; 0 – otherwise) 
General Population 
Dummy variable (1- In general population study group; 0 – otherwise) 
6.5 
Aggregation of values 
6.5.1 
To estimate overall values for the road options we aggregate the mean WTP 
and WTA values from the survey to the relevant national populations. This 
results in an estimate of the overall value the UK resident population places on 
the increased tranquillity, reduction in landscape severance, noise visual 
impact brought by the removal of the A303. The aggregation is conducted in 
the following steps: 
6.5.2 
First, we estimate the size of the visitor, road user and general populations as 
described in paragraphs 6.5.7. to 6.5.9. 
6.5.3 
Second, for each study group we calculate the proportions of people who are 
willing to pay for the road scheme (i.e. those with a utility gain), and those 
requiring compensation (i.e. those with a utility loss from the road scheme). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 42 

6.5.4 
Third, we multiply the proportions estimated in the second step, by the 
relevant populations estimated in the first step. This results in an estimate of 
the number of people in each study group’s wider population who are WTP/ 
WTA. 
6.5.5 
Fourth, for each study group we multiply the NPV of mean WTP by the wider 
populations’ WTP (as estimated in third step) and subtract it by the mean WTA 
value multiplied by the estimate of the wider population that is WTA. 
6.5.6 
We outline below the methods used to estimate the size of the visitor, road 
user and general populations (Table 7). 
6.5.7 
The total number of visitors per year to Stonehenge was sourced from the 
English Heritage (EH) visitor data and the Association of Leading Visitor 
Attractions. 29
The total number of visitors to Stonehenge per year was 1.37 million in 2015. 
Of these 40% are estimated to be UK residents by EH30. 
This results in an estimate of 0.55 million UK resident visitors annually. 
6.5.8 
Total number of road users was calculated using survey responses from the 
general population survey due to a lack of reliable data available externally. 
2.3% of the general population survey stated that they used the A303 road 
weekly (this includes drivers and passengers). 
This represents a conservative estimate of road usage in the general 
population survey. This helps to correct for potential over-estimation of 
road usage frequency by survey respondents caused by failure to recall 
usage effectively (recollection bias) or focusing bias (caused by the 
focus of the survey on Stonehenge and the A303 road). 
We applied this percentage to the UK resident population aged 16 and over 
(for details of UK population size, see 6.5.9), producing an estimate of 
just over 1.22 million A303 road users.31
For the CV study, each individual road user counts once within the year. This 
means a person who uses the road several times a day counts the 
same as a passenger in a car driving past once a week. 
6.5.9 
Total population figures (for Survey C) are taken from the Annual 
Population Survey (APS) of the Office for National Statistics (ONS). 
The APS estimates the UK population on 30th June 2015. 
We uprate these estimates to 2016 figures using ONS projections of 0.7% UK 
population growth.32
29 Source:    http://www.alva.org.uk/details.cfm?p=423 
30  English Heritage Stonehenge annual Visitor Survey, summer 2015 
31 Note this figure relates only to UK residents because the panel from which the survey sample was 
taken only includes UK residents. 
32 Source:  
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20160105160709/http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/pop- 
estimate/population-estimates-for-uk--england-and-wales--scotland-and-northern-ireland/mid-2014/sty--- 
overview-of-the-uk-population.html 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 43 

This results in an estimated population size of 53.2m residents aged 16 and 
over. 
The estimated population numbers of Stonehenge WHS visitors and road 
users (see above) are subtracted to avoid double counting. 33
This results in general population estimate of 51.43 million
Table 7 
Aggregation: Study group to population 
Study  Population 
Study groups 
Weighting method* 
group 
Population description 
(N) 
(n)** 
Visitors (those 
visiting in the 
Domestic annual visitors to 
Weighting based on age 
429 
0.55m 
previous 12 
Stonehenge (source: EH) 
months??) 
Quota-based sampling 
Domestic annual number of 
Road users 
and study group 
932 
1.22m***  A303 road users (source: 
formation 
Survey C) 
Quota-based sampling, 
UK Population aged 16 and 
study group formation, 
above34 less the Road Users 
General Population  weighting based on 
1,958 
51.43m  and Visitors (source: ONS, 
income, gender, age and 
2016) 
region. 
Notes: * see Figure 4; ** Study group sample size differs from survey sample size given in Table 2; 
*** this figure is based on the number of respondents in the general population survey who 
responded that they use the A303 about once a week (for more precision, this figure was 
based on the full survey sample excluding only speedster respondents (N = 2,006)).
 
6.5.10 
We consider the need to apply welfare weights to the respondents to adjust for 
differences in marginal utility of income. Following best practice (Fujiwara 
2013; HM Treasury 2011), this overcomes issues around the marginal utility of 
income. This reflects differences in marginal utility of income between high and 
low income groups (see section 4.2 for further discussion). We test for 
differences in the mean income of individuals who were willing to pay (i.e. 
those with a welfare gain from the policy), and requiring compensation (i.e. 
those with a welfare loss from the road scheme). We find no significant 
differences, leading us to conclude that welfare weighting was not necessary in 
this case. 
6.6 
Time scale and appraisal period 
6.6.1 
Willingness to pay: Respondents were asked for their willingness to pay as 
an annual tax for three years. This time frame was approved by the steering 
33  The overall UK population is estimated to be 65.1m on 30th June 2015. Of these, 12.3m were aged 0-15
years old. Source: 
https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/populationandmigration/populationestimates/bulle  
tins/annualmidyearpopulationestimates/mid2015#uk-population-continues-to-age 
34 We have included the total population above the age of 16. Including people under 16 in a survey 
requires written consent from a parent or guardian and a different formulation of the question as children 
are not constrained by income and budgets, and are unlikely to be paying tax. As a result, including 
respondents aged under 16 would be inconsistent with the microeconomic assumptions underlying the CV 
method (Shaw, Brady, and Davey 2011). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 44 

