This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Soft Items Consumables out of date/damaged and their disposal'.



 
Emergency Care | Urgent Care | We Care 
 
Infection Prevention and Control  
Operational Procedures 
 
Links    
The following documents are closely associated with this procedure 
 
  Infection Prevention and Control Policy  
  Health and Safety Policy  
  Untoward Incident Reporting Policy 
  Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Procedures 
  Waste Management Policy, Strategy and Standard Operating Procedure 
  Transfer Policy 
  Service Level Agreement with Occupational Health Provider 
  Health and Safety Workplace Inspection Process 
  Decontamination Policy 
  Vehicle Decontamination Procedure  
  Code of Dress for Uniformed Workforce Standard Operating Procedure 
 
 
 
Document Owner : 
Director of Nursing and Quality  
Document Lead: 
Head of Infection Prevention and Control 
Document Type: 
Operational Procedures 
For use by: 
EMAS staff including volunteers  
 
Equality Impact Assessment 
October 2015 
 
 
This document has been published on the: 
Name 
Date 
Library (EMAS Public Drive) 
21 April 2016 
Intranet 
21 April 2016 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 1 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
Document Location 
Version Control   
If using a printed version of this document ensure it is the latest published version.   
The latest version can be found on the Trust’s Intranet site. 
 
Version 
Date Approved 
Publication Date 
Approved By 
Summary of Changes 
1.0 
24 July 2006  
July 2006 
CIDC 
New Policy for new EMAS Trust 
1.1 
01 August 2007 
August 2007 
Clinical Governance 
Review date extended 
Committee 
2.0 
23 July 2008 
July 2008 
Clinical Governance 
Working review 
Committee 
3.0 
15 July 2009 
July 2009 
Clinical Governance 
Review following organisational changes 
Committee 
3.1 
07 August 2009 
August 2009 
Governance Committee 
Review deadline amended to reflect  the move to a 2 year review 
cycle; Equality & Human Rights Impact Statement updated. 
3.2 
09 November 2009  November 2009 
Director of Nursing & Quality Section 11.1 expanded to include reference to National Patient 
Safety Agency guidance 
3.3 
18 November 2009  November 2009 
Director of Nursing & Quality Appendices revised to reflect current practice 
3.4 
19 November 2009  November 2009 
Director of Nursing & Quality Correction of error on colour coding (section 11) 
3.5 
01 December 2009  December 2009 
Director of Nursing & Quality Decontamination Procedures added to Links To section.  Sections 
on Dealing with Spillages, Vehicle Cleaning, Decontamination of 
Equipment, Vehicles and Air Ambulance have been extracted and 
published in separate document.  Amendments made to Section 10 
3.6 
21 July 2010 
July 2010 
Director of Nursing & Quality amended to ensure compliance with NHSLA Risk Management 
Standards 
4.0 
30 June 2010 
June 2010 
Infection Prevention & 
Addition of invasive interventions narrative at section 24. 
Control Group 
4.1 
12 October 2010 
October 2010 
Director of Nursing & Quality Make Ready Cleaning schedule check lists added to appendices 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 2 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
5.0 
22 February 2011 
February 2011 
Infection Prevention & 
Section 5.5 new hand washing poster, Section 6.0 addition of sleeve 
Control Group 
protectors, Section 8.0 additional text regarding use of temporary 
closure on sharps bins, Section 9.0 amended flow diagram ‘Action to 
be taken in the event of sharps injury’. Appendix 2 Communicable 
diseases information replaced. Appendices 3 and 4 added. 
6.0 
26 June 2012 
June 2012 
Strategic IPC Group  
Terminology changed to reflect current terminology “sharps” to 
“inoculation injuries” and “make ready” to “Deep Clean” and universal 
in brackets removed from Standard Precautions. Mention is made of 
the use of sleeve protectors and the appropriate times for use. In 6.4 
added definitions of glove use have been included. Throughout the 
document the terminology has been updated to reflect the current 
healthcare waste terminology used in the Guidance for disposal of 
healthcare waste used on vehicles. – Section 6 Under MDRTB -  
mask wearing has been clarified; Section 7 Under aseptic non-touch 
technique terminology clarified; Section 9.3 in Occupational Health 
inoculation injury flow chart the terminology has been changed to 
reflect the generic name of the service removing the company name; 
Section 10 clarifies detergent and hot water use and PPE for 
cleaning; Section 20 Infestation – clarifies the contact for notifying 
exposure as IPC or Occupational Health; Section 24 under invasive 
interventions Catheterization has been removed, Intra Osseous 
Device has been referred to and signposted to the SOP; In the 
section on deep cleaning of specific equipment and vehicles 
timeframes according to current decontamination guidance have 
been specified. The National Ambulance group flow chart for 
Diarrhoea and Vomiting has replaced the previous version. 
6.1 
29 October 2013 
October  2013 
Strategic IPC Group 
Reviewed the references in line with the IPC Policy references 
Included clarification of details of Category 4 diseases  
Revision of Norovirus isolation precautions in Appendix 2 
6.4 (6.42) glove use – “ at the point of care” inserted. 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 3 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
7.0 
14 September 
17 September 
Infection Prevention and 
Linen and laundry procedure have been reviewed and incorporated 
2015 
2015 
Control Group 
into section 19 
The decontamination procedures have been reviewed and 
incorporated into section 15, 16, 17 and 18 
Addition of aseptic non-touch technique for wound care, intubation, 
catheterisation, intraousseous cannulation,  has been included in 
section 11 
Addition of donning and doffing PPE into section 10 
Addition of transportation and consumption of food  in vehicles in 
section 26 
The obtaining of IPC advice has been updated in section 6 
7.1 
13 April 2016 
21 April 2016 
Document Owner 
Updating of the needlestick injury flow chart in figure 9  
Addition of outbreak management procedure at section 27, 
management checklist at appendix two and monitoring form at 
appendix 3. 
Revisions reported to IPC Group June 2016. 
 
  
 

 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 4 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

Infection Prevention and Control Operational Procedures 
 
Contents 
 
Page 
 
1.   Introduction 

2.   Objectives 

3.   Scope 

4.   Definitions 

5.   Responsibilities 

6.   Obtaining IPC advice 

7.   The chain of infection 

8.   Standard IPC precautions 
12 
9.   Hand decontamination 
12 
10.  Personal protective equipment 
18 
11.  Aseptic technique  
24 
12. Safe management of sharps 
29 
13. Inoculation and/or contamination injuries 
31 
14. Exposure prone procedures 
35 
15. Cleaning and decontamination 
35 
16. Blood and body fluids spillage management 
37 
17. Premises cleaning 
38 
18. Decontamination of medical devices and consumables 
39 
19. Management of linen and laundry 
41 
20. Management and care of uniform 
43 
21. Care of the deceased 
45 
22. Communication of IPC related information 
45 
23. Care of the infectious patient 
47 
24. Highly infectious diseases and biological warfare 
47 
25. Provision of IPC related occupational health advice 
48 
26. Transportation and consumption of food in vehicles 
49 
27. Outbreak Management  
50 
28. Consultation 
51 
29. References 
51 
30. Monitoring Compliance and Effectiveness 
51 
Appendix 1 – Dissemination Plan 
Appendix 2 – Outbreak Management Checklist 
Appendix 3 – Outbreak Monitoring Form 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 5 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
1.  Introduction    
 
1.1.  The  Trust  is  committed  to  the  provision  of  a  clean  safe  environment  for  the 
delivery of healthcare, patients, employees and the public.  
 
1.2.  Health  care  associated  infections  (HCAIs)  impact  on  the  high  quality  care  the 
NHS strives to provide for patients. HCAIs are infections resulting from patients 
receiving a medical treatment or interventions in a range of healthcare settings 
which may be acquired by or transmitted to a patient in or out of hospital. Many 
HCAIs  are  avoidable  and  everyone  involved  in  patient  care  can  contribute  to 
the reduction in HCAIs.  
 
1.3.  These  procedures  have  been  developed  to  support  Trust  staff,  and  those 
undertaking activity on behalf of the Trust, including volunteers and Community 
First  Responders  (CFRs),  to  reduce  the  risk  of  transmission  of  infection  to 
patients, themselves and their colleagues.  
 
 
2. 
Objectives 
 
2.1.  The objectives of this procedure are to:   
  Ensure compliance with current legislation. 
  Adhere to best practice guidance issued by the Department of Health and 
other national guidance. 
  Provide person-centred care focused to meet the needs of the individual. 
  Manage  the  risks  to  patients  and  employees  arising  from  preventable 
infections. 
  Promote evidence-informed clinical practice. 
  Ensure cost effective procurement. 
  Use systems that make the best use of the skills and capacity of clinical 
staff to ensure effective working practices 
 
 
3. 
Scope 
 

3.1.  This  document  is  for  the  use  of  all  staff  and  contracted  agencies,  including 
volunteers  and  CFRs,  working  on  behalf  of  East  Midland  Ambulance  Service 
NHS Trust 
 
3.2.  This document, and the requirements within it, are intended to provide the Trust 
Board  with  assurance  that  the  standards  of  infection  prevention  and  control 
(IPC) are met, by respecting the patient’s right to a clean, safe environment and 
by  our  staff’s  right  to safe working  conditions  by  following  evidence  informed, 
best practice guidance. 
 
3.3.  The principles which govern the management of a clean safe environment must 
be applied to all health care and associated activities. 
 

 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 6 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
4. 
Definitions 
 
4.1.  Due  to  the  length  of  this  procedure  all  definitions  have  been  included  in  the 
relevant sections. 
5. 
Responsibilities 
 
5.1.  Chief Executive  
  
5.1.1.  The  Chief  Executive  is  the  accountable  officer  and  has  overall  Trust 
responsibility for IPC and as such will be a strong advocate for IPC.  
  
5.2.  Director of Infection Prevention and Control (DIPC) 
 
5.2.1.  The  role  of  Director  of  Infection  Prevention  and  Control  is  assigned  to  the 
Executive Director of Nursing and  Quality, who is nominated by the Board to 
have  executive  responsibility  for  IPC  and  cleaning  within  the  Trust.  The  post 
holder has responsibility for overseeing the Infection Control Group, Infection 
Prevention  and  Control  Policy  and  Annual  Programme,  and  is  an  integral 
member  of  the  Quality  and  Governance  Committee  (incorporating  Clinical 
Governance), reporting directly to the Chief Executive. 
 

5.3.  The Infection Prevention and Control Team  
 
5.3.1.  The  IPC  team  are  responsible  for  providing  expert  advice  and  guidance  in 
accordance  with  this  procedure  and  for  supporting  staff  with  its 
implementation  ensuring  that  this  remains  consistent  with  evidence  based 
practice.  
 
5.4.  Director of Operations 
 
5.4.1.  The  Director  of  Operations  is  the  designated  decontamination  lead  for  the 
Trust. The day to day responsibility is devolved to the Assistant and Associate 
Directors of Operations and the General Managers.  
 
5.5. 
Assistant and Associate Directors of Operations and General Managers 
 
5.5.1.  The  Assistant  and  Associate  Directors  of  Operations  are  designated  as 
decontamination leads in their respective divisions. They are responsible, and 
accountable,  for  ensuring  compliance  with  the  decontamination  procedures 
and that auditing and monitoring against standards takes place in line with the 
annual IPC audit programme.  
 
5.6. 
Senior Managers 
  
5.6.1.  All  senior  managers  are  responsible,  and  accountable,  for  ensuring 
implementation of and compliance with the IPC policies and procedures. 
 
5.6.2.  All  managers  are  responsible  for  challenging  poor  practice  and  non-
compliance with the policies and procedures.  
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 7 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
5.6.3.  Senior managers are responsible for ensuring the cleanliness of the vehicles, 
premises  and  equipment  to  achieve  the  Trust’s  high  standard  of  cleanliness 
through  a  visible  presence  and  support  of  the  Clinical  Team  Mentors  and 
Team Leaders in their areas.  
 
5.7. 
Trust staff and Clinicians 
 
5.7.1.  The  responsibility  for  IPC  is  devolved  to  all  staff  and  clinicians,  including 
volunteers and CFRs, within the Trust. All staff have a responsibility to attend 
IPC training and implement the policies and procedures. 
  
5.7.2.  The Trust empowers  staff to challenge and report poor  practice with respect 
to infection prevention and control. 
 
