This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Incineration of radioactive waste'.

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

COMMITTEE ON RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT 
 
 

SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 
2009-10 
 
 

DRAFT 3 
 
27 May 2010 
 
 

This  document  does  not  present  the  views  of  the  Committee  on  Radioactive  Waste 
Management nor can it be taken to present the views of its authors. It is a draft paper 
to  inform  Committee  deliberations  and  both  the  authors  and  the  whole  Committee 
may  adopt  different  views  and  draw  entirely  different  conclusions  after  further 
consideration and debate.  

 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 1 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
CONTENTS 
 
INTRODUCTION BY THE CHAIR ......................................................................................... 4 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................... 5 
1.  INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 9 
2.  HOW CoRWM WORKS ................................................................................................. 9 
CoRWM’s Principles .......................................................................................................... 9 
Scrutiny ........................................................................................................................... 10 
Formulation of Advice ...................................................................................................... 10 
Public and Stakeholder Engagement ............................................................................... 10 
Use of International Experience ....................................................................................... 11 
CoRWM Review of Its Effectiveness ............................................................................... 12 
3.  SCRUTINY AND ADVICE ON INTERIM STORAGE .................................................... 13 
The Interim Storage Tasks and CoRWM’s Approach ....................................................... 13 
Management of Higher Activity Wastes UK-Wide ............................................................ 15 
Nuclear Decommissioning Authority ............................................................................. 15 
Regulatory Developments ............................................................................................ 16 
Strategic Co-ordination ................................................................................................ 16 
Management of Spent Fuels, Plutonium and Uranium ..................................................... 17 
Spent Fuels .................................................................................................................. 17 
Plutonium ..................................................................................................................... 17 
Uranium ....................................................................................................................... 17 
Strategic Co-ordination ................................................................................................ 18 
Transport ......................................................................................................................... 18 
Provision of Information to the Public .............................................................................. 18 
Information on HAW Management ............................................................................... 18 
Security Information ..................................................................................................... 19 
Development of Scottish Government HAW Management Policy .................................... 19 
4.  SCRUTINY AND ADVICE ON GEOLOGICAL DISPOSAL ........................................... 20 
The Geological Disposal Tasks and CoRWM’s Approach ................................................ 20 
2009 Report to Government on Geological Disposal ....................................................... 21 
Voluntarism and Partnership ........................................................................................... 22 
Increasing the Awareness of Communities to the Invitation to Participate .................... 22 
Government and NDA Engagement in West Cumbria .................................................. 22 
Site Assessment .............................................................................................................. 23 
Screening Out of Unsuitable Areas .............................................................................. 23 
Identifying Sites for Desk-Based Studies ..................................................................... 24 
Site Characterisation .................................................................................................... 25 
NDA Implementation Planning ......................................................................................... 25 
5.  SCRUTINY AND ADVICE ON OTHER TOPICS .......................................................... 26 
Research and Development ............................................................................................ 26 
The R&D Tasks and CoRWM’s Approach .................................................................... 26 
2009 Report to Government on R&D ........................................................................... 27 
NDA R&D..................................................................................................................... 28 
Research Councils ....................................................................................................... 29 
New Build Wastes ........................................................................................................... 30 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 2 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
The New Build Wastes Task and CoRWM’s Approach ................................................ 30 
CoRWM’s Position on New Build Wastes..................................................................... 31 
CoRWM’s Response to the NPS Consultation ............................................................. 31 
Scrutiny of the PSE of Various Organisations .................................................................. 32 
The PSE Scrutiny Tasks and CoRWM’s Approach ...................................................... 32 
Liaison on Providing Information to the Public .............................................................. 33 
Questionnaire on PSE.................................................................................................. 33 
Scrutiny of PSE Related to Geological Disposal........................................................... 33 
Scrutiny of PSE on Various Aspects of HAW Management .......................................... 34 
6.  IMPACTS OF CoRWM’s SCRUTINY AND ADVICE .................................................... 35 
Actions taken in Response to CoRWM Recommendations.............................................. 35 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 Report on Interim Storage ................................ 35 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 Report on Geological Disposal ......................... 36 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 Report on R&D ................................................. 37 
Other Impacts of CoRWM’s Scrutiny and Advice ............................................................. 37 
Influence on Development of Government Policy ......................................................... 37 
Influence on the Implementation of Government Policy................................................ 38 
Promoting Understanding of Issues ............................................................................. 38 
7.  HOUSE OF LORDS INQUIRY ..................................................................................... 38 
8.  STATUS OF ARRANGEMENTS AND PLANS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HAW ... 39 
Treatment, Packaging, Storage and Disposal .................................................................. 39 
Treatment and Packaging ............................................................................................ 39 
Storage ........................................................................................................................ 40 
Transport ..................................................................................................................... 40 
Disposal .......................................................................................................................... 40 
Geological Disposal ..................................................................................................... 40 
Near-Surface Disposal ................................................................................................. 41 
9.  2010-11 WORK PROGRAMME ................................................................................... 41 
10. 
REFERENCES ......................................................................................................... 43 
CoRWM Documents ........................................................................................................ 43 
Other Documents ............................................................................................................ 46 
 
 
 
Annexes 

Terms of Reference...................................................................................................49 

CoRWM Members......................................................................................................54 

CoRWM Expenditure 2009-10...................................................................................58 

Recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 Reports to Government.................................59 

Glossary and Acronym List........................................................................................62 
 
Further Information.............................................................................................................73 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 3 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
INTRODUCTION BY THE CHAIR 
 
I  am  pleased  to  present  CoRWM’s  annual  report  for  2009-10  to  sponsor  Ministers,  the 
Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change and Environment Ministers in Scotland, 
Wales and Northern Ireland. 
 
This is the sixth CoRWM Annual Report but the first in a revised format. It summarises the 
outcomes  of  CoRWM’s  scrutiny  and  advice  work  during  the  year.  It  also  contains  the 
Committee’s  views  on  the  current  status  of  arrangements  and  plans  for  the  long-term 
management of higher activity radioactive wastes in the UK. 
 
2009-10  was  a  busy  year  for  CoRWM.  The  Committee  submitted  two  major  reports  to 
Government,  one  on  geological  disposal  and  one  on  research  and  development.  It 
responded  to  two  Government  consultations:  the  UK  Government  consultation  on  its  draft 
National  Policy  Statements  for  energy  infrastructure  and  the  Scottish  Government 
consultation on its policy for the management of higher activity wastes. In addition, CoRWM 
gave evidence to the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee during its inquiry 
into  CoRWM’s  performance  since  its  reconstitution  in  2007  and  the  appropriateness  of  its 
current remit. 
 
CoRWM has begun its work for 2010-11. Its priorities for scrutiny and advice this year are: 
 
• 
UK  Government  work  to  implement  its  policy  on  the  long-term  management  of 
higher activity wastes 
• 
Scottish  Government  development  of  its  policy  on  the  management  of  higher 
activity wastes and of proposals for its implementation 
• 
Nuclear  Decommissioning  Authority  development  of  its  second  Strategy  (NDA 
Strategy II) 
• 
NDA work on the implementation of geological disposal. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 4 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
1.  This  is  the  sixth  annual  report  of  the  Committee  on  Radioactive  Waste  Management 
(CoRWM  )  but  the  first  in  a  revised  format.  It  covers  the  Committee’s  work  during  the 
period  April  2009  to  March  2010.  The  report  describes  how  CoRWM  works  and 
summarises its activities during the year and their outcomes. 
CoRWM’s Remit and How it Fulfils It 
2.  CoRWM’s  remit  is  to  provide  independent  scrutiny  and  advice  on  the  long-term 
management  of  radioactive  wastes.  It  focuses  on  higher  activity  wastes  (HAW),  i.e. 
intermediate level wastes (ILW) and high level waste (HLW). Its work also includes spent 
nuclear  fuels,  plutonium  and  uranic  materials  that  are  not  considered  to  be  wastes  at 
present but may be in the future.  
 
3.  The  Committee  scrutinises  the  work  of  the  Nuclear  Decommissioning  Authority  (NDA) 
and  other  organisations  on  all  the  steps  necessary  for  the  long-term  management  of 
HAW  in  the  UK.  These  steps  will  typically  include  treatment,  storage,  transport  and 
disposal.  One  of  its  main  tasks  is  to  scrutinise  UK  Government  and  NDA  plans  and 
programmes for geological disposal of HAW. It also scrutinises the work of the Scottish 
Government on developing and implementing its policy of near-surface, near-site storage 
and  disposal  of  HAW.  Much  of  the  work  that  the  Committee  scrutinises  is  within  the 
Government’s Managing Radioactive Waste Safely (MRWS) programme. 
 
4.  CoRWM  has  a  set  of  five  guiding  principles  that  it  applies  in  its  work.  These  include 
commitments  to  openness  and  transparency  and  to  upholding  the  public  interest.  It 
carries  out  its  scrutiny  by  holding  meetings  with  NDA,  Government  officials,  regulators 
and  various  groups  of  stakeholders,  and  by  reviewing  documents  that  these 
organisations  produce.  It  visits  one  or  more  nuclear  sites  each  year,  where  it  sees 
radioactive  waste  management  facilities,  has  discussions  with  site  staff  and  holds  a 
public meeting. 
 
5.  The Committee provides both informal and formal advice to Government. In the case of 
formal advice it usually consults its stakeholders to gather and check evidence, to inform 
itself  of  their  views  and  to  obtain  their  comments  on  its  proposed  advice.  Such 
consultations  are  part  of  the  public  and  stakeholder  engagement  (PSE)  that  CoRWM 
carries out to support its work programme. Its PSE is aimed at promoting understanding 
of radioactive waste management issues, as well as seeking and discussing views. 
 
6.  During  2009-10  CoRWM  carried  out  its  first  review  of  its  own  effectiveness.  Based  on 
views  from  its  stakeholders  and  other  evidence,  the  Committee  judged  that  it  had 
performed  reasonably  well  on  criteria  of  being  a  trusted  and  authoritative  source  of 
advice, and of delivering its work programme to a high standard and to time and budget. 
On the criterion of having a demonstrable, positive effect on the management of the UK’s 
HAW,  the  view  of  most  stakeholders  was  that  it  was  too  soon  after  CoRWM’s 
reconstitution in late 2007 to form a judgement. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 5 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Scrutiny and Advice on Interim Storage 
7.  CoRWM’s  work  under  the  heading  of  interim  storage  covers  the  treatment,  packaging, 
storage  and  transport  of  HAW  and  the  management  of  spent  fuels,  plutonium  and 
uranium. In 2009-10 its main tasks on interim storage were: 
• 
to scrutinise the NDA’s development of its Topic Strategies for HAW, spent fuels, 
plutonium and uranic materials 
• 
to  advise  the  Scottish  Government  on  development  of  its  policy  for  the 
management of HAW 
• 
to monitor actions taken in response to CoRWM’s 2009 report to Government on 
interim storage (CoRWM doc. 2500). 
 
8.  The NDA’s Topic Strategies are at various stages of development and, in some cases, 
implementation. Although progress is being made on the HAW Topic Strategy, CoRWM 
notes  that  there  are  issues,  such  as  consolidation  of  storage  and  treatment  on  fewer 
sites,  that  seem  to  lack  strategic  direction  from  NDA.  For  spent  fuels  there  are  key 
decisions to be made over the next few years on how much AGR fuel to reprocess and 
on how and where to treat the many types of exotic fuels (i.e. non-standard fuels, mainly 
from research reactors that closed long ago). 
 
9.  CoRWM  gave  the  Scottish  Government  informal  advice  during  the  preparations  for  the 
public  consultation  on  its  HAW  management  policy,  then  responded  formally  to  the 
consultation.  The  informal  advice  resulted  in  a  lengthening  of  the  preparatory  period, 
allowing fuller consideration of the outcomes of the Strategic Environmental Assessment 
(SEA). The  Scottish Government  is  at  present (May  2010)  considering  the  consultation 
responses.  
 
10. CoRWM’s 2009 report to Government on interim storage (CoRWM doc. 2500) contained 
a recommendation about improving strategic co-ordination, which Government accepted. 
However, over a year after the report was published, Government has yet to make any 
specific  proposals  for  improvement.  There  has  also  been  little  action  on  CoRWM’s 
recommendations  about  making  appropriate  information  available  to  the  public  about 
HAW  management  and  about  how  the  security  of  storage  facilities  is  assured.  After 
discussion  with  the  regulators,  CoRWM  itself  published  information  about  how  new 
stores  for  spent  fuel  are  being  designed  to  mitigate  the  consequences  of  9/11  style 
terrorist attacks.  
Scrutiny and Advice on Geological Disposal 
11. CoRWM’s 2009-10 tasks on geological disposal included: 
• 
completion of its report to Government on geological disposal and monitoring of 
actions taken on the recommendations in the report 
• 
scrutiny  and  advice  on  the  voluntarism  and  partnership  approach  to  siting  of  a 
geological disposal facility (GDF) 
• 
scrutiny and advice on assessing potential GDF sites 
• 
scrutiny  of  NDA’s  work  on  implementation  of  geological  disposal  and 
development of a generic safety case for a geological disposal system. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 6 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
12. CoRWM’s  report  to  Government  on  geological  disposal  (CoRWM  doc.  2550)  was 
submitted in July 2009. Government responded in November 2009. The response stated 
that Government largely agreed with CoRWM’s recommendations and set out the work 
in progress and planned to address them. 
 
13. During  the  year  CoRWM  encouraged  the  UK  Government  to  increase  the  awareness 
amongst  local  authorities  of  its  invitation  to  express  an  interest  in  entering  without 
commitment discussions about the possibility of hosting a GDF. The Government carried 
out  various  actions  to  increase  awareness,  including  attending  local  government 
conferences and sending a Ministerial letter.  
 
14. In the one area that has so far expressed an interest, CoRWM attended meetings of the 
West  Cumbria  MRWS  Partnership,  as  an  observer.  It  noted  that  some  of  the 
recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 report on geological disposal (CoRWM doc. 2550) 
are being addressed by the Partnership, with input from Government where appropriate. 
CoRWM advised the Partnership on the peer review of the study to be carried out by the 
British  Geological  Survey  (BGS)  to  screen  out  areas  in  West  Cumbria  that  are 
geologically unsuitable for a GDF. 
 
15. CoRWM  discussed  with  NDA  the  methodology  that  might  be  used  to  identify  sites  for 
desk-based  study  within  areas  that  have  not  been  screened  out.  The  Committee 
commented on a draft of NDA’s Planning for Implementation document. It followed up its 
recommendation about the need to assess a wide range of geological disposal concepts 
by  learning  more  about  NDA’s  assessment  of  generic  concepts  and  plans  for  site 
specific optimisation.  
Scrutiny and Advice on Research and Development 
16. CoRWM’s main work on research and development (R&D) was to complete its report to 
Government  on  national  R&D  for  interim  storage  and  geological  disposal  of  HAW  and 
management  of  nuclear  materials  (CoRWM  doc.  2543).  The  report  contains  six 
recommendations,  including  one  on  the  need for  strategic  co-ordination of  UK  R&D  for 
HAW management between NDA, the rest of the nuclear industry, the regulators and the 
Research  Councils.  The  report  was  submitted  to  Government  in  October  2009;  a 
response is awaited. 
 
17. During  the  year  CoRWM  also  held  discussions  with  NDA  about  all  its  R&D  relevant  to 
HAW  management  and  scrutinised  the  development  of  the  NDA  geological  disposal 
R&D programme. In addition, the Committee had contacts with the Natural Environment 
Research  Council  (NERC)  about  its  plans  for  future  funding  of  research  on  radioactive 
waste management. CoRWM visited BGS, which is funded by NERC, to learn about its 
research and discuss its plans for the screening work in West Cumbria (para. 14).  
Scrutiny and Advice on Radioactive Wastes from New Nuclear Power Stations 
18. Most of CoRWM’s work on HAW from new nuclear power stations (“new build wastes”) 
was  related  to  the  radioactive  waste  aspects  of  the  Government’s  draft  National  Policy 
Statement (NPS) on energy infrastructure. The Committee made informal comments on 
drafts  of  documents  for  the  public  consultation  on  the  NPS;  these  were  confined  to 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 7 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
factual accuracy and clarity of expression. It then responded formally to the consultation 
and concurrently issued a separate statement of its position on new build wastes. 
 
