This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'great Crested Newt Licence - Thingley'.

Template for Method Statement to support application for licence under Regulation 53(2)(e) in 
respect of great crested newts Triturus cristatus.  Form WML-A14-2 (Version April 13)

Instructions for completion of Method Statement template
Introduction
This template is the new way to produce a Method Statement for great crested newt mitigation 
projects. It is designed to make the process easier for applicants, by providing standard responses 
where possible, and making clear the level and type of information required. It will also facilitate 
assessment of applications, as information will be presented in a standard way.
This spreadsheet has two main sections: Instructions and guidance, and the Method Statement 
template itself. When submitting your application, you need only send us the Method Statement (incl 
Cover Sheet). The instructions should help you complete the Method Statement, as well as providing 
guidance on some common areas of confusion in mitigation. These are designed to assist you in 
deciding whether to apply for a licence, and if you do, what kind of survey and mitigation should be 
proposed. Note: that this is offered as general guidance and in the event of any enforcement 
investigation the original legislation must be referred to.
Entering information into the template
(Pale red; bold outline except in some tables) Indicates mandatory fields
(Pale green; dashed outline except in some tables) Indicates fields that are either optional 
or will be necessary in some cases depending on the circumstances. In many cases it is 
helpful to fill in green fields to provide more detail. Where the spreadsheet can detect a 
necessary field from data you have already given, a green field will turn red. It is your 
responsibility to ensure any necessary information is included.
(Pale blue) Indicates a field that is automatically completed by the spreadsheet, based on 
data you have entered.
IMPORTANT: Only enter data in pale red or pale green fields. Do not enter or alter any data in other 
coloured fields, including whitespace, as this may affect spreadsheet function. Please do not reformat 
text, except to underline any changes if you are submitting an amendment.
It is your responsibility to ensure the completed template provides all information necessary for licence 
determination. We have tried to make the template as helpful as possible, by for example providing 
common responses in drop-down menus, and by indicating optional and necessary fields. However, 
these features may not be suitable for accepting the information for your scheme, and occasionally the 
automatic spreadsheet coding may produce unusual results. If this happens you must take care to 
explain the scheme on additional sheets, and not rely on the standard responses or automatic 
spreadsheet coding. It will not be acceptable to submit a Method Statement that provides misleading 
or incomplete information, and attribute such shortcomings to the template format.
Fill in the spreadsheet in order, as some data you enter is used in subsequent calculations or 
questions.There is a maximum of 1393 characters (approx 225 words) in the largest data entry 
sections, so try to be concise with your descriptions and ensure all text you enter is visible. If 
any question requires a more lengthy response, attach as a separate document, and mention 
you are doing so. Several questions have standard responses suitable for a maximum of 10 
ponds. If your scheme involves more, please attach separate documents, ideally in the same 
format.

Viewing: You may find it helpful to zoom in and out by scrolling your mouse wheel while holding 
down CTRL (or View > Zoom 
). Sometimes parts of a text box can appear "cut off", depending 
on your computer set-up. Zooming in or out may help, and all the text should be readable if 
you click inside the box.

Printing: To print the whole spreadsheet: File > Print... > Print what > Entire workbook. To print 
selected worksheets only, select the appropriate tabs (use shift to select a continuous range, and 
CTRL for non-adjacent worksheets), then File > Print > Print what > Active sheet(s).

Instructions for completion of Method Statement template
Method Statement structure and which parts to submit
The Method Statement is divided into two sections:
(I) Background and supporting information (worksheets with lavender-coloured tabs)
(II) Delivery information (worksheets with blue-coloured tabs)
Within each section, there are subdivisions, e.g. for survey, impact assessment, etc. For 
modifications to projects already licensed, or re-submissions following a 'Further Information 
Request' response, when submitting a hard or an electronic copy it will currently be necessary to re-
submit the document in its entirety detailing where changes have been made. If submitting a hard 
copy, you should not send the instructions and guidance sections (grey tabs) as they are not part of 
the formal Method Statement. If submitting re-submissions or new applications electronically, send 
the whole template file (plus maps and appendices) because attempting to extract worksheets will 
cause coding problems; in any case it is no additional effort to send the whole file. See Natural 
England website for current instructions on the format of licence application submission.
Important notes on technical mitigation issues
Use the Great crested newt mitigation guidelines  (English Nature, 2001) for technical guidance. This template is 
designed to record licence application data for a range of common development scenarios. However, this does 
not restrict the use of novel mitigation practice, where this is appropriate. If you wish to employ a method, 
approach or level of effort that deviates from the standard recommendations in the guidelines, you must point 
this out, and provide either: (a) direct evidence from other projects or research that it is likely to be effective; or, if 
no direct evidence is available (b) a sound rationale for why you think it is appropriate and likely to be effective. 
Note that applications that involve reductions compared to standard recommendations (e.g. lower capture effort 
or habitat areas) would only be acceptable if there are clear logistical or ecological reasons. It is unacceptable to 
propose reductions in standards simply to allow development to begin sooner, or to allow a larger development 
footprint.
New information requirements: transitional arrangements for licence assessment
The information requested in this form is largely the same as in recent years.  Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) data 
has been required from 31 May 2008 .
Notes on licence assessment
"Development" in this Method Statement means an activity that you believe to meet the requirements of 
Regulation 53(2)(e). It does not refer solely to construction-related activity.
This Method Statement is the evidence on which you must demonstrate compliance with Regulation 53(9)(b) 
(the "favourable conservation status test"). The "no satisfactory alternative" and "purpose" tests are assessed 
using other criteria.
Suggestions and queries
If you have suggestions for future versions of this template, please email them to: 
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx with "Newt template feedback" in the subject. If you 
encounter a fundamental technical problem when completing the template please contact Customer Services 
Wildlife Licensing in Bristol (tel 0845 601 4523; email xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx). Please note that we 
cannot provide advice on how to complete individual applications.

Version control
This template is WML-A14-2 Version April 13. The Natural England website will always carry the latest version, so please 
check there to ensure you have the correct one. It is possible there will be minor changes to the template in coming months 
based on applicant feedback. Your assistance with this would be much appreciated.
Changes: Ver 28 Jan 2008: Modified HSI fields & text in Survey section to address missing values. Minor formatting 
improvements. Cover Sheet amended to handle "revision" method statements. Ver Sept 2008: Text wrapping and formatting 
improved (to allow underlining), modified drop-down box on sheet E Mitigation (4) to allow 30 days capture effort or 'other' to be 
selected, plus some minor formatting improvements in some sections, further detail on information requirements provided. Ver 
Jan 2010: requested specific details in certain sections, B1.8 provides master plan link, changes to Section C1 and 2, 
additional advice on capture effort in E4, changes to E6a plus some minor formatting improvements in some sections, further 
detail on information requirements provided. Ver April 2010 reflected changes to the legislation. Ver Nov 2010: Guidance on 
post development monitoring requirements, GCN survey data ordered by pond (not by visit), creation of appendix for survey 
data for project with >10 ponds (separate file on website), Impact assessment drop-down options (D5.1) simplified, declaration 
page for permissions added. Ver Mar 2011: formatting in D5.1 corrected. Ver Aug 12: changes to legislation; ref to remedial 
action in E5; remove possess/control in B2. Ver April 13: adapted for the annexed licence process, req'ment for new Fig E5.2, 
req'ment for separate E6a&b.

Instructions for completion of Method Statement template
Application tools: (1) "Do I need a licence?" - rapid risk assessment
Background 