 
6. 
Obtaining Infection Prevention and Control Advice 
 

6.1. 
Expert infection prevention and control advice is available to staff at all times. 
 

6.2. 
In hours and routine requests for advice should be directed to the Infection 
Prevention and Control Team via email to xxx.xxxx@xxxx.xxx.xx or 
telephone: 
 
Kirsty Morgan   
Head of IPC   
 
07814 051714 
Kathy Fleming  
IPC Nurse Specialist   
07786 914016 
Gaynor Moss   
IPC Adviser 
 
 
07800 827326 
 
6.3. 
Outside of hours IPC advice should be obtained through the Regional 
Operations Manager in Emergency Operations Centre who will be able to 
provide the advice or contact the most appropriate service/clinician on call to 
provide the advice, either through the clinical on call rota or the Public Health 
England East Midlands on call rota. 
 

6.4. 
The IPC insite area provides a comprehensive source of procedural advice 
and an A to Z of infectious disease specific precautions.  
 
 
7.  The chain of infection 
 
7.1. 
A clear understanding of the chain of infection is essential in order to 
implement appropriate transmission based precautions and prevent the 
spread of infection 
 
7.2. 
This procedure is set out to provide an overview of the chain of infection to 
enable crews to recognise how to break the chain and protect themselves and 
their patients 
 
7.3.  Definitions 
 
7.3.1. The chain of infection refers to the process by which infection can be spread 
from one susceptible host to another. 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 8 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 


 
7.3.2. A primary pathogen is any disease producing microorganism. 
 
7.3.3. A commensal is an organism that generally resides on the human body 
without causing harm. Otherwise known as colonisation. 
 
7.4. 

The Chain of Infection 
 
Figure 1: Chain of Infection 
 
 
7.5. 

Infectious Agents 
 
 
7.5.1.  An infectious agent can be a primary pathogen or a commensal given the right 
opportunity. 
 
7.5.2.  The greater the organisms virulence (ability to grow and multiply), 
invasiveness (ability to enter the host) and pathogenicity (ability to cause 
disease) the greater the possibility of that microorganism causing an infection 
 
7.5.3.   Microorganisms can be split into the following groups: 
  Bacteria - minute organisms that are, to a greater or lesser extent, 
susceptible to antibiotics 
  Viruses - smaller than bacteria and known to survive outside the body but 
can only grow within cells, not susceptible to antibiotics 
  Fungi - can be either moulds or yeasts, not all are infectious 
  Protozoa - single celled organisms that commonly show characteristics 
associated with animals, they are motile and able to survive in the 
environment.  
  Parasites - organisms that live on or in a host and get their food at the 
expense of the host. 
  Prions - infectious agents primarily composed of proteins 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 9 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
7.6. 
Reservoirs 
 

7.6.1.  A reservoir is somewhere microorganisms can thrive and reproduce. 
 
7.6.2.   Reservoirs are those which have been proven by epidemiological and 
microbiological investigations to be the origin of infection. 
 
7.6.3.   Reservoirs can include 
  Patients 
  Staff 
  Equipment and Vehicles 
  Environment including soil and dust 
  Animals and Insects  
  Food and Water 
 
7.7. 
Portal of Exit and Portal of Entry 
 
7.7.1.  In order to cause disease a pathogen must have a way to enter the body – a 
portal of entry 
 
7.7.2.  To transmit to another host the microorganism must be able to leave the body 
– a portal of exit 
 
7.7.3.  The route of exit and entry may be different such as in enteric infections which 
enter via the mouth and leave via the rectum in faeces 
7.7.4.  The route of exit and entry may be the same such as in respiratory infections 
where droplets are exhaled by the infectious host and then inhaled by the 
susceptible host 
 
7.7.5.   Interventions which breach mucous membranes such as insertion of invasive 
devices (intravenous cannulation) can also provide portals of entry and exit. 
 
7.7.6.  Different microorganisms can use one or different routes to find new hosts: 
  Respiratory Tract – through the inhalation of organisms, including 
legionnaire’s disease (legionella) Open Tuberculosis, Chicken pox and 
Influenza  
  Alimentary Tract – through ingestion of contaminated food or water 
including norovirus, salmonella, and clostridium difficile  
  Skin and Mucosa – through damaged skin or by inoculation including the 
transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B and 
Hepatitis C   
 
7.8. 
Means of Transmission  
 
7.8.1.  The one feature which distinguishes infection from all other disease is that it 
can be spread, one person can catch it from another or via a vector; they can 
also be caused from the environment.  
 

7.8.2.  Infections can be transmitted by 
  Direct contact  
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 10 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
  Indirect contact  
  Aerosols  
  Ingestion  
  Inoculation  
  Absorption  
  Vectors  
 
7.8.3.  Direct contact is physical contact with the infectious site, for example contact 
with discharge form wounds or skin lesions. 
 

7.8.4.  Indirect contact through coughing or sneezing or when an immediate carrier is 
involved in the spread of pathogenic microbes from one source of infection to 
another person, for example on the hands of healthcare workers or any 
equipment which becomes contaminated and is then used on another patient 
without being decontaminated.  
 
7.8.5.  Aerosols produced by sneezing or in the dispersal of skin scales can spread 
through the air and infect other such as in chickenpox, measles and mumps.  
 
7.8.6.  Ingestion infection can occur when organisms capable of infecting the 
gastrointestinal tract are ingested. When these organisms are excreted 
faecally by an infected person faecal-oral spread is said to occur.  
 
7.8.7.  Inoculation infections occur when microorganisms are inoculated directly into 
the blood stream. Inoculation injuries include; bites and scratches that break 
the skin, splashes of blood or body fluids to the eyes, nose or mouth as well as 
needle stick injuries.  
 
7.8.8.  Vectors are any intermediate agent which can carry an infection between 
humans/animal for example mosquitoes.  
 
7.8.9.  Absorption is a route of entry for a few tropical diseases.  
 
7.9. 
Susceptible Host  
 

7.9.1.   A susceptible host is a person who cannot resist a microorganism invading 
the body, multiplying and resulting in an infection  
 

7.9.2.  The host is susceptible to the disease, lacking immunity or physical resistance 
to overcome the invasion by the pathogenic microorganism 
 
7.9.3.  Susceptible hosts come in all shapes and sizes and are not always easy to 
identify. They can be:  
  Very young  
  Frail and elderly  
  Those patients on steroids, dialysis or chemotherapy and with pre-existing 
conditions  
  Patients with severe shock and trauma, this could be physical or 
psychological, both will have an adverse impact on the patients 
susceptibility to infection  
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 11 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
 
8. 
Standard Infection Prevention and Control Precautions   
 
8.1. 
Standard  precautions  is  an  umbrella  term  used  to  encompass  eight  key 
elements  that,  when  implemented  appropriately,  will  prevent  the  spread  of 
infection. This includes: 
  Hand Hygiene  
  Personal Protective Equipment  
  Sharps disposal  
  Waste disposal  
  Management of clean and soiled linen  
  Management of Blood and Body Fluid Spills 
  Decontamination of equipment and the environment 
  Immunisation and vaccination 
  
8.2.  These  precautions  should  be  taken  with  all  patients  to  reduce  the  risk  of 
transmission  of  microorganisms  and  apply  to  blood,  and  other  body  fluids, 
secretions  and  excretions  (with  the  exception  of  sweat),  non-intact  skin  and 
mucous membranes.  
 
8.3.  Other  fundamental  issues  that  are  required  to  prevent  the  spread  of  infection 
include, but are not limited to: 
  Education of employees, operational and enabling staff 
  Immunisation of healthcare workers 
  Monitoring the implementation of and compliance with Infection Prevention 
and Control Policy and procedures. 
  Appropriate communication of infection risk between healthcare workers 
 
 
9. 
Hand decontamination 
 
9.1.  Introduction 

 
9.1.1.  Hand  decontamination  is  widely  recognised  as  the  single  most  effective 
measure  for  the  prevention  and  control  of  infection  and  is  vital  for  ensuring 
patients receive clean safe care.  
 
9.1.2.  The Trust currently has three options for hand decontamination: 
 
Hand Washing 
 
Alcohol Based Hand Rub 
 
Hand Wipes (detergent/disinfectant universal sanitising wipes) 
 
9.1.3.  Hand  washing  with  liquid  soap  and  water  is  the  gold  standard  for  infection 
prevention and control and must be undertaken on a regular basis. In the pre-
hospital,  emergency  and  urgent  care  environment  it  should  be  undertaken 
when there is access to appropriate hand wash facilities, such as on return to 
station and in hospital departments. Hands should be washed as shown in the 
hand  decontamination  technique  (Figure  2).  If  there  is  access  to  hand  wash 
facilities these should be utilised when hands are visibly soiled. 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 12 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 


 
 
Figure 2 – Hand decontamination techniques 
 
 
 
9.1.4.  Alcohol  based  hand  rubs  inactivate  microorganisms  and/or  temporarily 
suppress  their  growth;  they  are  only  effective  on  physically  clean  hands  as 
they are unable to penetrate through physical soiling. Alcohol based  hand rub 
is not recommended when patients have symptoms of, or are diagnosed with 
norovirus, 
Clostridium 
difficile 
or 
other 
diarrhoeal 
illnesses- 
use 
detergent/disinfectant wipes prior to application. 
 
9.1.5.  5  -  10  mls  of  alcohol  based  hand  rubs  should  be  applied  to  visibly  clean 
hands and rubbed in as shown in the hand decontamination technique (figure 
2).  Alcohol  based  hand  rubs  should  be  rubbed  in  until  the  solution  has 
evaporated and the hands are dry. 
 
9.1.6.  The  detergent/disinfectant  wipes  used  within  the  Trust  are  also  suitable  for 
hand decontamination. When staff do not have ready access to hand washing 
facilities,  they  can  be  used  to  remove  as  much  of  the  contamination  as 
possible and always be followed by alcohol hand rub. They must also be used 
prior to alcohol hand rub following contact with a patient who is symptomatic 
with diarrhoeal illnesses. 
 
9.2.  Opportunities for hand decontamination 
 
9.2.1.  The opportunities for hand decontamination are described as the fundamental 
reference  points  for  healthcare  workers  in  a  time  -  space  framework  that 
designates the moments when hand decontamination is required to effectively 
interrupt microbial transmission during care. 
 

 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 13 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 


 
9.2.2.  The opportunities for hand decontamination (hand hygiene) used by the Trust 
were  established  by  the  World  Health  Organisation  in  2005  and  have  been 
integrated  into  all  United  Kingdom  (UK)  ambulance  services  and  more  than 
400 hospitals worldwide.  
 
9.2.3.  These  “5  moments”  aim  to  offer  healthcare  workers  clear  advice  on  how  to 
integrate hand hygiene in the complex task of care. The “5 moments” for hand 
decontamination  can  most  easily  be  represented  by  the  Figure  3  (below) 
although this will not cover every opportunity that will present itself during the 
working day.  
 
Figure 3 - WHO Five Moments 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9.2.4.  In  addition  to  those  opportunities  listed  in  figure  one,  other  opportunities  to 
decontaminate hands include (but are not exclusive to):  
  Before preparing, eating, drinking or handling food  
  Before and after going to the toilet  
  Before starting work and after finishing work  
  Before putting on and after the removal of personal protective equipment  
  After handling dirty linen or waste  
  After cleaning equipment or environment  
  After  handling  contaminated  items,  including  dressings,  bedpans,  urine 
drainage bags  
 
9.3.  Bare below the elbows   

 
9.3.1.  The Trust supports the Department of Health led research which has resulted 
in  the  introduction  of  “bare  below  the  elbows”  into  healthcare  organisations, 
this  initiative  aspires  to  remove  the  barriers  to  hand  decontamination  and 
reduce the risk of infection from contaminated sleeves and jewellery.  
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 14 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
9.3.2.  Prior  to  the  commencement  of  the  shift  all  operational  staff  (accident  and 
emergency,  patient  transport  services,  Hazardous  Area  Response  Team, 
community  first  responders,  co-responders,  ambulance  support  team  and 
doctors)  are  required  to  be  compliant  with  bare  below  the  elbows.  This 
includes the removal of: 
  Wrist watches 
  Wrist and finger jewellery – apart from a plain wedding band 
  Long nails – nails should be natural and short in length 
  Nail varnish (clear and coloured) 
  Nail extensions (including gel nails) 
  Nail adornments 
  Long sleeves (by shortening sleeves or wearing sleeve protectors) 
 
These  items  are  all  capable  of  harbouring  pathogens  even  after  hand 
decontamination  has  been  performed.  The  exception  to  this  is  when    long 
sleeves are required as part of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as 
wearing  high  visibility  jackets,  air  ambulance  suit  or  other  Trust  issue  PPE, 
sleeve protectors should be worn as appropriate in these situations. A further 
exception  is  for  the  wearing  of  jewellery  for  cultural/religious  reasons  and  a 
plain wedding band. 
 
9.3.3.  Shell/fleece/jacket sleeves will easily become contaminated, and must not be 
worn  when  carrying  out  patient  care  activities  unless  adverse  weather 
conditions  dictate  otherwise,  in  this  instance  sleeves  should  be  rolled  up 
above the elbow or sleeve protectors must be worn.  
 