group as reflecting a realistic amount of time for the new tunnel to be built. 
Values for year two and year three were discounted using the Green Book’s 
3.5% discount rate (HM Treasury 2011, 26–28). This provides a net present 
value for those who are willing to pay for the road scheme. 
6.6.2 
Willingness to accept was asked as a one-off compensation payment in year 
one and therefore does not need to be discounted. 
6.6.3 
We note that the effects of the road scheme will have impacts into the future 
beyond the three-year tax payment period. It has the potential to impact on 
future generations who will also value the options for the A303 road. The WTP 
for the three-year tax payment represents the current generation’s maximum 
WTP for the road scheme split into three annual instalments. Similarly, the 
WTA for the loss of the road represents the value that those that prefer the 
view of Stonehenge from the current road place on the road as a one-off 
payment. 
6.6.4 
Non-use value is contained in both the WTP and WTA values including the 
bequest value element of non-use value. This means that impacts on future 
users and future generations are internalised and captured in the WTP and 
WTA values of current generations (Frey 1997). Therefore, although the road 
options will impact on and be valued by future generations (and this is a 
genuine value that needs to be accounted for in transport policies with long 
term impacts) there is no need to apply the WTP and WTA values elicited now 
to population numbers in the future because this would lead to double counting 
of the benefits as impacts on future generations are already captured in the 
bequest value element of non-use value in our surveys. 
6.6.5 
The values estimated from our CV study can be added to the range of other 
impacts captured in the overarching appraisal. Such impacts – for example 
journey time savings – are assessed over a 60 year appraisal period. The 
length of the appraisal period reflects the fact that new transport infrastructure 
typically has an indefinite life. Towards the end of the appraisal period, values 
are heavily discounted, such that extending the appraisal period beyond 60 
years would have a limited effect on the results. Whilst the CV study does not 
have a defined time period, the estimates are likely to capture impacts on 
current and future generations within this time period. While this might lead to 
an underestimate of the total value in cases where respondents in the current 
survey do not consider bequest values, it also avoids significant potential for 
double counting. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 45 


Results 
7.1 
Introduction 
7.1.1 
This section presents the results of the WTP and WTA analysis and the results 
of validity testing. We present the WTP and WTA results for the three different 
study groups: visitors to Stonehenge and the WHS, road users and the general 
population. 
7.1.2 
Following the methodology described in section 6, including the weighting by 
different income subgroups, gender and age the figures presented below 
reflect the weighted, aggregate values for the removal of the road. 
7.2 
Average WTP and WTA 
7.2.1 
Table 8 presents the percentage of people within three outcomes: 
a) Those willing to pay a positive amount for the road scheme (i.e. the green
box in Figure 4)
b) Those not willing to pay for the road scheme and requiring compensation
(i.e. the two orange boxes in Figure 4), and;
c) Those who are neither willing to pay nor require a compensation for the
road scheme (i.e. the grey boxes in Figure 4).
7.2.2 
The percentage of people willing to pay a positive amount for the road scheme 
was highest for visitors and road users (both 67.4%). 59.2% of the general 
population were willing to pay a positive amount for the road scheme. 
7.2.3 
The percentage shares of people requiring compensation were very low for all 
study group populations, and was lowest for Stonehenge visitors (0.5%). 
Across the three outcomes, between 30.5% and 38.5% of people neither 
required any compensation, nor were willing to pay. This suggests that the 
welfare of those who neither required any compensation, nor were willing to 
pay is unaffected by the road scheme, be it because the heritage impacts do 
not form part of their utility (welfare) function, or that the utility gains of the 
scheme are directly offset by the utility losses (recall section 6.3). 
Table 8 
Summary statistics of people willing to pay or requiring compensation 
for the removal of the A303 into a tunnel (the road scheme) 
General  P
Road User 
o pulation 
Visitor study 
study 
Safety Group
Outcome 
group 
group 
N. 
% 
N. 
% 
N. 
% 
A - Willing to pay for 
289 
67.4% 
628 
67.4% 
1,159 
59.2% 
road scheme 
B - Requiring 

0.5% 
20 
2.1% 
45 
2.3% 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 46 

General population 
Visitor study 
Road us er study 
study 
Outcome 
group 
group 
group 
N. 
% 
N. 
% 
N. 
% 
compensation 
for road 
scheme 
C - Neither willing to pay 
nor requiring 
138 
32.2% 
284 
30.5% 
754 
38.5% 
compensation 
Total 
429 
100% 
932 
100% 
1,958 
100% 
Note: sample size is based on final study group samples. Protest responses highlighted in table 5 are 
included in all samples. 
7.2.4 
Mean WTP and WTA results for outcome groups (A) and (B) are provided in 
Table 9. These are values for those respondents who are willing to pay or 
require compensation. Individual level mean WTP values do not include the 
zero WTP/WTA group (outcome C). Zero WTP/WTA responses are instead 
accounted for in the aggregation process (recall section 6.3). Accordingly, 
individual level mean WTP values represent an average money metric impact 
for outcomes (A) and (B) in Table 8. Given that zero responses are not 
accounted for in these calculations, individual mean WTP values should not be 
interpreted directly as an overarching measure of the value that individuals 
place on the road scheme, or compared to individual mean WTP elicited in 
previous studies (e.g. Maddison and Mourato, 2002). 
7.2.5 
The mean WTP for the road scheme (Outcome A) was highest for visitors at 
£23.39 per year for three years. It is only slightly lower for road users at £21.51 
per year for three years. The general population have a lower WTP than 
visitors and road users at £14.41 per year for three years. 
7.2.6 
The mean WTA for the road scheme (Outcome B) was highest for visitors at 
£187.50. Note that this figure is based on a sample of n=2. The average WTA 
of the road users who required compensation is £81.35 and lower at £57.90 for 
the general population. There is a wide confidence interval surrounding these 
estimates due to the generally low number of people requiring compensation 
for the removal of the road. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 47 

