This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Information around research on, safety & use of Stinger & similar devices against motorcycles.'.



 
 
 
Report for the National Pursuit Steering Group 
 
Motorcycles – Pursuit and Tactics 
July  2015 
 
 
Executive Summary 
 
This report considers the tactical options available to stopping motor cycles by the use 
of hollow spike tyre deflation devices (HoSTYDS). 
 
The police service has developed a high degree of risk aversion or ineffectiveness in 
respect  of  dealing  with  motor  cycle  community  problems  or  pursuits.  As  a  result  a 
number  of  incidents  where  the  paralysis  of  the  police  in  respect  of  dealing  with 
criminals using motorcycles has been exposed. 
 
Recent  examples  of  the  extensive  use  of  motor  cycles  engaged  in  serious  criminal 
activity  and  in  anti  social  behaviour  have  been  highlighted  in  BBC  and  other  media 
coverage  which  highlights  some  of  the  problems  facing  the  police.  Operational 
examples of these problems are wide ranging, with examples from the Metropolitan, 
Merseyside, Greater Manchester and others. 
 
This  situation  follows  the  understandable  perceived  logic  that  tactics  to  stop  motor 
cyclists,  other  than  in  a  close  range  confinement  tactic,  such  as  boxing,  are  too 
dangerous to the rider and should not be attempted. 
 
The risk to the rider of applying pursuit tactics or resolution is far too often given greater 
consideration  or  priority  than  the  risk  that  offending  riders  may  pose  to  other  road 
users.   
 

 
Rising trends have resulted in criminal groups getting bolder in their approach 
 
and social media being used to organise large group gatherings on motor  
 
cycles to create havoc, mayhem and obvious high risk situations to other road  
 
users.   
 
This necessitates a different approach to dealing with these problems. 
 
The public perception of the police service ‘standing back’ and allowing such activity 
to  continue,  without  considering  initiatives  to  engage  the  subject  and  machine  is 
something that has to be re-considered. 
 
The risks of motor cycle pursuits are well recognised.  However  these risks are not 
directly proportionate to the additional risks under normal driving conditions. Additional 
risks are generally confined to the riders of offending  motorcycles, and there should 
be no more risk to the police or members of the public than any other pursuit. 
 
In the interests of public assurance and Police effectiveness in dealing with high risk 
and serious criminal offences committed involving motorcycles, the decision to explore 
the use of HoSTYDS stopping devices against motorcycle tyres was commissioned by 
the  NPCC  leads  for  pursuits  and  driver  training.    Tests  have  been  carried  out  to 
establish  the  effect  such  hollow  spike  devices  have  on  motor  cycle  tyres  and  the 
resultant handling characteristics of the machine. 
 
The  rationale  for  this  testing  follows  exhaustive  consideration  of  other  options  in 
consultation with the Home Office Centre of Applied Science and Technology (CAST). 
 
Introduction 
 
Current  policy  in  relation  to  pursuit  of  motorcycles  is  informed  by  the  Authorised 
Professional Practice (APP) and police pursuits tactics directory. 
The  APP  is  a  public  document,  whilst  the  tactics  directory  is  a  restricted  police 
operational manual only. 
The following is taken from the pursuits APP: 
There may be a public interest in engaging motorcycles and quads in pursuits. Where 
such vehicles are used to facilitate serious crime or used repeatedly as the mode of 
transport for organised crime groups then, to minimise risk to the public from criminality 
 Page 2 of 12 

 
and  to  secure  public  confidence  in  policing,  a  pursuit  may  be  justified.  Careful 
consideration must be given to the risks involved and the NDM must be applied in the 
decision making process. 
 
Historically, commentary from the IPCC was used as a barometer favouring caution.   
The IPPC stated the following: 
“We believe that pursuits of motorcycles can be very dangerous as the rider is much 
more vulnerable than a driver or occupant of a car, and the tactical options for bringing 
the  pursuit  to  an  end  are  very  limited.  Currently  the  danger  is that  officers  initiate  a 
pursuit,  and  without  any  tactics  available  to  end  it  simply  wait  until  ‘something 
happens’.  We  therefore  believe  that  these  pursuits  should  be  limited  to  instances 
where a serious crime has been committed and that ACPO should seek to define this 
more clearly in future revisions to the Pursuit Guidelines. If a situation arises where 
due to public safety it is absolutely necessary for the police to pursue a motorcyclist, 
we believe that if possible a police helicopter should be deployed to take control of the 
pursuit and allow the police vehicle on the ground to pull back. This might help to limit 
the risks the motorcyclist will take to avoid capture and ensure a safer resolution of the 
pursuit.” (Docking et al, 2007 p.17) 
 
 
Risks of Pursuits Involving Motorcycles 
 
A trend can be seen over the last decade towards a reduction in police pursuit deaths 
(Teers, 2014, p. 7).  However there remains a number of fatalities each year.  
 