9.3.4.  When entering healthcare premises staff are expected to be comply with bare 
below  the  elbows  and  ensure  sleeves  are  rolled  up  or  long  sleeve 
coats/jackets/fleeces  are  removed,  unless  transferring  a  patient  whose 
condition presents an immediate threat to life. 
 
9.3.5.  Long  sleeved  coats  should  always  be  removed,  or  the  sleeves  rolled  up  to 
ensure effective hand decontamination can be achieved.  
 
9.3.6.  “Responding” mangers should remove their neck ties and any wrist or finger 
jewellery prior to carrying out any patient care.   
 
9.3.7.  Bare below the elbows also applies to operational staff in training schools, in 
order to instil best practice and promote compliance with this initiative. 
 
9.4.  Hand decontamination technique 
 
9.4.1.  Correct  technique  for  hand  decontamination  is  vital  for  ensuring  adequate 
decontamination.  Incorrect  techniques  can  cause  areas  of  the  hand  to  be 
missed  resulting  in  the  hands  remaining  contaminated  and  risk  spreading 
microorganisms. The  diagram  below    (figure  4)  shows  the  areas  of  skin that 
are  commonly  missed  when  hands  are  not  decontaminated  using  a  correct 
technique.  
 
 

 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 15 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 



 
Figure 4 – Areas frequently missed during hand decontamination  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
9.4.2.  When  washing  hands,  hands  should  be  wet  with  running  water  before 
applying  liquid  soap.  The  technique  displayed  on  the  posters  (figure  2)  at 
hand wash basins should be followed and hand washing should take 15- 30 
seconds. Particular attention should be paid to finger tips, thumbs, in-between 
fingers  (especially  on  the  dominant  hand)  and  to  wrists.    Hands  should  be 
rinsed  in  running  water  and  thoroughly  dried  with  disposable  paper  hand 
towels.  
 

9.4.3.  Where hand wash basins do not have elbow operated taps, disposable paper 
towels should be utilised to turn the taps off after hand washing.  
 
Figure 2: Hand Cleaning Techniques 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 16 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
9.5.  Skin care  
 
9.5.1. Healthy,  intact  skin  provides  an  effective  barrier  against  infection.  It  is 
important to keep the skin in good condition by using the correct hand washing 
method, drying hands thoroughly, rubbing alcohol hand gel in until it dries and 
regularly using hand moisturising cream.  
 
9.5.2. Cuts  and  abrasions  must  be  covered  with  waterproof  dressings  which  must 
be check regularly and replaced as necessary whilst on clinical duty. 
 
9.5.3. Any member of staff with extensive skin lesions, such as eczema or dry skin 
conditions  where  skin  integrity  is  compromised,  must  be  referred  to 
Occupational Health for advice and guidance.  
 
9.5.4. Hands must be moisturised regularly after hand cleaning to reduce the risk of 
dry skin, dry skin is more susceptible to crack and lesions.  The moisturiser will 
help to prevent dry skin, which in turn will reduce the risk of skin cracking and 
lesions developing.  
 
9.5.5. Moisturiser  should  either  be  personal  issue  or  from  a  pump  operated 
dispenser.  Personal  moisturisers  should  not  be  shared.  The  Trust  provides 
moisturiser  on  the  entrances  to  buildings,  at  hand  wash  basins  and  on 
vehicles.  
 
9.6.  Hand washing facilities  
 
9.6.1.  Hand  washing  facilities  must  be  dedicated  for  hand  washing  only,  there  are 
dedicated hand washing facilities available on all Trust premises.  
 
9.6.2.  All hand wash basins must be equipped with the following: 
  Liquid Soap 
  Moisturiser 
  Disposable paper towels 
  Foot operated, lidded domestic waste bin 
  Hand decontamination technique poster 
 
9.6.3.  Health  Technical  Memorandum  (HTM)  64  requires  hand  washing  facilities  in 
clinical areas to be equipped as follows: 
  No plug 
  No overflow 
  Water from the taps must not be situated directly above the plug hole 
  Elbow operated or non-touch taps. 
 
Whilst  the  Trust  does  not  provide  clinical  areas  for  the  assessment  and 
management  of  patients  within  Trust  premises,  it  is  committed  to  meeting  the 
requirements of HTM 64 as premises are refurbished and in new builds. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 17 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
10.  Personal Protective Equipment 
 
10.1. Introduction 
 
10.1.1. Personal  Protective  Equipment  (PPE)  at  Work  Regulations  (1992)  requires 
that PPE is to be supplied and used at work wherever there are risks to health 
and  safety  that  are  unable  to  be  controlled  in  other  ways.  Whilst  these 
regulations are concerned with protecting workers, in the health service PPE 
is  also  used  to  prevent  the  spread  of  infection  to  patients,  colleagues  and 
members of the public.  
 

10.1.2. These regulations require that PPE is: 
  Properly assessed before use to ensure it is suitable 
  Maintained and stored properly 
  Provided with instructions on how to use it safely 
  Used correctly by employees 
 
10.1.3. For the purposes of this procedure PPE refers to clinical PPE and includes all 
equipment which is intended to be worn or held by a person at work in order 
to protect against the transmission of microorganisms.  
 

10.1.4. PPE should be available on all vehicles and includes, but is not limited to: 
  Gloves  
  Aprons 
  Sleeve protectors 
  Protective suits (coveralls)  
  Facemasks – surgical  
  Eye protection/goggles 
  Operational  staff  must  carry  their  personal  issue  FFP3  mask  when  on 
duty 
  Operational staff must carry their personal issue eye protection when on 
duty 
 
10.1.5. The following body fluids may pose a transmission risk and should be handled 
with the same precautions as blood: 
  Faeces 
  Vomit 
  Urine 
  Amniotic fluid 
  Cerebrospinal fluid 
  Peritoneal fluid 
  Breast milk 
  Pleural fluid 
  Synovial fluid 
  Semen 
  Vaginal secretions 
  Unfixed tissues and organs 
 
 

 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 18 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
10.2. Dynamic risk assessment for selection of PPE 
 
10.2.1. Selection of appropriate PPE must be based on an assessment of the risk of 
transmission  of  microorganisms  to  the  patient  or  clinician  and  the  risk  of 
contamination  of  the  clinicians  clothing  and/or  skin  by  the  patient’s  body 
fluids.  
 
10.2.2. Many  clinical  activities  do  not  involve  direct  contact  with  body  fluids  and 
consequently  do  not  require  the  use  of  PPE.  For  example  taking  and 
recording observations or pushing a wheelchair/stretcher.  
 
10.2.3. Clinicians  are  required  to  use  their  judgement  when  determining  the  level  of 
PPE  required  for  each  case,  following  a  dynamic  risk  assessment  (figure  5) 
considering the risk of exposure of body fluids during particular activities. 
 
Figure 5 - Risk assessment matrix for PPE 
 
No exposure to blood, body fluids, 
No protective clothing required  
secretions or excretions anticipated  
Exposure to blood or body fluids 
Gloves and aprons required  
anticipated but LOW risk of splashing  
Gloves, aprons, sleeve protectors, 
Exposure to blood or body fluids 
eye/mouth/nose protection (goggles and 
anticipated but HIGH risk of splashing  
mask)  
 
10.3. Gloves 
 
10.3.1. The Trust has a latex free policy and consequently all gloves purchased and 
used  within  the  Trust  must  be  latex  free.  Nitrile  gloves  are  the  gloves  of 
choice for the Trust. Persons who feel they may be allergic to Nitrile gloves or 
who  are  experiencing  skin  conditions  as  a  result  of  wearing  gloves  should 
contact their team leader for a referral to the Occupational Health Team.  
 

10.3.2. Gloves should not be worn unnecessarily; a dynamic risk assessment should 
inform  the  necessity  of  gloves.  Gloves  should  be  worn  whenever  there  is 
expected  contact  with  blood,  mucous  membranes  and  non-intact  skin  and 
when  in  contact  with  a  patient  with  a  known  or  suspected  infection  or 
contaminated equipment. 
 
10.3.3.  Gloves should be donned (put on) immediately before an episode of patient 
treatment  where  contact  with  blood  or  other  body  fluids  is  anticipated  and 
doffed  (removed)  as  soon  as  the  activity  is  completed,  this  must  always  be 
followed by hand decontamination. 
 
10.3.4. Gloves  must  be  changed  between  caring  for  different  patients  or  between 
different care/treatment activities for the same patient.  
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 19 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
10.3.5. Gloves must be worn as single use items and disposed of in the appropriate 
waste stream, in line with the activity that has been undertaken.  Gloves must 
not  be  washed  or  decontaminated  with  alcohol  hand  gel  as  this  affects  the 
integrity  of  the  gloves  and  is  not  effective  at  removing  microorganisms  and 
breaches the manufacturer’s guidance on use.  
 
10.3.6. Gloves  must  not  be  worn  when  driving,  travelling  to  a  call  or  pushing 
wheelchairs/stretchers or carrying Tough books they should be donned at the 
point of care.  
 
10.3.7. Hand decontamination should accompany the removal/disposal of gloves.  
 
10.4. Aprons  
 
10.4.1. Disposable  single  use  plastic  aprons  must  be  worn  when  close  contact  with 
the patient, materials or equipment are anticipated and there is a risk clothing 
may become contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms or body fluids. 
 
10.4.2. Disposable single use plastic aprons should be worn for the decontamination 
of  the  vehicles  and  equipment.  They  should  also  be  worn  when  cleaning 
premises, if there is a risk of clothing becoming contaminated. 
  
10.4.3. Aprons  must  be  used  as  single  patient  use  items  and  disposed  of  in  an 
appropriate waste stream following use.  
 
10.5. Sleeve protectors 

 
10.5.1. Sleeve protectors can be worn as PPE to protect the wearer from the wrist to 
the elbow.  
 

10.5.2. Sleeve  protectors  are  not  a  replacement  for  removing  or  rolling  up  long  
jackets/sleeves/fleeces  during  clinical  interventions,  but  can  be  used  in 
situations  where  compliance  with  bare  below  the  elbows  is  not  possible  i.e. 
when high visibility jackets are unable to be removed, this includes inclement 
weather conditions.  
 
10.5.3. Sleeve  protectors  can  be  worn  where  there  are  multiple  patients  at  one 
location and there is a high risk of contamination from body fluids, they must 
be changed between patients.  
 
10.5.4. Sleeve  protectors  are  single  patient/intervention  use  items  and  should  be 
disposed of in the appropriate waste stream after use.  
 
10.5.5. Sleeve protectors can be worn to protect the member of staff  whilst the staff 
members  forearm  is  healing  following  medical  procedures,  tattoo’s  or  tattoo 
removal.  
 
10.6. Eye protection/visors 

 
10.6.1. Eye protection/visors  are required to be worn when a particular  procedure is 
likely  to  cause  splashing  of  body  fluids,  particularly  blood  or  tissue,  into  the 
eyes or face of the clinician.  
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 20 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
10.6.2. Eye protection/visors are recommended when caring for patients suspected to 
be  suffering  of  infectious  illnesses  spread  through  the  airborne  or  large 
droplets,  such  as  Severe  Acute  Respiratory  Syndrome,  Coronaviruses  and 
Pandemic influenza.  
 
10.6.3. The  Trust  issues  personal  issue  eye  protection,  this  is  required  to  be 
decontaminated with detergent/disinfectant wipes after  use and before being 
stored in its protective casing.  
 
10.6.4. Single use eye protection is available on vehicles; these must be disposed of 
in the appropriate waste stream following use.  
 
10.7. Surgical facemasks  

 
10.7.1. The use of surgical style facemasks is recommended during procedures when 
there is likely to be splashing of bodily fluids or tissue into the mouth. It is also 
recommended  when  dealing  with  a  patient  who  is  having  episodes  of 
coughing or sneezing.  
 
10.7.2. Where  patients  have  an  uncontrolled  productive  cough  and  are  unable  to 
cough into a tissue, consideration should be given to encouraging the patient 
to wear a surgical style facemask.  
 
10.7.3. Facemasks  are  single  use  and  should  be  disposed  of  into  an  appropriate 
waste stream following use. 
 
10.8. FFP3 facemasks  

 
10.8.1. High  efficiency  masks  or  respirators  with  filtering  efficiency  of  the  European 
Standard  CEN  FFP3  are  provided  as  personal  issue  within  the  Trust,  and 
should  be  utilised  when  caring  for  patients  suffering  from  airborne  infections 
or high risk infections (i.e. Viral Haemorrhagic  Disease) or when undertaking 
aerosol generating procedures.  
 