Table 9 
Mean and Median WTP and WTA values 
Study 
g  Outcome 

Mean 
Low 
High 
Median 
(WTP/WTA 
N 
Max (£) 

(£) 
95% CI 
95% CI 
(£) 
variable) 

p
 
A - Willing to pay for 
road scheme 
289 
£23.39 
£19.32 
£27.46 
£10.50 
£200.00 
(annual tax) 
Visitor 
B - Requiring 
compensation for 

£187.50  £187.50 
£187.50 
£187.50 
£187.50 
road scheme (one- 
off WTA) 
A - Willing to pay for 
road scheme 
628 
£21.51 
£18.23 
£24.80 
£10.50 
£250.00 
(annual tax) 
Road User 
B - Requiring 
compensation for 
20 
£81.35 
£45.40 
£117.30 
£53.75 
£187.50 
road scheme (one- 
off WTA) 
Gene ral 
A - Willing to pay for 

road scheme 
1,159  £14.41 
£12.74 
£16.07 
£5.50 
£200.00 

(annual tax) 



B - Requiring 

compensation for 
45 
£57.90 
£35.20 
£80.61 
£28.50 
£187.50 
ti 
road scheme (one- 

off WTA) 

Note: CI = Confidence interval. Note that individual mean WTP/WTA are estimated excluding zero 
responses. This is because we elicit both positive WTP values and negative WTA values 
at the individual level. Consequently, the valuation of the road scheme is not bounded at 
zero. This zero-response group who are neither willing to pay nor willing to accept 
compensation are accounted for in the aggregation process (section 6.5).
 
7.3 
Aggregate population level values for the road scheme 
7.3.1 
Table 10 shows the average WTP and WTA values aggregated to the relevant 
population levels of each study group. We calculate the proportion of positive 
WTP/WTA responses for each study group (recall Table 8). We then 
extrapolate the mean levels of WTP and WTA from the survey samples up to 
the relevant proportions within the national levels of visitors (population 
weighted based on age), road users and the general population (weights 
based on income, gender, age and region). In this way, zero-response bids 
(Outcome C, Table 8) are accounted for in the aggregation figure, by 
essentially excluding the equivalent proportion of the relevant populations from 
aggregation. 
7.3.2 
For example, for the visitor group: 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 48 

% study group (column 4, Table 10): 67% of the study group were willing to 
pay for the road scheme (Outcome A, Table 8); 
Relevant population (column 5, Table 10)Mean visitor WTP (£23.39) is 
aggregated to the relevant population, which represents 67% of the 
annual UK resident visitors to Stonehenge (n=368,292). 
% study group: 0.5% of the visitor group were willing to accept compensation 
for the road scheme (Outcome B, Table 10); 
Relevant population: Mean visitor WTA (£187.50) is aggregated to the 
relevant population of 0.5% of annual Stonehenge resident visitors 
(n=2,549). 
7.3.3 
We discount (HM Treasury Green Book, 3.5%) aggregated WTP values, given 
that the WTP values represent annual taxes to support the road scheme 
broken down into three different years of payments. The net present value 
(NPV) of the three years’ worth of WTP payments therefore represents the 
overall individual WTP for the road removal. The NPV WTP values are 
presented in Table 10 below. 
7.3.4 
As discussed above the WTA values are elicited as a one-off compensation 
amount for the removal of the road and therefore represent the overall cost to 
individuals (who value the road) for the removal of the road. 
7.3.5 
Net value is calculated for each study group by subtracting aggregate WTA 
from aggregate WTP. In other words, this creates the net value by subtracting 
the aggregated estimate of the dis-benefit for those whose welfare or utility 
would decrease due to the road scheme, from the aggregated estimate of the 
benefit for those whose welfare would increase. 
7.3.6 
As discussed in section 6.6.4, the WTP and WTA values incorporate future 
impacts (impacts on future users and generations) and hence do not need 
adding over time as this would lead to double-counting of the benefits. 
7.3.7 
The aggregate net benefit of moving the A303 road into a tunnel to visitors is 
£24.50m, for road users it is £49.15m, and for the general population it is 
£1.20 billion.35 The aggregate net benefits figures calculated for whole 
population groups are driven by the individual WTP and WTA estimates and 
the size of the relevant population. The relative size of these figures is, 
therefore, as expected: while the individual WTP of visitors is higher than that 
of road users and the general population, the total number of visitors is a lot 
smaller than the number of road users and the general population. 
7.3.8 
The aggregate figures are consistent with the Maddison and Mourato study 
(2001). However, a direct comparison is not possible because of differences in 
road options, survey design etc. For example, Maddison and Mourato were 
considering the removal of two roads at the time – the A344 (which has since 
been removed) and the A303, they assumed a two-year period of payments, 
they did not include a road user sample, and the values were calculated at the 
household and not individual level. More detail on this in section 3.3 and 
Appendix 2. 
35  All figures are Net Present Values in 2016 prices. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 49 

7.3.9 
This results in an estimated aggregate net present value of £1.3 billion for 
the whole of the UK for the removal of the section of the A303 into a 
tunnel.
 