Year 
04/05  05/06  06/07  07/08  08/09  09/10  10/11  11/12  12/13  13/14  14/15 
14 
RTI Fatalities 
43 
42 
35 
18 
33 
26 
24 
19 
31 
12 
Pursuit 

22 
27 
19 
11 
16 
17 
13 
12 
27 
10 
Related 
 
Statistics show a KSI reduction from 1994 to 2013 of 58.8% reduction for cars (Keep 
&  Rutherford,  2013),  with  similar  or  greater  reductions  for  pedestrians,  LGVs  and 
PSVs. However, over the same time period, there has only been a 14.8% reduction for 
motorbikes. Statistics from the US presented by Lin & Kraus (2009, p.711) suggest per 
mile  travelled  under  normal  conditions, motorcyclists  are  34 times more  likely  to  be 
killed and 8 times more likely to be injured than those using other vehicles, however it 
 Page 3 of 12 

 
must be remembered that this is under normal driving conditions, which as discussed 
later, are different to pursuit conditions.  
 
When  actually  involved  in  a  collision,  riders  are  3  times  more  likely  to  be  killed  or 
seriously  injured  than  drivers.  Carter  et  al  (2014)  identify  that  those  not  wearing 
helmets are 2.8 times more likely to be fatally injured in a collision. However, caution 
must  be  taken  when  referring  to  these  figures,  as  attention  is  drawn  to  numerous 
differences that make these not like for like statistics. For example, types of use (social 
and enthusiast use at speed more prevalent with motorcycles rather than commuter 
use), age and inexperience,  alcohol use, all go some way to offsetting the headline 
figures.  
 
Wells  and  Falcone  (1997,  p.744)  in  reviewing  several  research  studies  surrounding 
pursuits  situations,  identified  that  around  25%  of  pursuits  ended  in  a  collision, 
regardless  of  vehicle  type.  This  suggests  that  while  the  outcome  of  a  collision  in  a 
pursuit situation are statistically significantly more severe for the rider when involved 
in  a  collision,  unlike  in  normal  road  use  conditions,  a  motorcycle  is  not  necessarily 
more likely to actually be involved in a collision during pursuit. 
 
No evidence could be found to suggest a higher risk to other members of the public or 
police from motorcycle pursuits. A logical argument could be that if collision rates in 
pursuits are similar, due to the lighter weight and smaller dimensions of a motorcycle, 
it is likely to be less injurious to other members of the public, and impacts with other 
vehicles less likely to cause harm to the occupants of other vehicles. Equally, with a 
motorcycle, all occupants of the subject vehicle are in plain view, eliminating the risk 
of inadvertently putting at risk unknown occupants of a pursued vehicle, such as in the 
case of a car which could contain a child unbeknownst to pursuing officers. 
 
It should be recognised that although difficult to quantify, there have been significant 
developments in pursuit training including decision-making and command and control.  
 
 
 
 
 
Changes in Vehicle Crime 
 
 Page 4 of 12 

 
Over recent decades, the theft of vehicles in general, and the use of them in further 
crime, has altered significantly: 
 
“There  is  a  common  misconception  that  vehicle  theft  as  a  whole  has  remained 
unchanged in recent times, but nothing could be further from the truth. Vehicle theft 
has  changed  dramatically  over  the  past  decade;  the  who,  the  what,  the  where,  the 
when, the how, and especially the why of vehicle theft are all complex questions. Gone 
are  the  days  of  encountering  simple  cases  involving  teenage  joyriders  who  take  a 
vehicle for an hour or two and then abandon it in a dimly lit parking lot. Today, vehicle 
theft is high technology and involves sophisticated transnational vehicle theft rings that 
target particular makes and models of vehicles for various reasons.”  (McDonold, 2011, 
p. 40) 
 
Between 2000 and 2009 in the US, vehicle thefts swung heavily towards being a crime 
committed  by  adults,  from  58%  to  75%  (McDonold,  2011,  p.40),  indicating  more 
organised thieves rather than joy riders. Vehicle use facilitates much modern crime. 
Cash and Valuables in Transit (CViT) robberies almost invariably utilise stolen vehicles 
and cloned number plates (Jill Dando Institute, 2011).  
 