In recent years there has been a trend towards increasingly precautionary applications, resulting from a risk-averse approach 
to mitigation. Whilst considering potential risks to great crested newts is laudable, many recent mitigation schemes were 
designed for developments that actually had very little or no effect on the newt population. In part this is because it can be 
difficult to assess whether newts will be affected by certain activities, especially when they take place at some distance from 
breeding ponds. Newts tend to be present at increasingly low density the further one looks from ponds, and the task of 
detecting and capturing them becomes more problematic. Further from ponds, there is a corresponding reduction in the scale 
of impact on populations. Given that great crested newts can disperse over 1km from breeding ponds, the potential for 
offences may seem vast, yet the probability of an offence outside the core breeding and resting area is often rather small, and 
even if an offence takes place, the effect on the population may be negligible.
Natural England is concerned about the trend for increasingly risk-averse mitigation for several reasons. Primarily, there is no 
legal need, and little benefit to great crested newt conservation, in undertaking mitigation where there are no offences through 
development. Even where there technically is an offence, such as the destruction of a small, distant area of resting place 
habitat, or even killing low numbers of newts, it is arguable that impacts beyond the core area often have little or no tangible 
impact on the viability of populations. Mitigation in such circumstances is of questionable value in conservation terms. There 
are, however, substantial costs: developers delay projects and spend large sums on mitigation. Sometimes the mitigation 
project itself has environmental costs, especially when it entails substantial lengths of newt fencing. In some cases long newt 
fences are employed with no justification. Natural England wishes to see newt fencing used more appropriately, i.e. only where 
there is a reasonable risk of capturing, containing and/or excluding newts.
Natural England recognises that the two key factors leading consultants to adopt this risk-averse approach are: (a) uncertainty 
over the presence of newts and whether there will be an offence in areas distant from ponds; (b) undertaking mitigation under 
licence "just in case", so that there is no perceived risk of litigation for their client. Natural England wishes to see mitigation 
planning shift away from such a highly risk-averse starting point. The domestic legislation protecting great crested newts arises 
largely from the Habitats Directive, which has a central aim to restore scheduled species to a favourable conservation status. A 
more proportionate approach to mitigation, addressing tangible impacts on populations whilst giving lower priority to negligible 
effects, is consistent with the aims of the Directive. The recent loss of the "incidental result" defence from the legislation may 
create a tension with this approach, but it is hoped that the guidance here will assist.
This simple risk assessment can inform the decision as to whether to apply for a licence. It remains the responsibility of the 
developer - normally acting through their consultant - to decide whether to apply. Early consideration of options can often result 
in no licence being required - see Non-licensed avoidance measures tool, later in the Instructions section. A sound survey 
and careful comparison with development plans will often be the best guide to whether a licence should be obtained.
Guidance on use
The rapid risk assessment is done by completing the table on the next worksheet. Consider the impacts of the 
development without any licensed mitigation. For each "component", select a likely effect from the drop-down menu. It may 
help to produce a map of the land marked with 100m and 250m radii around each great crested newt breeding pond, overlaid 
with the development boundary. The land categories refer to all land, not just that used by newts. N.B. this risk assessment is 
not part of your application, and there is no obligation to use it; it is a tool to help you decide whether to apply for a licence. 
However, if you do proceed with an application, it would help Natural England if you could tell us the result of the risk 
assessment, if used, in the "Cover Sheet" section (there is a question there to remind you). 
Each effect is assigned a notional probability of leading to an offence. Note that these are purely notional for the purpose of 
this generic assessment, and should not be taken as definitive in a given real case. The score takes into account that some 
activities (e.g. killing newts) are not entirely predictable. The maximum notional probability is then used to derive a conclusion, 
which is displayed as red (probability ≥ 0.65), amber (0.3-0.65) or green (<0.3) in the "risk assessment result" box. Further 
information on interpreting the result is given below the table. Following this, you may wish to amend details of the 
development, and include additional precautions (see tool later in instructions), in order to avoid impacts on newts. You can 
then re-select the likely effects, to re-calculate the assessment based on the modified development, in order to see whether 
the risk has been reduced further. This process is in line with the general approach of avoiding offences wherever possible.
Remember you should enter the likely effects as if the development were to proceed  without any licensed mitigation  - i.e. 
no trapping or fencing, etc. This may mean, for instance, that killing newts is likely as the development would destroy areas 
they use (though we have taken into account in the probability score that it is often uncertain as to whether newts would be 
killed by development in a given location away from ponds). You should  consider likely effects after taking any 
appropriate unlicensed precautions to reduce risks 
 - e.g. groundworks during daylight only. Further guidance on this is 
given in the  Non-licensed avoidance measures  tool, later in the Instructions section.


Instructions for completion of Method Statement template
Application tools: (1) "Do I need a licence?" - rapid risk assessment
Caveats and limitations
This risk assessment tool has been developed as a general guide only, and it is inevitably rather simplistic. 
It has been generated by examining where impacts occurred in past mitigation projects, alongside recent 
research on newt ecology. It is not a substitute for a site-specific risk assessment informed by survey. In 
particular, the following factors are not included for sake of simplicity, though they will often have an important 
role in determining whether an offence would occur: population size, terrestrial habitat quality, presence of 
dispersal barriers, timing and duration of works, detailed layout of development in relation to newt resting and 
dispersal. The following factors could increase the risk of committing an offence: large population size, high 
pond density, good terrestrial habitat, low pre-existing habitat fragmentation, large development footprint, long 
construction period. The following factors could decrease the risk: small population size, low pond density, poor 
terrestrial habitat, substantial pre-existing dispersal barriers, small development footprint, short construction 
period. You should bear these mitigating and aggravating factors in mind when considering risk.
It is critical that, even if you decide not to apply for a licence, you ensure that any development takes account of 
potential newt dispersal. Where great crested newts are present, landuse in that area must ensure there is 
adequate connectivity. Retaining and improving connectivity will often involve no licensable activities.
Component
Notional offence 
Likely effect (select one for each component; 
probability 
select the most harmful option if more than one is 
score
likely; lists are in order of harm, top to bottom)
Great crested newt breeding pond(s)
No effect
0
Land within 100m of any breeding pond(s)
No effect
0
Land 100-250m from any breeding pond(s)
0.5 - 1 ha lost or damaged
0.3
Land >250m from any breeding pond(s)
No effect
0
Individual great crested newts
Obstructing dispersal of newts
0.8
Maximum: 0.8
Rapid risk assessment result:
RED: OFFENCE HIGHLY LIKELY
Guidance on risk assessment result categories
"Green: offence highly unlikely"
 indicates that the development activities are of such a type, scale and 
location that it is highly unlikely any offence would be committed should the development proceed. Therefore, no 
licence would be required. However, bearing in mind that this is a generic assessment, you should carefully 
examine your specific plans to ensure this is a sound conclusion, and take precautions (see Non-licensed 
avoidance measures
 tool) to avoid offences if appropriate. It is likely that any residual offences would have 
negligible impact on conservation status, and enforcement of such breaches is unlikely to be in the public 
interest.
"Amber: offence likely" indicates that the development activities are of such a type, scale and location that an 
offence is likely. In this case, the best option is to redesign the development (location, layout, methods, duration 
or timing; see Non-licensed avoidance measures tool) so that the effects are minimised. You can do this and 
then re-run the risk assessment to test whether the result changes, or preferably run your own detailed site-
specific assessment. Bear in mind that this generic risk assessment will over- or under-estimate some risks 
because it cannot take into account site-specific details, as mentioned in caveats above. In particular, the exact 
location of the development in relation to resting places, dispersal areas and barriers should be critically 
examined. Once you have amended the scheme you will need to decide if a licence is required; this should be 
done if on balance you believe an offence is reasonably likely.
"Red: offence highly likely" indicates that the development activities are of such a type, scale and location that 
an offence is highly likely. In this case, you should attempt to re-design the development location, layout, timing, 
methods or duration in order to avoid impacts (see Non-licensed avoidance measures tool), and re-run the 
risk assessment. You may also wish to run a site-specific risk assessment to check that this is a valid 
conclusion. If you cannot avoid the offences, then a licence should be applied for.

Instructions for completion of Method Statement template
Application tools: (2) Conversions
All area figures in this Method Statement template should be entered in hectares, to allow consistent 
calculations. Some ecologists prefer to work in m², especially for smaller figures such as pond surface 
areas. Use this tool to easily convert between the two units.
Enter area in m²:
 = 
0.0000 ha
Enter area in ha:
 = 
0 m²
Application tools: (3) Non-licensed avoidance measures
Background
Licensable activities should ideally be designed out of developments during the early planning stages. This should result in 
avoiding harm to great crested newt populations, and can save developers the time and expense of licensed mitigation 
measures. Many potentially licensable activities can in fact be avoided by careful planning of the development combined with 
simple precautionary measures. In many cases, adopting such an approach may mean that no licence is required (as no 
offence would be committed). Even when a licence is applied for because you decide an offence is likely, such measures can 
still be employed to reduce the level of harm to newt populations. This application tool helps you to plan non-licensed 
avoidance measures for common development scenarios. You may also use them in licensed projects to reduce impacts.
Guidance on use, caveats and limitations
Check the list below for suggestions for avoiding impacts that might be appropriate for your project. You can use this in 
combination with the "Do I need a licence? Rapid risk assessment" tool to help you plan mitigation and decide on whether to 
apply for a licence. For schemes that cover a large area, you might use these tools to decide that only part(s) of the 
development should be subject to a licence. This section is based on an examination of approaches considered in recent 
projects, and is obviously generic. The suggestions may not be appropriate for your particular development, or may require fine-
tuning to be helpful. Neither are they exhaustive: we encourage you to develop your own ideas and let us know so that we 
can include them in future guidance.
If you determine that no offences would be committed and therefore decide not to apply for a licence, it may be useful to keep 
a copy of the decision-making steps, and any precautions that will be taken. In some cases these might form the basis of a 
non-licensed method statement, to help a developer and their contractors understand how to carry out works with a minimal 
risk of breaching the law. If soundly produced, this might act as an audit trail and a "defence" in the event of any future queries 
about the development's effects on newts. Similarly, if you use these tools to determine that only part(s) of the development 
area should be subject to a licence, then it is helpful to include this rationale in the licence application, so that we can see why 
and how you have included and excluded particular areas in the licensed work.
Project element
Suggestions for avoidance measures
Location & layout
(a) Locate site as far as possible from potential breeding ponds and high quality terrestrial habitat. 
(b) Locate in areas subject to high pre-existing fragmentation. (c) Locate on hard, compacted 
ground with few fissures. (d) Design layout so that any hard landscaping is as far as possible from 
ponds, with retained habitat and soft landscaping toward ponds.
Timing & duration
(a) Restricting works to the winter period (when newts are rarely active above ground) is sensible if 
the project would not harm hibernation habitat. Projects with temporary habitat disruption and 
reinstatement, such as some pipelines, could potentially be carried out without any licensable 
activity in this way. (b) Keep duration of groundworks as short as possible. (c) Undertake during 
the day works that might only affect newts above ground.
Construction methods and  (a) Backfill trenches and other excavations before nightfall, or leave a ramp to allow newts to 
special precautions
easily exit. (b) Raise stored materials (that might act as temporary resting places) off the ground, 
e.g. on pallets. (c) For pipelines, use directional drilling to cross areas of core habitat and dispersal 
routes. (d) Avoid installing structures that act as barriers close to ponds, or include gaps at ground 
level where walls or fences are unavoidable.