Table 10 
Aggregation to population values 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
d

 
A
 
s
y

n
 
e

n
T
e
 of
d
 
n
o
 
al
 
al
fo
o
 
bl
se
u
p
n
u
 
u
V
 (£)
at
p
/W
a
er
n
u
d
d

u
b
va
ati
a
P
P
g
ati
P
ri
o
 st
o
e
ul
e
vi
(£)
vi
o
T
re
ul
T
m
p
el
p
M
N
lue
p
va
u
s
 of
gr
di
di
W
g
gr
W
o
o
N
re
g
%
R
p
in
in
A
va
p
Annual  tax 
(WTP  over 
289 
67.4% 
368,292 
£23.39 
£67.83 
three years) 
Visitors 
Compensation 
£24,501,877 

0.5% 
2,549 
£187.50 
n/a 
(one off WTA) 
WTP and WTA 
138 
32.2% 
175,863 
n/a 
n/a 
= £0 
Annual  tax 
Road 
(WTP  over 
628 
67.4% 
822,033 
£21.51 
£62.38 
U  three years) 
s  Compensation 
£49,145,539 

20 
2.1% 
26,179 
£81.35 
n/a 
(one off WTA) 
r  WTP and WTA 

284 
30.5% 
371,747 
n/a 
n/a 
= £0 
Annual  tax 
(WTP  over 
1159 
59.2% 
30,445,460 
£14.41 
£41.78 
three years) 
General 
Compensation 
£1,203,428,521 
Population 
45 
2.3% 
1,182,093 
£57.90 
n/a 
(one off WTA) 
WTP and WTA 
754 
38.5% 
19,806,624 
n/a 
n/a 
= £0 
Total net present value 
£1,277,075,937 
Notes: (i) The NPV calculation uses the standard HM Treasury discount rate (3.5%); (ii)The 
population sizes are described in section 6.1; (iii) The percentage calculations of relevant 
populations are based on four decimal places (only one decimal place reported in the 
table); (iv) For each study group, the aggregated value multiplies NPV individual WTP by 
the relevant population and subtracts it by the mean WTA multiplied by relevant 
population. (v)The relevant population column is calculated by multiplying the % of study 
group by the total population; (vi) The calculations presented in the table use numbers 
with multiple decimal places. The aggregated values for population group will not, 
therefore, exactly match the result if using the rounded numbers in the table.
 
7.4 
Validity test results 
7.4.1 
Table 11 shows the results for equation (2) where we test for theoretical 
validity of the WTP estimates using a pooled regression model that includes 
data from all three study groups. We include variables which are relevant 
covariates of WTP (Bishop 2002) plus the variable which reflects the 
respondent’s certainty that they would be willing to pay and a dummy variable 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 50 

for each study group in the sample (with the baseline being the visitors 
group).36 The dependent variable includes positive WTP responses only. 
Table 11 
Validity testing: Regression results for WTP 
Variable 
WTP 
P-value 
Female 
-4.247*** 
0.01 
Log age 
1.552 
0.63 
Log income 
6.500*** 
0.00 
Children 
4.541** 
0.02 
Married/with partner 
-3.201* 
0.06 
University education 
-2.908 
0.11 
In employment (full time, part time, self- 
-1.328 
0.58 
employed) 
Health 
0.870 
0.55 
Ethnicity 
2.749 
0.44 
Student 
-0.796 
0.87 
Retired 
-0.348 
0.90 
Number of times visited Stonehenge 
1.093* 
0.06 
Likely 
2.979** 
0.05 
Member 
7.064*** 
0.00 
Drivers license 
-0.442 
0.80 
Familiar with the impact of A303 
7.798*** 
0.00 
Certainty 
6.802*** 
0.00 
Road users 
-4.541 
0.16 
General population 
-4.057 
0.18 
Constant 
-61.849 
0.001 
Observations 
Note: *** significance at <1%; ** significance 
1666 
at <5%; * significance at <10%. 
Note: *** significance at <1%; ** significance at <5%; * significance at <10%. Respondents who had not 
answered the question on income are excluded from the validity tests. The WTP dependent 
variable only includes those with a positive WTP. The baseline for the sample dummies is the 
visitor study group. 
7.4.2 
Theoretical validity: As predicted by economic theory (Bateman and Willis 
2001), income has a statistically significant and positive association with WTP 
certainty of paying has a statistically significant and positive association with 
WTP; people that visit Stonehenge more often have a higher WTP, 
Membership in a heritage organisation has a statistically significant 
association with WTP; Familiarity with information provided on the impact of 
A303 on the WHS has a statistically significant and positive association with 
WTP. Despite visitors having a higher mean WTP in Table 9, the general 
population and road user group dummies are insignificant. This is likely to be 
36  Since the theoretical foundations of WTA values are less well-known and researched we focus on 
validity checks for WTP here. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 51 

due to controlling for the factors which drive the higher visitor WTP such as 
income, likelihood of future use or membership in a heritage organisations. 
7.4.3 
Certainty: the second element of validity testing is to test whether certainty of 
paying has an impact on people’s stated WTP amount. Certainty has a 
statistically significant and positive association with WTP. A positive 
association implies that on average, those who are certain that they would 
make the payment have a higher WTP, which in itself adds validity to the mean 
WTP calculations. However, we note that previous studies have found 
inconsistencies in the reported direction of the association between certainty 
and WTP (Bakhshi et al. 2015). We therefore recommend further sensitivity 
analysis of certainty levels (see section 8). 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 52 


