This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Raising the Game on Disability – Operational seminar JCP1709 - "Disability agenda"'.




 
 
Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, 
Social Etiquette and Language 
June 2013 
V4 
 



Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
 
Time 
30 minutes 
 
Objectives 
At the end of this topic learners will be able to: 
 
explain what is meant by non-verbal communication 
 
list examples of ‘social etiquette’ 
 
list appropriate language to be used when referring to disabled people. 
 
Learning Points 
This topic will cover the following learning points: 
 
Communication. 
 
Social etiquette. 
 
Language. 
 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 2 of 14 



Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
Topic Preparation 
 
Flipchart and pens 
 
Support Material 
 
Welcoming Disabled Customers Guide – available from the Intranet at: 
DWP >> A-Z >> Disability Information, useful contacts and links >> 
Business Disability Forum. 
Handouts: 
 
HO 05.01 – Language. 
 
HO 05.02 – Further Information. 
 
Validation 
Successful completion of this topic will be measured by question and answer. 
 
 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 3 of 14 



Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
Method of Delivery 
This topic is facilitator led and has been designed to be run as a workshop. 
It also includes: 
 
facilitator input; and 
 
group exercise. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 4 of 14 




Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
Introduce this topic by saying that clearly the DVD has 
 
highlighted examples of bad communication and disabled 
people face this kind of treatment regularly – we all need 
to try more to improve our communications and think 
about all our actions and how they impact on our 
customers and particularly those customers who we may 
have to treat more favourably in order to treat them 
equally. 
Think about anticipating reasonable adjustments – do we 
do enough to make sure our communications are 
understood by our customers?  Remember those 
customers who may need adjustments such as access to 
Easy Read materials.  These individuals are the least 
likely to ask for this option and therefore if it isn’t 
anticipated by us, then we may not be getting our 
messages across and subjecting these individuals to 
difficulties when trying to access benefits and jobs. 
Refer to the ‘Welcoming Disabled Customers’ guide 
produced by the Business Disability Forum and available 
in PDF format on the intranet. 
You may find it useful to have your own copy to show to 
the group and to explain how to access it from the DWP 
Intranet. 
 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 5 of 14 



Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
Communication, Etiquette and 
Language 
Introduction 
Many people are unused to meeting and talking with 
disabled people and consequently they aren’t always sure 
how to go about it. They often feel embarrassed and 
anxious and feel they might say or do the wrong thing and 
cause offence. There is no checklist to follow but a number 
of things should be borne in mind which will help.   
Non-verbal communication 
It is generally accepted that much – if not most – of 
people’s feelings are communicated via non-verbal 
communication (body language). The sending and 
receiving of these ‘emotional’ messages is almost sub-
conscious and they play a major role in determining how 
interactions take place between people. Disabled people’s 
non-verbal communication may not always work in the 
same way that it does for non-disabled people and this can 
create some problems and be a cause of discomfort to 
those not used to it. For example, not being able to make 
eye contact with a visually impaired person or not having 
voice intonation in someone with a speech impairment can 
prove unsettling and have a negative impact on the 
interaction simply because one channel of information is 
not working in the way it usually does. It is important to be 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 6 of 14 





Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
aware that this might be an issue as most of these 
exchanges take place sub-consciously.  
Conduct a ‘brainstorming’ exercise by asking the group 
 
to call out what they think the main areas are to consider. 
Write their responses on flipchart. 
 
Answers should include: 
 
 
Proximity (too close, invading personal space). 
 
Orientation (face to face/at the person’s eye 
level/consider furniture barriers). 
 
Posture (leg/arm crossing – negative, leaning 
forward – warm welcoming). 
 
Facial expression (eye browsed raised, smile, 
poker face). 
 
Appearance (official/first impressions/trust). 
 
Gestures (hand movements/nodding/shaking 
head). 
 
Eye contact (good use of eye contact where 
possible). 
 
Tone of voice. (It’s not what you say but how you 
say it!) 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 7 of 14 





Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
Social Etiquette  
It is important for us all to be aware of what we refer to as 
‘social etiquette’ when engaging with disabled people. 
In this instance, ‘social etiquette’ is a term describing 
 
guidelines dealing specifically with how to approach and 
engage with people with disabilities. 
 
Divide the learners into two groups. 
 