Instructions for completion of Method Statement template
Application tools (4): Survey data - what kind, how much, how old?
Background
Survey data are essential for any mitigation licence application. Consultants frequently seek advice on requirements for the 
level of effort, type of survey and age of survey data. The answer to this is that sufficient data need to be provided to 
demonstrate the level of impact on the population, plan effective mitigation, and allow an assessment of development and 
mitigation effects. Data requirements will be proportionate to the level of impact of the development. Clearly these will vary 
from case to case. The Great crested newt mitigation guidelines  provide general comments and technical advice on methods. 
This application tool provides further guidance to assist with planning pond survey effort and Method Statement preparation. It 
deals only with standard newt pond surveys and Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) assessments. Other kinds of surveys, e.g. 
terrestrial newt surveys, may be appropriate either as a substitute or in addition, depending on the situation.
Guidance on use, caveats and limitations
Using the table in the next worksheet, check the likely type of impact that your development would have, and then read 
across to see which types of surveys are indicated. The table is divided into permanent and temporary habitat loss; the latter 
occurs when there is rapid reinstatement to appreciably similar conditions following development (e.g. typical pipeline projects). 
Where both presence/absence and population size class assessment surveys are indicated, these can run together. Note that 
the indications in this table are meant as minimum standards, and are inevitably generic. The circumstances of a particular 
scheme may indicate that more survey is required
. For example, additional effort or other types of surveys (e.g. terrestrial 
dispersal survey, capture-mark-recapture [CMR]) should be done where there is a sound case.  Note that different survey 
types and effort may be appropriate for different ponds on (or close to) the same development site
, especially for large 
schemes where impacts vary across the footprint.
The figures on extent of habitat loss here do not take into account overall habitat availability. You will need to consider the 
spatial layout of habitat, and in particular barriers to dispersal
. So, for example, if 0.1ha of land were to be lost at a 
distance of 70m from a pond, and that 0.1ha seems likely (from maps, aerial photos or a walk-over survey) to provide the 
majority of good quality terrestrial habitat for the nearest population, then a population size class assessment should be done 
(contrary to the standard recommendation in the table). Conversely, for example, if this habitat were separated by major roads 
and built land, you may decide that no survey is necessary as it is unlikely to be used by newts. Furthermore, this table 
focuses on typical habitat loss/damage, and does not take into account all possible impact types, such as disturbance only. 
Again the general advice is to devise surveys appropriate to the level of potential impact.
Geographical limits of survey
In keeping with a proportionate and risk-based approach, surveys need reasonable boundaries. The Great crested newt 
mitigation guidelines 
 explain that surveys of ponds up to around 500m from the development might need to be surveyed. The 
decision on whether to survey depends primarily on how likely it is that the development would affect newts using those ponds. 
For developments resulting in permanent or temporary habitat loss at distances over 250m from the nearest pond, carefully 
consider whether a survey is appropriate. Surveys of land at this distance from ponds are normally appropriate when all of the 
following conditions are met: (a) maps, aerial photos, walk-over surveys or other data indicate that the pond(s) has potential to 
support a large great crested newt population, (b) the footprint contains particularly favourable habitat, especially if it 
constitutes the majority available locally, (c) the development would have a substantial negative effect on that habitat, and (d) 
there is an absence of dispersal barriers. 
That is not to say that all development proposals over 250m from a pond will not require surveys. There are cases where large 
numbers of newts have been found at 250-500m from ponds, and so impacts are potentially significant, but such cases are 
rare and can often be predicted by the presence of especially favourable habitat. Developments beyond 500m from the nearest 
pond would very rarely merit newt surveys.
Age of survey data
Newt survey data must be sufficient to accurately reflect the status of the site at the time the licence application is submitted. 
The older the survey data, the more likely it is to misrepresent status, and in general you are advised to carry out surveys as 
close as possible to submission. The larger the predicted impacts, the more important it is to have recent data. Particular care 
must be taken if there have been changes to the habitats on or adjacent to the site since the last survey. A walk-over survey, 
at the least, should be undertaken within 3 months prior to submission to check for habitat changes since the survey was 
carried out. If circumstances have changed, then only those areas affected by the changes need to be re-surveyed. 
Re-assessment of the impacts will need to be undertaken after any re-surveys, and this may require changes to mitigation 
plans. The far right column in the table gives maximum acceptable age of survey, from date undertaken to date of licence 
submission. Note that this assumes no significant habitat changes on or adjacent to the site since last survey. This must 
be confirmed, e.g. by walk-over survey, within 3 months prior to licence application submission. Whenever you rely on old 
surveys, mention their key findings in the main body of your Method Statement, and attach the full survey as an annex.

Instructions for completion of Method Statement template
Application tools (4): Survey data - what kind, how much, how old?
Survey guidance table
Impact type and location Potential terrestrial 
Presence/ 
Population  HSI
Maximum age of 
habitat - loss or damage  likely 
size class 
survey data (# 
(ha)
absence 
assessment
breeding 
survey
seasons)
Permanent habitat loss or damage
Pond(s) lost or damaged, 
≥0
YES
YES
YES
2
with or without other 
habitat loss or damage
No ponds lost or damaged,  ≤0.01
YES
NO
YES
3
development within 50m of 
nearest pond
>0.01
YES
YES
YES
2
No ponds lost or damaged,  ≤0.2
YES
NO
NO
3
development 50-100m 
from nearest pond
>0.2
YES
YES
YES
2
No ponds lost or damaged,  ≤0.5
YES
NO
NO
4
development 100-250m 
from nearest pond
>0.5
YES
YES
YES
3
No ponds lost or damaged,  ≤5
YES
NO
NO
4
development >250m from 
nearest pond (NB see 
>5
YES
NO
YES
3
notes)
Temporary habitat loss or damage
Pond(s) lost or damaged, 
≥0
YES
YES
YES
2
with or without other 
habitat loss or damage
No ponds lost or damaged,  ≤0.05
YES
NO
YES
3
development within 50m of 
nearest pond
>0.05
YES
YES
YES
3
No ponds lost or damaged,  ≤0.5
YES
NO
NO
4
development 50-100m 
from nearest pond
>0.5
YES
YES
YES
3
No ponds lost or damaged,  ≤5
YES
NO
NO
4
development >100m from 
nearest pond
>5
YES
NO
YES
4
Example: Survey undertaken in 2011 between April to June. Application submitted in autumn 2013 using the 2011 survey. The 
survey supporting the application would not suffice and the 2011 survey is actually 3 survey seasons old by autumn 2013 (i.e. 1st 
survey season = 2011, 2nd survey season = 2012 and 3rd survey season = 2013).  If the application had been submitted in 
March/April or even May 2013 it may have been acceptable if fully justified why no further survey effort was required. 
Measuring turbidity and vegetation cover. These factors can greatly influence survey counts, so it is 
important to measure them consistently. In the Method Statement, we ask you to use the following 
convention:
Vegetation cover score (0-5) ; 0 = no vegetation obscuring survey; 5 = water completely obscured by 
vegetation.
Turbidity score (0-5) : 0 = completely clear; 5 = very turbid.

Instructions for completion of Method Statement template
Application tools (5): Use of the great crested newt Habitat Suitability Index (HSI)
Background
The great crested newt Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) is quantitative measure of habitat quality (source: Oldham R.S., Keeble 
J., Swan M.J.S. & Jeffcote M. (2000). Evaluating the suitability of habitat for the Great Crested Newt (Triturus cristatus ). 
Herpetological Journal 10 (4), 143-155). The HSI is number between 0 and 1, derived from an assessment of ten habitat 
variables known to influence the presence of newts. An HSI of 1 is optimal habitat (high probability of occurrence), while an 
HSI of 0 is very poor habitat (minimal probability of occurrence). The HSI is calculated on a single pond basis, but takes into 
account surrounding terrestrial habitat and local pond density.
Application to great crested newt mitigation
The great crested newt HSI is potentially a useful tool in survey and mitigation. One benefit is that it can be undertaken in a 
single field visit (with supporting desk work), and at any time of the year (though some variables are more easily measured in 
spring and summer). Its main uses are:
1) in surveys, to assess habitat quality in a repeatable, objective manner. In particular, the HSI allows individual factors that 
influence newt presence to be easily identified. These factors could help explain a very high or very low count. A high HSI can 
justify employing additional survey effort or methods if no newts are found initially.
2) in impact assessments, to allow a measure of how damaging a development could be. HSI might also be used as a 
screening tool to select no impact or minimal impact options in conjunction with (3) below.
3) in risk assessments, helping to decide whether an offence might be committed, and therefore whether a licence should be 
applied for. If a pond has a very low HSI score (say <0.5) then there would typically be a minimal chance of great crested newt 
presence. Hence, with due care and in limited circumstances (see also caveats below), the HSI might be used in the absence 
of newt survey to help conclude that an offence is highly unlikely and therefore work could proceed in that area without a 
licence. This application of the HSI should only be used where the predicted impacts - were newts to be present - would be low 
(e.g. development at least 100m from pond, permanent habitat loss <0.5ha or temporary habitat loss <5ha). The developer 
and consultant should realise that there would still be a risk of committing an offence, but it would typically be so low as to be 
negligible. Obviously, note that if HSI >0.5, this is not confirmation of newt presence; a newt survey would be required to 
confirm this.
4) in habitat enhancement, HSI could be used to identify the low-scoring factors in an existing pond that need addressing to 
improve its quality for newts.
5) in post-development monitoring, to allow an assessment of habitat condition.
HSI in licence method statements
Natural England recommends that consultants engaged in great crested newt mitigation familiarise themselves with the HSI by 
reading the original paper by Oldham et al (2000). For field use in mitigation practice, we recommend that consultants follow 
the slightly simplified version adapted for the National Amphibian and Reptile Recording Scheme (NARRS). A helpful guidance 
note has been produced by The Herpetological Conservation Trust, available to download at: 
http://www.narrs.org.uk/Documents/nasdocuments/HSI_guidance.pdf.  
The survey sections of this template include fields for entering HSI data. The preceding guidance on survey data explains 
when it might be used most effectively.
Caveats and limitations
The HSI is not a substitute for undertaking newt surveys
; it indicates but cannot confirm presence or absence. A licence 
application that infers great crested newt presence solely from HSI data (i.e. no newt survey data presented) will be 
rejected
. Very low HSI scores may be used along with scheme details to infer a minimal chance of committing an offence in 
low impact situations, as explained above. This is on a risk assessment basis and consultants should be aware of the potential 
hazards of this approach. Whilst current data indicate a generally good relationship, HSI scores should not be used to predict 
population size. Care should be taken when interpreting low HSI scores; for example, a low scoring pond close to an occupied 
newt pond may still support newts. Whilst appropriate for most waterbody types, the HSI may lead to unusual scores for some 
atypical types (possibly including large expanses of marshes, and complex series of depressions in quarry floors). You are 
asked in the form to comment on any limitations of the HSI approach in your case, and if these are serious then it may be 
appropriate not to calculate HSI scores.