Sensitivity Analysis 
8.1 
Confidence intervals 
8.1.1 
Table 12 shows aggregated net benefit and the 95% confidence intervals.37
The lower/ upper bound aggregations use the lower/ upper bound WTP/WTA 
amounts shown in Table 9, in place of the mean individual WTP/ WTA. This 
results in a range for the overall net WTP for the whole population. Table 12 
shows the results: 
Table 12 
Confidence intervals for the aggregate WTP 
Lower bound of 95% 
Upper bound of 95% 
Aggregated net benefit 
confidence interval 
confidence interval 
Visitors 
£20,155,514 
£24,501,877 
£28,848,251 
Road Users 
£42,253,524 
£49,145,539 
£56,037,529 
General 
£1,083,180,378 
£1,203,428,521 
£1,323,675,770 
Population 
Total 
£1,145,589,416 
£1,277,075,937 
£1,408,561,550 
8.1.2 
These results show that even at the lower bound of the confidence interval the 
aggregate net WTP for the removal of the A303 into a tunnel is £1.15 billion
with an upper bound of £1.41 billion
8.2 
Certainty of payment 
8.2.1 
Willingness to pay studies can be subject to hypothetical bias, as discussed in 
section 5. Respondents know that they are unlikely to have to pay the amount 
they state. This can lead to an overclaiming of the WTP. While it is not possible 
to completely overcome this bias one way of addressing it is to ask responds 
how certain they are (on a scale of 1 to 5 – with 5 being very certain) that they 
would pay the stated amount.  Empirical studies such as Bakshi et al show that 
this has a positive impact on the validity of results (Bakshi et al. 2015). 
8.2.2 
To test the impact of those respondents who are not certain that they would 
pay the amount stated on the aggregate value we equalise their WTP to zero. 
Table 13 below shows the impact of assuming that the respondents who were 
uncertain about their stated WTP value had a £0 WTP.38  This results in an 
aggregated value of £1.17 billion, which sits within the confidence interval 
described in Table 12. While this does not eliminate the hypothetical bias it 
provides those who are uncertain with an opportunity to express this, and the 
researchers the opportunity to test the robustness of the valuation. 
37  A confidence interval is a statistical measure. It is a range of values so defined that we are 95% certain 
that the value provided lies within it. 
38 
These were respondents who did not know how certain they were or responded as 1-2 on a 5 
point scale where 1 = not at all certain and 5 = very certain about their WTP amount. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 53 

Table 13 
Certainty sensitivity analysis impact on aggregated results 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
d

 
A
 
s
y

n
 
e

n
T
e
 of
d
 
n
o
 
al
 
al
fo
o
 
bl
se
u
p
n
u
 
u
V
 (£)
at
p
/W
a
er
n
u
ati
d
d

ati
u
b
va
a
P
P
g
P
ri
o
 st
o
e
ul
e
vi
(£)
vi
o
T
re
ul
T
m
p
el
p
M
N
lue
p
va
u
s
 of
gr
o
di
di
W
g
gr
W
g
o
N
re
%
R
p
in
in
A
va
p
Annual tax 
(three year 
262 
61.1% 
333,884 
£24.59 
£71.32 
WTP) 
Visitors 
Compensation 
£23,333,387 

0.5% 
2,549 
£187.50 
n/a 
(one off WTA) 
WTP and WTA 
165 
38.5% 
210,270 
n/a 
n/a 
= £0 
Annual tax 
(three year 
577 
61.9% 
755,275 
£22.25 
£64.51 
WTP) 
Road 
Compensation 
£46,590,044 
Users 
20 
2.1% 
26,179 
£81.35 
n/a 
(one off WTA) 
WTP and WTA 
335 
35.9% 
438,505 
n/a 
n/a 
= £0 
Annual tax 
(three year 
997 
50.9%  26,189,925 
£15.35 
£44.51 
WTP) 
General 
Compensation 
£1,097,288,571 
Population 
45 
2.3% 
1,182,093 
£57.90 
n/a 
(one off WTA) 
WTP and WTA 
916 
46.8%  24,062,158 
n/a 
n/a 
= £0 
Total net present value 
£1,167,212,003 
Notes: (i) The NPV calculation uses the standard HM Treasury discount rate (3.5%); (ii)The 
population sizes are described in section 6.1; (iii) The percentage calculations of relevant 
populations are based on four decimal places (only one decimal place reported in the 
table); (iv) For each study group, the aggregated value multiplies NPV individual WTP by 
the relevant population and subtracts it by the mean WTA multiplied by relevant 
population. (v)The relevant population column is calculated by multiplying the % of study 
group by the total population; (vi) The calculations presented in the table use numbers 
with multiple decimal places. The aggregated values for population group will not, 
therefore, exactly match the result if using the rounded numbers in the table.
 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 54 


Conclusion 
9.1.1 
The study applies best practice stated preference methods (contingent 
valuation) to elicit the total net benefits associated with the hypothetical 
reduction in noise, increased tranquillity, increased visual amenity and reduced 
landscape severance associated with the removal of the A303 from part of the 
Stonehenge WHS for three population groups: Stonehenge visitors, road 
users, and the UK resident general population (aged 16 and over). Individual 
level mean WTP and WTA values and zero response rates are in line with 
comparable results from heritage studies in the UK and international studies of 
World Heritage sites. Validity tests show that WTP and WTA are consistent 
with theoretically consistent drivers of value (Bateman et al. 2002), with 
additional sensitivity analyses performed on respondent certainty levels. 
Surveys were carefully designed following best practice to reduce known 
biases in CV surveys (Bakhshi et al. 2015). 
9.1.2 
While the values elicited in this study cannot be directly translated into 
cashable benefits, they represent the value that the improvements achieved by 
the road scheme will have for users and non-users of the WHS. They therefore 
form a key component of the overall cost-benefit analysis of this scheme. They 
have been conducted in strict adherence to the Green Book guidance on 
appraisal and evaluation. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 55 