10.8.2. FFP3  masks  require  fit  testing  prior  to  being  issued  and  re-testing  in 
accordance  with  the  FFP3  Standard  Operating  Procedure  (SOP).  Masks 
should  be  tight  fitting  with  no  gaps  and  the  fit  should  be  checked  each  time 
the mask is donned.  
 
10.8.3. FFP3 masks are re-usable and require decontamination after use, this should 
be completed in line with the guidance in the SOP, unless the mask has been 
used  when  treating/transporting  a  patient  with  a  high  risk  infection,  in  this 
case the mask should be disposed of in the appropriate waste stream.  
 
10.8.4. Further information on FFP3 masks, including fit testing, decontamination and 
storage can be found in the FFP3 SOP.  
 
 
 
 

 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 21 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 


 
10.9. Protective suits (coveralls)  
 
10.9.1. Protective  suits  (coveralls)  are  not  routinely  required  except  when  there  is  a 
risk  of  extensive  splashing  of  bodily  fluids  onto  the  skin  or  clothing  of  the 
healthcare worker, where disposable aprons are not sufficient. 
 

10.9.2. Protective  suits  (coveralls)  are  also  required  when  dealing  with  infections 
caused by more hazardous microorganisms (viral haemorrhagic  diseases) or 
when dealing with chemical spills.  
 
10.9.3. In the pre-hospital setting protective suits (coveralls) may be required instead 
of aprons when trying to transfer a patient, who is heavily contaminated with 
bodily  fluids,  into  the  vehicle.  Consideration  should  be  given  to  the 
manoeuvrability  offered  by  the  suits  when  compared  to  the  disposable 
aprons.  
 
10.9.4. Protective  suits  (coveralls)  must  be  worn  as  single  use  items,  for  one 
procedure or episode of patient care and discarded into the appropriate waste 
stream.  
 
10.10.  Application and removal of PPE 
 
10.10.1.  PPE  must  be  applied  in  the  following  order;  apron,  mask,  eye  protection 
and then gloves. As demonstrated in figure 6 below. 
 
Figure 6 – donning PPE 
 
        
Apron (coverall) 
Pull over head and fasten at back of waist or pull 
coverall on 
 
Mask (Surgical) 
Secure  ties  or  elastic  bands  at  middle  of  head 
and neck 
Fit flexible band to bridge of nose and fit  snug to 
face & below chin 
 
FFP3  masks  should  be  fitted  according  to 
instructions 
 
Eye Protection 
Place over face and adjust to fit 
 
 
Gloves 
Extend to cover wrist 

 
 
10.10.2.  PPE  must  be  removed  in  such  a  way  to  limit  the  potential  for  cross 
contamination,  hand  should  be  decontaminated  after  the  removal  and 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 22 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 


 
disposal  of  each  piece  of  PPE.  All  PPE  should  be  disposed  of  in  the 
appropriate waste stream. 
 

10.10.3.  The order for removing PPE is; gloves, aprons, eye protection, facemask. 
As demonstrated in the figure 7 below. 
 

Figure 7 – doffing PPE 
  
Gloves: 
Grasp  the  outside  of  the  glove  with  the  opposite  gloved 
hand; peel off 
Hold the removed glove in the gloved hand, slide fingers 
of  the  un-gloved  hand  under  the  remaining  glove  wrist. 
Peel the second glove over the first  
 
Apron (Coverall)  
Unfasten  or  break  ties,  pull  away  from  neck  and 
shoulders, touching only the inside. 
Fold or roll into a bundle.  
 
Eye protection 
Handle only by the headband or sides 
 
Surgical mask 
Unfasten the ties – first at the bottom and then the top 
Pull  the  mask  away  from  the  face  without  touching  the 
front of the mask.  
Do not pull up over eyes. 
 
 
11. Principles of Aseptic Non Touch Technique for Interventions 

 
11.1.  Introduction  
 
11.1.1. Asepsis is defined as the absence of pathogenic organisms. Aseptic non-
touch technique (ANTT) is the clinical procedure developed to prevent the 
contamination of susceptible body sites by using sterile equipment and fluids 
during invasive medical procedures and by avoiding contamination of the 
equipment by adopting a non-touch technique. Aseptic non-touch technique 
therefore keeps the procedures as free from pathogenic microorganism as 
possible.  
 
11.1.2. The principles of aseptic non-touch technique play a vital role in preventing 
the transmission of infection in any environment. It is the responsibility of each 
clinician to understand these principles and incorporate them into every day 
practice.  
 
11.1.3. The principles of aseptic non-touch technique are: 
  Keeping exposure of susceptible sites to a minimum 
  Ensuring appropriate hand decontamination prior to the procedure 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 23 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
  Using gloves – sterile or non-sterile depending on the nature of the 
site. If using non-sterile gloves they should be clean and donned 
immediately prior to the procedure 
  Ensuring that all fluids and materials used are sterile 
  Checking that all packs are sterile, show no signs/evidence of damage  
or contamination and are in date.  
  Ensuring that contaminated and non-sterile items are not placed on 
the sterile field 
  Not re-using single use items 
  Reducing staff and/or bystander activity (whenever possible) in the 
immediate vicinity of where the procedure is performed. 
 
11.1.4.  If aseptic non-touch technique cannot be applied, because of the nature of 
the emergency or environmental factors for example,  this must be handed 
over to the staff at the receiving hospital and clearly documented on the 
patient report form (paper or electronic).  
 
11.1.5. Indications for using an aseptic non-touch technique are: 
  Routine insertion of intravenous cannula 
  Urinary catheterisation 
  Wounds healing by primary intention (before the skin has healed) e.g. 
traumatic or surgical wounds requiring suturing or gluing 
  Intubation 
  Intraosseous access 
  Accessing invasive devices 
 
11.2.  Intravenous Cannulation 
 
11.2.1.  Peripheral intravenous cannulation is a commonly performed procedure and 
has an associated risk of infection because of the potential for direct microbial 
entry into the blood stream.  
 
11.2.2. Due to the increased risk of infection with pre-hospital cannulation, patients 
should only be cannulated when there is a clinical need. Unjustified 
prophylactic cannulation and cannulation purely on the basis that it has come 
to be expected by the hospital must not occur.  
 
11.2.3. As a general guide cannulation would be considered appropriate where a 
drug or fluid is likely to or needs to be administered on route to hospital or 
where the patient condition is unstable and likely to deteriorate.  
 
11.2.4. The choice of cannula must reflect the size of the vein and the maximum flow 
rate required. Most drugs can be administered through a 22g (Blue) or 20g 
(Pink) cannula. An 18g (Green) cannula is not generally required for the 
routine administration of drugs.  
 
11.2.5. Inserting a cannula which is too large for the size of the vein increases 
endothelial damage, leading to an increased risk of phlebitis. Venous return 
cannot take place because the vein itself is actually occluded by the cannula 
(known as the haemodilution effect). Therefore using the smallest suitable 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 24 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
cannula, that will deliver the required flow rate, not only reduced the risk of 
phlebitis, but increases the uptake of drug into the circulation.  
 
11.2.6. Intravenous cannulation must be carried out aseptically whenever the 
patients’ clinical condition allows a routine insertion, such as stable patients’ 
requiring the administration of IV pain relief.  
 
11.2.7. Good practice for intravenous cannulation is broken down into two main areas 
of concern, the initial insertion and the ongoing care.  
 
11.2.8. Intravenous cannulation insertion should be undertaken as follows: 
 
  Decontaminate hands 
  Apply single use, disposable tourniquet 
  Palpate the vein 
  Decontaminate hands 
  Clean the site using 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropyl 
alcohol using a cross hatch “#” motion for 30 seconds 
  Leave the skin to dry for 30 seconds 
  Choose cannula, open pack and place cannula aseptically in the 
sterile field – if this is not possible another clinician should open the 
cannula packaging and present the cannula so it can be grasped by 
the cannulating clinician.  
  Decontaminate hands and don gloves 
  Insert cannula – ensure that the site is not touched 
  Use a sterile, semi-permeable transparent dressing to secure the 
cannula 
  Record the date and time of insertion on the label and stick to the 
dressing – without obscuring the view of the insertion site.  
  Dispose of any used items in the appropriate waste receptacles and 
remove gloves. 
  Decontaminate hands 
  Record the date and time of insertion on the patient report form.  
 
11.2.9.  If any of the above steps cannot be performed due to circumstances, such as 
life threatening emergencies or environmental conditions, the inserted 
devices must be classified as EMERGENCY INSERTED. This must be 
recorded on the patient report form , the red sticker applied to the dressing 
and the information must be handed over to the receiving hospital.  
 
11.2.10. Always ensure that giving sets and syringes are handled aseptically. For 
certain procedures, such as when titration of medication is required a sterile 
field should be retained to hold the syringes between doses, either by use of 
the syringe packaging or a bung for the end of the syringe. Syringes should 
not be store in pockets or on the patients lap between the administration of 
doses.  
 
11.2.11. Ongoing access of the intravenous device should always be undertaken 
using an aseptic non-touch technique.  
  Hands should be decontaminated 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 25 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
  Clean the access port using 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% 
isopropyl alcohol for 30 seconds 
  Allow to dry  
  Decontaminate hands and don gloves 
  Access the devise  
  Dispose of used items in the waste receptacles and  remove gloves  
  Decontaminate hands 
 
 
11.3.  Catheter Care 
 
11.3.1. Urinary Tract infections are the second largest group of healthcare associated 
infections in the UK, with 60% of these infections attributed to the presence 
and length of duration of an indwelling urinary catheter. 
 
11.3.2. EMAS staff  do not undertake catheterisation however,  patients with 
catheters insitu are cared for and transported,  therefore staff need to be 
aware of the use of asepsis in ongoing catheter care and maintenance.  
 
11.3.3.  Gloves and aprons are required when providing catheter care. Hand 
decontamination must be performed before donning PPE and after removal of 
PPE. 
 
11.3.4. All staff need to be aware of the risk of infection for the patient is catheter 
bags are not correctly cared for and managed during transportation.  
  Catheter drainage bags should not be disconnected from the catheter 
unless clinically indicated (i.e. to change the bag)  
  Position the drainage bag below the level of the bladder to prevent 
back flow. 
  Do not allow the catheter bag to contact the floor – secure leg bags 
appropriately and night bags to a catheter stand.  
  Empty the catheter before it is three quarters (¾) full, using a single 
use container.  
 
 
11.4.  Wound Care 
 
11.4.1. Wound care must be undertaken using sterile equipment, including sterile 
wound care packs. Gloves and aprons are required when closing wounds. 
Sterile wound care packs must be available to clinicians who are qualified to 
glue and suture wounds.  
 
11.4.2. The key principles must be applied throughout the procedure 
 
  Keeping exposure of susceptible sites to a minimum by preparing 
equipment prior to undertaking wound care 
  Ensuring appropriate hand decontamination prior to the procedure 
  Using gloves – sterile or non-sterile depending on the nature of the 
site. If using non-sterile gloves they should be clean and donned 
immediately prior to the procedure 
  Ensuring that all fluids and materials used are sterile 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 26 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
  Checking that all packs are sterile, show no signs/evidence of damage 
or contamination and are in date.  
  Ensuring that contaminated and non-sterile items are not placed on 
the sterile field 
  Not re-using single use items 
  Reducing staff and/or bystander activity (whenever possible) in the 
immediate vicinity of where the procedure is performed. 
 
11.4.3. Where possible hands should be washed with liquid soap and dried with 
paper towels prior to wound care, when this is not possible a detergent wipe 
must be used prior to the alcohol based hand rub. Hands must be 
decontaminated when donning and doffing gloves.  
 
11.4.4. Wound care for a severed limb should follow the principles of asepsis, trauma 
dressing wet with saline should be used to cover the severed ends and 
covered in cling film to retain the dressing and moisture. Severed limbs 
should be splinted to protect from further damage. 
 
11.4.5. Severed limbs and other body parts should then be put into clear bags or 
patient property bags and transported with the patient.  These should never 
be put into a clinical waste bag, glove or sharps bin.  
 
11.5.  Intubation  
 
11.5.1. Endotracheal intubation must always be performed using an aseptic non-
touch technique. Equipment must be sterile at the point of use and in date, 
the equipment must not be used if the packaging is not intact or is 
contaminated.  
 