Post development monitoring advice and guidance
Licences can only be issued where Natural England is confident there will be no detriment to maintaining the 
conservation status of the newt population at a favourable level, and in some cases a package of monitoring and 
remedial action will be required to provide that confidence.
All mitigation schemes carry a risk of failure. If mitigation measures fail, then the resulting impact on the 
conservation status of the newts may mean that the “Favourable Conservation Status test” (FCS test) will not 
have been met. This risk is greatest for activities that are judged to have a medium or high impact. Post-
development monitoring has a role in providing confidence in any judgement that there will be no detriment to 
favourable conservation status by detecting problems that may lead to such a detrimental effect and enabling 
appropriate remedial action to be taken to avoid it. 
Post-development monitoring will be expected for most medium and high impact cases. Monitoring and remedial 
action will form an important component of the mitigation package in these cases and will be a key prerequisite 
to an application for a mitigation licence passing the FCS test.
The success of mitigation commonly depends on measures undertaken following the main phase of construction 
and newt capture (e.g. Edgar, Griffiths & Foster, 2005; Lewis, Griffiths & Barrios, 2007). Deficiencies in newly 
created ponds are a common problem and both aquatic and terrestrial habitat features may require several 
years of management to achieve a high value for newts. Monitoring is necessary to inform that management. 
Monitoring great crested newt numbers and breeding can also be used to identify the need for action. 
When assessing applications, Natural England considers whether post-development monitoring proposals, in 
conjunction with the other mitigation measures, will be sufficient to ensure that the FCS test will be met. The 
need for monitoring, and the type of monitoring required, is related to the impact of the development and the 
status of the great crested newt population. In this way, monitoring requirements are proportionate to the risk of 
potential impacts on conservation status. For developments having low impacts, monitoring will not normally be 
required.  Developers reducing the impact of their projects will therefore benefit from having lower costs 
following construction. For further details, see section 8.5 of the Great crested newt mitigation guidelines. 
In addition to being necessary in some cases to support a conclusion of no detriment to maintenance of 
favourable conservation status, data produced in accordance with monitoring conditions helps Natural England 
and others to assess the effectiveness of mitigation measures. This in turn can feed back into good practice, so 
that future mitigation can be made more effective (these improvements can also help with cost effectiveness).  
The UK government has a duty to report to the European Commission on derogations, and for this we rely on 
data collected under mitigation licences.
References
Edgar, P, Griffiths, RA & Foster, JP. 2005. Evaluation of translocation as a tool for mitigating development 
threats to great crested newts (Triturus cristatus) in England, 1990-2001, Biological Conservation, 122: 45-52.
Lewis, B, Griffiths, RA & Barrios, Y. 2007. Field assessment of great crested newt Triturus cristatus mitigation 
projects in England. Natural England Research Report NERR001. Natural England, Peterborough.

A. COVER SHEET - Form WML-A14-2 (Version April 2013)
The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (as amended)
Template for Method Statement to support application for licence under Regulation 53(2)(e) in 
respect of Great crested newts Triturus cristatus

Site/project name:
Thingley Bridge
Applicant (developer) name:
Network Rail
Named Ecologist:
Is this application for a new Method Statement (not previously licensed), a modification to a licensed 
Method Statement(non-annexed only), or a re-submission following a "Further Information Request" 
notice?
New method statement; not previously licensed
If a re-submission, please give previous application reference (EPSL or EPSM):
NB: For re-submissions and modifications (non-annexed) the Method Statement should be re-
submitted in it's entirety, including all maps, appendices, reports, etc.  You must clearly show 
any changes from the previously submitted version by underlining relevant text (CTRL-U).                                                                          

This space is for information on non-annexed licence  modifications  only.  Please note: modifications 
are not granted automatically, and you must demonstrate that the legislative tests are still met. In 
particular, any additional losses of habitat or other reductions in the quality or quantity of mitigation 
measures must be balanced with improvements.

Existing licence EPSL/EPSM #:
Reason for modification:
Further information:
Brief summary of action taken under the licence to date, including any losses or gains of newt habitat 
and numbers of translocated animals:
In undertaking this mitigation project, I agree to comply with good practice as set out in the Great 
crested newt mitigation guidelines 
 (English Nature, 2001). [Note: if you state "No" your application will 
almost certainly be rejected; you will be required to provide a justification. See comments on 
Technical mitigation issues  in Instructions]
Yes
If you carried out the rapid risk assessment on whether a licence is required (see earlier tab), please 
give the result here:
Contents: Click on a link to take you to start of each major section of this spreadsheet
Instructions
A Cover sheet
F Summary, G Refs, H Annexes
Licence risk assessment
B Introduction
I Map checklist
Conversions, Avoidance
C Survey & site assessment
Survey data guidance
D Impact assessment
HSI guidance
E Mitigation & compensation

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
The Conservation of Habitats and Species Regulations 2010 (as amended)
Method Statement to support application for licence under Regulation 53(2)(e)

NB: There is a maximum of 1393 characters (approx 225 words) in the  largest data entry sections 
so try to be concise with your descriptions and  ensure all text you enter is visible . If any question 
requires a more lengthy response, attach as a separate document, and reference in section I. 

B Introduction
B1 Background to development
B1.1 Location - site/project name
Thingley 
B1.2 Location - Local authority area
Wiltshire
B1.3 Location - OS grid reference (approx site centre, to 8 figures, format AB12345678)
ST89487016
B1.4 Land ownership(s)
Compound area owned by
Thingley Court Farm, Thingley. All other land owned by Network 
Rail
B1.5 Current landuse
Semi-natural - other (state below)
Other:
Embankments comprising scrub and herbaceous vegetation
B1.6 Development type
Improving existing structures (WWTW etc)
Other:
For liner developments provide start and finish grid references:
Need for proposed development (brief description)
Required as part of planned electrification of the Great Western Main Line.
B1.7 Planning status
Permitted development
Further planning status - more information, if necessary

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
B Introduction (continued)
Relationship with impacts due to other nearby development
B1.8 Is the current application part of a larger development project (e.g. a phased or multi-plot 
development
)? Is this project likely to have impacts on great crested newts in the local area in the 
future, or has it had any in the last 5 years?  For example, is it part of a phased mineral extraction, 
housing development or one plot in a multiple ownership residential scheme?
Yes
If yes, please provide below a summary of how the current  application  relates to the larger project. 
Note: sections in this  Method Statement on impact assessment and mitigation measures must 
explicitly relate to impacts from the development currently  proposed, but a separate  master plan is 
expected to take due regard of the overall project . This is important to ensure that in-combination 
effects are considered, and mitigation measures across the whole project are both sufficient and 
coherent. Summarise here how this has been achieved. 
NB:  If yes, a project-wide master plan must be included that details the over all impact assessment and mitigation.  
The master plan must be appended as a separate document to this method statement: see 
http://www.naturalengland.org.uk/Images/WML-G11_tcm6-9930.pdf for details that are required.  For this 
 method 
statement also include a map FIG. B1.8 -  -see "I Map checklist" tab.

The Great Western Electrification Scheme will include the construction of gantries and associated 
infrastructure to support Overhead Line Electrification (OLE), alteration to and demolition/replacement 
of a number of existing structures along the railway, some alteration of existing track heights for 
clearance beneath structures and ancillary works including the construction of feeder stations and 
switching station sites. As part of these works, no new railway would be constructed. The works 
required within the railway corridor are clearance of 6.6m of woody vegetation either side of the track 
to limit arcing of electricity (vegetation is currently maintained at 3.5m from the nearest running line), 
construction of OLE system and supports, power supply and distribution, track works to provide 
clearance for the OLE under structures (e.g. bridges and tunnels) and works to structures to provide 
clearance or support for the OLE system. This licence application relates to the works to one 
structure, required as part of this larger scheme.
B1.9 Apart from any mentioned in B1.8, are there other great crested newt mitigation projects which 
might affect the target population? Notes: Include any projects within 100m of site boundary, and any 
further away that are likely to seriously impact on the population at the site. Include current projects, 
any from the last 5 years, and any planned to happen within the next 5 years. You must make 
reasonable efforts to establish this, including discussions with your client and the LPA. 
Yes
If yes, provide summary information here, including site names, dates, and - if known - licence 
reference numbers:
There are no other known GCN mitigation projects which may affect the target population, within 100m 
of the site boundary or beyond. The OLE works are planned for this section of the route during 2015-
2016
NB: Locations of other GCN sites must be shown on FIG. B1.9 - see "I Map Checklist" tab

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
B Introduction (continued)
B2.1 Which licensable activities are requested?
Note: Enter "Yes" or "No" to indicate which activities you will be undertaking. For all "Yes" responses, 
except resting place activities, also enter a number. For activities affecting individual great crested 
newt(s), enter the maximum number of individuals you wish to capture, disturb etc. For breeding site 
activities, enter the number of breeding sites damaged or destroyed. The numbers are not mutually 
exclusive (so, for example, if you intend to take up to 50 newts, and also to disturb the same 50 
individuals, please list 50 in both the "Take" field and the "Disturb" field.)
Activity
Yes/no?
Number*
Capture
Yes
30
Injure*
No
Kill*
No
Disturb
Yes
30
Transport
Yes
30
Damage or destroy breeding site
No
Damage or destroy resting place
Yes
*injuring and killing will not normally be licensed in mitigation projects.
B2.2 Provide a very brief description of any construction activities in this project. E.g. "Construction of 
five flats with access road and car park". If there will be no construction activity, enter "None".
Demolition of bridge and construction of a replacement structure.