19. CoRWM’s response to the NPS consultation covered issues including whether there will 
be effective arrangements for managing new build wastes and the possible impact of the 
NPS  on  the  long-term  management  of  existing  HAW.  The  CoRWM  position  statement 
reiterated  that  the  Committee  is  neither  for  nor  against  new  nuclear  power  stations.  It 
stated that CoRWM’s future work on new build wastes will consist of scrutiny and advice 
on  plans  to  ensure  that,  if  new  build  wastes  are  created,  they  are  safely  and  securely 
managed,  and  minimising  adverse  impacts  of  new  build  waste  management  on  the 
management of existing wastes. 
Scrutiny and Advice on Public and Stakeholder Engagement 
20. CoRWM  scrutinises  the  PSE  activities  of  Government,  NDA,  other  nuclear  industry 
organisations and the regulators related to the long-term management of HAW. It holds 
discussions with various organisations about their PSE and observes PSE in practice by 
attending events such as stakeholder workshops on particular topics. It also monitors co-
ordination  of  PSE  related  to  radioactive  waste  management  amongst the  organisations 
involved.  
 
21. Early  in  2010,  CoRWM  sent  a  questionnaire  to  Government,  NDA  and  other 
organisations  about  their  PSE  activities.  This  included  questions  about  how  each 
organisation  draws  up  an  engagement  strategy  and  reviews  its  effectiveness.  The 
responses  to  the  questionnaire  will  be  evaluated  in  2010-11  and  included  in  a  position 
paper on PSE. This paper will include the results of CoRWM’s scrutiny of PSE in 2009 
and  2010,  and  the  results  of  its  monitoring  of  Government  action  on  CoRWM’s 
recommendation to improve co-ordination of PSE. 
Status of UK Arrangements and Plans for Management of Higher Activity Wastes 
22. Based on its scrutiny work in 2009-10, CoRWM has the following observations about the 
status of plans for managing HAW in the UK.  
 
23. Only about 30% of existing UK ILW has been treated and packaged to make it suitable 
for longer term storage and eventual disposal. Of the remaining 70%, some is held in old 
facilities and is not in stable forms. It is important that such ILW is retrieved as soon as is 
practicable,  and  is treated,  packaged  and  placed  in  modern  stores.  CoRWM  welcomes 
NDA statements about the priority it is giving to retrieval of HAW from high hazard legacy 
facilities, especially at Sellafield. However, the rate of progress is not yet fast enough. 
 
24. Although  the  current  plans  for  HAW  storage  are  adequate,  the  approach  to  storage  is 
fragmented  and  too  few  sites  have  contingency  plans.  A  more  strategic  approach  is 
required.  
 
25. The  implementation  of  geological  disposal  is  proceeding  at  an  appropriate  pace.  The 
rate  of  progress  of  the  voluntary  approach  to  GDF  siting  must  be  determined  by  the 
willingness  of  the  volunteering  communities  to  proceed.  It  is  also  important  to  allow 
sufficient time for technical work, particularly site characterisation, GDF design and R&D. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 8 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
1.  INTRODUCTION 
1.  This  is  the  sixth  CoRWM  Annual  Report  but  the  first  in  a  revised  format.  It  covers  the 
Committee’s work in the period from April 2009 to March 2010. 
 
2.  CoRWM’s remit is given in its Terms of Reference (Annex A). These state that: 
 
"...  The  role  of  the  reconstituted  Committee  on  Radioactive  Waste  Management 
(CoRWM)  will  be  to  provide  independent  scrutiny  and  advice  to  UK  Government  and 
devolved administration Ministers on the long-term management, including storage and 
disposal, of radioactive waste. CoRWM’s primary task is to provide independent scrutiny 
on  the  Government’s  and  Nuclear  Decommissioning  Authority’s  proposals,  plans  and 
programmes  to  deliver  geological  disposal,  together  with  robust  interim  storage,  as  the 
long-term management option for the UK’s higher activity wastes.” 
 
 
3.  The  current  membership  of  CoRWM  is  given  in  Annex  B.  Its  sponsors  are  the 
Department  for  Energy  and  Climate  Change  (DECC)  for  the  UK  Government,  the 
Scottish  Government,  the  Welsh  Assembly  Government  and  the  Department  of  the 
Environment in Northern Ireland. 
 
4.  The Committee’s work programme for 2009-10 (CoRWM doc. 2515.2) was agreed with 
its sponsors early in 2009-10. It was carried out within CoRWM’s agreed budget (Annex 
C). 
 
5.  Section 2 of this report is about CoRWM’s working methods. Sections 3-6 describe the 
results of CoRWM’s scrutiny and advice work during 2009-10. Section 7 of the report is 
about the inquiry carried out by the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee 
to assess how CoRWM has performed since its reconstitution in 2007 (House of Lords, 
2010a).  Section  8  gives  the  Committee’s  views  on  the  current  status  of  arrangements 
and  plans  for  the  long-term  management  of  higher  activity  wastes  (HAW)  in  the  UK. 
Section 9 contains information about CoRWM’s work programme for 2010-11. 
 
 
2.  HOW CoRWM WORKS 
CoRWM’s Principles 
6.  CoRWM has five guiding principles that it applies in its work (CoRWM doc. 2248). These 
principles are about:  
 
• 
openness and transparency 
• 
upholding the public interest 
• 
fairness 
• 
a safe and sustainable environment 
• 
working efficiently and effectively. 
 
7.  The Committee also has a transparency policy and a publication scheme (CoRWM doc. 
2249).  
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 9 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Scrutiny 
8.  CoRWM  scrutinises  the  work  of  the  Nuclear  Decommissioning  Authority  (NDA),  and 
other  organisations that own  or  produce  HAW,  on  all  the  steps  necessary  for  the  long-
term management of these wastes. These steps will typically include treatment, storage, 
transport  and  disposal,  either  in  a  geological  disposal  facility  (GDF)  or  a  near-surface 
disposal facility. The Committee scrutinises the work of the UK Government and NDA on 
the  delivery  of  geological  disposal  and  the  work  of  the  Scottish  Government  on 
developing its policy for the management of HAW. Much of the work that the Committee 
scrutinises  is  within  the  Government’s  Managing  Radioactive  Waste  Safely  (MRWS) 
programme (Defra et al., 2008).  
 
9.  CoRWM  carries  out  its  scrutiny  by  holding  meetings  with  NDA,  Government  officials, 
regulators  and  various  groups  of  stakeholders,  and  by  reviewing  documents  that  these 
organisations produce. The Committee visits one or more nuclear sites each year, where 
it  holds  discussions  with  site  managers  and  staff  and  sees  radioactive  waste 
management facilities. During the visit it usually holds a meeting with local people. These 
meetings  are  open  to  the  public  and  participants  typically  include  members  of  the  Site 
Stakeholder  Group  (or  its  equivalent),  elected  representatives  and  local  residents. 
CoRWM  also  monitors  developments  in  other  countries,  with  the  objective  of  checking 
that the UK is making full use of international experience. 
 
Formulation of Advice 
10. All CoRWM’s formal advice is to Government. It is mostly given in reports on particular 
topics (e.g. CoRWM doc. 2550) but can also be in shorter documents such as position 
papers  (e.g.  CoRWM  docs.  2420,  2558)  and  responses  to  consultations  (e.g.  CoRWM 
docs.  2748,  2795).  Members  of  the  Committee  also  give  informal  advice,  both  verbally 
and in writing, to Government, NDA and others. 
 
11. The  procedures  CoRWM  uses  to  formulate  its  advice  are  summarised  in  a  document 
produced in March 2010 (CoRWM doc. 2806). The methods it uses to gather and check 
the  evidence  that  underlies  its  advice  depend  on  whether  the  advice  is  formal  or 
informal. In the case of formal advice CoRWM usually consults its stakeholders, firstly to 
inform itself of their views and secondly to obtain their comments on its proposed advice 
(CoRWM  doc.  2806).  The  views  expressed  in  CoRWM’s  documents  are  always  the 
Committee’s  own.  It  has  a  quality  control  procedure  for  its  documents  (CoRWM  doc. 
2771). 
 
Public and Stakeholder Engagement 
12. CoRWM  undertakes  public  and  stakeholder  engagement  (PSE)  to  support  its  work 
programme.  In  2009-10  its  PSE  focused  on  stakeholders.  It  included  meetings  with 
various groups and consultation on draft documents, via the website and an e-bulletin. In 
general, the Committee uses PSE to: 
 
• 
assemble evidence on particular topics 
• 
obtain the views of stakeholders and the public on these topics 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 10 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
• 
check the factual accuracy of its draft documents 
• 
seek comments on its proposed advice. 
 
13. In addition, CoRWM asks stakeholders and the public for their views on the Committee’s 
performance and ways of working (para. 23).  
 
14. In  2009-10  CoRWM  held  two  stakeholder  workshops,  one  to  discuss  the  draft  of  its 
report  to  Government  on  geological  disposal  and  one  to  discuss  the  draft  report  to 
Government on research and development (CoRWM docs. 2543, 2550, 2593, 2677). It 
held  discussions  with  a  range  of  stakeholders  during  its  work  on  the  Scottish 
Government  policy  for  HAW  management  (para.  27).  It  met  local  stakeholders  when  it 
visited the nuclear power stations at Hunterston and Hinkley Point (CoRWM docs. 2802, 
2809). 
 
15. CoRWM  had  considered  convening  a  Citizen’s  Panel  as  part  of  its  engagement  of  the 
public  on  progress  with  the  implementation  of  geological  disposal  (Task  14  in  CoRWM 
doc.  2515.2).  It  became  clear  during  2009-10  that  this  would  not  be  appropriate  at this 
early stage.  
 
16. The CoRWM web site (www.corwm.org.uk) was redesigned in 2008 after the Committee 
was  reconstituted.  However,  user  feedback  and  developments  in  peer  sites  led  to  a 
decision  to  improve  the  site  further  and  ensure  that  it  met  all  current  standards  for 
accessibility  and  usability.  In  addition,  the  DECC  MRWS  website  and the  NDA  website 
now contain extensive background information on radioactive waste management, so the 
CoRWM site needs to concentrate on the Committee’s work. 
 
17. CoRWM  worked  with  specialist  website  experts  from  DECC,  the  Government’s  Central 
Office  of  Information  (COI)  and  an  external  company.  An  expert  review  of  the  existing 
site  and  seven  other  peer  sites  was  carried  out,  which  was  followed  by  detailed 
interviews  with  ten  stakeholders  from  a  variety  of  backgrounds.  Draft  wireframes  and 
content  of  key  web  pages  were  developed  and  again  tested  with  stakeholders.  the 
content was then reviewed by a specialist copy editor to ensure that the copy was clear, 
accessible  and  met  content  writing  guidelines.  The  new  website  will  be  launched  in 
summer 2010. 
 
Use of International Experience 
18. CoRWM uses several means to keep in touch with international developments. Through 
the  literature  and  websites  it  monitors  progress  in  various  countries  on  the  long-term 
management  of  HAW,  especially  progress  in  implementing  geological  disposal.  It  also 
monitors  the  relevant  work  of  the  European  Commission,  the  Nuclear  Energy  Agency 
(NEA)  and  the  International  Atomic  Energy  Agency  (IAEA).  CoRWM  members  gather 
information when they visit other countries in the normal course of their work. In addition, 
CoRWM  has  discussions  with  representatives  of  other  countries’  Governments, 
regulators and waste management organisations (e.g. CoRWM docs. 2664, 2823). 
 
19. In  2009  CoRWM  held  a  meeting  in  London  with  the  USA’s  Nuclear  Waste  Technical 
Review  Board  (NWTRB)  (CoRWM  doc.  2725).  NWTRB  is  an  independent  agency  that 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 11 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
reports  to  Congress  on  Department  of  Energy  work  on  the  long-term  management  of 
high level waste (HLW) and spent fuels. CoRWM’s discussions with NWTRB covered the 
pre-disposal management and geological disposal of HLW and spent fuels. CoRWM was 
particularly  interested  in  lessons  learned  at  the  Waste  Isolation  Pilot  Plant  (WIPP),  an 
operating GDF for “transuranic” (TRU) wastes1, and at Yucca Mountain, a site that was 
investigated for a GDF to hold all US spent fuel. It also heard about NWTRB work since 
the  cancellation  of  the  Yucca  Mountain  project  and  about  the  appointment  of  a  “Blue 
Ribbon  Commission”  (CoRWM  doc.  2725).  The  Commission  is  conducting  a 
comprehensive  review  of  policies  for  managing  the  back  end  of  the  nuclear  fuel  cycle, 
including all the alternatives for the storage, processing and disposal of civil and defence 
spent fuel, HLW and materials derived from nuclear activities.2 
 
20. CoRWM has followed developments in the European Union COWAM (Community Waste 
Management)  in  Practice  project.  This  is  about  sharing  good  practice  in  involving  local 
communities  in  radioactive  waste  management  (www.cowam.com).  CoRWM  attended 
the  September  2009  meeting  of  UK  participants  in  the  project,  which  discussed 
community  benefits  packages,  a  national  case  study  of  community  involvement  and 
needs for further research. 
 
21.  CoRWM has also followed developments in China, which has plans to build more than 
20 new nuclear power stations in the next decade or so and to reprocess spent fuel. A 
CoRWM  member  visited  China  twice  (once  with  the  IAEA  and  once  with  a  UK  team 
including  NDA  and  National  Nuclear  Laboratory  participants)  to  examine  the 
Government’s waste management strategy and plans. Several potential sites for a GDF 
have been identified, including one in granite in the Gobi desert where borehole drilling 
sections  have  already  been  taken.  An  underground  rock  laboratory  is  being  designed 
and  is  planned  to  be  in  operation  by  2020.  While  this  site  is  the  most  advanced,  the 
Chinese  Government  desires  another  site  (with  different  rock,  probably  clay)  to  also 
undergo  full  sub-surface  characterisation  so  that  the  sites  can  be  compared  and  a 
decision on which to use taken on technical grounds. The intention is that a GDF will be 
operational by about 2050. 
 
CoRWM Review of Its Effectiveness 
22. In March 2009 CoRWM agreed a process to review its effectiveness (CoRWM doc.2555) 
and adopted the following criteria by which it would judge its success: 
 
• 
CoRWM is a trusted and authoritative source of advice 
• 
CoRWM has carried out its work to a high standard and to time and budget 
• 
CoRWM has had a demonstrable positive effect on the management of the UK’s 
HAW. 
 
23. Evidence for the review of effectiveness was gathered during the year. It took the form of 
programme  progress  reports  and  budget  reports  to  plenary  meetings,  feedback  from 
                                               
1 TRU waste is a term used mainly in the USA. In UK terminology TRU wastes are long-lived, 
actinide-containing intermediate level wastes, such as plutonium contaminated materials. 
2 There is further information on the Commission’s website http://brc.gov. It is due to produce an 
interim report in mid-2011 and a final report early in 2012. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 12 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
questionnaires circulated to stakeholders and consideration of Government responses to 
recommendations  in  the  Committee’s  reports  on  interim  storage  (CoRWM  doc.  2500) 
and  geological  disposal  (CoRWM  doc.  2550).  Account  was  also  taken  of  evidence 
submitted  by  various  organisations  to  the  House  of  Lords  Science  and  Technology 
Committee inquiry (Section 7) and the findings of that inquiry (House of Lords, 2010a). 
The impacts of CoRWM’s scrutiny and advice are dealt with in Section 6. 
 