10 
References 
Ajzen, Icek, Thomas C. Brown, and Lori H. Rosenthal. 1996. ‘Information Bias in Contingent 
Valuation: Effects of Personal Relevance, Quality of Information, and Motivational Orientation’. 
Journal of Environmental Economics and Management 30 (1): 43–57. 
doi:10.1006/jeem.1996.0004. 
Arrow, Kenneth, and Robert Solow. 1993. Report of the NOAA Panel on Contingent Valuation
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Washington, DC. 
http://www.cbe.csueastbay.edu/~alima/courses/4306/articles/NOAA%20on%20contingent%20va 
luation%201993.pdf. 
Báez, Andrea, and Luis César Herrero. 2012. ‘Using Contingent Valuation and Cost-Benefit 
Analysis to Design a Policy for Restoring Cultural Heritage’. Journal of Cultural Heritage 13 (3): 
235–45. doi:10.1016/j.culher.2010.12.005. 
Báez-Montenegro, Andrea, Ana María Bedate, Luis César Herrero, and Jose Ángel Sanz. 2012. 
‘Inhabitants’ Willingness to Pay for Cultural Heritage: A Case Study in Valdivia, Chile, Using 
Contingent Valuation’. Journal of Applied Economics 15 (2): 235–58. doi:10.1016/S1514- 
0326(12)60011-7. 
Bakhshi, H., Daniel Fujiwara, R. N. Lawton, Susana Mourato, and Paul Dolan. 2015. ‘Measuring 
Economic Value in Cultural Institutions’. Cultural Value Project. London, UK: Arts and 
Humanities Research Council. 
Bakshi, H., Fujiwara, Daniel, Ricky Lawton, Susana Mourato, and Paul Dolan. 2015. ‘Measuring 
Economic Value in Cultural Institutions (Cultural Value Project)’. Arts and Humanities Research 
Council, London, UK. 
Bateman, I. J., R. T. Carson, B. Day, M. Hanemann, N. Hanley, T. Hett, M. Jones-Lee, et al. 
2002. Economic Valuation with Stated Preference Techniques: A Manual. Cheltenham, UK: 
Edward Elgar. 
Bateman, Ian J., R.T. Carson, Brett Day, M Hanemann, Nick Hanley, T Hett, and et al. 2002. 
Economic Valuation with Stated Preference Techniques: A Manual. Cheltenham, UK: Edward 
Elgar. 
Bateman, Ian J., and Kenneth George Willis. 2001. Valuing Environmental Preferences: Theory 
and Practice of the Contingent Valuation Method in the US, EU, and Developing Countries

Oxford University Press. 
Bedate, Ana María, Luis César Herrero, and José Ángel Sanz. 2009. ‘Economic Valuation of a 
Contemporary Art Museum: Correction of Hypothetical Bias Using a Certainty Question’. Journal 
of Cultural Economics 
33 (3): 185–99. doi:10.1007/s10824-009-9098-y. 
Bennett, Jeff, Mark Morrison, and Russell Blamey. 1998. ‘Testing the Validity of Responses for 
Contingent Valuation Questioning’. The Australian Journal for Agriculture and Resource 
Economics 
42 (2): 131–48. 
Bishop, Richard C. 2002. ‘Where to from Here?’ In A Primer in Nonmarket Valuation. The 
Economics of Non-Market Goods and Resources. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 
Boxall, Peter C., Jeffrey Englin, and Wiktor L. Adamowicz. 2003. ‘Valuing Aboriginal Artifacts: A 
Combined Revealed-Stated Preference Approach’. Journal of Environmental Economics and 
Management 
45 (2): 213–30. doi:10.1016/S0095-0696(02)00063-3. 
Boyle, Kevin J. 2002. ‘Contingent Valuation in Practice’. In A Primer on Nonmarket Valuations
111–70. 
Brown, Thomas C, and Robin Gregory. 1999. ‘Why the WTA–WTP Disparity Matters’. Ecological 
Economics 
28 (3): 323–35. doi:10.1016/S0921-8009(98)00050-0. 
Burgess, Jacquelin, Judy Clark, and Carolyn Harrison. 2000. ‘Culture, Communication, and the 
Information Problem in Contingent Valuation Surveys: A Case Study of a Wildlife Enhancement 
Scheme’. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy 18 (5): 505–24. 
doi:10.1068/c1s. 
Cameron, Trudy Ann, and Daniel D Huppert. 1989. ‘OLS versus ML Estimation of Non-Market 
Resource Values with Payment Card Interval Data’. Journal of Environmental Economics and 
Management 
17 (3): 230–46. doi:10.1016/0095-0696(89)90018-1. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 56 