It  is  common  knowledge  amongst  those  wishing  to  evade  the  police  that  policy 
prevents  pursuit  of motorcycles.  Media  has  often  identified this,  both  to  the  general 
public but also to criminals, with examples from within GMP of thieves making off on 
stolen  motorcycles  not  being  pursued  due  to  policy  (BBC,  2010).  A  Google  search 
reveals numerous forum posts on motorcycle forums suggesting that to prevent being 
chased, riders should throw their helmets away if police attempt to stop them (Pit Bike 
Club, 2012; Bike Chat Forums, 2012). However, this also demonstrates the willingness 
of some who are committing minor document  offences to exploit this, and highlights 
the need to ensure proportionality is always considered.  
 
Thefts of motorcycles have reduced slightly, with statistics from the Metropolitan Police 
area  showing  a  reduction  from  9683  in  2007  to  8558  in  2011  (Metropolitan  Police, 
2012),  however,  around  the  country  motorcycles  are  being  increasingly  used  for 
serious  crime,  such  as  burglaries,  street  robberies  and  high  value  commercial 
robberies,  particularly  cash  in  transit  robberies,  presumably  due  in  part  to  their 
manoeuvrability  and  speed,  but  also  in  part  due  to  the  knowledge  that  police  are 
heavily restricted when considering pursuit of motorcycles. In addition to this financial 
cost, victims of crime suffer physical and psychological harm. Wainer and Summers 
 Page 5 of 12 

 
(2011) found that 30% of cash in transit robberies resulted in injury to a victim, with 8% 
being serious GBH level injuries.  
 
In Manchester City Centre, one jewellers was targeted twice within a week by a team 
using a moped to steal over £165k of watches (Keeling, 2015), similar to a string of 
robberies in London netting as much as £500k each time (Tran, 2014). These types of 
robberies,  along  with  street  robberies  such  as  a  violent  series  in  Cheetham  Hill 
(Bainbridge,  2014)  are  escalating  with  the  use  of  motorcycles.  These  prevent 
significant challenges under current National pursuit policy, as when opportunities are 
presented to police in such notoriously difficult to detect cases in the form of sightings 
of offenders, police are restricted in their actions. 
 
A further emerging threat is the use of motorcycles in serious disorder and anti-social 
behaviour.  Within  GMP,  groups  riding  large  numbers  of  unlicensed  motorcycles 
dangerously  through  built  up  and  city  centre  areas  has  demonstrated  a  “show  of 
power” by OCGs within the city, aware that police are limited in their actions. While 
there is immediate risk to the public by these actions, there is also a threat to public 
confidence in policing, as by failing to consider appropriate and proportionate tactics 
to address incidents like this shows a propensity towards accepting lawless behaviour. 
 
As  reported  recently  in  the  National  press,  the  funeral  of  Clarence  “Clay”  Edwards, 
affiliated  to  the  Moss  Side  Doddington  OCG  (Britton,  2013)  was  followed  by  OCG 
members taking to the streets on over 100 off road bikes, mostly not registered, without 
helmets,  causing  serious  disorder.  For  several  hours  riders  rode  at  speed  through 
estates,  shopping  centres,  along  pavements  and  the  wrong  way  down  dual 
carriageways (Wheatstone, 2015). While initially given leeway due to the sensitivities 
of the funeral, as the bikers left the area and continued disorder, and rode dangerously 
despite the lack of police presence, only being monitored by the Police Helicopter, a 
decision was made to utilise tactics to contain the motorcycles. While not pursued, pre-
emptive stinger deployments and contact at low speed were utilised to detain several 
offenders. 
Balancing Human Rights and Public Expectations 
 
The crux of the argument surrounding motorcycle pursuits is that of public expectation. 
On the one hand, the public expect that the police will take action to prevent crime and 
apprehend criminals, and on the other hand they expect protection for individuals and 
for  the  police  not  to  impose  danger  onto  citizens.  The  mainstream  media  have 
 Page 6 of 12 

 
presented  articles  criticising  both the  policy  of  not  pursuing  criminals  on motorbikes 
(BBC, 2010 & 2015) and police handling of incidents where motorcycles have been 
pursued and fatality occurred (Manchester Evening News, 2010). 
 