24.  CoRWM  reviewed  its  effectiveness  at  its  plenary  meeting  in  April  2010  (CoRWM 
doc.2798). The key points from the review were: 
 
• 
Feedback  from  questionnaires  was  generally  positive.  However,  a  number  of 
stakeholders  stated  that  it  was  too  soon  to  assess  whether  CoRWM  has  had  a 
demonstrable  positive  effect  on  the  management  of  HAW.  This  was  reflected  in 
evidence to the House of Lords inquiry (House of Lords, 2010a).  
• 
The  work  programme  for  2009-10  was  largely  completed  and  this  was  done  within 
budget.  There  is  a  need,  however,  for  better  detailed  work  programming  to  ensure 
that  adequate  time  is  always  allowed  for  factual  checking  and  PSE  on  draft 
documents. 
• 
The  proposed  2010-13  work  programme  (CoRWM  doc.  2800)  was  submitted  to 
Government  for  approval  in  March  2010  and  is  more  focused  than  previous  years. 
This  reflected  experience  of  previous  year’s  programmes  and  feedback  from 
stakeholders  that  programmes  had  been  too  broad  and  resources  somewhat 
stretched.  
• 
CoRWM had improved its working practices during the year, particularly by devising 
and  applying  quality  control  procedures for  documents (CoRWM  docs.  2539,  2771) 
and  clarifying  how  it  formulates  its  various  types  of  advice  (paras  10-11;  CoRWM 
doc. 2806). 
• 
Assessing  the  effectiveness  of  an  advisory  and  scrutiny  committee  will  always  be 
difficult, especially in the case of one concerned with long-term activities such as the 
management of HAW.  
• 
CoRWM will be looking at the assessment processes used by similar advisory bodies 
in other countries, in order to identify best practice.  
• 
The improved CoRWM web site and the use of modern survey techniques will extend 
the opportunities for obtaining feedback on the Committee’s performance.  
 
 
3.  SCRUTINY AND ADVICE ON INTERIM STORAGE 
The Interim Storage Tasks and CoRWM’s Approach 
25. CoRWM’s report to Government on interim storage (CoRWM doc. 2500) was published 
at the end of 2008-09. The tasks on interim storage set out in CoRWM’s 2009-10 work 
programme (CoRWM doc. 2515.2) were: 
 
Task 1: Scrutinise and advise on interim storage issues for HAW and materials that may 
be declared to be wastes, including: 

a)  monitoring  actions  taken  in  response  to  the  recommendations  in  CoRWM’s 
March 2009 Interim Storage Report (CoRWM doc. 2500) 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 13 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
b)  scrutinising  the  NDA’s  development  of  its  Topic  Strategy  for  HAW,  including  its 
work on management options for short-lived intermediate level wastes (ILW) 
c)  following NDA progress in the development of its Topic Strategies for spent fuels, 
plutonium and uranium 
d)  keeping a watching brief on waste transport issues (with a view to undertaking a 
major piece of work in 2010-11). 
 
Task 2: Scrutinise the development of Scottish Government policy for the management 
of  higher  activity wastes,  including  the  associated  Strategic  Environmental  Assessment 
(SEA) and advise accordingly. 

 
26. CoRWM’s  scrutiny  work for Task  1  was  carried out  largely  through meetings  with  NDA 
and  regulators.  These  meetings  dealt  with  progress  on  the  various  NDA  Topic 
Strategies3,  and  with  actions  being  taken  in  response  to  the  recommendations  in 
CoRWM’s report on interim storage (CoRWM doc. 2500).  
 
27. For  Task  2  CoRWM  drew  up  a  detailed  plan  of  action  that  had  six  main  strands,  as 
follows.  
i)  Scrutinising  the  development  of  the  consultation  proposals,  including  attending 
meetings organised by the Scottish Government and offering informal comments 
on early drafts of its consultation material.   
ii)  Meeting  a  range  of  stakeholders  to  learn  their  views  on  the  Scottish 
Government’s  proposals.  The  purpose  of  these  meetings  was  to  inform 
CoRWM’s view of the policy and what the implications of its implementation might 
be.  
iii)  Holding  meetings  with  British  Energy,  Dounreay  Site  Restoration  Ltd,  the 
Highland  Council,  Magnox  North,  NDA,  the  Health  and  Safety  Executive  (HSE), 
and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA). Members also attended 
a  Scottish  Government  stakeholder  workshop  on  29  January  2010,  to  observe 
the  Government’s  engagement  process  and  hear  the  views  of  a  range  of 
stakeholders  including  local  government,  NGOs,  nuclear  site  operators  and 
others. Members also met with a number of NGOs and local site stakeholders at 
Dounreay and Hunterston.   
iv)  At  its  February  2010  plenary  meeting  CoRWM  discussed  the  key  issues 
emerging from bilateral meetings (CoRWM doc. 2779), and its own review of the 
consultation documents. This informed the preparation of CoRWM’s response to 
the consultation  
v)  CoRWM discussed and agreed a formal response to the Scottish Government at 
its March 2010 plenary, which was then submitted (CoRWM doc. 2795). 
                                               
3 Details are at www.nda.gov.uk/strategy/overview.cfm  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 14 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
vi)  CoRWM  proposes  to  scrutinise  the  process  whereby  the  Scottish  Government 
finalises and adopts its policy and this will be the subject of a position paper to be 
produced, probably towards the end of 2010. 
 
Management of Higher Activity Wastes UK-Wide 
Nuclear Decommissioning Authority 
28. CoRWM  discussed  NDA  progress  on  its  HAW Topic  Strategy  at  meetings  with  NDA  in 
June 2009 and March 2010 (CoRWM docs. 2624, 2792) and at a meeting with HSE, the 
Environment  Agency  (EA)  and  SEPA  in  March  2010  (CoRWM  doc.  2811).  The  NDA’s 
existing  and  planned  Integrated  Project  Teams  (IPTs)  on  various  aspects  of  HAW 
management were also discussed at these meetings.  
 
29. For topic strategy purposes, NDA divides HAW into several categories: 
• 
UK-owned high level waste (HLW) 
• 
overseas-owned HLW 
• 
overseas-owned ILW 
• 
wet ILW (e.g. sludges, ion exchange resins) 
• 
solid ILW (e.g. metals, concrete) 
• 
graphite. 
 
30. For each category there is a baseline strategy and, where appropriate, NDA is exploring 
alternative  strategies,  with  a  view  to  changing  the  baseline  strategy  if  it  would  be 
optimum  to  do  so.  In  exploring  alternative  strategies,  account  is  taken  of  the  need  to 
achieve  passive  safety  as  soon  as  is  reasonably  practicable  and  of  opportunities  to 
improve  HAW  management  in  various  ways  (e.g.  by  reducing  the  quantities  of  HAW 
destined  for  geological  disposal).  There  are  two  categories  of  alternative  strategies: 
those that mitigate risks and those that provide a step change in benefits, compared to 
the baseline. 
 
31. The IPTs are NDA-led projects that will underpin strategy development or provide better 
management  methods  for  particular  wastes.  They  are  partnerships  between  NDA  and 
one or more of its Site Licence Companies (SLCs). At present there are IPTs on reactor 
decommissioning wastes, interim storage and thermal treatment.  
 
32. CoRWM notes that the present NDA topic strategy development process does not deal 
with some strategic issues in a very transparent way. In particular there are a number of 
issues that NDA considers as “opportunities” that CoRWM regards as requiring strategic 
direction. These issues include: 
•  consolidation  of  storage  of  HAW  on  fewer  sites  (so  that  not  every  NDA  site  has  to 
have a HAW store) 
•  consolidation  of  HAW  treatment  (by  moving  wastes  from  one  site  to  another  for 
treatment or by using mobile treatment plant) 
•  treatment  of  some  HAW  to  make  it  suitable  for  near-surface  disposal  (e.g. 
decontamination, segregation). 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 15 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
33. CoRWM  has  been  monitoring  progress  in  the  Letter  of  Compliance  (LoC)  process 
carried  out  by  NDA’s  Radioactive  Waste  Management  Directorate  (RWMD)  (CoRWM 
doc.  2792).  LoC  assessments  are  an  integral  part  of  the  management  of  HAW  on 
nuclear-licensed  sites  and  support  site  operators’  safety  cases  for  HAW  conditioning, 
packaging,  storage  and  geological  disposal  (Radioactive  Waste  Management  Cases). 
LoC  assessments  are  also  requested  by  waste  owners  and  operators  as  part  of  their 
exploration of alternative conditioning methods.  
 
34. In  its  March  2009  report  on  interim  storage  (CoRWM  doc.  2500),  CoRWM  raised  the 
question  of  whether  RWMD  needed  more  resources  in  order  to  speed  up  new  LoC 
assessments and reviews of existing LoCs. As far as the Committee is aware, NDA has 
not yet addressed this question. 
 
Regulatory Developments 
35. In addition to its bilateral meetings with regulators, CoRWM attended an EA workshop on 
approaches  to  assuring  the  disposability  of  HAW  packages  (CoRWM  doc.  2637).  The 
workshop was part of a project on the monitoring and inspection regimes and techniques 
that could be used to determine whether packages of ILW and HLW remain disposable 
during  interim  storage,  on  arrival  at  a  GDF  and  during  any  period  that  a  GDF  remains 
open before backfilling and sealing. 
 
36. A notable regulatory development during the year was the publication of revised and new 
modules  of  the  joint  regulatory  guidance  on  the  management  of  HAW  on  nuclear 
licensed  sites  (HSE  et  al.,  2010). The regulators  informed  us (CoRWM  doc.  2811)  that 
some organisations are already complying with the guidance but others seem reluctant 
to do so. 
 
Strategic Co-ordination 
37. In  its  2009  report  on  interim  storage  (CoRWM  doc.  2500),  CoRWM recommended that 
there  should  be  greater  UK-wide  strategic  co-ordination  of  the  conditioning,  packaging 
and  storage  of  HAW.  In  its  response  to  the  report  (DECC  et  al.,  2009),  Government 
accepted  this  recommendation  and  stated  that  it  was  exploring  the  best  means  of 
implementing it and would invite CoRWM to provide input to and scrutinise proposals as 
they developed.  
 
38. As yet, CoRWM has not been invited to provide any input to proposals. The Committee 
notes that there appears to be greater co-ordination at the technical level than when its 
report was published (e.g. via the IPTs). It has also been told that the Radioactive Waste 
Policy  Group  (RWPG),  which  is  made  up  of  Government  and  regulators,  has  new 
members  and  new  terms  of  reference,  which  may  enable  it  to  encourage  strategic  co-
ordination (CoRWM doc. 2811). For NDA, the Strategy Development and Delivery Group 
(SDDG)  has  existed  for  about  18  months  and  now  involves  the  Ministry  of  Defence 
(MoD),  as  well  as  Government  and  regulators.  It  is  not  clear  to  CoRWM  whether  the 
SDDG can play a role in UK-wide strategic coordination. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 16 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Management of Spent Fuels, Plutonium and Uranium 
Spent Fuels 
39. CoRWM  discussed  NDA  progress  in  developing  topic  strategies  for  spent  fuels  at 
meetings with NDA and regulators in June 2009 and March 2010 (CoRWM docs. 2624, 
2793, 2811). The current situation for Magnox fuel is that work is in hand to develop an 
alternative  to  reprocessing,  should  one  be  required,  but  reprocessing  is  very  much  the 
preferred route.  
 
40. NDA  is  likely  to  decide  over  the  next  year  or  two  how  much  AGR  fuel  to  reprocess 
because  this  is  linked  to  key  investment  decisions  at  Sellafield.  Work  on  the 
management of AGR fuel that is not to be reprocessed is progressing but as yet there is 
no safety case for longer-term storage of the fuel at Sellafield (in existing ponds or in a 
new dry storage facility) and no detailed assessment of the disposability of AGR fuel. 
 
41. For  the  “exotic”  fuels4,  two  types  of  decision  are  needed:  how  to  treat  them  (either  to 
condition them for disposal or to recover useful materials) and where to treat them (at the 
sites  where  they  are  now  kept  or  at  Sellafield).  The  issues  are  complex  and  involve 
safety  and  financial  considerations  and  the  views  of  stakeholders  at  various  NDA  sites 
and near potential transport routes. 
 
42. CoRWM  has  also  been  monitoring  progress  by  British  Energy  on  the  management  of 
spent fuel at Sizewell B. British Energy has carried out a number of local consultations 
and  will  submit  a  Planning  Application  and  Environmental  Statement  for  a  dry  storage 
facility  for  Sizewell  B  fuel  in  2010  (British  Energy,  2009).  There  will  then  be  a  public 
consultation on British Energy’s proposals. 
 
Plutonium 
43. In  2009-10  CoRWM  attended  a  DECC  workshop  on  the  long-term  management  of  the 
UK’s separated civil plutonium (Environment Council, 2009) and sent informal comments 
to  DECC  on  two  pre-consultation  discussion  papers  on  long-term  plutonium 
management  (CoRWM  docs.  2690,  2718).  It  discussed  long-term  plutonium 
management  at  its  November  2009  plenary  meeting  (CoRWM  docs.  2723,  2729).  This 
discussion  was  intended  to  be  a  pre-cursor  to  considering  whether,  and  if  so  how,  to 
respond to a DECC consultation on the long-term management of plutonium. This DECC 
consultation was delayed; CoRWM understands that it will begin later in 2010. 
 
44. NDA  cannot  progress  with  its  topic  strategy  for  plutonium  until  DECC  has  held  its 
consultation  and  decided  on  a  UK  strategy.  Meanwhile,  NDA  is  carrying  out  R&D  on 
plutonium  immobilisation.  There  is  also  work  on  disposability  of  MOX  fuel  (as  input  to 
consideration of plutonium recycling) (CoRWM doc. 2793). 
 
Uranium 
45. NDA work on its topic strategy for uranic materials is progressing (CoRWM doc. 2793). 
Work  is  in  progress  on  options  for  the  management  of  the  uranium  hexafluoride  at 
                                               
4 NDA uses the term “exotic fuels” for non-standard fuels, mainly from research reactors that were 
closed many years ago. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 17 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Capenhurst. Options being considered include continued storage as hexafluoride in new 
containers, deconversion to oxide at Capenhurst and deconversion to oxide elsewhere. 
NDA’s RWMD is considering the disposability of uranic materials. 
 
Strategic Co-ordination 
46. CoRWM  recommended  in  its  2009  report  on  interim  storage  (CoRWM  doc.  2500)  that 
there  be  greater  UK-wide  strategic  co-ordination  of  the  management  of  spent  fuels, 
plutonium  and  uranium.  By  this  it  meant  greater  strategic  co-ordination  between  the 
owners  of  these  materials  (NDA,  MoD,  British  Energy  and  Urenco  UK  Ltd),  with  the 
involvement of Government and regulators. Government accepted this recommendation 
(DECC et al., 2009) but has not put forward any proposals. Nevertheless, it appears that 
co-ordination between NDA and  MoD is improving. In addition, the remit of RWPG has 
been expanded to cover spent fuels, plutonium and uranium (CoRWM doc. 2811).  
 
Transport 
47. CoRWM met with Department for Transport (DfT) in January 2010 (CoRWM doc. 2764) 
and  briefly  discussed  transport  with  NDA  in  March  2010  (CoRWM  doc,  2792).  It  was 
found  that  there  are  extensive  interactions  between  waste  producers  and  DfT  on  HAW 
packaging issues. In view of this, and the prescriptive nature of the transport regulations, 
it was concluded that there would be no value in CoRWM carrying out any major work on 
packaging for transport.  
 
48. CoRWM also concluded from these meetings that there is a lack of strategic planning for 
transport  of  existing,  committed  and  new  build  wastes.  In  particular,  it  is  not  clear  to 
CoRWM who will co-ordinate the identification of the current infrastructure that needs to 
be  maintained  or  the  new  infrastructure  that  will  be  needed  for  transport  of  HAW  and 
spent  fuels  for  treatment,  storage  and  disposal  (CoRWM  doc.  2764).  The  Committee 
notes  that  NDA’s  Topic  Strategy  for  transport  and  logistics  deals  only  with  current 
arrangements. 
 
Provision of Information to the Public 
Information on HAW Management 
49. CoRWM  recommended  in  its  2009  report  on  interim  storage  (CoRWM  doc.  2500)  that 
appropriate information be made publicly available on the management of higher activity 
wastes,  spent  fuels,  plutonium  and  uranium.  It  considered  that  there  was  a  need  to 
summarise, for a variety of readerships, the progress to date, the management options 
under  consideration  for  the  future,  and  the  issues  involved  in  choosing  between 
alternative options. 
 
50. In  its  response  to  this  recommendation  (DECC  et  al.,  2009),  Government  mentioned 
various  pieces  of  work  that  NDA  had  in  hand.  CoRWM  discussed  these  with  NDA  in 
March 2010 (CoRWM doc. 2792). While what NDA is doing is valuable, it does not really 
address the key issue in CoRWM’s recommendation. In particular the NDA’s Radioactive 
Waste  Management  Information  Strategy  is  about  information  management  by  waste 
producers and owners, not provision of information to the public. There is still a need for 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 18 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
information  on  plans  for the  management  of  the various  types  of  HAW, to  complement 
the information in the UK Radioactive Waste Inventory (Defra & NDA, 2008) about waste 
quantities and characteristics.  
 