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C Survey and site assessment
C1 Pre-existing survey information on great crested newts at survey site
C1.1 Indicate conclusion on newts at development site from pre-existing survey data, if any. You 
should make reasonable efforts to find this data, including consulting the NBN Gateway and Local 
Records Centres.
Pre-existing survey indicates likely great crested newt presence
C1.2 Age of pre-existing survey data (years between now and latest survey)
Over 6 years
C1.3 Source(s) of pre-existing survey data; also include a copy or summary in the appendix
NBN and Backgrounnd Data Search Report
C2 Status of great crested newts in the local area
C2.1 Local status (within approx 10km). Note: often there will be only patchy data on newt distribution, 
but you may feel able to assign one of the categories below when combined with pond density figures 
for the local area. Note: this is only a rough measure.
Occasional - known or likely to occur at c. 1-5 ponds per square km
Further information on local status
C3 Recent survey (to inform this mitigation project)
C3.1 Objective of survey
To assess population size class of great crested newts in specified pond(s)
Other:
C3.2 Survey area and justification
Clearly state which areas (e.g. all ponds within 250 or 500m of the site) were surveyed and include 
pond numbers/references as appropriate. For linear developments, state how far either side of the 
route was surveyed (i.e. 250m on both sides). Provide a justification for the area surveyed.
All ponds within 500m of the development site were identified and surveyed.
What is the area (ha) of the development site?
0.5575
Any explanation of this figure, if needed:
NB: to accompany the survey section you must identify the survey area and  all  ponds within that area, 
indicating those surveyed from those not surveyed, on FIG. C3.2(a).  It is helpful to indicate the 250m 
and 500m radii limits around the development boundary.  An aerial photograph of the site and 
surrounding area is also useful - please label as FIG. C3.2(b) if included.  See "I Map Checklist" tab.


James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C3.3 Habitat description: waterbodies.                                                                                    Briefly 
describe all  waterbodies within your survey area. Please provide only a short text description, e.g. 
"Pond 1 is a small garden pond in the northwest of the site. Pond 2 is a marl pit pond in the centre of 
the site".  Include pond references (names). Attach information on a separate sheet if it will not fit 
here. Do not include Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) data here; this is to be added later in the Method 
Statement.  
Pond 1 is a small pond located within a hedgerow junction, it is completely shaded and surrounded by 
arable farmland. Pond 2 is a small pond surrounded by brambles and is situated within pastoral 
grasslands.
Waterbodies: distance from development site boundary and other ponds
Provide distance (to the nearest 10m) from the development site boundary for each pond within the 
survey area. If pond is on site, enter "0". If a pond on site or close to the development was not 
surveyed for great crested newts, still give the distance, and provide reason for not surveying.
Pond ref
Distance (m)
Surveyed for great crested newts?
1
410 Yes
2
80 Yes
C3.4 Habitat description: terrestrial habitats.                                                                          Briefly 
describe the terrestrial habitats present on the development site and any adjacent areas likely to 
support great crested newts, e.g. "Area A (5 ha) is predominantly ruderal grassland with scattered 
scrub. Area B (3.2 ha) is ancient woodland. Area C (0.5 ha) is a mosaic of scrub and neutral 
grassland". If there is no defined boundary to development site, use same rationale as in previous 
question.  These should be shown on Fig C3.2(a).
The area surrounding the site, including 0.067 Ha south of the site for use as a compound area, is 
made up of improved pastoral grassland. The railway emabnkment to the south, including the 0.048 
Ha southern quadrants, comprise continuous scrub, predominantly Hawthorn.  The northern 
quadrants, including 0.3625 Ha of the site, comprises rough grass and herbacious vegetation, 
predminantly nettle. 0.08 Ha of the site area is hard standing that comprising the road and bridge
NB: Photographs showing the habitats on site should be provided - FIG. C3.4 - see "I Map checklist" tab

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C3.5 Waterbodies: quantitative assessment. 
A Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) score should be calculated for each waterbody that would be 
subject to activities likely to result in adverse impacts on the local great crested newt population. 
See guidance in the Instructions section (Survey data and HSI tabs). It is not required for 
waterbodies subject to low impacts, though can be entered if you wish; this may be useful, for 
example, to provide objective evidence that the population affected is likely to be small.
In the boxes below, enter the Pond reference (or name) then the SI scores. The spreadsheet will 
automatically calculate the HSI. It is expected that, for each HSI, all ten SI scores should be 
entered in most cases. If you did not calculate a particular SI score, leave blank (do not enter "0"). 
If more than two variables are missing, the HSI should be treated as provisional and you should 
comment on this below. If more than 10 waterbodies need HSI scores, include additional 
information in an appendix, in the same format as below.
Pond ref
1
2
SI1 - Location
1
1
SI2 - Pond area
0.6
0.1
SI3 - Pond drying
0.5
0.9
SI4 - Water quality
0.67
1
SI4 - Shade
0.2
0.6
SI6 - Fowl
1
0.67
SI7 - Fish
1
1
SI8 - Ponds
0.98
0.98
SI9 - Terr'l habitat
0.33
0.33
SI10 - Macrophytes
0.3
0.3
HSI
0.57
0.57
Pond ref
SI1 - Location
SI2 - Pond area
SI3 - Pond drying
SI4 - Water quality
SI4 - Shade
SI6 - Fowl
SI7 - Fish
SI8 - Ponds
SI9 - Terr'l habitat
SI10 - Macrophytes
HSI
Comments and constraints on Habitat Suitability Index data for this project (if appropriate).  If ponds 
did not under go a HSI assessment please also explain why:

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4 Amphibian survey
C4.1 Terrestrial amphibian survey
Was a terrestrial survey undertaken?
No
If no, proceed to next section.
Objective of terrestrial survey:
Other objective:
Which area was surveyed for terrestrial amphibians?
Explain terrestrial survey area(s). Also mark on map, and give map reference here:
Fill in the boxes to show methods, timing, effort and results:
Survey start date:
Survey end date:
Method:
Refuge search
Pitfall
Night search
Other
Effort (suitable days):
No. of newts* found:
Total newts:
0
Metamorphs and immatures as percentage of total catch:
*for this section, "no. of newts" refers more accurately to "no. of newt observations", as individuals are 
not distinguished in typical surveys. If you have individual newt data, state below.
Comments on results, e.g. favoured areas, migration route, juvenile dispersal route. Also mark 
observations and locations newts found on a map, and give map reference here:
Indicate any other amphibian species found during terrestrial survey:
Lissotriton vulgaris
L. helveticus
Rana temporaria
Bufo bufo
Epidalea calamita
List any other amphibian species found, with comments on their status at the site:

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - great crested newt results - Pond 1
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Was an aquatic amphibian survey done?
Yes
If no, proceed to next section.
Total no. of ponds surveyed:
2 If >10 ponds or >8 visits for a pond, provide details, in same format, in an annex.
Surveyor name(s):
Important. Read before completing this section: Enter great crested newt survey data in relevant boxes in the table below (for Pond 1) and those on subsequent sheets (for up to 9 
other ponds). Enter "0" where you did a survey and found no newts; leave box blank if no survey was done. This format is designed for a typical single season survey with typical 
methods and effort. Explain atypical methods/effort later. For multiple year surveys, give details in annex (convert data to this format if possible). Use these tables to provide details 
only for the most recent season's survey. Append older survey results in full. Automatic yellow highlight indicates possible detectability problem (see Evaluation & interpretation 
section, later).
Pond reference (e.g. "Pond 1") - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
1
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
No. of survey visits to this pond:
(any method)
4
>= 1,000,000 cp
11-50 traps
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
No
No
29/04/2014
11
3
3 Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
No
No
30/04/2014
11
3
3 Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
No
No
01/05/2014
11
3
3 Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
No
No
02/05/2014
9
3
3 Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints: Netting not used as a survey method as GCNMG states two methods should be used and Torching and Bottle Trapping are the most 
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
effective methods
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 2)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 2) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
2
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
6
>= 1,000,000 cp
11-50 traps
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
Yes
No
29/04/2014
11
2
2 Adult totals:
0
1
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
1
0
0
2
1
0
No
30/04/2014
11
2
2 Adult totals:
1
3
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
No
01/05/2014
11
2
2 Adult totals:
0
1
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
No
02/05/2014
9
2
3 Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
1
0
7
3
0
No
06/05/2014
14
2
3 Adult totals:
1
10
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
0
0
0
2
4
0
No
07/05/2014
13
2
2 Adult totals:
0
6
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
10
Comments and constraints:
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 3)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 3) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints:
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 4)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 4) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints:
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 5)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 5) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints:
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 6)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 6) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints:
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 7)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 7) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints:
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 8)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 8) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints:
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 9)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 9) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints:
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey - crested newt results (continued - Pond 10)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
Pond reference (e.g. Pond 10) - enter in box 
Method:
Torch
Bottle-trap
Net
Egg search
Larvae
below:
Torch power:
No. of traps used in pond:
larvae found? 
(any method)
No. of survey visits to this pond:
Sex/life stage: Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
Male
Female
Imm.
eggs found?
(1) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(2) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(3) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(4) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(5) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(6) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(7) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
(8) Date:
Air temp
Veg cover
Turbidity
0
Adult totals:
0
0
0
Peak adult count for this pond in any one visit (by torch, trap or net):
0
Comments and constraints:   
Temp Veg Tur 
0 problem?
Torch power low
0 ?
Visit 1 overall det problem
0 ?
# ponds
2