Article 2 of the Human Rights Act presents a positive duty to prevent foreseeable loss 
of  life.  To  engage  in  a  pursuit  which  is  overly  dangerous  potentially  reaches  the 
threshold where loss of life is foreseeable. However, when the pursuit, which in itself 
can be seen as a use of force, is the only means of affecting an arrest, and the pursuit 
is proportionate, a loss of life will not be seen as a contravention of the Act. In balance 
to this, there is a need to prevent serious crime and protect potential future victims of 
the  offenders.  To  allow  potentially  dangerous  offenders  to  continue  unabated  risks 
allowing other foreseeable serious incidents to occur.  
 
In  2014,  GMP  recorded  8  pursuits  with  the  subject  vehicle  a  motorcycle.  None 
continued beyond 2 minutes, with one rider stopping almost immediately, two being 
lost  soon  after the  pursuit  began,  and five  being terminated  by  control  or  the  police 
driver due a lack of proportionality. Of these five, four were stolen vehicles, and in one 
a helicopter was 30 seconds away when terminated, with the subject vehicle travelling 
at speeds below 30 mph. National statistics indicate very low numbers of motorcycle 
pursuits,  this  inaccurately  represents  the  number  of  encounters  with  motorcycles, 
simply as police officers take no action when a motorcycle fails to stop and thus no 
pursuit is recorded. 
Public  expectation,  given  the  circumstances  would  be  to  pursue  until  the  helicopter 
was in a position to take over, and adequate tactics should be available to reflect this. 
Current tactics are in need of review to offer guidance and protection to officers making 
decisions to pursue, when adequately justified.  
 
 
 
 
 
Alternatives and Tactics for Pursuit 
 
It is clear that tactics used to end a motorcycle pursuit are generally higher risk than 
when  employed  against  other  vehicles,  and  as  highlighted  in  the  IPCC  report  of 
Docking et al (2007), to pursue until “something happens” without tactical options is 
not acceptable and should not occur. However, as with any pursuit, a reasonable time 
 Page 7 of 12 

 
should be allowed to develop tactics and begin implementation. The use of air support 
is  clearly  a  viable  option  as  it  prevents  a  physical  intervention  with  the  subject 
motorcycle, and this was advocated by Docking et al.  
 
Martin (2001) reports on a study of police helicopter crews, when a helicopter got a 
vantage  point  above  a  pursuit  and  ground  patrols  disengaged,  50%  of  suspects 
continued  to  drive  dangerously,  the  decision  to  drive  in  this  way  apparently 
independent of the actions of the police. The remaining 50% continued on average for 
a further 90 seconds before slowing and reducing danger to members of the public.  
 
Alpert  and  McDonald  (1997)  conducted  a  study  in  Baltimore  and  Metro-Dade, 
concluding that the helicopter provided an effective alternative pursuit. Once in place, 
ground  crews  terminated,  the  helicopter  directing  ground  crews  in  once  the  vehicle 
was  parked,  or  in  75%  of  cases  abandoned.  In  Baltimore,  once  in  position  the 
helicopter demonstrated an 83% success rate, in Miami-Dade 91%, demonstrating a 
strong  case for terminating ground  pursuit  once air  support  is  in  place  in  all  but  the 
most serious cases. Other, more intrusive tactics such as use of HOSTYDs and tactical 
contact  do  require  further  assessment  on  a  case  by  case  basis,  but  with  a  less 
restrictive policy, this could be assessed and documented by the relevant people using 
the National Decision Model by considering the use of appropriate stopping tactics. 
  
Equally, it could be argued that use of tactics to either pre-empt a pursuit or at the early 
stages of a pursuit where they could be implemented at a low speed could reduce risk 
of serious harm to the subject. While this may reduce harm to the subject vehicle rider, 
under controlled conditions this is likely to be a lot less severe than if a collision were 
to occur further into a pursuit at speed, effectively utilising  ‘use of force’ in detaining 
the offender, protecting the public from danger and also protecting the subject from the 
risk posed by the subject to him/herself.  
 