Security Information 
51. CoRWM discussed its 2009 recommendation about making security information publicly 
available (CoRWM doc. 2500) with the Office of Civil Nuclear Security (OCNS) (CoRWM 
doc.  2746).  CoRWM’s  understanding  is  that  planned  enhancements  to  the  OCNS 
website have been delayed pending the formation of the Office for Nuclear Regulation, of 
which OCNS will be a part. 
 
52. After  the  meeting  with  OCNS,  CoRWM  took  further  action  on  the  specific  issue  of 
information  about  designing  HAW  stores  and  spent  fuel  stores  to  resist  9/11  style 
terrorist  attacks.  It  wrote  to  OCNS  and  to  the  Nuclear  Installations  Inspectorate  (NII) 
summarising  its  current  understanding  of  the  assessment  and  mitigation  of  aircraft 
impact risks and asking some questions. It then produced a note based on that summary 
and the NII and OCNS response (CoRWM doc. 2740). The key point is that regulators 
will require new stores to be designed so as to mitigate the consequences of 9/11 style 
attacks. 
 
Development of Scottish Government HAW Management Policy 
53. The  proposed  Scottish  Government  Policy  is  to  “support  long-term  near  surface,  near 
site  storage  and  disposal  facilities  so  that  the waste  is monitorable  and  retrievable  and 
the need for transporting it over long distances is minimal
 (Scottish Government, 2010). 
54. CoRWM  presented  a  detailed  response  (CoRWM  doc.  2795)  to  each  of  the  questions 
posed in the consultation. It also made the general comment that it felt that, while it was 
clear  that  a  great  deal  of  effort  and  work  had  gone  into  producing  the  consultation 
documents and the evidence that underpinned the development of the policy, there were 
areas where they could have been significantly improved.  
55. CoRWM  presented  a  list  of  principal  comments  on  the  policy  proposals  (CoRWM  doc. 
2795) and these are reproduced below.    
i)  CoRWM considers that the policy would benefit from having more information on 
the  physical  and  chemical  nature  of the  waste  being  produced  in  Scotland. The 
Policy  Statement  needs  to  bring  out  that,  within  the  definition  of  HAW  that  is 
included, there is a sizeable portion of waste (the Environmental Report suggests 
approximately 25% by volume) that will not be suitable for near-surface disposal. 
The  Policy  Statement  should  be  clear  about  the  process  for  arriving  at  an  end-
state for this waste.  
 
ii)  The  policy  is  general  and  enabling,  and  places  responsibility  for  developing  an 
implementation strategy with owners and producers. The policy does not ensure 
optimisation and co-ordination. CoRWM believes the Scottish Government needs 
to give more explicit guidance about what the implementation strategy is aiming 
to  achieve.  For  example,  is  there  a  preference,  where  possible,  for  disposal? 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 19 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
What  are  the  full  ranges  of  criteria  for  arriving  at  siting  decisions?  There  also 
needs to be more guidance about the process for developing the implementation 
strategy and the likely timelines.   
 
iii)  The  Policy  Statement  needs  to  make  it  clear  that  the  NDA  will  lead  the 
development  of  an  Implementation  Strategy.  Scottish  Government  will  have  to 
direct and enable the NDA to take on this lead role. 
 
iv)  The Policy Statement needs to spell out how considerations of cost, affordability 
and  best  value  will  be  taken  into  account  in  developing  an  implementation 
strategy. 
 
v)  The  final  policy  statement  needs  to  be  stand-alone.  Consequently,  information 
and detailed definitions that are currently within the Environmental Report need to 
be  brought  into  the  Policy  Statement.  For  example,  it  is  stated  in  the 
Environmental Report that the preference is for disposal but this is not reflected in 
the Policy Statement. 
 
56. CoRWM  will  scrutinise  how  these  principal  comments  and  the  other  important  issues 
raised  in  its  response  to  the  consultation  (CoRWM  doc.  2795)  are  addressed  in  the 
development of the final policy. 
 
 
4.  SCRUTINY AND ADVICE ON GEOLOGICAL DISPOSAL 
The Geological Disposal Tasks and CoRWM’s Approach 
57. The  tasks  on  geological  disposal  set  out  in  CoRWM’s  2009-10  work  programme 
(CoRWM doc. 2515.2) were: 
 
Task 3: Complete CoRWM’s 2009 report to Government on geological disposal report. 
 
Task  4:  Scrutinise  and  advise  on  the  voluntarism  and  partnership  approach  to  geological 
disposal facility siting, including:  

a)  scrutinise Government work to increase awareness of the invitation to communities 
and monitor responses 
b)  scrutinise Government and NDA engagement with communities that have expressed 
an interest. 
 
Task 5: Scrutinise and advise on site assessment, including:  
a) scrutinise the British Geological Survey’s screening out of unsuitable areas  
b) scrutinise the NDA’s and others’ approaches to the assessment of skills and 
infrastructure requirements for desk-based studies and surface-based investigations 
(stages 4 and 5 of the siting process).  
c) scrutinise NDA preparations for stage 4 of the siting process (desk-based studies).  

 
Task 6: Scrutinise and advise on NDA implementation and safety case work, including:  

a) scrutinise NDA’s continuing development of its Provisional Implementation Plan  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 20 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
b) scrutinise NDA’s continuing development of its Generic Disposal System Safety 
Case.  

 
Task 7: Monitor actions taken in response to the recommendations in CoRWM’s July 2009 
Geological Disposal report.  
 
Task 8: Maintain a watching brief on decision making, funding, risk management and 
regulatory developments.  
 
58. A  draft  of  CoRWM’s  report  to  Government  on  geological  disposal  was  sent  out  to 
stakeholders for comment and placed on the CoRWM website. The comments received 
were  logged  and  published  with  CoRWM’s  responses  to  them  (CoRWM  doc.  2592).  A 
stakeholder event was held in Cumbria in May 2009 to discuss the draft report (CoRWM 
doc. 2593). All the comments received were considered during finalisation of the report. 
 
59. CoRWM  had  regular  contacts  with  DECC  in  order  to  scrutinise  Government  work  to 
increase  awareness  of  the  invitation  to  communities  to  express  an  interest  in  entering 
discussions about becoming involved in the process of siting a GDF (Task 4a). Only one 
part  of  the  UK  has  so  far  expressed  an  interest,  namely  West  Cumbria.  CoRWM 
scrutinised Government and NDA engagement in Cumbria (Task 4b) mainly by attending 
meetings of the West Cumbria Managing Radioactive Waste Safely (MRWS) Partnership 
(www.westcumbriamrws.org.uk)  as  an  observer.  At  CoRWM’s  plenary  meeting  in 
December  2009,  the  leader  of  Copeland  Borough  Council  gave  a  presentation  to 
Committee about the work of the Partnership (CoRWM docs. 2743, 2744). CoRWM kept 
in  contact  with  the  Nuclear  Legacy  Advisory  Forum  (NuLeAF)  about  the  GDF  siting 
process  and  other  aspects  of  the  management  of  HAW.  The  Executive  Director  of 
NuLeAF  gave  a  presentation  to  CoRWM  at  a  plenary  meeting  (CoRWM  docs.  2734, 
2743). 
 
60. It  is  planned  that  NDA’s  RWMD  will  become  the  delivery  organisation  for  geological 
disposal. CoRWM’s scrutiny of work for assessment of possible sites for a GDF (Task 5) 
was carried out through meetings with RWMD, EA, the British Geological Survey (BGS), 
and  written  and  telephone  communications  with  DECC  and  the  West  Cumbria  MRWS 
Partnership.  
 
61. CoRWM’s scrutiny of NDA work on implementation of geological disposal (Task 6a) was 
carried  out  through  written  comment  on  RWMD  documents  relating  to  implementation, 
followed  by  a  meeting  with  RWMD  focused  on  the  processes  it  is  putting  in  place  to 
facilitate implementation. There was no specific scrutiny work on RWMD’s development 
of  its  generic  Disposal  System  Safety  Case  (DSSC),  although  CoRWM  maintained 
awareness  of  RWMD  plans  (e.g.  CoRWM  doc.  2766).  This  scrutiny  will  take  place  in 
2010-11, after RWMD publishes a first version of the DSSC. 
 
2009 Report to Government on Geological Disposal 
62. CoRWM’s  report  to  Government  on  geological  disposal  was  issued  at  the  end  of  July 
2009 (CoRWM doc. 2550). The report covers: 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 21 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
• 
voluntarism and partnership in the GDF siting process 
• 
decision making, funding and managing risks in the implementation of geological 
disposal 
• 
international experience 
• 
PSE 
• 
the regulatory framework for geological disposal 
• 
land use planning and SEA 
• 
developing concepts and designs for geological disposal. 
 
63. The  report  contains  five  recommendations,  which  are  given  in  full  in  Annex  D.  The 
recommendations are about: 
 
• 
developing the principles to be used in deriving Community Benefits Packages 
• 
explaining  how  local  stakeholders  would  have  the  opportunity  to  influence  the 
planning  process  for  a  GDF  if  the  planning  application  is  referred  to  the 
Infrastructure Planning Commission5 
• 
discussing with communities that have expressed an interest the advantages and 
disadvantages  of  single  and  two  staged  planning  applications  for  underground 
investigations and construction of a GDF 
• 
carrying  out  options  assessments  in  which  a  wide  range  of  geological  disposal 
concepts is considered and stakeholders are involved 
• 
the need for an integrated process for GDF design, site assessments and safety 
case development. 
 
64. Government  responded  to  the  report  in  November  2009  (DECC  &  DoENI,  2009).  The 
response  stated that Government  largely  agreed  with  CoRWM’s  recommendations  and 
set out the work in progress or planned to address them. Some specific pieces of work 
are noted in the relevant sub-sections below; further details are in Section 6. 
 
Voluntarism and Partnership 
Increasing the Awareness of Communities to the Invitation to Participate 
65. Government  worked  throughout  2009-10  to  increase  community  awareness  of  the 
invitation  to  express  an  interest  in  entering  without  commitment  discussions  about 
hosting a GDF. DECC and NDA staff attended local authority conferences, offering the 
opportunity for elected members and officials to obtain more information on the issues. In 
the  autumn  of  2009  the  DECC  Minister  of  State  wrote  to  the  chief  executives  of  local 
authorities reminding them of the invitation. As of now (May 2010), no other community 
has expressed an interest. 
 
Government and NDA Engagement in West Cumbria 
66. Various  members  of  CoRWM  attended  meetings  of  the  West  Cumbria  MRWS 
Partnership  as  observers  during  2009-10.  Progress  in  the  work  of  the  Partnership  is  a 
                                               
5 Current Government policy is that the Infrastructure Planning Commission will be abolished and 
replaced by a different fast-track planning procedure for major projects. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 22 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
standing  item  at  CoRWM’s  plenary  meetings  and  CoRWM  provides  information  and 
advice to the Partnership when it is appropriate to do so.  
 
67. In March 2010 CoRWM met with the Partnership’s Steering Group to obtain their views 
on  Government  and  NDA  support for  the  Partnership’s  work  (CoRWM  doc.  2790).  The 
Steering Group told CoRWM that the Partnership had received all the support it needed 
from  DECC  but  that  it  thought  the  importance  of  the  Partnership  merited  greater 
recognition  in  Government,  in  particular  it  would  be  helpful  if  it  was  recognised  at 
Ministerial  level.  The  Steering  Group  was  also  very  pleased  with  how  individuals  from 
NDA had worked with the Partnership. It had some concerns about whether the level of 
NDA  support  in  the  future  would  be  sufficient  to  meet  all  the  Partnership’s  needs  and 
whether NDA appreciated that the Partnership required time to do its work.  
 
68. The topics covered in the first three of CoRWM’s recommendations in its 2009 report to 
Government  on  geological  disposal  (CoRWM  doc.  2550)  are  being  addressed  in  the 
work  of  the  Partnership,  with  input  from  the  Government  and  regulators.  There  is  a 
Partnership  workstream  on  Community  Benefits  Packages  (Recommendation  1),  in 
which  DECC  participates.  Planning  applications  (Recommendations  2  and  3)  are  to  be 
covered  in  a  workstream  on  safety,  security,  environment  and  planning  (West  Cumbria 
MRWS Partnership, 2010a). 
 
Site Assessment 
Screening Out of Unsuitable Areas 
69. The  process  of  screening  out  areas  that  are  obviously  unsuitable  for  a  GDF  will  be 
carried  out  by  the  British  Geological  Survey  (BGS),  working  under  contract  to  DECC. 
The  draft  BGS  report  will  be  made  available,  for  discussion  and  peer  review,  to  the 
relevant communities and local authorities, NDA, the regulators and CoRWM. 
 
70. The screening process in West Cumbria is due to begin in summer 2010. CoRWM has 
provided  advice  and  comments  to  the  West  Cumbria  MRWS  Partnership  on  the  peer 
review of the screening process and on CoRWM’s role with respect to the process and 
the peer review (CoRWM doc. 2711).  
 
71. The points made about CoRWM’s role were:  
 
• 
CoRWM could provide advice on and scrutiny of the site screening process. It could 
scrutinise the BGS screening process and its appropriateness, the robustness of the 
peer  review  arrangements  put  in  place,  and  the  quality  of  engagement  with  the 
Partnership on the peer review process and its co-ordination.  
• 
CoRWM would not act in the role of peer reviewer of the BGS report. Whilst CoRWM 
would  receive  the  BGS  report  and  develop  a  view  on  it,  this  would  be  focused  on 
scrutiny of the BGS screening process as a whole and within the context of MRWS 
Stage 2.  
 
72. With respect to co-ordination of the peer review for the BGS screening process, CoRWM 
provided the following advice: 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 23 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
 
• 
It is reasonable that Government (via DECC) works with the Partnership and BGS to 
develop a coordinated peer review process.  
• 
Co-ordination  would  include  definition  of  the  planned  timescale for review,  avenues 
for submission of reviews, style of reviews, deadlines for completion, rules regarding 
use of data, and rules regarding attribution of sources and use of third parties.  
• 
All the relevant material should be available to all reviewers equally.  
• 
The process for considering the reviews should be open, transparent and fair. 
• 
Reviews must be independent and technically credible.   
• 
Cost  and  value  for  money  are  important  but  secondary  considerations  to  the 
provision  of clearly  independent  professional  reviews.  However,  parties with  shared 
interests may jointly wish to commission or utilise a single peer review. 
 
73. Additional  informal  advice  was  provided  on  specific  detailed  aspects  of  peer  review, 
including  terms  of  reference,  independence  and  objectivity,  and  credibility  and 
competence. 
 
74. The  status  of  BGS  processes  and  plans  in  relation  to  the  screening  out  of  unsuitable 
areas  was  discussed  in  a  meeting  between  CoRWM  and  BGS  in  February  2010 
(CoRWM  doc.  2801).  A  key  point  from  this  meeting  was  that  the  provisional  timetable 
gave BGS 10 weeks to undertake its study and submit a final report to the West Cumbria 
MRWS Partnership. This included a fortnight for the peer review of the draft report and 
for BGS amendments in the light of the review. During discussion at the February 2010 
plenary  (CoRWM  doc.  2788),  it  was  suggested  that  CoRWM  contact  both  the 
Partnership and DECC with advice to extend the time period allowed for peer review and 
amendment of the BGS report.6 
 
75. CoRWM emphasised to BGS the importance of stating clearly in its screening report that 
areas  not  excluded  are  not  automatically  suitable.  How  this  point  is  presented,  both  in 
words  and  in  figure  or  map  form,  would  be  critical  to  the  engagement  with  the 
communities in West Cumbria. 
 
Identifying Sites for Desk-Based Studies 
76. Desk-based  studies  are  Stage  4  of  the  GDF  siting  process,  after  the  screening  out  of 
unsuitable areas (Stage 2) and the community’s Decision to Participate (Stage 3) (Defra 
et al., 2008). In order to proceed from Stage 2 to the site assessment in Stage 4 there 
has to be a process for moving from areas that have not been excluded to sites for desk-
based studies. RWMD carried out work on developing a proposed process in 2009 and 
discussed it with CoRWM at a meeting in January 2010 (CoRWM doc. 2782).  
 