Carson, Richard T. 1997. ‘Contingent Valuation Surveys and Tests of Insensitivity to Scope’. In 
Determining the Value of Non-Marketed Goods, edited by R. J. Kopp, W. W. Pommerehne, and 
N. Schwarz, 127–63. Studies in Risk and Uncertainty 10. Springer Netherlands
http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-011-5364-5_6. 
Chakraborty, Archishman, and Rick Harbaugh. 2010. ‘Persuasion by Cheap Talk’. American 
Economic Review 
100 (5): 2361–82. doi:10.1257/aer.100.5.2361. 
Champ, Patricia A., and Richard C. Bishop. 2001. ‘Donation Payment Mechanisms and 
Contingent Valuation: An Empirical Study of Hypothetical Bias’. Environmental and Resource 
Economics 
19 (4): 383–402. 
Champ, Patricia A., Richard C. Bishop, Thomas C. Brown, and Daniel W. McCollum. 1997. 
‘Using Donation Mechanisms to Value Nonuse Benefits from Public Goods’. Journal of 
Environmental Economics and Management 
33 (2): 151–62. doi:10.1006/jeem.1997.0988. 
Creigh-Tyte, S. W. 2000. ‘The Built Heritage: Some British Experience’. Recherches 
Économiques de Louvain / Louvain Economic Review 
66 (2): 213–29. 
Cummings, Ronald G., and Laura O. Taylor. 1999. ‘Unbiased Value Estimates for Environmental 
Goods: A Cheap Talk Design for the Contingent Valuation Method’. The American Economic 
Review 
89 (3): 649–65. 
Darling, Arthur C., and et al. 2000. ‘Uncertainty in Cost-Benefit Analysis Based on Referendum 
Contingent Valuation’. Mpact Assessment and Project Appraisal, 18 (2): 125–37. 
doi:10.3152/147154600781767466. 
Del Saz Salazar, S., and J. Montagud Marques. 2005. ‘Valuing Cultural Heritage: The Social 
Benefits of Restoring and Old Arab Tower’. Journal of Cultural Heritage 6 (1): 69–77. 
doi:10.1016/j.culher.2004.09.001. 
Eftec. 2005. ‘Valuation of the Historic Environment The Scope for Using Results of Valuation 
Studies in the Appraisal and Assessment of Heritage-Related Projects and Programmes’. 
London, UK: Economics for the Environment Consultancy. http://www.english- 
heritage.org.uk/publications/valuation-historic-environment/valuation-historic-environment-final- 
rep.pdf. 
Ericson, Keith M. Marzilli, and Andreas Fuster. 2014. ‘The Endowment Effect’. Annual Review of 
Economics 
6 (1): 555–79. doi:10.1146/annurev-economics-080213-041320. 
Frederick, Shane, and George Loewenstein. 1999. ‘Hedonic Adaptation’. In Well-Being: The 
Foundations of Hedonic Psychology
, edited by D. Kahneman, E. Diener, and N. Schwarz, 302– 
29. New York, NY: Russell Sage Foundation.
Frey, Bruno S. 1997. ‘Evaluating Cultural Property: The Economic Approach’. International 
Journal of Cultural Property 
6 (2): 231–46. 
Fujiwara, D., R. Lawton, and S. Mourato. 2015. ‘The Health and Wellbeing Benefits of Public 
Libraries’. London, UK: SImetrica, Arts Council England. 
http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/media/uploads/Health_and_wellbeing_benefits_of_public_libraries 
_full_report.pdf. 
Fujiwara, Daniel. 2013. ‘The DWP Social Cost-Benefit Analysis Framework (WP86) - 
Publications - GOV.UK’. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-dwp-social-cost- 
benefit-analysis-framework-wp86. 
Haab, Timothy C., Matthew G. Interis, Daniel R. Petrolia, and John C. Whitehead. 2013. ‘From 
Hopeless to Curious? Thoughts on Hausman’s “Dubious to Hopeless” Critique of Contingent 
Valuation’. Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, October, ppt029. 
doi:10.1093/aepp/ppt029. 
Hanley, Nick, Susana Mourato, and Robert E. Wright. 2001. ‘Choice Modelling Approaches: A 
Superior Alternative for Environmental Valuatioin?’ Journal of Economic Surveys 15 (3): 435–62. 
doi:10.1111/1467-6419.00145. 
Hausman, Jerry. 2012. ‘Contingent Valuation: From Dubious to Hopeless’. Journal of Economic 
Perspectives 
26 (4): 43–56. doi:10.1257/jep.26.4.43. 
HM Treasury. 2011. ‘The Green Book: Appraisal and Evaluation in Central Government’. HM 
Treasury. 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/220541/green_bo 
ok_complete.pdf. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 57 