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C4.2 Aquatic amphibian survey (continued)
NB: This page prints in landscape format
If appropriate, state other great crested newt survey methods and results, including rationale for using these other methods:
Confirm that you have checked current conditions by carrying out a walk-over survey within 3 months prior to application submission.
Yes
If the survey was not undertaken this year, detail any changes to habitats (aquatic and terrestrial) on site since the survey was initially carried out below.
Was a population estimate derived, e.g. using Capture-Mark-Recapture methods?
No
If no, proceed to next question.  If yes, append summary methods & results to method statement (must include confidence intervals, sampling effort and recapture rate).
Other amphibian species - peak counts (enter additional information in appendix if necessary, e.g. very large population detected, or non-native species present)
Species:
L. vulgaris
L. helveticus
R. temporaria
B. bufo
E. calamita
Pond ref
1-10 adults; no eggs or 
Not found
Not found
Not found
Not found
1 larvae
Pond ref
1-10 adults + eggs and/or 
Not found
Not found
Not found
Not found
2 larvae
Pond ref
0
Pond ref
0
Pond ref
0
Pond ref
0
Pond ref
0
Pond ref
0
Pond ref
0
Pond ref
0

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
C5 Interpretation and evaluation
Summary of presence, peak count, population size class and habitat quality
Enter whether great crested newts (any life stage) were detected for each pond, and HSI score for 
each pond subject to adverse impacts (see guidance in instructions). The other fields (in blue) should 
be generated automatically based on data you have entered in previous sheets.
Pond ref
Gt. crested 
Peak adult 
Pop size 
HSI 
Low detect-
Peak count 
newts 
count
class
ability 
visit number
detected?
warning*
1 No
0
0.57
Yes
10
Small
0.57
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
*Note: The detectability column will state "Caution" if your data suggest any survey was done in poor conditions (temp<5C, veg 
cover>3, turbidity>3 or torch power <500,000 cp); otherwise it is blank. Aquatic newt surveys should not be carried out when air 
temp is <5C or with weak torches as results can be misleading. Whilst careful timing can sometimes avoid vegetation and 
turbidity problems, they are inevitable at some sites. It may be appropriate to undertake more detailed surveys and 
interpretation techniques (e.g. CMR). If this column returns "Caution", or there is any other reason to suspect detectability 
problems, you should be especially careful about interpreting counts, and comment on this in the constraints box below.
Peak total site count**:
10
** This figure is derived as follows. For each survey visit, the spreadsheet picks the highest count of adult newts obtained by 
torch, net or bottle-trap for each pond. These individual pond counts are then summed to give a site count for each visit. The 
peak total site count is then the highest of these figures, i.e. highest summed count across all ponds attained on any one visit. 
This figure may derive from counts using a mixture of methods (torch, bottle-trap or net) - see adjacent table which shows how 
the figure is derived. The calculations assume survey visits per pond are undertaken within similar timeframes, if this is not the 
case, this Peak total site count should be calculated by hand and reasons for it explained in the general comments text box 
below.
Population size class for site***:
Small
*** this automatically generated size class assumes that it is appropriate to aggregate counts from all ponds, i.e. there is likely 
to be newt movement between ponds, for example where each pond is within approx 250m of another, with no significant 
barriers to dispersal. If this is not the case, please explain in box below and give alternative accounts of peak total site counts 
and population size class for the site. For surveys of >10 ponds, data should be added to appendix provided, and note that 
peak counts etc will need to be derived separately.
Site status assessment (see Section 5.8.5 of Great crested newt mitigation guidelines  for guidance):
Quantitative
Minor importance - small population
Qualitative
Moderate - breeding on site; habitats common in area
Functional
Moderate importance - probably some dispersal to/from nearby population(s)
Contextual
Unknown
General comments on overall site status, and constraints to interpretation and evaluation

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
D Impact assessment
N.B: this section must identify impacts in the absence of mitigation or compensation measures.  Refer 
to the Great crested newt mitigation guidelines  for guidance in impact types (section 6). 
NB: Impacts must be shown on FIG. D - see "I Map checklist" tab.  Ensure all habitats types that will be 
affected by the proposals and impacts on them (indicating whether temporary or permanent) are clearly 
indicated and 50m, 250m and 500m radii are shown around great crested newt ponds.

D1 Pre- and mid-development impacts: descriptive text. Example: "Vegetation clearance and archaeological 
investigations in Area A (Xha) would kill and injure newts, and damage core refuge sites (consisting of X (ha) of X habitat and 
Y (ha) of Y habitat, etc), close to Pond 1. Moderate negative impact on population." 
Clearance of embankment vegetation and top soil ( 0.4105 Ha ) and pastoral grassland (0.067 Ha) 
would kill or injure newts. Moderate negative impact. 0.08 Ha of the site area comprises the road 
bridge
D2 Long-term impacts: descriptive text. Example: "Construction of Plot 1 (X ha) in Area B (Xha) would kill and 
injure newts, destroy Pond 1 (a breeding site) and destroy 0.7ha of core terrestrial habitat, consisting of 0.2ha of rough 
grassland and 0.5ha of deciduous woodland, around Pond 1. Creation of play area in Area C (Xha) would reduce grassland 
value for newts. Construction of Plot 1 would create significant dispersal barrier between Ponds 1 and 2. Serious negative 
impact on population."
Following remediation, habitats are allowed to regenerate.  Neutral impact on population
D3 Post-development interference impacts: descriptive text. Example: "Major increase in risk of fish and 
invasive aquatic plant introduction due to creation of large residential development adjacent to pond. Potentially serious 
negative impact on population."
None anticipated
D4 Other impacts: descriptive text. Example: "Reduced water table due to altered local hydrology when development 
is complete. Increased early pond desiccation, resulting in lower breeding success. Likely serious negative impact on 
population."

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
D Impact assessment (continued)
D5.1 Quantititative impact assessment

Complete info for each pond that supports, or is likely to support, great crested newts **. Select HSI/peak count/presence category (choose peak count if available). Then 
select effects. N.B. state the effects of the development without any mitigation/compensation  you may have planned. For sites with >10 ponds, please include these details 
in an appended document. In drop-down options, "-ve" = negative, "destrn" = destruction, "dmg" = damage, "terrl" = terrestrial. The boxes will automatically turn 
red/amber/blue to indicate high/medium/low scale of impact.
Pond ref
HSI / peak count / 
Effect on pond
Effect on 
Effect on 
Effect on distant 
Fragmentation 
Interference and 
presence
immediate 
intermediate terr'l 
terrestrial habitat 
effect
other effects
terrestrial habitat 
habitat (50-250m 
(>250m from pond)
(<50m from pond)
from pond)
HSI 0.5-0.59 ("below average")
No effect
No effect
No effect
Temporary -ve effect
No fragmentation
No effect
1
Peak count 1-10
No effect
No effect
Temporary -ve effect
No effect
No fragmentation
No effect
2
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
**Notes on terms in these tables: "Ponds" must include all known or 
D5.2 Quantitative summary of long-term impacts: enter data in table:
suspected breeding ponds, plus any that are likely to be used by great 
Impact
Number or area 
crested newts for foraging. Area of ponds to be calculated by measuring or 
(ha) to be lost
estimating extent at winter maximum. "Terrestrial habitat" here includes 
Number of ponds to be lost
0 any land likely to be important to the local great crested newt population for 
Number of ponds to be damaged
0 foraging, resting, hibernating or dispersal. This means, for example, that 
Total area of ponds to be lost (ha)
0 even unvegetated or sparsely vegetated areas close to high quality newt 
Area of immediate terrestrial habitat (<50m from pond) to be lost
0 ponds (within around 50m) should be included in impact assessments; this 
Area of immediate terrestrial habitat (<50m from pond) to be damaged
0 could apply to quarry floors, arable and amenity grassland. Areas may be 
excluded from calculations if you assess that they are substantially isolated 
Area of intermediate terrestrial habitat (50-250m from pond) to be lost
0
by barriers to dispersal and therefore highly unlikely to be used by newts; 
Area of intermediate terrestrial habitat (50-250m from pond) to be damaged
0.5575 this may even include apparently high quality areas. Areas may also be 
Area of distant terrestrial habitat (>250m from pond) to be lost
0 excluded if you believe for any other reason that they are highly unlikely to 
Area of distant terrestrial habitat (>250m from pond) to be damaged
0 be used by newts.
NB: Temporary habitat losses followed by habitat re-instatement - include under 'damage'
Note: there is space to comment on data in these tables in the next worksheet

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
D Impact assessment
D6 Provide general comments on the impacts of the development.
 Place the impacts in a wider 
context, and if necessary comment on the data provided in the previous impact assessment tables. 
Small amounts of habitat will be temporarily damaged to facilitate construction of new structure, once 
complete habitats will be reinstated with no net loss of habitat.