77. RWMD  had  considered  in  detail  the  situation  in  which  a  Community  Siting  Partnership 
asks NDA to develop and apply a process in consultation with stakeholders, in order to 
define  potential  sites  for  desk-based  characterisation.  CoRWM  advised  on  the  need  to 
be very cautious, especially with respect to how different administrative bodies are to be 
                                               
6 This was later overtaken by events and a longer period will now be allowed for peer review and 
finalisation of the BGS screening report. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 24 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
involved. These need to be given the opportunity to participate and support the process. 
Maintenance  of  partnership  confidence  requires  a  clear  strategy  of  support,  education 
and  information,  especially  if  the  process  appears  to  be  ‘stop-start’  or  have  gaps 
between stages. 
 
78. CoRWM noted that the relationship between application of objectives, exclusion criteria 
and timing of geological assessment needs to be made clear before desk-based studies 
begin. It suggested that a possible approach would be to assess potential host geologies 
and locations for surface facilities in parallel, producing maps to illustrate these. The two 
maps  could  then  be  overlain  to  see  the  differences  between  them.  During  this 
assessment it would be important not to introduce arbitrary constraints on the depths of 
underground  facilities  or  on  the  distances  between  surface  and  underground  facilities. 
CoRWM  also  advised  that  the  possible  relationships  between  excluded  areas,  sites for 
GDF surface facilities and sites for underground facilities need to be carefully explained 
to stakeholders and the public at an early stage. 
 
Site Characterisation 
79. CoRWM  attended  an  Environment  Agency  (EA)  workshop  on  “Assessing  the 
Characterisation  of  Geological  Environments  for  Repository  Implementation”  in 
September 2009 (CoRWM doc. 2707; Quintessa, 2009). The workshop was designed to 
contribute to developing EA work on understanding uncertainties in desk-based studies 
and  surface-based  characterisation  and  the  role  of  underground  investigations,  and  to 
provide comment on the MRWS timeline and its relationship with staged regulation. The 
workshop  was  broken  down  into  thematic  sessions:  desk-based  studies  (MRWS  Stage 
4),  surface-based  characterisation  (Stage  5),  underground  characterisation  (Stage  6) 
and management issues.  
 
80. Some general conclusions of the workshop were: 
 
• 
at present it is not possible to define in detail the activities within each MRWS stage 
• 
the permitting process for all characterisation work needs to be flexible 
• 
hold points imposed by regulators should not be ‘stop’ points. 
• 
MRWS Stage 5 should include time for re-processing data from the MRWS Stage 4 
prior to detailed investigations 
• 
characterisation  work  under  MRWS  Stage  6  should  be  in  two  parts:  underground 
research and underground characterisation 
• 
an underground research facility would be required at each prospective GDF site 
• 
the management of the process has to recognise that the project will change from a 
dominantly science-based project to an engineering project through its life cycle and 
this should be central to implementation planning. 
 
NDA Implementation Planning 
81. In  summer  2009  CoRWM  commented  on  a  draft  of  an  RWMD  document  titled 
“Geological  Disposal:  Planning  for  Implementation”.  It  then  met  with  RWMD  to  discuss 
the document and the RWMD implementation planning process in general (CoRWM doc. 
2714).  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 25 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
 
82. RWMD  indicated  that  the  Provisional  Implementation  Plan  (PIP),  which  is  in  effect  the 
Lifetime Plan for a GDF up to and beyond its closure, would not be developed further in 
2009-10. RWMD was focusing on developing a 5-year plan that would cover in detail the 
steps  in  the  MRWS  GDF  siting  process  leading  towards  a  Government  decision  on 
surface-based  investigation.  The  5-year  plan  was  also  required  for  assessment  in  the 
Government's  Public  Value  Programme,  which  aimed  to  identify  spending  priorities  in 
preparation for the next Comprehensive Spending Review. 
 
83. Discussion  of  the  Planning  for  Implementation  document  included  the  transition  from 
generic  to  more  site  specific  studies  and  the  need  for  options  assessments  covering  a 
wide range of geological disposal concepts (the fourth recommendation in CoRWM doc. 
2550).  CoRWM  understands  that  the  final  version  of  the  document,  which  has  been 
retitled  “Geological  Disposal:  Steps  Towards  Implementation”,  will  be  published  later  in 
2010. It will provide a first point of reference for the public on RWMD’s early planning for 
the implementation of geological disposal.  
 
84. The PIP might become the definitive Implementation Plan if and when a community took 
a Decision to Participate in the siting process, but this change to the PIP would depend 
on  many  factors,  including  regulatory  requirements  that  are  also  evolving.  RWMD  also 
explained that the PIP would, when developed, indicate what might happen on a range 
of  assumptions  not  all  of  which  would  prove  valid.  Once  site-specific  work  began,  the 
generic work undertaken so far could be "banked" and subsequent work tailored to the 
site.  
 
85. R&D  needs  and  gaps  would  be  identified  as  part  of  the  process  of  developing  a  site-
specific  design  and  this would  involve  discussions  with  the  local  community.  If  an  area 
wanted to see how the process might develop after any Decision to Participate, a set of 
"bounding" assumptions could be agreed with the Partnership and the PIP could then be 
made  specific  to  the  area.  The  generic  PIP  could  be  used  for  any  other  communities 
expressing an interest. 
 
86. The  delay  in  publishing  the  NDA  Planning  for  Implementation  document  meant  that 
CoRWM was unable to carry out scrutiny on this topic in late 2009 and early 2010.  
 
 
5.  SCRUTINY AND ADVICE ON OTHER TOPICS 
Research and Development 
The R&D Tasks and CoRWM’s Approach 
87. The  tasks  on  research  and  development  (R&D)  set  out  in  CoRWM’s  2009-10  work 
programme (CoRWM doc. 2515.2) were: 
 
Task 9: Complete CoRWM’s 2009 report to Government on R&D 
Task 10: Scrutinise the implementation of the high-level RWMD R&D Strategy 
Task 11: Scrutinise the development of the RWMD R&D work programme 

2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 26 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Task 12: Monitor actions taken in response to the recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 
report to Government on R&D.
 
 
88.  Completion  of  the  2009  CoRWM  report  to  Government  on  R&D  (CoRWM  doc.  2543) 
involved  addressing  and  responding  to  comments  received  (CoRWM  doc.  2630)  when 
the draft report was sent out for consultation to stakeholders and placed on the CoRWM 
website. It also involved taking into account points made at a stakeholder event held in 
September 2009 to discuss the draft report (CoRWM doc. 2677). 
 
89. Tasks  10  and  11  were  taken  together  because  much  of  the  implementation  of  the 
RWMD  R&D  Strategy  (NDA,  2009a)  will  take  place  via  the  development,  and  the 
carrying  out,  of  the  RWMD  R&D Work  Programme.  CoRWM  received  drafts  of  RWMD 
R&D  work  programme  documents  for  comment  and  held  a  meeting  with  RWMD  in 
January 2010 to discuss the programme (CoRWM doc. 2776). 
 
90. Government has yet to respond to CoRWM’s 2009 report on R&D (CoRWM doc. 2543), 
so it has not been possible to carry out much work on Task 12. However, a meeting was 
held  with  NDA  to  discuss  all  its  R&D  relevant  to  CoRWM’s  remit  at  which  the 
recommendations  in  the  report  were  discussed  (CoRWM  doc.  2766).  In  addition, 
CoRWM has been following developments at the Research Councils. 
 
91. In  September  2009,  CoRWM responded to  a  call  for  evidence  for  an  inquiry  on  setting 
priorities  for  publicly  funded  research  by  the  House  of  Lords  Science  and  Technology 
Committee. In order to meet the House of Lords Committee’s deadline it was necessary 
to respond before the 2009 R&D report was finalised. CoRWM then revised its evidence 
(CoRWM doc. 2719) following publication of its R&D report. 
 
2009 Report to Government on R&D 
92. CoRWM’s  report  to  Government  on  R&D  was  issued  at  the  end  of  October  2009 
(CoRWM doc. 2543). The report covers: 
 
•  the UK’s process for providing R&D in the management of HAW 
•  the skills requirements to support R&D in the MRWS programme, in particular 
those R&D skills needed to enable implementation of geological disposal 
•  the infrastructure requirements, in particular those facilities supporting R&D on 
highly radioactive materials and facilities for R&D that will need to be carried out 
underground 
•  PSE on the above topics. 
 
93. The report contains six recommendations, which are given in full in Annex D. These are 
about: 
 
• 
the need for strategic co-ordination of UK R&D for the management of HAW 
(within the NDA, between the NDA and the rest of the nuclear industry, amongst 
the Research Councils and between the whole of the nuclear industry, its 
regulators and the Research Councils) 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 27 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
• 
ensuring that EA and SEPA obtain the resources they need to access and 
commission additional independent research 
• 
assigning to a single organisation the responsibility for providing leadership and 
strategic direction for the provision of R&D skills relevant to HAW management 
• 
improving and enhancing the capabilities of UK facilities for research with highly 
radioactive materials and making them more accessible to researchers 
• 
establishing an underground research facility at any site in the UK where it is 
proposed to construct a GDF. 
 
94. In  the  letter  explaining  why  the  Government’s  response  to  the  R&D  report  had  been 
delayed, Lord Hunt, the DECC Minister of State, stated that: 
 
“This  report  is  wide  ranging  and  raises  a  number  of  interesting  and  inter-connected 
points  that  cut  across  the  work  of  several  Government  departments,  Devolved 
Administrations and delivery agencies. Officials from CoRWM’s sponsor departments are 
currently  working  together  with  these  bodies  to  examine  the  report  and 
recommendations jointly to ensure that issues raised are considered, as far as possible, 
in a joined up manner.” 
 
NDA R&D 
R&D on Management of HAW 
95. A  meeting  with  NDA  on  R&D  in  January  2010  (CoRWM  doc.  2766)  provided  CoRWM 
with an overview of the R&D being carried out by NDA and its SLCs that is relevant to 
CoRWM’s interests. The meeting began with a brief discussion of the recommendations 
in  CoRWM’s  2009  report  to  Government  on  R&D  (CoRWM  doc.  2543),  which  NDA 
broadly  supported.  NDA  then  described  how  its  own  R&D,  particularly  the  Direct 
Research  Portfolio,  is  managed.  NDA  re-emphasised  that  it  would  only  fund  research 
that it designates as needs-driven. 
 
96. Most  of  the  R&D  that  NDA  pays  for  is  funded  through  the  SLCs  (CoRWM  doc.  2543). 
NDA stated that it cannot direct the SLCs as to which R&D to fund but can only advise. 
CoRWM  asked  about  strategic  oversight  of  all  the  R&D  and  who  in  NDA  has  an 
overview.  This  led  to  a  discussion  of  the  role  of  the  NDA  Research  Board  on 
Decommissioning  and  Clean  Up  (NDARB)  and  the  Nuclear  Waste  Research  Forum 
(NWRF), which reports to the NDARB.  
 
97. The NDARB is primarily concerned with NDA’s own research and co-ordinating this with 
other organisations. The NWRF provides a forum for SLCs, other nuclear site licensees 
and  regulators  to  talk  to  each  other.  Neither  the  NDARB  in  its  present  form  nor  the 
NWRF is an appropriate mechanism for carrying out the strategic co-ordination of R&D 
that  CoRWM  considers  is  needed  (CoRWM  doc.  2543).  CoRWM  has  been  invited  to 
attend NWRF meetings as an observer and has accepted the invitation. 
 
98. In March 2010 NDA published its business plan for 2010-13 (NDA, 2010). This indicates 
that NDA’s own spend on R&D in 2010-11 will be £6 million, compared to £34 million in 
2009-10.  It  is  not  yet  clear  to  CoRWM  how  NDA  R&D  on  HAW  management  will  be 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 28 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
affected  by  the  budget  reduction.  Nor  is  it  clear  to  the  Committee  how  SLC  funding  of 
R&D will change in 2010-11. 
R&D on Geological Disposal 
99. CoRWM  met  RWMD  in  January  2010  (CoRWM  doc.  2776)  to  discuss  a  draft  of  the 
document  that  contains  an  overview  of  the  geological  disposal  R&D  programme, 
diagrams describing the programme and prioritisation tables. The Committee recognised 
that it is difficult for RWMD to set out a highly focussed R&D programme in advance of 
the  identification  of  possible  sites  for  a  GDF  and  hence  the  types  of  geological 
formations and geological disposal concepts that need to be studied.  
 
100. 
There  was  also  discussion  of  the  need  to  identify  skills  gaps  and  ensure  that  the 
programme leads to the development of UK R&D skills on the timescale on which they 
will  be  needed.  It  was  noted  that  there  is  likely  to  be  strong  competition  for  geological 
R&D skills from other technical areas (e.g. carbon capture, oil and gas exploration). 
 
101. 
CoRWM has been invited to attend meetings of RWMD’s Research Advisory Panel 
as  an  observer.  It  has  accepted  this  invitation  and  expects  to  provide  input  to 
discussions,  where  appropriate,  and  update  the  Panel  on  CoRWM’s  work,  as  well  as 
observing  proceedings.  At  a  meeting  with  the  Chief  Executive  of  NDA  in  March  2010 
(CoRWM  doc.  2797),  CoRWM  learnt that  RWMD  spend  on  R&D  will  increase  in future 
years, as implementation of geological disposal progresses. 
 
102. 
CoRWM  notes  that  EA  is  scrutinising  RWMD  R&D  in  detail.  This  is  part  of  EA’s 
scrutiny of all RWMD work relating to geological disposal (EA, 2010). 
 
Research Councils 
103. 
In  March  2010  the  Chair  of  CoRWM  wrote  to  the  Chief  Executive  of  the  Natural 
Environment  Research  Council  (NERC)  expressing  concern  that,  although  radioactive 
waste disposal is identified explicitly in NERC’s current strategic plan (“Next Generation 
Science for Planet Earth”), it is not yet recognised in any of the Theme Action Plans that 
will  deliver  the  strategy.  This  may  mean  that  research  projects  on  radioactive  waste 
disposal will not be included in NERC’s developing thematic programmes until 2011-12, 
after the next Comprehensive Spending Review, when budgets may be more limited.  
 
104. 
In  his  reply,  the  Chief  Executive  of  NERC  emphasised  NERC’s  current  support  for 
relevant  research  and  the  flexibility  of  NERC’s  strategy  and  programmes,  which  would 
allow  expansion  if  required.  He  also  stated  that,  subject  to  approval  by  its  Council,  a 
NERC  activity  was  being  developed  on  radioactivity  in  the  environment.  In  addition,  he 
invited CoRWM to meet the relevant NERC staff to explore these issues further. CoRWM 
intends to arrange a meeting in due course. 
 
105. 
CoRWM is also concerned about the uncertainty in the timing of the Engineering and 
Physical  Sciences  Research  Council’s  (EPSRC)  call  for  research  proposals  on 
geological  disposal.  This  concern  was  prompted  by  an  EPSRC-convened  workshop  in 
summer 2009; it is still unclear when the programme will be initiated. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 29 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
106. 
One  of  the  questions  asked  by  the  House  of  Lords  Science  and  Technology 
Committee  in  its  inquiry  about  setting  priorities  for  publicly  funded  research  (House  of 
Lords,  2010b)  was  about  the  balance  of  funding  between  “targeted”  and  “responsive-
mode” research. In its evidence (CoRWM doc. 2719), CoRWM expressed the view that 
much more curiosity-driven research is needed for HAW management, in addition to the 
targeted  research  sponsored  at  present  by  the  nuclear  industry  and  the  Research 
Councils.  This  point  was  also  made  in  the  2009  report  on  R&D  (CoRWM  doc.  2543), 
which noted that, in the nuclear area, EPSRC makes much more use of “managed calls” 
for  targeted  research  than  it  does  of  “responsive-mode”  funding  for  curiosity-driven 
research. 
 
107. 
In its report on its inquiry about setting priorities for publicly funded research (House 
of Lords, 2010b), the Science and Technology Committee stated: 
 
“It goes without saying that an appropriate balance needs to be maintained between the 
different types of research. We were told that, in the light of its inherent unpredictability, 
responsive-mode  research  is  likely  to  fare  less  well  in  challenging  economic 
circumstances than targeted research. With this in mind, we urge Research Councils, 
in determining the appropriate balance, to give due consideration to the role and 
importance  of  responsive-mode  research  in  meeting  the  broader  objectives  of 
research
.”
 