While there is a duty to protect the subjects we pursue, there is also a duty to prevent 
the harm they potentially pose to others. Where a rider is involved in, or suspected to 
be involved in, serious crime and there are suitable tactics in place, pre-emptive tactics 
or a pursuit may be proportionate. 
 
Evidence using hollow spike devices on motor cycles: 
 
 Page 8 of 12 

 
In furtherance of seeking an understanding of the results of using ‘Stinger’ and ‘Stop 
‘Stick devices’ to penetrate motor cycle tyres and the potential for using such devices 
as  part  of  a  tactical  option  to  stop  motorcycles,  tests  were  carried  out  under  the 
direction of the NPCC lead for pursuits and driver training. 
These tests were carried out on the 23rd June 2015 at the St Athan military campus in 
South Wales and on the 3rd and 8th July 2015 over a section of high quality road, used 
dual carriageway junc 3 M18, Doncaster 
 
Appended  is  a  list  of  those  officers  and  staff  involved  in  the  testing  regime  and 
photographs  and  video  footage  is  appended  at  relevant  parts  within  the  record  of 
testing. 
 
Conclusions 
 
Allowing a less restrictive policy relating to motorcycles, balanced by control measures 
to ensure only truly proportionate pursuits are authorised, then with sufficient training, 
and accurately documented decision making, the public expectation to attempt to catch 
criminals  can  be  met,  while  still  ensuring  that  the  risk  created  is  no  more  than  is 
absolutely necessary.  
 
It  is  recognised  that  there  is  significant  additional  risk  when  pursuing  motorcycles, 
however  it  is  identified  that  the  additional  risk  in  pursuit  situations  is  not  directly 
proportionate to the additional risk under normal driving conditions. Additional risks are 
generally contained to the riders of a motorcycle, and should be no more risk to the 
police or members of the public than any other pursuit, in fact probably less. 
 
Tactical options authorising the use of HoSTyDS devices against motorcycle tyres is 
being reviewed, providing the requirements set out in the pursuits tactics directory are 
properly considered.  
 
There  are  other  tactical  options  which  are  suitable  for  use  on  motorcycles  and 
mentioned in the tactics directory.   Employing air support to allow withdrawal of pursuit 
vehicles at the earliest opportunity remains an option, but where other tactical options 
can be applied to end the pursuit, these must be considered where obvious danger or 
risk is paramount to other road users, including the rider. 
 
 Page 9 of 12 

 
The use of pre-emptive tactics are likely to reduce the risks of a later pursuit, although 
present their own risk of injury, although due to lower speeds are likely to result in less 
serious injury.  
 
Contributing  authors  of  this  report  and  supporting  papers  are:    Ch  Insp  Mark 
Dexter Gt Manchester Police, Insp Craig Clifton South Yorkshire Police – NPCC staff 
officer (pursuits) Alan Jones NPCC RP Trg & Pursuits. Dr Paul Harrison (Home Office 
CAST). 
 
Those involved in the testing programme are thanked for their contribution which has 
been  invaluable  in  the  understanding  and  learning  of  the  effect  of  rapid deflation  of 
motor cycle tyres. 
Special thanks to the riders, Gareth Morgan (South Wales) Pc Kevin Harper and Pc 
Ricard Tordoff (both South Yorkshire). 
Additional thanks to Insp Craig Clifton (South Yorks) Alan Jones (NPCC RP Trg), Ch 
Insp  Mark  Dexter  (Gt  Manchester)  Dr  Paul  Harrison  (Home  Office  CAST)  for  his 
excellent scientific contribution and results analysis, to Andy Beck (Californian super 
bike school) for the loan of his motor cycle, to Chris Lloyd of South Wales tyre repairs, 
for supplying the tyres and replacing punctured tyres throughout the test, to Dr  Rob 
Dawes South Wales emergency crash team (medical support), Tony Eadon Managing 
director Spanset Ltd (UK supplier of stinger devices) ACO Mark Milton (NPCC lead for 
driver training), Mick Trosh (NPCC ITS) DCC Andy Holt (NPCC lead police pursuits). 
The following are acknowledged as having provided support to the testing programme:  
Sgt  Tristian  Knight  (Met)  Mick  Trosh  (NPCC  RESTORE)  Lloyd  Hanley,  Pc  Keith 
Williams (South wales), Bob Ward (Wilts), Pc Simon Briscoe Richards (South Wales 
driver trg).  Thanks also to the South Wales and the Yorkshire group media team (Craig 
Hargreaves and Paul Downs) for their recording and editing of the DVD footage. 
 