11.5.2. The key principles of aseptic non-touch technique must be applied throughout 
the procedure: 
  Keeping exposure of susceptible sites to a minimum 
  Ensuring appropriate hand decontamination prior to the procedure 
  Using gloves – sterile or non-sterile depending on the nature of the 
site. If using non-sterile gloves they should be clean and donned 
immediately prior to the procedure 
  Ensuring that all fluids and materials used are sterile 
  Checking that all packs are sterile, show no signs/evidence of damage 
or contamination and are in date.  
  Ensuring that contaminated and non-sterile items are not placed on 
the sterile field 
  Not re-using single use items 
  Reducing staff and/or bystander activity (whenever possible) in the 
immediate vicinity of where the procedure is performed 
  Record on  the PRF 
 
11.6.  Intraosseous Access 
 
11.6.1. Introduction of an intraosseous (IO) device should always be performed as an 
aseptic technique.  Equipment must be sterile and in date, packaging must be 
checked for integrity and contamination. The device should not be used if the 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 27 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
packaging is not intact or is contaminated, for more information on the device 
please refer to the IO SOP 
 
11.6.2. Good practice guidelines for the insertion of IO are:  
  Locate the appropriate insertion site 
  Decontaminate hands 
  Clean the site using 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate in 70% isopropyl 
alcohol using a cross hatch “#” motion for 30 seconds 
  Leave the skin to dry for 30 seconds 
  Prepare infusion system and ensure driver and needle are securely 
seated.  
  Decontaminate hands and don gloves 
  Insert IO– ensure that the site is not touched 
  Use dressing to secure the IO and secure the tubing 
  Dispose of any used items in the appropriate waste receptacles and 
remove gloves 
  Decontaminate hands 
  Record the date, time and site of insertion and aseptic technique used 
on the patient report form 
 
 
12. 
Safe Management of Sharps  
 
12.1. 
Inoculation/sharps injuries are second only to back injuries as a cause of 
occupational injury (Safer Needles Network, 2015). It is estimated that there 
are 100,000 needlestick injuries every year, with only a fraction of these being 
reported.  
 

12.2. 
Sharps include: 
  Needles 
  Scalpels 
  Stitch cutters 
  Glass ampoules 
  Sharp instrument 
  Razors 
  Bits of bone or teeth 
  Any article that can cut or puncture the skin by having a fine edge or 
point  
 
12.3. 
When they are not handled and disposed of correctly sharps become 
dangerous and staff should take extreme care when using and disposing of 
sharps. Contaminated needles can transmit more than 20 dangerous blood-
borne pathogens, including Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and Human Immuno-
deficiency Virus (HIV), the effects can be devastating for the injured party and 
their family. 
 

12.4. 
Any incident where adequate and appropriate measures have not been taken 
to dispose of sharps, and thereby putting staff at risk of injury, should be 
reported as an incident, regardless of actual harm being caused.  
 
 

 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 28 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
12.5. 
Preventing sharps injuries 
 
12.5.1. The Trust is committed to reducing the number of inoculation injuries to staff 
and recognises that exposure prevention is the primary strategy to reduce 
these injuries. Needle-safe cannula and lancets for blood glucose monitoring 
are in use and as more “safety” sharps are available these are explored and 
considered for implementation.  
 
12.5.2. All clinicians should attend appropriate training and refresher sessions and 
only use devices if they have been trained to do so. Needle safe devices 
should be used where available and if trained to do so. Where alternatives are 
available to eliminate the use of sharps this should be considered i.e. the use 
of mucosal atomisation devices for the delivery of naloxone.   
 
12.5.3. Clinical sharps must be single use and stored within their designated 
containers on vehicles or in the appropriate bags when they are not in use. 
 
12.5.4. Sharps must be disposed of immediately after use and not passed hand to 
hand, handling must be kept to a minimum and the sharps bins should be 
positioned to promote this practice. Sharps should only be handled by one 
person at a time and clinicians should always dispose of their own sharps and 
never expect anyone else to dispose of them on their behalf. A single handed 
technique should be used for disposing of sharps, do not hold the sharps 
container or ask someone else to do so when disposing of the sharp.  
 
12.5.5. All devices should be assembled with care and disposed of as a single unit, 
needles should never be cut, bent or broken prior to use or before disposal. If 
disassembling devices is unavoidable commercial devices should be used for 
this purpose. 
 
12.5.6. Needles and cannulas must never be re-sheathed and the needles should 
only be removed from their sheaths when the patient has been prepared and 
the needle is ready to be used.  
 
12.5.7. All clinical staff should be extra vigilant during emergency procedures as there 
is an increase in risk of inoculation injury in this situation. Procedures 
involving sharps should only be attempted in a stationary vehicle. 
 
12.5.8. Clinicians must conduct a dynamic risk assessment and take extreme care 
when treating restless or aggressive patients and, where possible, should ask 
for assistance when cannulating, giving injections or setting up fluid therapy if 
the patient is uncooperative. 
 
12.6.  Safe use of sharps bins 
 
12.6.1. Sharps bins must be compliant with UN3291 and BS7320 standards, all bins 
procured by the Trust must meet these standards 
 
12.6.2. When assembling the sharps container ensure the lid is securely fitted to the 
base, this should be checked before the sharps bins are used for the first 
time. Check the exterior of the bin  is clean, if needed clean with a 
detergent/disinfectant wipe 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 29 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 


 
 
12.6.3. The identification label must be completed with the name of the organisation 
and station/base and must also be signed and dated by the person 
assembling the sharps bin  
 
12.6.4. The temporary closure mechanism must be deployed on the sharps bin 
whenever the sharps bin is not in use.  
 
12.6.5. Vehicle based sharps bins must be secured in an appropriate bracket within 
the vehicle, these needs to be below shoulder height and, where possible, out 
of the reach of children.  Sharps bins must never be placed into clinical waste 
bags and consideration to appropriate placement on the vehicles must be 
given with consultation of the IPC Team.  
 
12.6.6. Sharps bins should never be disassembled or emptied of its contents; staff 
should never attempt to retrieve items from the sharps bin. If the sharps 
container becomes damaged it must be placed into a larger sharps container 
and appropriately labelled, it must never be placed into a clinical waste bag.  
 
12.6.7. Sharps bins should be locked and disposed of when they reach the fill line on 
the sharps container or after they have been in use for three months and 
when the vehicles are being sent to workshops for repair. The 
closed/disposed section of the label must be completed with staff signature 
and date prior to disposing of the sharps bin in the appropriate waste stream.  
 
Figure 8 
 
 
 
 
13. Management of inoculation and contamination injuries 

 
13.1.  The risk of transmission of infection from an inoculation or contamination 
injury is low, however it is important for all staff to follow the procedure below 
if they sustain an inoculation injury. 
 
13.2.  An inoculation injury is defined as: 
  Inoculation of blood by a needle or other sharp. 
  Contamination of broken skin with blood. 
  Blood splashes to mucous membrane e.g. eyes or mouth. 
  Swal owing a person’s blood e.g. after mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. 
  Contamination where clothes have been soaked by blood. 
  Body exudates or secretions through a wound or sore. 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 30 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
  Human bites or scratches or animal bites. 
 
13.3.  Immediate Action 
 
13.3.1.  To reduce the risk of transmission of blood borne viruses the immediate 
priority following an inoculation or contamination injury is first aid.  However, 
all inoculation  and contamination  
 
13.3.2.  injuries should be managed in accordance the process detailed below, a 
quick reference for this process can be found in figure 9 
 
13.3.3. The first aid required following an inoculation injury is: 
  Encourage the wound to bleed but do not suck the wound. 
  Wash the wound with warm running water and soap 
  If running water is not available use an Iripod or bag of saline 
  Cover wound with a dressing 
 
13.3.4. Following a contamination or splash injury irrigate the area with copious 
amounts of tap water. 
 
13.4.  Follow up and on-going actions 
 
13.4.1. It is important that action is taken within one hour of the incident occurring. 
 
13.4.2. In Hours (08:30-16:30) Staff should contact occupational health for advice 
and to be risk assessed to ascertain if post exposure prophylaxis is required. 
Occupational Health will arrange for appropriate blood samples to be taken, 
this may require attendance at the Emergency Department. 
 
13.4.3. Out of Hours or if occupational health are unavailable: Staff should attend 
the nearest / receiving emergency department or minor injury unit where this 
is available and appropriate, to be risk assessed to ascertain if post exposure 
prophylaxis is required and to have blood samples taken.  
 
13.4.4. Bloods should be requested from the source patient (where known) and taken 
by a third party (someone not directly involved in the incident). The patient 
must give informed consent following information about the implications, prior 
to having blood samples taken to establish if they have any blood borne 
viruses. The patient has a right to decline to provide blood samples. 
 
13.4.5. All inoculation injuries must be reported to occupational health as soon as 
possible after the incident, including those reported to the emergency 
department. This is reported through the helpline number (on insite) by the 
member of staff or the online reporting system by the line manager.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 31 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 


 
Figure 9 
 
 
 
 
13.4.6. While extremely remote, there is the possibility staff will be exposed, thorough 
a blood exposure incident to a “high risk” Human Immunodeficiency Virus 
(HIV) patient. There are four factors associated with an increased risk of 
occupationally acquired HIV infection 
  Deep penetrating injury 
  Physical blood on the device causing the injury 
  Injury with a hollow bore instrument that has been placed in the source 
patients artery or vein 
  Terminal HIV related illness in the source patient  
 
13.4.7. In such circumstance, and where indicated by the risk assessment, the staff 
member will be offered a course of medication to reduce the risk of 
transmission of HIV, this is known as post exposure prophylaxis (PEP). 
 
13.4.8. In order to be most effective this course of treatment needs to be commenced 
as soon as possible following the incident, the decision on whether or not to 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 32 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
start the course of treatment must be made by the effected member of staff in 
conjunction with the clinician providing the advice. 
 
13.4.9. Follow up testing for blood borne viruses is normally undertaken at regular 
intervals in line with the incubation periods for the blood borne viruses, the 
testing required will be based on the risk assessment. This includes: 
  6 weeks Hepatitis B antigen and Hepatitis C 
  12 weeks Hepatitis B antigen, Hepatitis C and HIV 
  24 weeks Hepatitis B antibodies, Hepatitis C and HIV 
 
13.4.10. Additional counselling or support following the incident is available to staff 
through occupational health or the alternative support measures in place in 
the Trust, including peer to peer and chaplaincy, the details for these can be 
found at the end of each chief executives bulletin or on insite.  
 
13.4.11. Line and duty managers have a responsibility to ensure the injured person 
receives appropriate and immediate assistance from Occupational Health or 
the emergency department and that all relevant details are documented, 
including completion of an incident form.  
 
13.5.  Inoculation Injuries in Members of the Public 
 
13.5.1. Following contamination, inoculation or needle stick injuries sustained by a 
member of the public either through bystander interventions or incident when 
assisting Trust please advise them to: 
 
Encourage any wound to bleed. Do not suck the wound 
 
Clean the wound or irrigate the contaminated area 
 
Apply a waterproof dressing to the wound 
 
13.5.2. The member of the public should then be advised to go immediately to the 
Emergency Department (ED) for risk assessment and treatment if required. If 
post exposure prophylaxis is required, the time frame for commencing 
treatment is 72 hours; the optimum time for treatment to commence is within 
one hour.  There should be no difference in immediate treatment between the 
member of the public and a member of staff.  The member of the public will 
require follow up through their own general practitioner or the Genito-Urinary 
Medicine/Sexual Health clinic. This advice should be documented on a PRF. 
 
13.5.3. If this incident was as a result of assisting the Trust, i.e. a member of EMAS 
staff or an agent acting on behalf of EMAS, is undertaking interventions which 
resulted in the incident – member of the public sustained a needlestick injury 
from a cannula, this will need to be reported as an incident using the Trust 
incident reporting procedures.  
 
14. Exposure Prone Procedures 

 
14.1.  Exposure Prone Procedures (EPP) are defined as those invasive procedures 
where there is a risk that an injury to the worker may result in the exposure of 
the patients open tissue to the blood of the healthcare worker. Including 
where the workers gloved hands maybe in contact with sharp instruments, 
needle tips or sharp tissue (i.e. spicules of bone or teeth) inside a patients 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 33 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
open body cavity, wound or confined anatomical space where the hands or 
fingertips are not completely visible at all times. This includes situations such 
as pre-hospital trauma, which includes road traffic collisions which involve 
torn metal, broken glass and injuries which include severe open wound, and 
care of patients where there is a regular and predictable risk of biting. 
 
14.2.  Staff who perform EPP need to be aware of their obligations to declare if they 
know they have been at risk of exposure to a BBV, this includes situations 
that fall outside of work as well as during working hours. All new starters 
applying for posts which may involve EPP must have specific screening in 
accordance with national guidance, this includes testing for BBVs. 
 