 
New Build Wastes 
The New Build Wastes Task and CoRWM’s Approach 
108. 
The  task  on  wastes from  new  nuclear  power  stations  set  out  in  CoRWM’s  2009-10 
work programme (CoRWM doc. 2515.2) was: 
 
Task  13:  Advise  on  interim  storage  and  geological  disposal  issues  for  ILW  and  spent 
fuels from new build nuclear power stations. 
 
 
109. 
CoRWM  began  work  on  this  task  in  June  2009 when  it  commented  informally  on  a 
first draft of the summary of evidence on radioactive waste management that DECC had 
prepared to accompany the draft National Policy Statement (NPS) for new nuclear power 
stations. These informal comments were from the points of view of factual accuracy and 
clarity of expression.  
 
110. 
In  early  autumn  2009  CoRWM  made  informal  comments  on  a  further  draft  of  the 
evidence summary and on a draft chapter for the NPS consultation document and a draft 
section  for  the  nuclear  NPS.  Again  these  comments  were  only  about  factual  accuracy 
and clarity of expression. 
 
111. 
The DECC public consultation on the energy infrastructure NPSs began in November 
2009.  CoRWM  discussed  the  preparation  of  its  response  to  the  consultation  at  its 
December 2009 plenary meeting (CoRWM doc. 2743). It agreed that it would prepare a 
response  to those  parts of  the  nuclear  NPS  consultation  that  dealt  with  ILW  and  spent 
fuel and issue a separate statement of CoRWM’s current position on new build wastes. It 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 30 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
also agreed the structure of its response and its approach to the consultation questions 
(CoRWM  doc.  2733).  The  response  (CoRWM  doc.  2748)  and  position  statement 
(CoRWM  doc.  2749)  were  prepared  over  the  period  from  late  December  2009  to  early 
March  2010.  Drafts  were  discussed  at  the  January  2010  and  February  2010  plenary 
meetings (CoRWM docs. 2770, 2788). 
 
112. 
To obtain information for use in its response to the NPS consultation, CoRWM held 
meetings  with  regulators  and  with  prospective  reactor  vendors  and  operators  (CoRWM 
docs.  2746,  2747,  2764,  2765,  2767).  It  also  invited  stakeholders,  via  its e-bulletin  and 
website, to send it any information about new build  wastes that they wished to draw to 
the Committee’s attention (CoRWM doc. 2755). All the information received at meetings 
and by other means was taken into account in preparing the NPS consultation response. 
 
CoRWM’s Position on New Build Wastes 
113. 
The March 2010 statement of CoRWM’s position on new build wastes (CoRWM doc. 
2749)  starts  from  the  statements  made  in  the  Committee’s  2006  Recommendations  to 
Government  (CoRWM  doc.  700).  It  reiterates  that  the  Committee’s  position  on  the 
desirability  or  otherwise  of  building  new  nuclear  power  stations  remains  neutral,  i.e. 
CoRWM is neither for or against new build. 
 
114. 
The statement then deals with consideration of wastes in the new build assessment 
process  and  with  the  testing  and  validation  of  proposals  for  management  of  new  build 
wastes. It ends by stating that CoRWM’s future work on new build wastes will consist of 
carrying out scrutiny and providing advice on: 
 
• 
consideration of waste issues in the public assessment process for new build 
power stations 
• 
formulation of plans to ensure that, if new build wastes are created, they are 
safely and securely managed 
• 
prevention  and,  where  that  is  not  possible,  minimisation  of  adverse  impacts 
on the management of existing and committed wastes 
• 
maintenance  of  public  confidence  in  plans  for  the  long-term  management  of 
new build wastes, in addition to existing and committed wastes. 
 
CoRWM’s Response to the NPS Consultation 
115. 
CoRWM  responded  to  seven  questions  in  the  NPS  consultation  document.  The 
principal question for the Committee was Question 19, which was: 
 
Do you agree with the Government’s preliminary conclusion that effective arrangements 
exist or will exist to manage and dispose of waste that will be produced by new nuclear 
power stations in the UK? 
 
116. 
In its response (CoRWM doc. 2748) CoRWM agreed that some arrangements exist 
that would be effective for the management of HAW from new nuclear power stations. It 
went on to state that whether there will be effective arrangements for all the steps in the 
management, including the disposal, of new build HAW is a matter of judgement, and it 
is for the Government to make this judgement, based on the information available to it.  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 31 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
 
117. 
The response then said that CoRWM considers that the Government should take into 
account when making this judgement that, while the current UK process for siting a GDF 
for HAW is sound, it is at an early stage. Its success depends on finding a combination 
(or combinations if more than one GDF is needed) of a willing host community and a site 
that  is  technically  suitable  to  hold  enough  HAW. At  present,  it  is  uncertain  whether  the 
appropriate  combination  (or  combinations)  of  community  and  site  can  be  found  in  this 
country. This uncertainty applies to existing and committed HAW, as well as to new build 
HAW, and is likely to persist for many years.  
 
118. 
 In addition, the response stated that CoRWM considers that the Government should 
recognise  the  need  for  optimisation  of  the  management,  including  the  disposal,  of  new 
build  HAW.  To  meet  legal  and  regulatory  requirements,  it  is  necessary  for  prospective 
operators of new nuclear power stations, with the assistance of NDA, to identify, assess 
and compare options for the management of new build spent fuel, including the design 
and  location  of  stores,  the  storage  period  and  a  range  of  possible  geological  disposal 
concepts. 
 
119. 
The response also made the point that CoRWM considers that it is essential for the 
public  to  have  confidence  in  the  management  of  new  build  HAW.  The  need  for  public 
confidence is being taken into account in the implementation of geological disposal. To 
date, insufficient attention has been paid to it in planning for storage of new build spent 
fuel.  This  needs  to  be  rectified  in  future,  particularly  by  prospective  operators  of  new 
nuclear power stations. 
 
120. 
In answer to the general consultation question, CoRWM’s response made a number 
of points about the possible impact of the NPS on the long-term management of existing 
and  committed  HAW.  CoRWM  emphasised  to  Government  the  importance  of  the 
voluntarist  approach  to  the  siting  of  a  GDF  (or  GDFs)  and  reiterated  its  view  (CoRWM 
doc. 2550) that it would be helpful if Government were to restate its commitment to this 
approach  and  indicate  that  it  would  consult  stakeholders  before  adopting  any  other 
approach. CoRWM also stated that there is a need for greater integration in planning for 
the long-term management of existing, committed and new build wastes. 
 
Scrutiny of the PSE of Various Organisations 
The PSE Scrutiny Tasks and CoRWM’s Approach 
121. 
In 2009-10 CoRWM had two tasks relating to carrying out scrutiny and providing 
advice on public and stakeholder engagement (CoRWM doc.2515.2):  
 
Task  15:  Liaise  with  other  organisations  on  ways  to  provide  information  to  the  public 
about the MRWS programme and radioactive waste management in general.
 
 
Task 16: Scrutinise the PSE activities of Government, NDA and the regulators related to 
the MRWS programme.
 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 32 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
122. 
For Task 15 CoRWM took opportunities as they arose, rather than convening specific 
meetings  or  requesting  documents.  For  Task  16  CoRWM  wrote  to  Government,  NDA, 
regulators  and  operators  of  nuclear  sites  asking a  series  of questions  about  their  PSE. 
Members  of  CoRWM  also  observed  the  PSE  practices  of  various  organisations  when 
attending  meetings  of  their  stakeholders.  In  addition,  CoRWM  monitored  the  PSE 
activities of organisations through their literature and websites. 
 
Liaison on Providing Information to the Public 
123. 
CoRWM  discussed  the  provision  of  information  to  the  public  about  interim  storage 
related  topics  with  NDA  in  March  2010  (CoRWM  doc.  2792).  As  noted  above  in  the 
context  of  interim  storage  (para.  49),  the  work  carried  out  so  far  by  NDA  on  the 
management of information about radioactive wastes does not address CoRWM’s main 
concerns (CoRWM doc. 2500). 
 
124. 
When  rebuilding  CoRWM’s  website  (para.  16),  the  decision  was  taken  to  focus  the 
site  on  the  Committee’s  work,  leaving  other  websites  to  provide  general  information 
about the management of higher activity wastes. Three websites were examined to find 
out  whether,  between  them,  they  contained  the necessary  information. These  were  the 
main DECC website, the DECC MRWS website and the NDA website7. It was noted that 
there  were  some  gaps  and  overlaps.  These  were  drawn  to  the  attention  of  DECC  and 
NDA.  There  will  be  further  work  on  this  topic  during  CoRWM’s  scrutiny  of  the 
rationalisation of these three websites that is to take place in 2010-11.  
 
125. 
CoRWM  learnt  in  June  2009  that  EA,  HSE  and  DfT  intended  to  set  up  joint  web 
pages on regulating geological disposal (CoRWM doc. 2550). The web pages went “live” 
in December 20098. EA has also revised and expanded its own web pages on geological 
disposal9. 
 
Questionnaire on PSE 
126. 
In  January  2010  CoRWM  put  a  number  of  questions  (CoRWM  doc.  2750)  to 
Governments,  NDA,  regulators  and  site  operators  about  their  PSE  activities.  These 
included  how  they  identified  their  stakeholders,  drew  up  an  engagement  strategy  and 
reviewed  its  effectiveness,  and  how  they  made  relevant  information  more  accessible. 
CoRWM  asked  for  comments  and  observations.  A  number  of  responses  have  been 
received. These will be evaluated in 2010-11 and the results included in a position paper 
on  PSE  to  be  published  in  December  2010,  with  the  outcomes  of  other  CoRWM  PSE 
scrutiny activities in 2009 and 2010. 
 
Scrutiny of PSE Related to Geological Disposal 
127. 
The  results  of  CoRWM’s  initial  scrutiny  of  Government  and  NDA  PSE  related  to 
geological  disposal  are  given  in  the  2009  report  to  Government  (CoRWM  doc.  2550). 
Since  then  NDA’  RWMD  has  published  its  Public  and  Stakeholder  Engagement  and 
                                               
www.decc.gov.uk, http://mrws.decc.gov.uk, www.nda.gov.uk.  
8 www.environment-agency.gov.uk/business/sectors/111766.aspx 
9 For example, www.environment-agency.gov.uk/business/sectors/37483.aspx  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 33 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Communications Strategy for geological disposal (NDA, 2009b). It is currently developing 
stakeholder engagement plans. 
 
128. 
As previously mentioned (para. 66), CoRWM is an observer at meetings of the West 
Cumbria  MRWS  Partnership10.  The  Partnership  is  carrying  out  a  wide  range  of  public 
engagement  activities  and  has  independent  facilitation  for  its  meetings.  The  UK 
Government  and  NDA  are  providing  support  when  requested  to  do  so.  CoRWM  is 
impressed by the extensive nature and inclusivity of the PSE activities in West Cumbria. 
 
Scrutiny of PSE on Various Aspects of HAW Management 
129. 
CoRWM observes the work of the Government’s Nuclear Engagement Group, where 
the UK Government, the Devolved  Administrations, NDA and the regulators share their 
engagement plans on legacy and new nuclear issues and discuss lessons learned. One 
of its outputs is the "nuclear consultations" page and map on the DECC website11. The 
Group is independently facilitated.  
 
130. 
CoRWM  attends  meetings  of  the  NDA  National  Stakeholder  Group12  (e.g.  CoRWM 
doc.  2803).  This  also  has  an  independent  facilitator.  Its  effectiveness  is  reviewed 
periodically and another review is due in 2010.  
 
131. 
Meetings at which CoRWM observed the PSE practices of organisations in 2009-10 
included: 
 
• 
DECC  workshop  on  the  long-term  management  of  plutonium  (Environment 
Council, 2009) 
• 
Scottish  Government  workshops  for  the  development  of  its  policy  on  the  long-
term management of HAW13 
• 
EA workshop on site characterisation (Quintessa, 2009) 
 
132. 
CoRWM  noted  British  Energy  PSE  on  the  proposed  dry  store  for  spent  fuel  at 
Sizewell B (British Energy, 2009) and some of the DECC and the regulators’ PSE related 
to  waste  management  aspects  of  new  nuclear  power  stations14.  In  addition,  CoRWM 
took the opportunity during its visits to Hinkley Point and Hunterston to ask site operators 
and  stakeholders  about  the  PSE  undertaken  and  their  views  on  its  effectiveness 
(CoRWM docs. 2802, 2809). 
 
 
                                               
10 www.westcumbriamrws.org.uk 
11www.decc.gov.uk/en/content/cms/what_we_do/uk_supply/energy_mix/nuclear/consultations/consult
ations.aspx 

12 www.nda.gov.uk/stakeholders 
13 www.scotland.gov.uk/Topics/Environment/waste-and-pollution/16293/higheractivitywastepolicy  
14 https://www.energynpsconsultation.decc.gov.uk/home/events,  
www.hse.gov.uk/newreactors/stakeholderengagement.htm
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 34 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
6.  IMPACTS OF CoRWM’s SCRUTINY AND ADVICE 
133. 
This section of the report sets out the impacts that CoRWM considers its scrutiny and 
advice  has  had  in  2009-10  on  the  work  of  Government,  NDA  and  others.  It  includes 
actions  taken  in  response  to  the  recommendations  in  CoRWM’s  three  2009  reports  to 
Government  (CoRWM  docs.  2500,  2543,  2550).  It  also  covers  the  effects  of  other 
CoRWM  work  on  the  development  and  implementation  of  Government  policy  on  the 
management  of  HAW  and  on  promoting  understanding  of  radioactive  waste 
management issues. 
 
Actions taken in Response to CoRWM Recommendations 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 Report on Interim Storage 
134. 
The  2009  CoRWM  report  on  interim  storage  (CoRWM  doc.  2500)  made  four 
recommendations to Government. The text of these is given in full in Annex D. 
 
135. 
The  first  recommendation  was  about  strategic  co-ordination  of  conditioning, 
packaging and storage of HAW and of management of spent fuels, plutonium and uranic 
materials. Government accepted this recommendation (DECC et al., 2009) and indicated 
that it would explore the best means of implementing it and invite CoRWM to comment 
on  its  proposals.  To  date,  Government  has  not  put  any  specific  proposals  to  CoRWM. 
However,  CoRWM  has  observed  that  some  actions  have  been  taken  that  may  lead  to 
better strategic co-ordination in some areas (paras. 38, 46).  
 
136. 
The second recommendation was about making appropriate information available to 
the public about the management of HAW, spent fuels, plutonium and uranic materials. 
The Government response (DECC et al., 2009) noted the range of information that was 
already available and that was planned to be made available, and the NDA work in hand 
on a radioactive waste information management system. CoRWM does not consider that 
any of the actions taken to date meet the need it identified in its recommendation. It has 
made  its  views  known  to  NDA  (CoRWM  doc.  2792)  and  to  regulators  (CoRWM  doc. 
2811).  
 
137. 
The  third  recommendation  in  the  2009  report  on  interim  storage  was  about  making 
information  available  to  the  public  about  how  the  security  of  storage  and  transport  of 
radioactive wastes and nuclear materials is assured. In its response (DECC et al., 2009) 
Government  recognised  the  importance  of  being  open  and  transparent  and  stated  that 
work was underway to make existing information more accessible and to raise its profile. 
This  work  was  subsequently  delayed  as  a  result  of  planned  changes  to  regulatory 
organisations (para. 51). In the meantime, CoRWM itself has made information available 
to  the  public  about  designing  stores  to  mitigate  the  consequences  of  terrorist  attacks 
(para. 52; CoRWM doc. 2740).  
 
138. 
The fourth recommendation was about co-ordination of PSE between NDA and other 
UK  industry  organisations  at  national,  regional  and  local  levels.  Government  accepted 
the  need  for  such  co-ordination  and  stated  that  it  would  be  looking  to  improve  co-
ordination wherever possible (DECC et al., 2009). CoRWM has monitored co-ordination 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 35 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
during the year and will report its findings in its position paper on PSE late in 2010 (para. 
126).  
 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 Report on Geological Disposal 
139. 
There  were  five  recommendations  in  CoRWM’s  2009  report  to  Government  on 
geological disposal (CoRWM doc. 2550). The text of these is given in full in Annex D. 
 