———. 2013. ‘Public Sector Business Cases Using the Five Case Model: Green Book 
Supplementary Guidance on Delivering Public Value from Spending Proposals’. 
Horowitz, John K., and Kenneth E. McConnell. 2002. ‘A Review of WTA/WTP Studies’. Journal 
of Environmental Economics and Management 
44 (3): 426–47. doi:10.1006/jeem.2001.1215. 
Kahneman, Daniel, Alan B. Krueger, David Schkade, Norbert Schwarz, and Arthur A. Stone. 
2006. ‘Would You Be Happier If You Were Richer? A Focusing Il usion’. Science 312 (5782): 
1908–10. doi:10.1126/science.1129688. 
Kahneman, Daniel, and Amos Tversky. 1979. ‘Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision under 
Risk’. Econometrica 47 (2): 263–91. doi:10.2307/1914185. 
Kim, Samuel Seongseop, Kevin K. F. Wong, and Min Cho. 2007. ‘Assessing the Economic 
Value of a World Heritage Site and Willingness-to-Pay Determinants: A Case of Changdeok 
Palace’. Tourism Management 28 (1): 317–22. doi:10.1016/j.tourman.2005.12.024. 
Kim, Younjun, Catherine L. Kling, and Jinhua Zhao. 2015. ‘Understanding Behavioral 
Explanations of the WTP-WTA Divergence Through a Neoclassical Lens: Implications for 
Environmental Policy’. Annual Review of Resource Economics 7 (1): 169–87. 
doi:10.1146/annurev-resource-100913-012501. 
Lee, Joo-Suk. 2014. ‘Measuring the Benefits of the Intangible Cultural Heritage Hall in Jeonju 
Korea: Results of a Contingent Valuation Survey’. Journal of Cultural Heritage. Accessed 
November 6. doi:10.1016/j.culher.2014.05.001. 
Lockwood, Michael. 1996. ‘Analysing Conflict between Cultural Heritage and Nature 
Conservation in the Australian Alps: A CVM Approach’. Journal of Environmental Planning and 
Management 
39 (3): 357–70. doi:10.1080/09640569612462. 
Loewenstein, George, and Daniel Adler. 1995. ‘A Bias in the Prediction of Tastes’. The 
Economic Journal 
105 (431): 929–37. doi:10.2307/2235159. 
Maddison, David, and Terry Foster. 2003. ‘Valuing Congestion Costs in the British Museum’. 
Oxford Economic Papers 55 (1): 173–90. doi:10.1093/oep/55.1.173. 
Maddison, David, and Susana Mourato. 2001a. ‘Valuing Different Road Options for 
Stonehenge’. Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites, 4 (4): 203–12. 
doi:10.1179/135050301793138182. 
Mitchell, Robert Cameron, and Richard T. Carson. 1989. Using Surveys to Value Public Goods: 
The Contingent Valuation Method
. Resources for the Future. 
Mourato, S., E. Fimereli, D. Contu, C. Gaskell, and C. Boniatti-Pavese. 2014. ‘The Economic 
Benefits of Cultural Built Heritage Interiors Conservation from Climate Change Damages in 
Europe’. WP6 Final Report. London, UK: Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and 
the Environment. 
https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwjAx_W 
BlOTNAhXmAMAKHX9cAJ8QFggeMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.climateforculture.eu%2Fin 
dex.php%3Finhalt%3Ddownload%26file%3Dpages%2Fuser%2Fdownloads%2Fproject_results 
%2FD_06.1_final_publish.pdf&usg=AFQjCNEmpiNVVbd1Kr66uDCAHhWep4PYWw&sig2=vfs6I 
qUMCX-ccnmg1HWP7w. 
Mourato, Susana, Andreas Kontoleon, and Alexi Danchev. 2002. Preserving Cultural Heritage in 
Transition Economies: A Contingent Valuation Study of Bulgarian Monasteries
. Cheltenham, UK: 
Edward Elgar. 
Noonan, Douglas S. 2003. ‘Contingent Valuation and Cultural Resources: A Meta-Analytic 
Review of the Literature’. Journal of Cultural Economics 27 (3–4): 159–76. 
doi:10.1023/A:1026371110799. 
Pearce, David, Giles Atkinson, and Susana Mourato. 2006. ‘Cost-Benefit Analysis and the 
Environment’. Recent Developments, Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and 
Development

Pearce, David, and Ece O’zdemiroglu. 2002. ‘Economic Valuation with Stated Preference 
Techniques Summary Guide’. DETR. 
Ruijgrok, E.C.M. 2006. ‘The Three Economic Values of Cultural Heritage: A Case Study in the 
Netherlands’. Journal of Cultural Heritage 7 (3): 206–13. doi:10.1016/j.culher.2006.07.002. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 58 
 

Schkade, David A., and Daniel Kahneman. 1998. ‘Does Living in California Make People 
Happy? A Focusing Illusion in Judgments of Life Satisfaction’. Psychological Science 9 (5): 340– 
46. doi:10.1111/1467-9280.00066. 
Shaw, Catherine, Louca-May Brady, and Ciara Davey. 2011. ‘Guidelines for Research with 
Children and Young People’. ncb Research Centre. 
Shogren, Jason F., Seung Y. Shin, Dermot J. Hayes, and James B. Kliebenstein. 1994. 
‘Resolving Differences in Willingness to Pay and Willingness to Accept’. The American 
Economic Review 
84 (1): 255–70. 
Sieber, Patrik, and Jan Melichar. 2014. ‘Ekonomické Hodnocení Hluku Ze Silniční Dopravy: 
Studie Podmíněného hodnocení<BR>[The Economic Valuation of Road Traffic Noise: The 
Contingent Valuation Study]’. Politická Ekonomie 2014 (6): 824–49. 
Throsby, C. D., and Glenn A. Withers. 1986. ‘Strategic Bias and Demand for Public Goods’. 
Journal of Public Economics 31 (3): 307–27. doi:10.1016/0047-2727(86)90063-0. 
Toluna. 2016. ‘ESOMAR 28’. 
Tuan, Tran Huu, and Stale Navrud. 2007. ‘Valuing Cultural Heritage in Developing Countries: 
Comparing and Pooling Contingent Valuation and Choice Modelling Estimates’. Environmental 
and Resource Economics 
38 (1): 51–69. doi:10.1007/s10640-006-9056-5. 
US EPA. 2000. ‘Guidelines for Preparing Economic Analyses’. Washington DC: US 
Environmental Protection Agency. 
Whynes, David K., Jane L. Wolstenholme, and Emma Frew. 2004. ‘Evidence of Range Bias in 
Contingent Valuation Payment Scales’. Health Economics 13 (2): 183–90. doi:10.1002/hec.809. 
Willis, Kenneth George. 1994. ‘Paying for Heritage: What Price for Durham Cathedral?’ Journal 
of Environmental Planning and Management 
37 (3): 267–78. 
Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. 2010. Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data. MIT 
Press. 
HE551506-AA-GEN-SWI-RP-JX-000025 | P01, S2 | 06/02/2017 
Page | 59