14.3.  All staff infected with a BBV will need to be reviewed on a case by case basis 
commencing with a referral to OH. If required, further advice can be obtained 
from United Kingdom Advisory Panel for Healthcare Workers Infected with 
Bloodborne Viruses (UKAP). The final decision about the type of work that 
may be undertaken by a healthcare worker infected with a BBV should be 
made on an individual basis taking into account the specific working practices 
of the worker concerned, this decision will be undertaken by the Trust and 
reviewed in accordance with the restriction of practice policy. Specialist 
advice will be sought from OH and UKAP as required. 
 
14.4.  If a member of patient facing staff is diagnosed with a blood borne virus the 
Trust will review all of the incidents that the staff member has attended, since 
their last negative test, to identify any potential exposure prone procedure 
risks to patients. Any patients who have potentially been exposed will be 
contacted by the Trust to inform of the risk and provide guidance on the next 
steps required. 
 
15. Cleaning and decontamination  

 
15.1.  Introduction 
 
15.1.1. It is essential that high standards of cleanliness are maintained to prevent and 
control infections. All staff have a responsibility to maintain vehicles, stations 
and equipment in a clean condition, thus reducing the risk of cross infection to 
themselves, their patients, their colleagues and members of the public. 
 

15.2.  Colour Coding 
 
15.2.1.  The national colour coding for ambulance services aims to prevent cross 
infection and to reduce the risk of cross contamination. 
 
Figure 10 – National Colour Coding  
 
Red 
Blue 
Showers, toilets and sluice 
General areas 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 34 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
Green 
Yellow 
Kitchen and dining areas 
Ambulance interior 
 
15.2.2. All cleaning items, for example cloths, mops and buckets must follow the 
colour coding and must not be transferred between different areas.  
 
15.2.3. Cleaning equipment must be stored clean and dry between uses. Mops and 
cloths must not be stored in cleaning, detergent or disinfectant solutions.  
 
15.3.  Mop heads 
 
15.3.1. All mop heads for vehicle cleaning are single use, once they have been used 
to clean a vehicle they must be disposed of into the appropriate waste stream; 
they are not to be transferred between vehicles.  
 

15.3.2. Mop heads used for station cleaning must be disposed of a minimum of once 
a week (on a Monday)   and recorded on the mop head change sheet. If they 
are visibly soiled or used to clean up blood or bodily fluids the mop head must 
be disposed of in the appropriate waste stream immediately.  
 
15.3.3. The re-usable station mop heads must not be stored in cleaning solutions, 
water or disinfectant. 
 
15.3.4. Mop buckets must be stored clean and dry, the cleaning of mop buckets must 
be recorded on the weekly mop head change sheet 
 
15.4.  Cleaning – Using Detergent 
 
15.4.1. Cleaning is a prerequisite of decontamination to ensure that effective 
disinfection or sterilisation can be carried out. 
 

15.4.2. The physical act of cleaning removes contamination but does not destroy 
microorganisms.  
 
15.4.3. Precautions should be taken against splash and repeated exposure to 
detergents, personal protective equipment should be donned following a 
dynamic risk assessment.  
 
15.4.4. If there is a need to scrub items when cleaning by hand, a sink is needed 
which is deep enough to complete  immerse the items to be cleaned as 
scrubbing can generate aerosols which may convey infective agents. When 
scrubbing is needed it must be carried out with the equipment and brush 
below the surface of the water.  
 
15.5.  Cleaning – Using Disinfectant  
 
15.5.1. If required, disinfection should only be carried out after a detergent clean.  
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 35 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
15.5.2. Disinfection is a process used to reduce the number of viable 
microorganisms; harmful microorganisms can be destroyed by chemical, such 
as a chlorine releasing agent, or by immersion in hot water, above 70OC. 
 
15.5.3. When disinfection is required, a dynamic risk assessment will be needed to 
ascertain the level of PPE required, and staff should ensure there is adequate 
ventilation when they are using disinfectants.  
 
15.5.4. Many disinfectants deteriorate after dilution; solutions should be labelled with 
the date, time and signature of the person making the solution.  Solutions 
should be made immediately prior to use and discarded within 24 hours.  
 
15.5.5. Disinfectant chemicals should always be made fol owing the manufacturer’s 
instructions and should not be mixed with any other chemicals.  
 
 
16. Blood and Body Fluid Spillages 
 
16.1.  Effective management of blood and body fluid spillage is a crucial factor in 
controlling the spread of infection. Exposure to any such fluid constitutes a 
risk to all staff and others within the immediate environment. These risks can 
be minimised by dealing promptly with the spillage through appropriate 
cleaning and disinfection. 
 
16.2.  In general, the volumes of most blood or bodily fluid spills that occur are not 
excessive, i.e. blood smeared on sharps boxes or pieces of equipment. These 
can be managed by wiping with a detergent/disinfectant wipe.  
 
16.3.  For body fluid spills on flat surfaces: 
 
16.3.1. Don appropriate PPE 
 
16.3.2. Sprinkle the Haz-Tab granules over the spill until all moisture is absorbed 
 
16.3.3. Leave for no more than 2 minutes 
 
16.3.4. Using blue paper towels collect the granules and spill mixture 
 
16.3.5. And follow the guidance for splashes and drips below 
 
16.4.  For splashes or drips on vertical surfaces 

 
16.4.1. Don appropriate PPE 
 
16.4.2. Make up 10,000ppm chlorine solution by adding 4 Haz-Tab tablets to the 
small 1litre bottle and fill to the line with COLD water  
 

16.4.3. When the tablets have dissolved screw down the top and mix gently by 
inversion, do not shake.  
 
16.4.4. Whilst waiting for the tablets to dissolve, clean the area with a detergent wipe. 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 36 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
16.4.5. Once the solution has dissolved, transfer into a yellow bucket and clean the 
area with a yellow cloth.  
 
16.4.6. Discard the remaining solution and keep the bottle for next use 
 
16.4.7. Remove PPE and decontaminate hands.  
 
 
17.  Premises Cleaning  
 
17.1.  The premises within the Trust play a role in transmitting infection; dust, dirt 
and residue of liquids increase the risk of this transmission and therefore 
should be kept to a minimum through regular cleaning and by good design 
features of equipment, fixtures and fittings. 
 

17.2.  Written cleaning schedules have been developed and are available on all 
Trust premises to ensure frequencies of cleaning and cleaning methods are 
available at the point of use.  
 
17.3.  Work surfaces and floors should be smooth-finished, intact, durable, and 
washable. Surfaces should be impervious to liquids and not allow pooling of 
liquids.  
 
17.4.  Staff are expected to wash their cutlery and crockery after use and dry it with 
a paper towel.  
 
17.5.  Staff are expected to clean ovens, microwaves and toasters after each use 
and ensure spillages in fridges/freezers are cleaned up immediately. 
Refrigerators should be cleaned weekly or after any spillages and defrosted 
and cleaned in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. 
 
17.6.  Cork shower mats are not permitted for use within any Trust premise, shower 
mats that are in use must be anti-slip and are required to be washed with hot 
water and detergent and hung to dry after each use.  Shower mats should be 
replaced annually. 
 
17.7.  Toilets should be cleaned with a toilet brush, using toilet descaling fluid. Toilet 
brushes should be cleaned by flushing the cistern and rotating the brush as 
the clean water comes through, tap on the edge of the toilet to remove excess 
water and store in a clean, dry brush holder. If the toilet brush is worn or 
soiled and unable to clean it must be disposed of and replaced.  
 
17.8.  The internal and external aspects of the waste bins should be cleaned at least 
weekly. With the lid wiped clean on a daily basis. 
 
18. Decontamination of medical devices and consumables 

 
18.1.  The aim of decontaminating equipment is to prevent potentially harmful 
pathogenic organisms reaching a susceptible host and establishing an 
infection.  
 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 37 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 


 
18.2.  Single use Equipment  
 
18.2.1. Certain items of equipment are classified as single use only. Single use 
means that the  manufacturer: 
  Intends for the equipment to be used once and then thrown away 
  Considers them unsuitable for use on more than one occasion 
  Has insufficient evidence to confirm that re-use would be safe 
 
18.2.2. The consumer Protection Act 1987, will hold a person liable if a single use 
item is re-used against the manufacturers recommendations 
 
18.2.3. Single use items are easily identifiable by the following symbol: 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
18.3.  Single patient use 

 
18.3.1.  Single patient use items can be used more than once on the same patient, 
such items include oxygen tubing and masks. These items must be discarded 
once the patient no longer requires them; they can be handed over to the 
hospital with the patient for on-going treatment. 
 
18.4.  Sterile and clean items 
 
18.4.1.  Any equipment supplied within sealed packaging designed to keep the item 
sterile or clean must remain stored within the packaging.  
 

18.4.2. Sterile and clean items must not be removed from their packaging for storing 
in response bags.  
 
18.5.  Reusable equipment 
 
18.5.1.  Reusable equipment should be appropriately decontaminated between each 
patient use.  
 

18.5.2. The choice of process for decontamination depends on a number of factors: 
  The type of equipment  
  The organism involved 
  The time required for reprocessing 
  The risk to patients and staff 
  The manufacturers written instructions 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 38 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
18.5.3.  Figure 11 is designed as a risk assessment model to aid staff in identifying 
the most appropriate method of decontamination.  
 
Risk 
Application of Item 
Minimum standard 
 
Items / surfaces not in contact with 
Minimal 
the patient e.g. floors, walls 
Clean and dry 
 
 
 
Clean and dry but, if 
Items / surfaces that come into 
contaminated with blood, 
Low 
contact with healthy skin e.g. 
body fluids or suspected 
mattresses, rails 
transmissible organisms - 
disinfect 
In contact with intact mucous 
membranes, or if contaminated with 
virulent or readily transmissible 
Medium 
Disinfect of single use 
organisms. e.g. respiratory 
equipment, ear pieces, 
thermometers 
In contact with a break in the skin or 
mucous membrane, or for 
High  
introduction into normally sterile 
Sterilise or single use 
body areas e.g. cannula, forceps, 
dressings 
 
 
18.6.  Returning medical devices for service, inspection or repair 
 
18.6.1. Medical equipment that requires inspection, repair or servicing must be 
cleaned by the user prior to being sent. The level of cleaning required will be 
based on the level of contamination on the medical device.  
 

18.6.2. If a piece of equipment is so heavily contaminated it is impossible to remove 
the contamination using simple cleaning methods, staff should store the piece 
of kit safely and seek advice from the Trust Infection Prevention and Control 
Team.  
 

18.6.3. After cleaning the equipment staff must complete a decontamination 
certificate (these are located in the infection prevention and control toolkit). 
The decontamination certificate must be fully completed otherwise the piece 
of equipment will not be collected or inspected/repaired.  
 
18.7.  Management of contaminated tough books 

 
18.7.1. Toughbooks require decontamination after each patient use, this is achieved 
through the use of the detergent/disinfectant wipes. 
 

18.7.2.  On occasion the Toughbook may be used on a patient with an infectious 
disease or the Toughbook may become contaminated with blood and body 
fluids. When this happens the following process must be followed: 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 39 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
  Clean the Toughbook with a detergent/disinfectant wipe 
  Place the Toughbook in a clear bag and complete a decontamination 
certificate 
  Take the Toughbook to IM&T during office hours or to the Emergency 
Operations Centre out of hours where a replacement Toughbook will be 
issued 
  The Toughbook will then be collected by the IPC team to thoroughly 
decontaminate and swab with the ATP swabs to ensure adequate 
decontamination has been achieved. 
  The Toughbook will be returned to IM&T for function testing and then put 
back into circulation. 
 
 
19. Management of  Linen and Laundry 
 
19.1.  
All laundry must be fit for purpose, visibly clean, made from the right material 
and not damaged or discoloured.  This section refers to linen used during the 
treatment or care of patients (for staff uniform advice see the next section)  
 

19.2.   Linen used for patient care is not laundered within the Trust, there is a 
separate agreement for laundering provision provided by an external 
contractor, and expert advice for these contracts and specifications for 
laundry services is provided by the IPC team in line with current guidance.  
 
19.3.  Clean Linen
 
 
19.3.1. Clean linen is defined as the freshly laundered linen which is stored on 
stations or held on vehicles but has not yet been in contact with a patient. 
 
19.3.2. Linen storage areas should be dedicated for linen storage and not used for 
other activities, these cupboards should have all linen removed and be 
cleaned at least quarterly.  
 
19.3.3. The rooms/cupboards should be equipped with shelving that can be easily 
cleaned and allow the free movement of air around the stored linen. Linen 
should be stored aware from direct sunlight and water in a secure, dry and 
cool environment. 
 
19.3.4. Where it is not possible to store linen in a designated cupboard on station 
laundry shrouds must be in place over the linen cages and the shrouds must 
remain closed when not accessing the linen.  
 
19.3.5. Any linen that is stored in the garage area of a station must have a shroud 
over the linen cage and discussion with estates and IPC team to ascertain a 
more permanent store solution where possible and further mitigation. 
 