140. 
The first recommendation was about Community Benefits Packages. In its response 
(DECC  &  DoENI,  2009)  Government  reaffirmed  the  commitment  to  providing  benefits 
packages  given  in  the  2008  MRWS  White  Paper  (Defra  et  al.,  2008).  It  stated  that  it 
believed that any benefits package must be developed jointly between local communities 
and  Government  as  discussions  about  hosting  a  GDF  progressed,  and  that  final 
agreement on a package would take time, possibly some years (DECC & DoENI, 2009). 
DECC,  as  an  observer  at  the  meetings  of  the  West  Cumbria  MRWS  Partnership,  is 
helping to take forward the Partnership’s workstream on community benefits. Any other 
area that expressed an interest in entering discussions with Government about hosting a 
GDF could draw on this work. 
 
141. 
The  second  and  third  recommendations  were  about  the  procedure  for  making  a 
planning application for a GDF. The second recommendation was about the involvement 
of  local  stakeholders  in  the  event  that  a  planning  application  is  referred  to  the 
Infrastructure  Planning  Commission  (IPC).  The  third  recommendation  was  about  the 
stages  and  hold  points  in  planning  applications.  Government  responded  positively  to 
both recommendations (DECC & DoENI, 2009).  
 
142. 
Government stated that public consultation and participation would be at the heart of 
the  planning  process,  whether  or  not  a  planning  application  was  referred  to  the  IPC.  It 
further stated that the advantages and disadvantages of single- and two-stage planning 
applications  would  form  part  of  the  discussions  that  Government  and  NDA  would  have 
with  potential  host  communities  and  that  there  would  be  appropriate  hold  points  and 
associated opportunities for stakeholder engagement (DECC & DoENI, 2009). CoRWM 
welcomes  these  commitments  which,  if  translated  into  actions,  would  largely  meet  its 
recommendations. 
 
143. 
The  fourth  recommendation  was  that  Government  should  ensure  that  NDA  carries 
out  options  assessments  in  which  a  wide  range  of  geological  disposal  concepts  is 
considered  and  that  stakeholders  are  involved  in  these  assessments. The  Government 
response  (DECC  &  DoENI,  2009),  a  draft  RWMD  document  on  optimisation  of  a  GDF 
(NDA,  2009c)  and  CoRWM  discussions  with  RWMD  (CoRWM  docs.  2714,  2776)  have 
shown  that  RWMD  is  considering  a  range  of geological  disposal  concepts  at  a generic 
level. However, RWMD does not intend to carry out much of the necessary optimisation 
work  until  more  is  known  about  potential  GDF  sites.  CoRWM  will  be  following  RWMD 
work  closely.  It  will  take  a  particular  interest  in  whether  RWMD  is  considering  a 
sufficiently  wide  range  of  geological  disposal  concepts  for  each  potential  site  and 
whether enough stakeholders are being involved in comparisons of these concepts. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 36 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
144. 
The  last  recommendation  in  the  2009  report  on  geological  disposal  was  about  the 
need  for  NDA  to  have  an  integrated  process  for  GDF  design,  site  assessments  and 
safety  case  development.  Government  agreed  (DECC  &  DoENI,  2009)  that  it  was 
essential  for  NDA  to  have  such  an  integrated  process.  CoRWM  will  be  examining 
documents published by RWMD in 2010, for example the Steps Towards Implementation 
document and the documents describing the DSSC, to determine the extent to which a 
suitable process is in place. 
 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 Report on R&D 
145. 
The six recommendations in CoRWM’s 2009 report to Government on R&D (CoRWM 
doc.  2543)  are  given  in  full  in  Annex  D.  As  explained  by  the  DECC  Minister  of  State 
(para.  94),  the  scale  and  breadth  of  the  issues  covered  in  the  report  have  led  to  a 
significant  delay  in  producing  the  Government  response  (which  was  due  at  the  end  of 
January  2010).  The  report  was  well  received  by  the  House  of  Lords  Science  and 
Technology Committee (House of Lords, 2010a). In oral evidence Lord Jenkin of Roding 
commented,  “...the  R&D  report  contains  fairly  clear  and  specific  and,  it  seemed  to  me, 
quite wise recommendations”. 
In his oral evidence, Lord Hunt of Kings Heath (the DECC 
Minister  of  State),  explaining  the  delay  in  Government  responding  to  the  R&D  report, 
said  “...an  important  report  like  that  deserves  a  lot  of  work  in  terms  of  responding...”
CoRWM has taken every opportunity to raise its R&D recommendations in meetings with 
sponsors, NDA and stakeholders and looks forward to action in response to them in due 
course. 
 
Other Impacts of CoRWM’s Scrutiny and Advice 
Influence on Development of Government Policy 
146. 
The  main  policy  area  in  which  CoRWM  had  influence  in  2009-10  was  that  of 
development of Scottish Government policy on the management of HAW (paras. 53-56). 
Early scrutiny of the Scottish Government development process led to the advice that the 
process  be  slowed  down  to  allow  full  consideration  of  the  outcomes  of  the  SEA  when 
drafting  the  policy  documents.  The  Scottish  Government  accepted  this  advice  and 
delayed the start of its consultation by several months, so that it began in early 2010, not 
in autumn 2009 as originally planned. The Scottish Government also took into account a 
number  of  CoRWM’s  comments  in  preparing  its  draft  policy  documents.  CoRWM 
anticipates that the Scottish Government will consider the Committee’s response to the 
consultation (CoRWM doc. 2795) when finalising its HAW policy. 
 
147. 
Other examples of CoRWM work in 2009-10 that could influence future Government 
policy are: 
 
• 
the  Committee’s  response  to  the  DECC  consultation  on  the  energy 
infrastructure NPS (paras. 115-120; CoRWM doc. 2748) 
• 
the Committee’s responses to the pre-consultation discussion papers on the 
long-term  management  of  plutonium  (paras.  43-44;  CoRWM  docs.  2690, 
2718). 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 37 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Influence on the Implementation of Government Policy 
148. 
Examples  of  where  CoRWM’s  work  in  2009-10  influenced  the  implementation  of 
Government policy related to the management of HAW are as follows. 
 
• 
CoRWM encouraged Government to increase the awareness of the invitation to 
communities to express an interest in entering discussions about hosting a GDF 
(CoRWM  doc.  2550).  Government  carried  out  a  number  of  actions  to  do  this 
(para. 65). 
• 
EA,  HSE  and  DfT  agreed  in  principle  to  set  up  a  Joint  Regulatory  Office  for 
geological disposal, as advised by CoRWM (CoRWM doc. 2550). As a first step, 
these regulators have set up joint web pages (para. 125). 
• 
NDA took into account CoRWM advice (CoRWM doc. 2550) in finalising its PSE 
and  communications  strategy  for  geological  disposal  (NDA,  2009b)  and  its 
strategy  for  sustainability  appraisal  and  environmental  assessment  (NDA, 
2009d). 
• 
CoRWM advised the West Cumbria MRWS Partnership on the peer review of the 
BGS  Geological  Sub-Surface  Screening  Report  (paras.  69-75;  CoRWM  doc. 
2711).  The  Partnership’s  draft  specification  for  the  peer  review  reflected  this 
advice (West Cumbria MRWS Partnership, 2010b).  
• 
CoRWM  advice  is  being  used  by  NDA  in  developing  its  proposed  process  for 
identifying sites for desk-based assessment (paras.76-78; CoRWM doc. 2782). 
 
Promoting Understanding of Issues 
149. 
CoRWM  considers  that  several  of  its  activities  in  2009-10  have  contributed  to 
stakeholder  and  public  understanding  of  HAW  management  issues.  These  activities 
include: 
 
• 
the  stakeholder  event  to  discuss  the  draft  2009  report  to  Government  on 
geological  disposal  (CoRWM  doc.  2593)  and  the  publication  of  that  report 
(CoRWM doc. 2550) 
• 
the  stakeholder  event  to  discuss  the  draft  2009  report  to  Government  on  R&D 
(CoRWM doc. 2677) and the publication of that report (CoRWM doc. 2543) 
• 
publication  of  CoRWM’s  evidence  (CoRWM  docs.  2756,  2789)  to  the  House  of 
Lords  Science  and  Technology  Committee  inquiry  on  radioactive  waste 
management (House of Lords, 2010a) 
• 
holding  public  meetings  at  Hunterston  (CoRWM  doc.  2802)  and  Hinkley  Point 
(CoRWM doc. 2809). 
 
 
7.  HOUSE OF LORDS INQUIRY 
150. 
In  January  2010  the  House  of  Lords  Science  and  Technology  Committee  launched 
an  inquiry  into  CoRWM.  The  purpose  of  the  inquiry  was  to  assess  how  CoRWM  had 
performed  since  its  reconstitution  in  2007,  to  consider  whether  CoRWM’s  remit  had 
proved  to  be  appropriate  and  to  gauge  CoRWM’s  impact  on  the  implementation  of  the 
MRWS programme (House of Lords, 2010a).  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 38 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
 
151. 
CoRWM  submitted  written  evidence  to  the  inquiry  (CoRWM  docs.  2756,  2789)  and 
gave oral evidence. The inquiry also received written and oral evidence from DECC and 
NDA, and written evidence from EA, the Geological Society of London, Greenpeace and 
the Nuclear Industry Association (House of Lords, 2010a).  
 
152. 
The  report  of  the  inquiry  was  published  in  March  2010  (House  of  Lords,  2010a).  It 
states that: 
 
“The existence of an independent and effective scrutiny body plays an important part in 
maintaining  public  trust  and  confidence  in  the  Government’s  strategy  for  radioactive 
waste  disposal.  CoRWM  must  be  able  to  show,  therefore,  that  it  is  proactively 
scrutinising  Government  policy  and  the  NDA’s  progress  in  implementing  the  MRWS 
programme. In this report, we make a series of recommendations designed to strengthen 
CoRWM,  enabling  it  to  better  hold  the  Government  to  account  on  their  progress  in 
developing  a  geological  disposal  facility.  Without  on-going  external  pressure,  it  is 
possible that the MRWS programme may not be implemented as rapidly as is needed.” 

 
153. 
Government has stated that it will respond to the report. It would not be appropriate 
for  CoRWM  to  respond  but  it  will  publish  its  comments  on  the  House  of  Lords’ 
recommendations (CoRWM doc. 2821). 
 
 
8.  STATUS OF ARRANGEMENTS AND PLANS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF HAW 
Treatment, Packaging, Storage and Disposal 
Treatment and Packaging 
154. 
The  latest  available  figures from  NDA  indicate  that  about  9%  of the  total  volume  of 
ILW  expected  to  arise  from  the  current  nuclear  programme  has  been  conditioned  and 
packaged  for  longer  term  storage  and  eventual  disposal.  For  HLW  the  figure  is  48% 
(NDA,  2009e).  If  only  existing  wastes  are  considered,  the  figure  is  about  30%  for  ILW. 
There  is  about  800  cubic  metres  of  highly  active  liquor  in  tanks  at  Sellafield  awaiting 
vitrification (Defra & NDA, 2008).  
 
155. 
As noted in CoRWM’s report to Government on interim storage (CoRWM doc. 2500), 
some  existing  ILW  is  in  relatively  inert  and  stable  forms  and  is  not  a  high  priority  for 
immobilisation.  Other  ILW,  particularly  that  in  some  legacy  facilities,  is  in  much  less 
stable  forms.  It  is  important  that  such  legacy  wastes  are  retrieved  as  soon  as  is 
practicable.  Ideally,  these  wastes  would  be  conditioned  as  soon  as  they  had  been 
retrieved, so as to achieve the greatest hazard reduction in the shortest time. However, 
there are some cases where retrieving the wastes and placing them in a buffer store is 
likely to be the best option, because it achieves substantial short-term hazard reduction 
while  allowing  time  to  sort  and  characterise  the  wastes  and  to  carry  out  R&D  on 
conditioning methods. 
 
156. 
CoRWM welcomes NDA statements about the priority being given to retrieving ILW 
from legacy facilities, especially at Sellafield (NDA, 2010). However, the Committee has 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 39 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
not  yet  seen  any  speeding  up  of  retrieval  projects  or  of  the  rates  of  conditioning  and 
packaging  of ILW in general.  At  Magnox  sites  more  centralised  project management  is 
leading  to  better  use  of effort  and funds (CoRWM  doc.  2809)  but  does not  seem to  be 
speeding  up  ILW  retrieval  or  conditioning  overall.  There  are  indications  that  some 
retrieval  projects  at  Sellafield  are  slowing  down  (CoRWM  doc.  2811).  This  situation  is 
less than ideal. 
 
Storage 
157. 
CoRWM concluded in its March 2009 report (CoRWM doc. 2500) that: 
 
At all nuclear sites the current plans for storage of higher activity wastes are adequate to 
meet the CoRWM 2006 recommendation, and the subsequent Government commitment, 
that  there  should  be  arrangements  for  safe  and  secure  storage  for  at  least  100  years. 
However, the present UK approach to storage lacks robustness: it is fragmented and too 
few sites have contingency plans. A more strategic approach is required. 
 
158. 
As far as CoRWM is aware, this is still the situation. The setting up of the NDA’s IPT 
on interim storage is a welcome development but it appears that it has yet to make any 
practical  impact.  Furthermore,  it  is  unclear  to  CoRWM  how  NDA  intends  to  tackle 
strategic issues such as the possible consolidation of HAW storage on fewer sites, and 
the  possible  use  of  shared  storage  facilities  for  NDA  and  British  Energy  ILW  at  sites 
where there are stations owned by both organisations. 
 
Transport 
159. 
There  is  almost  no  transport  of  HAW  in  the  UK  at  present.  This  situation  could 
change  in the  next few  years  if  it  is  decided to move  HAW for treatment,  packaging  or 
storage.  It  will  be  essential  to  involve  stakeholders  and  the  public  in  such  decisions, 
including  people  who  live  near  transport  routes,  as  well  as  those  who  live  near  the 
dispatching and receiving nuclear sites.  
 
160. 
Eventually there will be a need to move a large volume of HAW (including any spent 
fuel, plutonium and uranium that has been declared to be waste) to a GDF (or GDFs). It 
appears  to  CoRWM  that  insufficient  attention  has  been  paid  to  planning  for  such 
transport.  There  is  a  need  to  co-ordinate  the  identification  of  the  current  infrastructure 
that  must  be  maintained  for  future  use  and  to  set  out  plans  for  establishing  the  new 
infrastructure that will be required.  
 
Disposal 
Geological Disposal 
161. 
The  rate  of  progress  in  implementing  geological  disposal  was  raised  during  the 
House  of  Lords  Science  and  Technology  Committee’s  inquiry  into  radioactive  waste 
management  (House  of  Lords,  2010a).  The  House  of  Lords  Committee  expressed 
concern that neither the Government nor CoRWM was conveying any sense of urgency. 
 
162. 
CoRWM’s  view  is  that,  in  general,  the  implementation  of  geological  disposal  is 
proceeding at an appropriate pace. The process for establishing a GDF is founded on a 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 40 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
voluntary approach and its speed of progress must be determined by the willingness of 
the  potential  volunteer  community  or  communities  to  proceed.  Any  attempt  to  try  to 
impose time constraints on deliberations is likely to be counter-productive.  
 
163. 
It  is  also  important  to  allow  sufficient  time  for  technical  work,  in  particular  site 
characterisation, GDF design and R&D. As the programme progresses, it is possible that 
scientific  and  technical  developments  will  allow  it  to  be  speeded  up  in  some  respects. 
However,  CoRWM  considers  that  there  will  be  a  need  for  long-term  underground 
observations  and  experiments  at  any  prospective  GDF  site  and  that  time  must  be 
allowed for these (CoRWM doc. 2543).  
 
164. 
Time  is  also  needed  for  RWMD  to  develop  into  an  organisation  that  can  deliver  a 
project  of  the  size,  duration  and  complexity  of  establishing  a  GDF.  To  date,  geological 
disposal  has  been  a  science-based  concept  and  there  are  many  challenges  in 
progressing it to an engineering project. 
 