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
E Mitigation and compensation
E1 Mitigation strategy.
 Provide an overview of how the impacts will be addressed in order to ensure 
no detriment to the maintenance of the population at a favourable conservation status. If a non-
adjacent (ex situ ) receptor site is proposed, include sound justification and rationale for this.
 All four quadrants of the bridge and areas used for compound and access will have temporary 
amphibian fencing erected to encircle those areas. Pitfall traps will be placed at 10m intervals and a 
minimum capture effort of 30 suitable days will be employed to clear the site (small population, 
low/temporary impact) along with hand searches and destructive searches once capture is complete.  
Where practicable top soil will be retained and used to remediate habitats following work , utilising the 
native seed bank.  Four hibernacula will be created along the railway corridor.
E2 Receptor site selectionNB: this relates to the place(s) where any captured newts will be 
released, or the place(s) where newts displaced (e.g. by fencing) will arrive. It does not just refer to 
distant receptor sites. Enter details unless no newts will be captured or displaced.  
NB: Location of the receptor site in relation to the development site must be provided on FIG. E2 - see "I 
Map checklist" tab

E2.1 Existing great crested newt status at receptor site(s)
Great crested newts present; small population size class
E2.2 Survey information for receptor site: briefly summarise what surveys have been carried out to 
establish great crested newt status at receptor site. Include year, month, methods, effort and main 
results.
All ponds to be used as receptor ponds are geographically close to the site and surveyed as part of 
this scheme between April / May 2014 during 4 or 6 visits using bottle trapping, torching and egg 
searching. Results concluded small GCN breeding population associated with pond 2.
E2.3 Receptor site(s): location. Must include: site name, OS grid ref (8 figures, format AB12345678), 
admin area if different from development site, distance from development site.
Network Rail Estate, ST89317007, 50m from development site 
E2.4 Receptor site(s): ownership and land status. Include: planning status of the land and whether it 
has any conservation designation. (Confirm landowner agreement for the use of the receptor site/s if 
the land is outside of the applicant's land ownership, in Declaration worksheet J 
).
Owned by Network Rail, no designations cover this site, land forms part of infrastructure and 
embankments are safe from future development.
E2.5 Receptor site: habitat description, size (in ha) and adjacent land use.
Habitats consist of dense continuous scrub with grass verges along the length of the railway.  Site is 
set in a rural environment and surrounded by pastoral grassland.

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
E Mitigation & compensation (continued)
E3 Habitat creation, restoration and/or enhancement
Quantitative summary of habitat creation, restoration or enhancement measures
The left side of table below summarises the impacts you specified in section D. Enter the habitat creation, restoration and/or enhancement that 
will be undertaken to compensate for these impacts in the right hand column.
Habitat
Impacts
Compensation
Effect
Number or area 
Habitat creation, restoration or enhancement measure
Number or area (ha) 
(ha) lost
gained
Breeding ponds
No. Waterbodies lost
0 No. Waterbodies to be created
0
No. Waterbodies damaged
0 No. Waterbodies to be restored or enhanced
0
Area of Waterbodies to be lost
0 Total area of Waterbodies to be created
0
Total area of Waterbodies to be restored or enhanced
0
Core terrestrial 
Core terrestrial habitat lost or damaged
0 Area of habitat within 50m of breeding Waterbody to be created, 
0
habitat
enhanced or reinstated
Intermediate terr'l 
Intermediate terrestrial habitat lost or 
0.5575 Area of habitat 50-250m of breeding Waterbody to be created, 
0.5575
habitat
damaged
enhanced or reinstated
Distant terrestrial 
Distant terrestrial habitat lost or damaged
0 Area of habitat >250m of breeding Waterbody to be created, 
0
habitat
enhanced or reinstated
If appropriate, comment on the above figures for habitat creation, restoration or enhancement (eg: "The small net loss of terrestrial habitat will be addressed by 
enhanced quality in created and retained areas. This will be done by...")
NB:  All  habitat creation, restoration and enhancement measures must be shown on FIG. E3.1 - see "I Map checklist" tab
All areas of damaged habitat will be reinstated following completion of the scheme resulting in no net loss of habitat.
E3.1a Describe the location(s) of aquatic habitat creation, restoration or enhancement measures. (Confirm  landowner agreement for these measures, if they 
are to be created on land outside of the applicant's land ownership, in Declaration worksheet J). 
No aquatic work proposed.
E3.1b Describe the creation, restoration or enhancement of aquatic habitats (include design and water body dimensions as per mitigation guidelines: 
these will be included in any annexed licence issued 
).  NB: Only put timing of aquatic creation, restoration or enhancement in the timetable E6a.
No aquatic work proposed.

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
E Mitigation & compensation (continued)
E3.2 Terrestrial habitat measures
State number/area/length of any terrestrial habitat measures. Leave blank if not applicable. Please 
describe management methods and any novel designs or techniques in free text box below or in 
appendix. *Dimensions of hibernacula are expected to be at least  that recommended in the mitigation 
guidelines.
Number/area/length
Hedgerow planting
0
Grassland re-seeding
0.4775
Grassland management
0
Scrub planting
0
Woodland planting
0
Hibernacula creation*
4
Refuge creation
0
0
Describe any other terrestrial habitat measures, including locations & design. (Confirm landowner 
agreement for these measures, if they are to be created on land outside of the applicant's ownership, in 
Declaration worksheet J).  
 NB: Do not put in specific dates here; add these into E6a (separate document).
4no hibernacula will be created within Network Rail estate boundary within 250m of the site. To preserve 
diversity of habitat onsite top soil will be retained and reused when the site is reinstated so as to utilise 
the existing seed bank where feasible.  From this, ruderal habitats, can be expected to regenerate as well 
as some scrub regeneration. 0.08 Ha of the site will remain as hard standing (existing road) and is 
omitted from the table above
E3.3 Integration with roads and other hard landscapes.
Explain any measures you will take to integrate mitigation with roads and other hard landscapes. If you 
propose any connectivity measures, such as underpasses, the design (including length, width and 
height), installation, monitoring and maintenance must be specified (please refer to guidance in section 8 
of the Great crested newt mitigation guidelines). 
NB: Locations & details of any proposed connectivity measures must be provided on FIG. E3.3 - see "I Map 
checklist" tab

  
E3.4 Integration with other species and habitat requirements.
If relevant, explain briefly how the great crested newt mitigation measures will be integrated with 
measures for other species and habitats.

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
E Mitigation & compensation (continued)
E4 Capture, exclusion & translocation:
  Please do not refer to any dates in this section  - these 
should be provided in E6a.
State capture +/or exclusion methods, with effort levels.   See notes over page. 
Use 
Minimum capture 
method?
effort (days)
At waterbody: bottle-trap, net, hand search &/or drain down
No
At waterbody: ring-fence, pitfall trap (+ fence & refuges)
No
Away from waterbody: hand search
Yes
30
Away from waterbody: destructive search
Yes
5
Away from waterbody: fence, pitfall trap (+ fence & refuges)
Yes
30
Away from waterbody: night search
No
Away from waterbody: exclusion fence only 
Yes
365
Other or additional method(s) - state below:
No
NB:   Capture effort must cease if weather conditions become unsuitable (see over & GCNMG).
Amphibian fencing should not be removed during hibernation/dormancy periods if newts may be 
hibernating/dormant in any cracks between the fence and the ground.

A minimum of 25 nights trapping will only be acceptable in  exceptional circumstances  which are 
fully justified and explained .  See guidance on capture effort at bottom of the page.

Capture location(s). State where capture/exclusion will occur and where newts will be released. 
Exclusion fence with pitfall traps will be placed around structure quadrants and compound / access 
areas.  Newts captured within these areas will be moved off site to receptor areas and placed safely in 
sheltered habitat.
NB: Locations of all capture/exclusion activities must be shown on FIG. E4(a).  Any non-standard 
capture/exclusion measures should be detailed on FIG. E4(b) - see "I Map checklist" tab.

Briefly explain your capture/exclusion proposals (e.g. where amphibian fencing will go, the use of any 
drift fencing, pitfall trap and artificial refugia density and spacing, details of enhanced capture efforts, 
where hand and/or destructive searches will take place etc 
).  (NB: if a very complex capture operation 
is proposed, provide further details in an appendix; min. effort must be stated):
  Standard exclusion fence erected around site perimeter.  Pitfall traps placed at 10m intervals along 
each length of fence.  This method to run for min 30 days.  Hand searches will take place on all areas 
containing rubble, logs, debris etc min 30 days concurrent with trapping, followed by 5 days of 
destructive searches taking place following 5 clear days at the end of the trapping programme.  Due to 
restrictions over proximity of working near a live running rail, ringfencing the site as a whole is not 
possible.  Fencing will be placed along the top embankments and then run down the embankment to 
the ballast bed, encircling as much of the quadrant as possible.

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
E Mitigation & compensation (continued)
E5 Post-development site safeguard.
 Refer to Section 8.5 of the Great crested newt mitigation guidelines.
E5.1 Habitat management & maintenance
Is any specific post-development habitat management and site maintenance planned? 
No
If no, proceed to population monitoring section.
State which of the following habitat management operations will occur:
Aquatic vegetation management in water bodies
Clearance of shading tree or scrub cover around waterbody margins
Mowing, cutting or grazing of grassland
Desilting and clearance of leaf-fall 
Woodland and scrub management
Other (state below)
NB: Details of site management and maintenance should be shown on FIG. E5.1. - see "I Map checklist" tab.  Indicate 
which areas (including which ponds) the management and maintenance plan will apply to.

State which of the following site maintenance operations will occur:
Checking for fish presence, and removal through appropriate methods
Checking pond condition and remedial action as required
Checking for and removal of dumped rubbish
Reinstatement following fire, acute pollution or other major damage
Repair or replace fences
Maintain tunnel, underpass etc in good condition
Repair or replace interpretation boards
Other (state below)
State the period for which habitat management and maintenance plan will continue:
NOTE: A separate, detailed plan must also be attached if (a) population size class is large and impacts are moderate-high, (b) 
regionally important population and impacts are moderate-high, (c) losses of > 2 breeding water bodies on site supporting 
medium size class population, or (d) phased or multi-plot developments. Organisations involved with the development should 
demonstrate a commitment to the plan.
Indicate if such a document is attached:
E5.2 Post-development population monitoring (refer to Section 8.5.2 of the GCNMG and advice at beginning of 
this template).
NB: Details of water bodies which will be monitored post development must be shown and referenced on FIG. E5.2. - 
see "I Map checklist" tab.  