19.3.6.  Storage of clean linen on vehicle should be within a designated cupboard on 
the vehicle and should not be stored with other items, all items must be 
removed from the cupboard during the deep clean process to enable 
appropriate cleaning.  
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 40 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
19.4.  Used and Infectious Linen 
 
19.4.1.  Segregation of linen is undertaken to protect the health care workers and the 
linen and laundry workers from the potential for handling contaminated waste.  
The linen is segregated into two main streams used linen or infectious linen
 

19.4.2. Used linen includes all soiled and foul linen, irrespective of state but on 
occasion contaminated with blood or body fluids.  
 
19.4.3. Infectious linen applies to all linen from patients who are known or suspected 
to have an infectious disease, including linen contaminated with blood or body 
fluids from a patient with a blood borne virus, linen from patients with 
diarrhoea or other infectious disease (i.e. varicella zoster, measles). Infectious 
linen also includes linen from patients who are known or suspected to have 
an infestation (i.e. scabies, lice or fleas) 
 
19.4.4. Linen from patients with a hazard group four (category three) organism, such 
as viral haemorrhagic disease should not be returned to the laundry but 
should be disposed of as highly infectious waste.  
 
19.5.  Handling Linen  
 
19.5.1. When handling soiled linen: 
  Cover cuts and abrasions with waterproof dressings 
  Wear an apron and gloves 
  Dispose of used linen promptly into the appropriate linen bag 
  Handle linen with care when removing it, linen should be folded 
individually during removal  
  Do not put soiled linen onto a clean surface or onto clean equipment 
  Remove personal protective equipment (PPE) and wash hands after use 
and before returning to other duties 
 
19.5.2. Infectious/infested linen should be placed into a water soluble (alginate) bag 
and then into an impermeable bag immediately after removal. 
 
19.5.3. Used linen should be placed into an impermeable bag immediately after 
removal, if linen is heavily contaminated with blood or bodily fluids this should 
be placed into a water soluble (alginate) bag.  
 
19.5.4. All staff are requested to make themselves familiar with local hospital 
procedures to ensure correct segregation when disposing of linen at the 
hospital on patient handover.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 41 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 



 
Figure 12 –  Used laundry segregation  
Used linen 
White bag 
All used linen 
irrespective of state, but 
on occasions 
contaminated with blood 
or body fluids  
 
Infectious/Infested line  
Alginate bag and 
 Linen from patients with 
designated bag as per 
a known or suspected 
locality. 
infectious condition (i.e. 
measles, MRSA, C.diff, 
diarrhoea)  
 
Used linen from patients 
with infestations (i.e. 
 
scabies, lice and fleas)  
 
 
19.5.5. Particular care should be taken when handling linen in case clinical waste or 
sharps have accidently been concealed within. Items other than linen must 
not be placed into linen bags. Sharps are a hazard to laundry workers and 
can cause damage to the linen and the machines.  
 
19.5.6. Once linen has been bagged for collection it should not be handled again, 
bags should be securely tied with a knot when two thirds full and stored in a 
secure area away from the public.  
 
19.6.  Used linen and the non-conveyed patient 
 
19.6.1. There may be occasion when staff use linen during the treatment/assessment 
of patients who are not conveyed, or when transporting patients from the 
hospital to their own residence. The linen generated during this process must 
be bagged in an appropriate linen bag, as detailed above and the bag must 
then be sealed. 
  
19.6.2. Once bagged the linen must be carefully stored away from any future patients 
and any accompanying escorts and deposited at the nearest station or 
hospital at the next opportunity.  
 
19.6.3. Used or infectious linen must be removed from the vehicle at the end of the 
shift.  
 
 
20. Management and care of uniforms  
 
20.1.  All staff should have sufficient uniform to wear clean clothing each shift and at 
least one spare set of uniform on station in case their uniform becomes 
contaminated during the shift. 
 
20.2.  
When there is reasonable likelihood a clinically qualified responding manager 
will be delivering patient care during their shift, they should consider wearing 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 42 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
their uniform. When responding to an incident without being in full uniform 
managers must remove their tie and where practical, should wear their high-
visibility jacket. 
 
20.3.  Although best avoided, if you wear your fleece or soft shell jacket during 
clinical care all measures should be taken to avoid the contamination, 
including rolling sleeves up or using sleeve protectors. 
 
20.4.  Contaminated uniform 
 
20.4.1. For situations where contamination may be extensive and foreseeable, a 
protective suits (coveralls) should be worn as an outer garment as well as any 
other PPE required. After use the protective suit (coverall) must be disposed 
of in the appropriate waste stream.  
 
20.4.2. If staff uniform does become contaminated the following procedure should be 
followed: 
  Report the situation to Emergency Operational Control (EOC) and 
seek permission to return to station to change uniform 
  Ensure that other items of clothing or equipment are not 
contaminated, take care to protect the vehicle seats when returning to 
station.  
  Remove uniform and place into Staff uniform bag, ready to take home 
for laundering (see section 19.6) 
  If shoes are contaminated these should be washed with soap and 
water, dried and cleaned in the normal manner. 
 
20.5.  Laundering Uniform 
 
20.5.1. Uniforms should   be washed at the hottest temperature suitable for the fabric 
and utilising detergent.   Uniforms must be washed with a detergent at 60OC 
or above for a minimum of 10 minutes, do not use a short wash cycle. If the 
uniform is dirty a cold-water pre-wash is advised. 
 
20.5.2. High-visibility jackets are to be washed with detergent at 40OC (or highest 
temperature specified on the garment) for a minimum of 10 minutes. Do not 
use a short wash cycle.  
 
20.5.3. Keeping washing machines and tumble dryers clean and will maintained will 
protect the machines efficiency as dirty or underperforming machines can 
result in poor wash  cycles. In order to avoid overloading your machine, 
uniform should be washed separately to other clothing.  
 
20.5.4. Uniforms should be steam ironed to further reduce the levels of 
microorganisms, and should be stored in a manner that reduces the risk of 
contamination. 
 
20.6.  Staff contaminated uniform bag 
 
20.6.1. Staff are expected to take their uniforms home for laundering as facilities are 
not provided on stations for operational staff. 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 43 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
20.6.2. Uniform bags are available to all staff taking uniforms home for washing. 
Uniforms are placed into the bag and sealed with the tape, thus eliminating 
any unnecessary handling of soiled garments. The bag is placed unopened 
into the washing machine, during the wash cycle the soluble membrane and 
tie tape will dissolve, releasing the contents of the bag for washing. Once the 
cycle is complete the bag should be removed and discarded into the domestic 
waste.  These easy to follow instructions are printed onto each bag. These 
bags are provided as an option for staff and are not obligatory.  
 
20.6.3. Hospital style soluble bags are not designed for use in a domestic washing 
machine and will not dissolve effectively; this may result in damage to the 
washing machine.  
 
20.6.4. Provided guidance is adhered to there is no evidence uniform or other work 
clothes, pose a significant hazard in terms of spreading infection.  
 
20.6.5. If uniform is heavily contaminated with body fluid, the most appropriate course 
of action might be to dispose of your uniform as clinical waste, utilising the 
appropriate clinical waste stream. 
 
 
21. Care of the deceased 
 
21.1.  Where staff need to move a deceased patient standard infection prevention 
and control precautions will need to be followed using a dynamic risk 
assessment. 
 

21.2.  When handling and transporting deceased patients: 
  The body must not be handled  unnecessarily 
  Deceased patients being transported by the Trust must be placed into 
a disposable plastic body bag 
  Consider the use of PPE, based on your dynamic risk assessment 
  If there is any risk of infection the receiving unit must be alerted 
  Upon completion of the incident the vehicle and equipment must be 
decontaminated according to procedures.  
 
 

22. Communication of Infection Prevention and Control  
 
22.1.  Procedure for Emergency Operations Centre 
 
22.1.1. Where applicable and appropriate in the scope of the call, staff are expected 
to ask the patient if they have any infectious diseases the ambulance service 
needs to be aware of. 
22.1.2. This information is entered into the call log notes and, if the patient has an 
infection, this is communicated to the crew attending the call.  
 
 
 
 

 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 44 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
22.2.  Procedure for A&E   
 
22.2.1. The information regarding a patient’s infection status may be obtained in the 
following ways: 
  Patient provided  
  Medical history provided by others such as family or household members  
  Patient history provided by other health care professional  
  Clinical assessment of patient  
  Respiratory - productive cough  
  Gastrointestinal - diarrhoea and/or vomiting  
  Circulatory - Signs of sepsis / raised temperature  
  Presence of a rash / cellulitus  
  Clinically infected wound / indwelling device  
  Recent foreign travel  
 
22.2.2. Any information gained regarding a patient’s infectious status, along with the 
source of this information, must be documented on the patient care record 
and verbally communicated to the receiving healthcare professional. It may be 
necessary to notify the receiving department in advance if it is anticipated that 
the patient may require isolation 
 
22.3.  Procedure for PTS 
 
22.3.1. When booking patients for transport PTS control will ask if the patient has any 
specific infections that the crew will need to be aware when transporting the 
patient and if the patient has any medical conditions that may cause a 
significant risk of cross infection to another person or if the patient is highly 
susceptible to infections i.e. neutropenic patients 
 
22.3.2. Infection control risks and status will be recorded on the work sheet to inform 
crews prior to transportation. Patients that pose significant infection 
prevention or control risks must be transported individually; this will need to 
be factored into the work plan for the shift. 
 
22.3.3. When collecting a patient from transportation, if the patient communicates any 
symptoms of diarrhoea and/or vomiting to the PTS crew or if the handover 
indicates the patient has an infection, this should be discussed with the nurse 
in charge and PTS control, this patient will potentially be unable to travel with 
other patients. 
 
22.3.4. If a patient has symptoms of diarrhoea and/or vomiting en route to the 
receiving destination, ideally, the crew should notify the receiving department 
on route so appropriate arrangements can be made. Where this is not 
possible, upon arriving at the destination one crew member should remain on 
the vehicle with the patient while the other notifies the receiving department. If 
neither of these options is practical then the crew must notify the receiving 
department upon arrival in the unit. 
 
22.3.5. If there is any query as to whether a patient requires single transportation this 
should be discussed with the IPC team. 
 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 45 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
22.4.  Notification of hospital departments  
 
22.4.1. Communicable infectious diseases may give rise to an outbreak of infection 
amongst patient, visitors and healthcare staff. Outbreaks exist when there are 
more cases than expected in a given area or among a specific group of 
people, over a particular time period. Outbreaks of infectious diarrhoea and 
vomiting, for example, can lead to widespread closures of wards and life 
limiting symptoms in the most vulnerable patient. It is therefore vital that any 
potential communicable infection is communicated to the receiving area. 
 
22.4.2. In order to ensure that this information is communicated in a timely fashion to 
Emergency Departments clinicians are encouraged to pre-alert hospital 
departments if they are transporting a patient with symptoms of diarrhoea 
and/or vomiting or if the infection status history indicates to the crew that 
isolation is necessary.  
 
 
23. Care of patients with infections 

 
23.1.  Staff should follow standard infection prevention and control precautions at all 
times as patients infectious status is not always known, this will minimise the 
risk of cross infection.  
 

23.2.  In general most of the communicable infections encountered by the 
ambulance service do not require any special procedures or actions by staff 
other than adhering to the principles of standard infection prevention and 
control precautions.  
 
23.3.  Information on dealing with specific infections is available in the A to Z of 
disease specific precautions on insite.  
 
23.4.  Infestations 
 
23.4.1. Staff may occasionally come into contact with patients who are infested with 
parasites which live on the skin, the three types of parasites staff may 
encounter are: 
  Scabies 
  Lice (head, clothing and pubic) 
  Fleas 
 
23.4.2. Staff are required to employ standard infection prevention and control 
precautions and localised cleaning when dealing with these infestations.  
Where potential exposure has occurred staff are advised to contact the IPC 
team or Occupational Health for advice.  
 
 

24. Highly infectious diseases and biological warfare 
 
24.1.  Highly infectious diseases 
 
24.1.1. Highly infectious diseases (Hazard group 4 biological agents)  are defined by 
the Advisory committee for Dangerous Pathogens , Health and Safety 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 46 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
Executive (2005) Biological agents: Managing the risks in laboratories and 
healthcare premises. These include 
  Rabies 
  Plague 
  Viral Haemorrhagic diseases 
  Zoonotic infections caused by the Hendra and Nipah viruses 
  Smallpox 
 
24.1.2. These diseases are extremely rare in the UK and cases are more likely to be 
of a suspected nature than confirmed diagnosis.  National policy dictates that 
in suspected cases the ambulance service will be required to convey the 
patient to the nearest High Security Infectious Diseases Unit (HSIDU) using 
appropriate standard infection prevention and control precautions for the 
patients presenting condition.  
 