 
 
References 
 
Alpert, G., & McDonald, J. (1997). Helicopters and Their Use in Police Pursuit: National 
Institute of Justice. 
Bainbridge, P. (2014). Robbers on motorbikes target five women in violent robberies. 
Manchester 
Evening 
News
Retrieved 
02/02/15 
from 
http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-
 Page 10 of 12 

 
news/robbers-motorbike-target-five-women-6759923 
BBC. (2010). Helmet-free motorbike thieves not pursued by police. Retrieved 02/02/15 
from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-10984311 
Bike  Chat  Forums.  (2012).  Are  police  allowed  to  chase  motorbikes?      Retrieved 
18/01/15, from http://www.bikechatforums.com/viewtopic.php?t=245683 
Britton, P. (2013). Twelve men jailed after man stabbed to death in nightclub - but killer 
may  never  be  known Manchester  Evening  News.  Retrieved  from 
http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-
news/twelve-men-jailed-after-john-1988735 
Carter, P., Flannagan, C., Buckley, L., Rupp, J., Cicchino, J., & Bingham, C. (2014). 
Motorcycle  Crash  Helmet  Use  and  Injuries  Following  Repeal  of  Michigan's 
Motorcycle  Helmet  Law.  Paper  presented  at  the  APHA  142nd  Annual 
Conference, New Orleans. 
College  of  Policing.  (2014).  Police  Pursuits.      Retrieved  26/02/14,  from 
http://www.app.college.police.uk/app-content/road-policing-2/police-pursuits 
Docking, M., Bucke, T., Grace, K., & Dady, H. (2007). Police Road Traffic Incidents: A 
Study of Cases Involving Serious and Fatal Injuries. London, UK: IPCC. 
Jill Dando Institute. (2011). Written evidence from the Jill Dando Institute of Security 
and Crime Science. 
Keeling,  N.  (2015).  Watch:  Dramatic  CCTV  of  watches  smash  and  grab  raid. 
Manchester 
Evening 
News
Retrieved 
from 
http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-
news/cctv-video-cheshire-watch-robbery-8476670 
Keep, M., & Rutherford, T. (2013). Reported Road Accident Statistics.  
Lin, M., & Kraus, J. (2009). A review of risk factors and patterns of motorcycle injuries. 
Accident analysis and prevention, 41(4), 710-722.  
Manchester Evening News. (2010). Daughter of biker Alan Long "disgusted over Police 
case. 
Martin, J. (2001). Pursuit Termination. Law and Order, 49(7), 30-33.  
McDonold, C. (2011). The Changing Face of Vehicle Theft.  The Police Chief, 78(7), 
40-45.  
Metropolitan  Police.  (2012).  A  count  of  certain  motor  vehicle  types  reported  either 
stolen or damaged to the Metropolitan Police Service. 
Pit 
Bike 
Club. 
(2012). 
New 
Law? 
 
 
Retrieved 
18/01/15, 
from 
http://www.pitbikeclub.co.uk/archive/index.php/t-83278.html 
Teers, R. (2014). Deaths during or following police contact: Statistics for England and 
Wales 2013/14 London, UK: IPCC. 
 Page 11 of 12 

 
Tran, M. (2014). Thieves on mopeds and motorbike in Knightsbridge Rolex robbery. 
The 
Guardian
Retrieved 
from 
http://www.theguardian.com/uk-
news/2014/aug/27/thieves-mopeds-rolex-west-london-robbery 
Wainer, L., & Summers, L. (2011). Understanding the harms of Cash and Valuables in 
Transit (CViT) Robbery. London, UK: LSE. 
Wells, L., & Falcone, D. (1997). Research on police pursuits: Advantages of multiple 
data collection strategies. Policing, 20(4), 729-748.  
Wheatstone, R. (2015). Widespread disorder, arrests and seized bikes in aftermath of 
murdered  biker  Clarence  Edwards'  funeral.  Mirror.  Retrieved  from 
http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/widespread-disorder-arrests-seized-
bikes-5115492 
 
 Page 12 of 12