NB: It is the licensee's responsibility to ensure that post development monitoring is carried out and that remedial 
action is taken if compensation measures are failing.

State whether any population monitoring will be carried out:
No
If no, proceed to next section
Indicate timing and type of post-development population monitoring:
Timing (years post-dev't):
Type of monitoring:
Comments on monitoring period, methods or effort. Specify which water bodies will be monitored:          
NB:  A Natural England mitigation licence will not confer rights of access to monitor water bodies or 
other habitats which lie outside the licensee's ownership. Permission/s should be granted prior to 
applying for a licence. Please see Declaration section in worksheet J.


James Smith: Thingley Bridge
E Mitigation & compensation (continued)
E5.3 Mechanism for ensuring site safeguard and post-development works
NB:  this must be 
agreed in full before submitting the formal licence application.
Site safeguard
Undertaking to submit formal record of population as it stands in the final scheme layout: Note to be 
sent to Local Records Centre, County Recorder, national recording scheme (where they exist) and to 
the relevant contact at the LPA. To be done before completion of development, or within 1 year of 
grant of licence (whichever is sooner). To include site name, OS grid reference and brief summary of 
survey and capture data.
I undertake to comply with this requirement
Yes
State the email addresses of the above contacts (to whom you will send this information):
Wilts ARG - xxxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx, Wilts & Swindon Biological Records Centre - 
xxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx, 
Other mechanism(s) for ensuring site safeguard (e.g. Restrictive Covenant, clause to relinquish future 
development rights in S106 agreement, NERC Act agreement, explicit recognition of site in local 
planning documents, designation as County Wildlife Site or similar.) The need for this, and the type of 
mechanism, will vary with the scheme and impact. For substantial impact schemes, some mechanism 
is always required. 
 If you offer no specific mechanism, explain how you believe the population will be 
free of threats as far as can be reasonably determined.
The site is a railway embankment where future development is not possible, however, as an active 
railway ongoing maintenance is essential.  The site, receptor sites and surrounding areas are well 
outside the regional strategy for development so no planning permission can be given for development 
in this area.
Post-development works
How will all post-development works (management, maintenance (including remedial action) and 
monitoring, as appropriate) be ensured?
Select mechanism:
Other, or combination of mechanisms (state below)
Further information on mechanism. Including whose responsibility it is for undertaking each element of 
work, parties to any agreements, etc. Confirm that works will proceed subject to grant of licence:
 Contractual arrangement between Development Ecology (ecologists), Network Rail (sponsor) and 
Murphy Group (contractor).  Works will proceed subject to grant of licence.
NOTE: a copy of any significant document, such as a Section 106 agreement, must be attached.

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
E Mitigation & compensation (continued)  (NOTE: this version should only be used for non-annexed licence modifications and NOT NEW APPLICATIONS 
submitted after end April 2013 - for which a separate work schedule, WML-A14a- E6a&E6b, must be completed)
E6 Work schedule:  
Please ensure that this section is S.M.A.R.T and appropriate timescales are provided for each activity, to fit with order of events.
Mandatory for all projects. Complete these schedules to show timings for all major categories of work in section E (mitigation and compensation meaures), and to show the main construction 
period. The most common activities are listed here, and you can add up to 4 more if needed. Leave blank if not applicable. Enter timing by stating start and end dates, to nearest month and year 
(see first line for example). Enter comments if you need to clarify timings. For very complex schemes (e.g. high impact or phased development schemes) state at bottom and attach a separate 
schedule. 
A) Pre-development and mid-development
Activity
Timing
Comments
Example: Receptor site pond creation
Nov-11 to Dec-11
also plant pond up with native species in January 2013
Receptor site pond creation
Receptor site pond enhancement
Receptor site terrestrial hab works - general e.g. reseeding, hedge planting
Receptor site terrestrial hab works - features e.g. hibernacula, refuges
Construction of permanent fences/walls
Construction of underpass/tunnel/culvert (and installation of 'guide' fencing)
Newt fence installation (to include drift fencing if applicable)
Newt capture (pitfall trapping etc - outside hibernation/dormancy periods only)
Pond draining and pond destruction (please indicate which will occur when)
Hand searches
Destructive searches
Construction period (start and end dates)
Site checks & maintenance during construction
Drift fence removal (not to be undertaken during hibernation/dormancy periods)
Newt fence removal (not to be undertaken during hibernation/dormancy periods)
Habitat reinstatement (for temporary impact schemes only)
Post construction mitigation/compensation on dev't site or other (provide details) 
B) Post-development works - type a "Y" where each activity will occur for a given year, as per the work specified in E5, and leave blank for no activity. 
Year:
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
2021
2022
2023
2024
Population monitoring
Habitat management
Site maintenance
Scheme is complex, therefore I have attached a separate works schedule:

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
F Summary
F1 Give a brief summary of the development, and the mitigation strategy you have set out to ensure it 
meets the "favourable conservation status" test.  
NB: Please show the final layout on FIG. F1. - see "I Map checklist" tab.
As part of plans for the electrification of the railway structures must be adapted to support the new 
infrastructure. To replace the existing bridge 0.5575 Ha of habitat must be temporarily damaged to 
facilitate the work.  Bridge quadrants and compound areas will be ring fenced and trapped for a min 30 
days.  4no hibernacula will be created nearby and newts will be translocated into surrounding habitat 
following completion, habitats will be reinstated.
G References
G1 List any documents previously referred to:
H Annexes
H1 Have you attached a management & maintenance plan?
No
H2 Have you attached any documents relating to long-term site safeguard and funding mechanism for 
management (e.g. Section 106 Agreement)?
No
H3 Have you attached pre-existing survey reports?
Yes
H4 Have you attached any further documents? (Include here any other documents critical to the 
mitigation project, e.g. hydrological assessment)
Yes
If yes, please state title(s):
BDS Records Search Route 7x, RSK

James Smith: Thingley Bridge
I Checklist of maps, photographs and diagrams
You must provide maps, photographs and diagrams to adequately explain the mitigation plans. Use 
the checklist below to state which ones you are attaching. The items marked * are mandatory for all 
schemes
. Additional maps, photos or diagrams should be included where necessary to adequately 
explain the scheme; suggestions are given below, and you may attach others if helpful.
Map guidance: Ensure maps have the following features:
~ Title and reference
~ Scale bar: 100m on site maps, and 1km on location maps
~ Direction of North
~ Survey maps: all ponds to be indicated regardless of newt status; great crested newt 
breeding ponds clearly marked; 500m radii shown around the development footprint
~ Impact assessment maps: show 50m, 250m and 500m radii around great crested newt 
breeding ponds and others that will be affected by the proposed works. It must clearly 
show areas and habitat types to be affected by development (destroyed, damaged, and 
temporary impacts as appropriate). 
~ all habitat creation measures to be shown on the relevant maps.
Click box to state whether each figure is attached (those marked * are mandatory to be submitted with 
the licence application.  Those marked ** are mandatory and will also form part of any annexed 
licence (from end April 2013)):
Yes
**B1.8 Project-wide Masterplan map (NB: mandatory for phased or multip-plot dev's)
Yes
*B1.9 Map to show locations of other nearby great crested newt mitigation sites
Yes
*C3.2(a) Map to show development site location, survey area and ponds
Yes
C3.2(b) Aerial photograph to show development site location and survey area
Yes
*C3.4 Photographs to show habitats on development site
**D Map to show impacts: habitat damage and destruction (to include habitat types and 
Yes
losses (ha))
Yes
**E2 Map to show location of receptor site in relation to development site
Yes
**E3.1 Map to show all habitat creation, restoration and enhancement measures
**E3.3 Diagram to show mitigation connectivity measures (e.g. underpasses) (if applicable) 
No
Yes
**E4(a) Map to show capture and exclusion measures
No
**E4(b) Diagram to show non-standard capture/exclusion measures (if applicable)
Yes
**E5.1 Map to show post development management and maintenance
**E5.2 – Showing all waterbodies that wil  be surveyed as part of post development 
No
monitoring, with their water body references (if applicable)
Yes
**F1 Map to show final layout of development and mitigation measures
List any other maps, photographs or diagrams attached:


James Smith: Thingley Bridge
J Declarations
N/A
Re: E2: I confirm that relevant landowner consent/s has/have been granted to accept great 
crested newts onto land outside the applicant's ownership.
N/A
Re: E3.1 and E3.2 – I confirm that landownership consent/s has/have been granted to 
allow the creation of the proposed habitat compensation (aquatic or terrestrial) on land 
outside the applicant's ownership.
N/A
Re: E5.2 – I confirm that consent/s has/have been granted by the relevant landowner/s for 
monitoring and maintenance purposes, as set out in E5.2, on land outside the applicant's 
ownership.
Unsecured consents statement :  
If you have been unable to secure consents for any of the three declarations please explain why and 
detail any plans you have in place to obtain the consent(s) or provide details of any right(s) or 
agreement(s) that will enable the lawful implementation of the proposed mitigation, compensation and 
monitoring.  Important Note: Failure to provide the appropriate landowner consents means that the 
method statement is unlikely to meet the requirements for the FCS test to be met.  It is therefore in 
your interest to ensure that the appropriate consents have been secured before applying for a licence.