Ask one group to consider examples of social etiquette 
when talking to: 
 
a hearing impaired person 
 
a visually impaired person 
 
someone with a speech impairment 
Ask the other group to consider examples of social 
etiquette when: 
 
talking to a wheelchair user 
 
providing assistance. 
Ask each group to note their examples on flipchart before 
bringing the groups back together to feedback. 
 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 8 of 14 




Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
Examples should include: 
 
 
Disabled people are individuals just like 
everybody else;  
 
Don’t patronise or make assumptions about their 
abilities or needs; 
 
Don’t forget some disabilities are not apparent, 
for example epilepsy and mental illness; 
 
Even when a disabled person is with someone, 
talk to the disabled person directly; 
 
If someone has difficulty understanding you - 
perhaps because they have a learning disability - 
be patient, where necessary, explain something 
more than once and use simple language; 
 
Don’t ask personal questions about a person’s 
disability as these are intrusive and rude;  
 
If someone looks ‘different’ do not stare at them;  
 
If you are talking to an adult, treat them like an 
adult; 
 
Talk naturally and only raise your voice if it helps 
the communication process; 
 
Only touch disabled people if you need to attract 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 9 of 14 



Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
their attention and there is no other way of doing 
so, e.g., in a dangerous situation or where 
background noise makes it impossible to gain the 
person’s attention, etc. However, ensure you only 
touch lightly and briefly and on a non-threatening 
part of the body, e.g., elbow or shoulder; 
 
Never compromise a person’s right to privacy and 
dignity; 
 
Treat disabled people the same way as you 
would anyone else and in the way you would like 
to be treated.   
When talking to a hearing impaired person: 
 
Talk to them directly even if they are 
accompanied by a sign language interpreter; 
 
If they lip read make sure your face is in the light, 
look directly at the person and speak clearly and 
naturally – don’t try and help by changing the way 
you talk;  
 
If you are not understood be prepared to repeat 
yourself or rephrase what you have said. 
When talking to a visually impaired person: 
 
Introduce yourself on first meeting; 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 10 of 14 



Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
 
When you are going to move away tell them. 
When talking to someone with a speech impairment: 
 
Be patient and don’t try to guess what they want 
to say or finish their sentences; 
 
If you don’t understand, don’t pretend you do. 
Instead ask them to repeat what they have said; 
 
Ask straightforward questions which require short 
answers or a nod/shake of the head. 
When talking to a wheelchair user: 
 
Facilitate eye contact, e.g., by sitting down, facing 
the wheelchair user or taking a step backwards; 
 
Don’t lean on the wheelchair - it is part of the 
user’s personal space; 
 
Don’t push a person in a wheelchair without 
permission.   
Providing assistance: 
 
Never assume that a disabled person needs help 
and always ask before providing it.   
 
If someone looks as if they need assistance, offer 
it, but wait for them to accept before you help. 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 11 of 14 



Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
 
In offering assistance don’t ask leading questions, 
for example, “are you OK?” as this tends to evoke 
the response of “yes”. Instead ask something like     
“excuse me, can I help?” or “excuse me, may I 
assist?”.   
 
If assistance is requested ask how you may help. 
All disabled people have their own preferences 
about how they like to be helped and you need to 
respect this; you should not assume how any 
help should be provided. 
 
If assistance is turned down don’t let that put you 
off offering help to someone else in the future. 
Disabled people vary widely in their responses to 
offers of help and their need for it. Remember 
they should be treated as individuals. 
 
If assisting a blind person, tell them what is 
happening, as they may need to respond, e.g., if 
there are any steps, tell them whether the steps 
go up or down. 
 
Remember that assistance dogs are working 
dogs, not pets. They should not be fed, patted or 
distracted when they are working. 
 
A good rule of thumb is to consider whether what 
you are doing adversely impacts on the disabled 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 12 of 14 






Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
person’s dignity and if it does, then perhaps you 
are not providing assistance effectively. 
 
According to figures published in 2009 by the Royal 
 
National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), there were    
18,000 people using Braille in the UK. 
According to figures published by British Sign Language 
(BSL), there are currently 125,000 adult and 20,000 
children in the UK that use BSL. 
Language 
Some of the words and phrases we use can offend 
disabled people because they suggest that the disabled 
person is dependent, helpless or a victim. Some words 
such as ‘cripple’ or ‘retarded’ have become terms of abuse 
or are used to make fun of disabled people.  
Issue Handout HO 05.01 – Language 
 
This handout lists some common words to avoid with 
suggested alternatives. 
 
Using HO 05.01 facilitate a discussion around the 
 
language to be avoided / used. 
                   
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 13 of 14 





Raising The Game on Disability 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and 
Language 
Issue Handout HO 05.02 – Further Information. 
 
                                       
Ask the learners if they have any questions before 
 
continuing with the next topic. 
 
END OF TOPIC 05 
 
 
Topic 05 – Communication, Social Etiquette and Language          June 2013 
V4 
 
Page 14 of 14