24.1.3. Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of a Hazard Group 4 infection will be 
transported by the Hazardous Area Response Team (HART) in a dedicated 
vehicle carrying only basic equipment. These patients will be transported with 
heighted infection prevention and control precautions.  
 
24.2.  Biological Warfare  Agents  
 
24.2.1. These agents include: 
  Anthrax 
  Plague 
  Smallpox 
  Some of the Viral Haemorrhagic diseases 
 
24.2.2. None of these diseases present an immediate threat to life and there is time 
to seek expert medical advice from Public Health England.  
 
24.2.3. Only staff who are trained in the use of specialised personal protective 
equipment and associated decontamination procedures should be within the 
hot or warm zones of an incident where such agents are thought to be 
involved. This will be the responsibility of HART and all other staff should 
remain a safe distance and await support from trained staff and specialist 
advisors. Incidents of this nature are dealt with through the implementation of 
the Major Incident plan appendix 2.  
 
24.2.4. If staff are inadvertently contaminated they should isolate themselves and 
contact the Incident Officer who will arrange for appropriate decontamination.  
 
 
25. Provision of IPC related Occupational Health (OH) advice 
 
25.1.  Pre-employment  
 
25.1.1.  Prior to commencing employment in the Trust staff will undertake a medical 
examination by OH where their immunisation status will be assessed. 
Subsequently advice and, where appropriate, vaccinations will be offered in 
line with individual duties. These vaccinations will be documented on the staff 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 47 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
members record to allow for subsequent vaccinations and booster doses to 
be administered.  
 
25.1.2.  An immunisation programme includes vaccination for: 
  Tuberculosis 
  Rubella (German Measles)  
  Poliomyelitis 
  Hepatitis B (HBV) 
  Tetanus 
  Influenza 
  Hepatitis A (for specific staff groups)  
 
25.1.3.  Immunisation is not available against all infectious diseases and is not 
guaranteed to be 100% effective, it should never be regarded as an 
alternative to safe infection prevention and control working practices.  
 
25.2. 
Staff sickness and reporting  
25.2.1. If staff suspect they have an infectious illness they should get advice and 
treatment from their GP. Those who work directly with patients should follow 
the procedure for reporting sickness and contact occupational health for 
advice on when they should return to work, this is especially important if they 
develop any of the following diseases: 
  Skin infection on exposed areas 
  Infestation  
  Diarrhoea and/or vomiting (staff must be symptom free for 48 hours 
following the last episode of diarrhoea and/or vomiting before returning 
to work)  
  Jaundice 
  Hepatitis 
  Infectious diseases – chicken pox, measles, mumps, Scarlett fever, 
whooping cough (pertussis),  
 
25.2.2. The Health and Safety Executive must be informed under the Reporting of 
Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) 1995, 
of any blood borne virus exposure where the source is known to be infected 
with hepatitis B or C or with HIV. This will be completed by the Risk and 
Safety team.  
 
26. Transportation and consumption of food on vehicles 
 
26.1.  Food transportation 
 
26.1.1. Food must only be transported in the designated areas. 
  
26.1.2. In order to prevent the contamination of food, food containers should be fit for 
purpose, lidded, washable, liquid and leak proof and must be labelled and 
dated. 
 
26.1.3. Cool bags can be utilised to increase the amount of time food can remain out 
of the fridge before cooking or consumption. Ice blocks need to be used in 
conjunction with the cool bag and these should have been in the freezer for at 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 48 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
least 24 hours prior to use and must be the correct size for the bag and the 
amount of food to be kept chilled. Cool bags must be fit for purpose, sealable, 
washable, leak proof and undamaged.  
 
26.2.  Food Consumption 
 
26.2.1. Food and drink must not be consumed whilst driving. 
 
26.2.2. Staff must not consume food or drink in the treatment/clinical area of the 
vehicle or whilst undertaking clinical care.  Staff can consume snack food and 
drink in the cab area of the vehicle to provide sustenance and maintain 
hydration during calls. Meal breaks must not be taken in the vehicle. Any 
rubbish must be disposed of appropriately. 
 
26.2.3. Hand hygiene must be undertaken prior to and after consuming food or drink. 
Where possible this should be undertaken with soap and water. When there is 
no access to soap and water the hand wipes should be used to 
decontaminate hands. Gloves should never be used as a substitute for 
appropriate hand hygiene.  
 
 

27. Outbreak Management  
 
27.1 
If two or more cases of the infections listed below are reported within the 
incubation period of the infection, this needs to be reported to the infection 
prevention and control (IPC) team who will review and advice on the 
appropriate processes to promote a prompt resolution to the outbreak.  
  Diarrhoea and/or vomiting   
  Scabies 
  Pertussis 
  Chicken pox 
  Mumps  
  Measles 
  Scarlet fever  
 
27.2   In the event there are two or more cases of any of the above listed infections 
the appropriate manager should follow the process listed below in the first 
instance: 
  Identify how many staff are affected by the organism, listing the staff 
members name, date of reporting sick, last date in work and date 
symptoms commenced.  This must be recorded on the outbreak form. 
  Contact the infection prevention and control team; this should be done via 
email out of office hours.  
  Commence the outbreak checklist (available on insite)  
  Remind staff off sick they are not to return to work until they are no longer 
infectious; this is 48 hours after last symptoms for diarrhoea and/or 
vomiting, the A to Z of disease specific precautions or the IPC team will 
provide advice for any other infectious diseases.   
 
27.3 
A member of the IPC team will contact the area affected following receipt of 
the email and will provide further advice and guidance.  
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 49 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
 
27.4 
The IPC team are responsible for reporting the suspected outbreak to Public 
Health England. The  IPC team will advise on the need for the area to be 
deep cleaned following a suspected outbreak, this will be assessed on a case 
by case basis and take into account the suspected organism and the likely 
route of transmission. The deep clean will be arranged by the Estates team 
and will be signed off by Estates or IPC team following completion.  
 
27.5 
Where staff are reporting sick with diarrhoea and/or vomiting stool samples 
may be requested, upon advice from IPC team, these should be posted to the 
Public Health England laboratory in the packaging provided.  
 
27.6 
Following the end of the outbreak the process and actions will be reviewed to 
identify any lessons learnt and implement any changes to the outbreak 
management checklist and SOP. 
 
27.7 
The outbreak management checklist is to be used by the team managing the 
outbreak in conjunction with the IPC team to ensure swift action, minimise the 
risk of onward transmission of infection and ensure actions are taken for a 
prompt resolution which minimises disruption to service. This can be located 
at appendix two of this procedure or on the IPC Toolkit pages on insite. 
 
27.8 
The outbreak monitoring form is a quick way of capturing staff who are off sick 
with signs and symptoms of the infectious disease causing the outbreak. At a 
quick glance, it will provide vital information regarding the outbreak curve and 
whether transmission is continuing. This can be located at appendix three of 
this procedure or on the IPC Toolkit pages on insite.  
 
28. Consultation  

 
28.1. This procedure has been presented for comments and approval at the Infection 
Prevention and Control Group. 
 
28.2. Further  consultation  has  taken  place  with  the  Locality  Quality  Managers, 
occupational  Health,  Hazardous  Area  Response  Team,  Emergency  Planning 
and  Preparedness.  Staff  side  have  been  included  in  the  consultation  process 
as have organisational learning and all relevant stakeholders  
 
 
29. References 
  Department  of  Health  (2013)  Choice  Framework  for  Local  Policy  and 
Procedure  01-04  –  Decontamination  of  linen  for  health  and  social  care: 
Management and Provision. Crown Copyright London.  
  Department  of  Health (2015)  Health and Social Care  Act  2008:  Code of 
Practice on the prevention and control of infections and related guidance. 
Crown Copyright, London 
 
 
30. Monitoring Compliance and Effectiveness of the Procedure 
 
 
30.1. Monitoring  of  the  compliance  with  and  effectiveness  of  this  procedure  will  be 
undertaken  as  part  of  the  quarterly  divisional  audits  and  the  IPC  specialist 
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 50 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

 
audits. These results will be analysed and reported to the Infection Prevention 
and Control Group meetings for assurance.  
 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Page: 
Page 51 of 48 
Document ID: 
NS/07.04.1 
Version: 
7.1 
Date of Approval: 
13.April 2016 
Status: 
Final 
Approved by: 
Infection Prevention and Control Group 
Next Review Date: 
September 2017 
 

Appendix 1 
Plan for Dissemination of Procedural Document 
 
Title of document: 
Infection Prevention and Control Procedures  
Version Number: 
7.1 
Dissemination lead: 
Kirsty Morgan,  
Print name, title and 
contact details 

Head of IPC 
Previous document 
Yes  /  No 
already being used? 
(Please delete as 
Kirsty.morgan@e
appropriate) 
mas.nhs.uk 
Who does the 
All staff  
document need to be 
disseminated to? 

Proposed methods 
Information cascade by mangers 
of dissemination: 
 
Including who will 
disseminate and 

Update of QE noticeboard template to highlight updated procedures 
when 
to staff 
Some examples of 
 
methods of 
Bulletin article in “In Focus”  
disseminating 
information on 
 
procedural documents 
include: 
Posting on the intranet  
Information cascade 
 
by managers 
Email to the VAS/PAS providers for information.   
Communication via 
Management/ 
Departmental/Team 
meetings 

Notice board 
administration 

Articles in bulletins 
Briefing roadshows 
Posting on the Intranet 
 
Note: Following approval of procedural documents it is imperative that all employees or other 
stakeholders who will be affected by the document are proactively informed and made aware 
of any changes in practice that will result. 
 

Appendix 2 
 
Outbreak Management Checklist 
 
An outbreak, in this situation, is considered to be two or more related cases of infection 
these will be related in time and place. To be considered related staff would have to have 
been in work within when the infection was consider transmissible.   
 
The following checklist is to be used by the team managing the outbreak in conjunction with 
the  IPC  team  to  ensure  swift  action,  minimise  the  risk  of  onward  transmission  of  infection 
and ensure actions are taken for a prompt resolution which minimises disruption to service. 
 
Action 
Date  
Signed 
Recognition of potential outbreak 
 
 
Commence outbreak monitoring form – record every member of   
 
staff who has gone off sick with symptoms of the infectious 
disease.  
Contact IPC team (by email if outside of normal working hours) 
 
 
Minimise unnecessary visitors, essential staff only 
 
 
Put up signage on front door, stairs and door into control room 
 
 
(where appropriate) 
Check toilets to ensure liquid soap, paper towels are available 
 
 
(and liquid soap is in date)  
Ensure alcohol hand gel dispensers are full, in date and in 
 
 
working order 
Reminder email to all staff regarding hand and workstation 
 
 
hygiene 
Ensure detergent/disinfectant wipes and alcohol hand gel are 
 
 
available at each pod 
Review standards of cleanliness and check cleaning records of 
 
 
toilets and kitchen  
Check the fridge and freezer temperature checklists and that 
 
 
staff are labelling food.   
Inform the cleaning staff to increase cleaning of frequent touch 
 
 
points and to clean with Sporicidal wipes 
Supply staff with stool sample pots for postage to PHE 
 
 
laboratory (available via IPC team if indicated) 
When staff report sick they are reminded they can not return to 
 
 
work until they are no longer considered infectious. 
Replace all toilet brushes  
 
 
Look back exercise to identify common work stations – 
 
 
consideration of deep clean of IT equipment if common station 
identified 
Consider any common denominators amongst symptomatic 
 
 
staff – social or work activities (which have included food and 
drink) or predisposing factors 
Arrange for a deep clean of EOC to be completed, if required, 
 
 
following discussion with IPC team and arranged through 
estates. 
Compliance with appropriate return to work in when no longer 
 
 
infectious is recorded on the return to work form 
 
IPC  Outbreak Management Checklist Version 1 

Appendix 3 
Outbreak Monitoring Form  
Location: 
 
Tel: No. 
Email: 
 
 
 
 

Date Outbreak Commenced: 
 
Date:   
Date of 
Specimen date 
Date of last 
Date of first 
Date sick leave 
return to 
No. 
Name of Staff 
Job Role 
 
 
 
 
 
& results 
shift 
symptoms  
commenced 
work 
Yes – awaiting 
Eg: 
Jo Bloggs 
EMD/CAT/Para/Tech  12.03.15 
12.03.15 
13.03.15 


D,V  D 
 
18.03.15 
results 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IPC Outbreak Monitoring Form  Version 1 

Appendix 3 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Key: N- nausea, D-diarrhoea, V- vomiting  
 
IPC Outbreak Monitoring Form  Version 1