Near-Surface Disposal 
165. 
In the UK, consideration of near-surface disposal as an option for some HAW is at an 
early  stage.  NDA  has  work  in  hand  on  the  possible  near-surface  disposal  of  reactor 
decommissioning  wastes,  including  R&D  on  treatment  of  graphite.  However,  it  is  now 
clear  that  there  are  operational  wastes  for  which  near-surface  disposal  could  be  an 
appropriate option, e.g. ion exchange resins and filters from Sizewell B and new PWRs. 
The  inclusion  of  near-surface  disposal  in  the  Scottish Government  policy  on  HAW may 
lead to the identification of further wastes that could be disposed of by this method. 
 
166. 
Near-surface  disposal  of  some  ILW has  been  practised  in  many  other  countries for 
decades  and technologies  are  well-established. The challenges for  the UK  are  likely  to 
be in deciding where to site disposal facilities, including whether there should be facilities 
that  will  hold  both  LLW  and  ILW.  Early  stakeholder  and  public  involvement  will  be 
essential. 
 
 
9.  2010-11 WORK PROGRAMME 
167. 
CoRWM  submitted  its  proposed  work  programme  for  2010-13  to  Government  in 
March 2010 (CoRWM doc. 2800). Its priorities for scrutiny and advice in 2010-11 are: 
 
• 
UK  Government  work  to  implement  its  policy  on  the  long-term  management  of 
higher activity wastes 
• 
Scottish Government development of its policy on the management of HAW and 
of proposals for its implementation 
• 
NDA Strategy II 
• 
NDA work on the implementation of geological disposal. 
 
168. 
The Committee proposed to submit a formal response to the NDA consultation on its 
Strategy II and to prepare position papers on: 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 41 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
• 
the development of Scottish Government HAW policy 
• 
BGS screening out of areas in Cumbria unsuitable for geological disposal 
• 
NDA preparations for Stage 4 of the geological disposal facility siting process 
• 
PSE by all organisations involved in the management of HAW. 
 
169. 
Government approval of the 2010-13 work programme is awaited. 
 
 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 42 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
10. REFERENCES 
CoRWM Documents 
CoRWM  Title 
doc. no. 

  700 
CoRWM Recommendations to Government 2006. 
2248 
CoRWM’s Guiding Principles, January 2008.  
2249 
CoRWM Publication Scheme and Transparency Policy, January 2008.  
2420 
Coherence and Coordination of Regulatory Processes, September 2008. 
2515.2 
CoRWM Work Programme 2009-12, March 2009. 
2500 
Interim Storage of Higher Activity Wastes and the Management of Spent Fuels, 
Plutonium and Uranium. CoRWM Report to Government. March 2009. 
2539 
Quality Control for CoRWM Documents, September 2009. 
2543 
Report on National Research and Development for Interim Storage and 
Geological Disposal of Higher Activity Radioactive Wastes and Management of 
Nuclear Materials. October 2009. 
2550 
Geological Disposal of Higher Activity Wastes. CoRWM Report to Government. 
July 2009. 
2558 
Decision Making and Responsibilities in the Implementation of Geological 
Disposal, March 2009.  
2592 
Log of Responses to Consultation on Full Draft of CoRWM’s Geological Disposal 
Report, April-May 2009. 
2593 
Report of Stakeholder Workshop on Draft Geological Disposal Report, 
Workington, 15 May 2009. 
2624 
Meeting with NDA on CoRWM Interim Storage Tasks for 2009-10, Warrington, 11 
June 2009. 
2630 
Log of Responses to Consultation on CoRWM’s Report on National Research 
and Development for Interim Storage and Geological Disposal of Higher Activity 
Radioactive Wastes and Management of Nuclear Materials. October 2009. 
2637 
Note on Environment Agency Workshop on Approaches to Assuring the 
Disposability of Radioactive Waste Packages, Warrington, 14 July 2009. 
2664 
Meeting with Delegation from Japan, August 2009. 
2677 
Report of CoRWM 9 September 2009 Stakeholder Workshop on Draft R&D 
Report. 
2690 
CoRWM Informal Comments on DECC Pre-Consultation Discussion Paper on 
the Key Factors that could be used to Compare One Option for Long-Term 
Plutonium Management with Another. September 2009. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 43 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
CoRWM  Title 
doc. no. 

2707 
EA Workshop 29-30 September 2009, Assessing the Characterisation of 
Geological Environments for Repository Implementation, CoRWM Report, 
November 2009. 
2711 
BGS Screening Peer Review: CoRWM Advice to the West Cumbria MRWS 
Partnership, December 2009. 
2714 
Geological Disposal: Planning for Implementation. Meeting with NDA, 23 October 
2009. 
2718 
CoRWM Informal Comments on DECC Pre-Consultation Discussion Paper on 
Decision Methodology and Timetable for Decision Making on Long-Term 
Plutonium Management. November 2009. 
2719 
Response from Members of CoRWM to the House of Lords Science and 
Technology Committee Call for Evidence on Setting Science and Technology 
Research Funding Priorities, revised November 2009. 
2725 
Meeting with US Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board, London, 12 November 
2009. 
2729 
Minutes of CoRWM Plenary Meeting, York, 19 November 2009. 
2723 
Options for the Long-Term Management of the UK’s Separated Plutonium: 
Recent History and the Current Situation. November 2009. 
2733 
New Build Wastes: Preparation of CoRWM Response to DECC Consultation on 
Draft National Policy Statement, Draft 4, January 2010. 
2734 
NuLeAF and the MRWS Process: presentation to CoRWM by Fred Barker, 
Executive Director of NuLeAF, December 2009. 
2740 
CoRWM’s Understanding of the UK Requirements for the Assessment and 
Mitigation of the Risks of Aircraft Impact on Stores for Higher Activity Wastes and 
Spent Fuel. February 2010. 
2743 
Minutes of Plenary Meeting 16-17 December 2009, London. 
2744 
West Cumbria MRWS Partnership: presentation to CoRWM by Elaine Woodburn, 
Leader of Copeland Borough Council, December 2009. 
2746 
CoRWM Meeting with the Office for Civil Nuclear Security, Harwell, 7 December 
2009. 
2747 
CoRWM Meeting with Regulators’ Generic Design Assessment Team, London, 8 
December 2009. 
2748 
Response from the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management to the 
Government Consultation on the Draft National Policy Statements for Energy 
Infrastructure, March 2010. 
2749 
CoRWM’s Statement of its Position on New Build Wastes, March 2010. 
2750 
Brian Clark Letter and Questionnaire on PSE, January 2010.  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 44 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
CoRWM  Title 
doc. no. 

2755 
Information on New Build Wastes Submitted to CoRWM by Stakeholders, 
February 2010. 
2756 
Evidence from the Chair of CoRWM to the House of Lords Science and 
Technology Committee Call for Evidence on Radioactive Waste Management, 
January 2010. 
2764 
CoRWM Meeting with Department for Transport, London, 15 January 2010. 
2765 
CoRWM Meeting with Westinghouse, Preston, 20 January 2010. 
2766 
CoRWM Meeting with NDA on R&D, Warrington, 19 January 2010. (in draft) 
2767 
CoRWM Meeting with EDF and AREVA, London, 22 January 2010. 
2770 
Minutes of Plenary Meeting 27 January 2010, London. 
2771 
Quality Control for CoRWM Documents, February 2010. 
2776 
CoRWM Meeting with NDA on RWMD R&D Programme to Support Geological 
Disposal, 28 January 2010. 
2779 
Issues for Plenary Discussion on Scottish Government Higher Activity Waste 
Policy Consultation Documents, February 2010. 
2782 
Task Group 4 Meeting with RWMD on Moving from Areas to Sites, 28 January 
2010. 
2788 
Minutes of Plenary Meeting 25 February 2010, Nottingham. 
2789 
Addendum to Evidence from the Chair of CoRWM to the House of Lords Science 
and Technology Committee Call for Evidence on Radioactive Waste 
Management, March 2010. 
2790 
Notes of the Meeting between the Steering Group of the West Cumbria MRWS 
Partnership and CoRWM, 23 February 2010. 
2792 
CoRWM Meeting with NDA on HAW Topic Strategy and Related Matters, 
Warrington, 1 March 2010. 
2793 
CoRWM Meeting with NDA to Discuss Topic Strategies for Spent Fuels and 
Nuclear Materials and Related Matters, Manchester, 3 March 2010. 
2795 
Response from CoRWM to the Scottish Government Consultation on Scotland’s 
Higher Activity Radioactive Waste Policy, April 2010. 
2797 
CoRWM Chair’s Meeting with NDA Chief Executive Officer, London, 4 March 
2010. 
2798 
Reviewing the Effectiveness of the Committee, April 2010. 
2800 
CoRWM Proposed Programme of Work 2010-2013, March 2010. 
2801 
CoRWM Visit to BGS, Keyworth, 24 February 2010. 
2802 
CoRWM Visit to Hunterston A&B Sites, 9-10 March 2010. 
2803 
NDA National Stakeholder Meeting, Manchester, 16-18 March 2010. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 45 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
CoRWM  Title 
doc. no. 

2806 
CoRWM Procedures for Formulating Advice, March 2010. 
2809 
CoRWM Visit to Hinkley Point A&B Sites, 9-10 March 2010. 
2811 
Meeting with NII, EA and SEPA to Discuss Progress by NDA and Others in 
Developing Strategies for the Management of Higher Activity Wastes, Spent 
Fuels and Nuclear Materials, Manchester, 26 March 2010. 
2821 
CoRWM Comments on Recommendations in the 2nd Report of Session 2009-10 
by the House of Lords Science and Technology Committee, Radioactive Waste 
Management: a further update (HL Paper 95), May 2010 (in draft). 
2823 
Risk and Challenges Associated with Recycling and Waste Disposal: Korean 
Perspective: presentation by Yongsoo Hwang, Korean Energy Research 
Institute, September 2009. 
 
 
Other Documents 
British  Energy,  2009.  Managing  Spent  Fuel  at  Sizewell  B.  Submission  of  Planning 
Application and Environmental Statement to the Department of Energy and Climate Change. 
 
DECC, Scottish Government, Welsh Assembly Government, DoENI, 2009. UK Government 
and Devolved Administration Response to the CoRWM Report on ‘Interim Storage of Higher 
Activity  Wastes  and  the  Management  of  Spent  Fuels,  Plutonium  and  Uranium’.
  (CoRWM 
doc. 2632) 
 
DECC  and  DoENI,  2009.  Response  of  the  UK  Government  and  the  Department  of  the 
Environment,  Northern  Ireland  to  the  CoRWM  Report  on  ‘Geological  Disposal  of  Higher 
Activity Radioactive Wastes’.
 (CoRWM doc. 2727) 
 
Defra  et  al.,  2008.  Managing  Radioactive  Waste  Safely.  A  Framework  for  Implementing 
Geological Disposal.
 Cm 7386. 
 
Defra  and  NDA,  2008.  The  2007  UK  Radioactive  Waste  Inventory.  Main  Report. 
Defra/RAS/08.002, NDA/RWMD/004. 
 
Defra  et  al.,  2006.  Response  by  the  UK  Government  and  the  Devolved  Administrations  to 
the Report and Recommendations from the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management 
(CoRWM)

 
Environment Agency, 2010. Environment Agency Scrutiny of RWMD’s Work Relating to the 
Geological  Disposal  Facility,  Annual  Review  2008/09
.  NWAT/NDA/RWMD/2009/001.  Issue 
1, January 2010. 
 
Environment  Council,  2009.  Summary  Report  of  DECC  Workshop  on  the  Long  Term 
Management of the UK’s Separated Civil Plutonium, 21 May 2009. 

2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 46 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
 
HSE,  EA  and  SEPA,  2010.  Joint  Guidance  on  the  Management  of  Higher  Activity 
Radioactive Waste on Nuclear Licensed Sites.
 This consists of the following documents: 
• 
Fundamentals 
• 
Overview and Glossary 
• 
Part 1: The Regulatory Process 
• 
Part 2: Radioactive Waste Management Cases 
• 
Part 3a: Waste Minimisation, Characterisation and Segregation 
• 
Part 3b: Conditioning and Disposability (for trial use and comment) 
• 
Part 3c: Storage of Radioactive Waste (for trial use and comment). 
• 
Part 3d: Managing Information and Records relating to Radioactive Waste. 
 
House of Lords Science and Technology Committee, 2010a. 2nd Report of Session 2009-10. 
Radioactive Waste Management: a further update.
 HL Paper 95. 
 
House  of  Lords,  2010b.  Setting  Priorities  for  Publicly  Funded  Research.  House  of  Lords 
Science and Technology Committee, 3rd Report of Session 2009-10. HL Paper 104. 
 
NDA,  2009a.  The  NDA’s  Research  and  Development  Strategy  to  Underpin  Geological 
Disposal of the UK’s Higher Activity Radioactive Wastes. 
 
 
NDA,  2009b.  Geological  Disposal:  A  Public  and  Stakeholder  Engagement  and 
Communications Strategy. 
Report NDA/RWMD/015. July 2009. 
 
NDA, 2009c. Key Aspects of RWMD’s Approach to Optimisation of the Geological Disposal 
Facility
. Draft RWMD document. August 2009. 
 
NDA, 2009d. Geological Disposal: A Strategy for Sustainability Appraisal and Environmental 
Assessment
. July 2009. 
 
NDA, 2009e. Geological Disposal. NDA RWMD Interactions with Waste Packagers on Plans 
for  Packaging  Radioactive  Wastes  April  2008-March  2009.  
NDA  Report  No. 
NDA/RWMD/012. September 2009. 
 
NDA, 2010. Business Plan 2010-13
 
Quintessa, 2009. Assessing the Characterisation of Geological Environments for Repository 
Implementation.  Environment  Agency  Workshop  29-30  September  2009.  
Quintessa  QRS-
1398E-TN6, October 2009. 
 
Scottish  Government,  2010.  Scotland’s  Higher  Activity  Radioactive  Waste  Policy, 
Consultation 2010. 
 
West  Cumbria  MRWS  Partnership,  2010a.  Work  Programme  for  2010-11.  Document  No. 
13.1 draft 15 March 2010. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 47 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
West  Cumbria  MRWS  Partnership,  2010b.  Specification  for  Peer  Review  of  the  BGS 
Geological Sub-Surface Screening Report.
 Document No. 53, draft 2 February 2010. 
 
 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 48 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
ANNEX A 
CoRWM TERMS OF REFERENCE 
 
Introduction 
A1.  Following  the  announcements  by  UK  Government  and  the  devolved  administrations 
(Government), on 25 October 2006, a new Committee on Radioactive Waste Management 
(CoRWM)  will  be  appointed  under  these  revised  terms  of  reference  designed  to  meet  the 
future needs of the Government’s Managing Radioactive Waste Safely (MRWS) programme. 
The  Committee  will  be  jointly  appointed  by  UK  Government  and  relevant  devolved 
administration  Ministers.  Details  of  its  roles,  responsibilities  and  membership  are  outlined 
below.  
 
CoRWM’s Role and Responsibilities 
 
A2. The role of the reconstituted Committee on Radioactive Waste Management (CoRWM) 
will  be  to  provide  independent  scrutiny  and  advice  to  UK  Government  and  devolved 
administration  Ministers  on  the  long-term  management,  including  storage  and  disposal,  of 
radioactive  waste.  CoRWM’s  primary  task  is  to  provide  independent  scrutiny  on  the 
Government’s  and  NDA’s  proposals,  plans  and programmes  to  deliver  geological  disposal, 
together  with  robust  interim  storage,  as  the  long-term  management  option  for  the  UK’s 
higher activity wastes.  
 
A3.  Sponsoring  Ministers  (from  Defra,  DTI  and  the  devolved  administrations)  will  agree  a 
three-year  rolling  programme  and  budget  for  CoRWM’s  work  on  an  annual  basis.  Any  in-
year changes will be the subject of agreement by sponsoring Ministers.   
 
A4. CoRWM will provide appropriate and timely evidence-based advice on Government and 
Nuclear  Decommissioning  Authority  (NDA)  plans  for  the  delivery  of  a  geological  disposal 
facility for higher activity wastes under the Managing Radioactive Waste Safety programme. 
The  work  programme  may  include  review  of  activities  including  waste  packaging  options, 
geological  disposal  facility  delivery  programmes  and  plans,  site  selection  processes  and 
criteria, and the approach to public and stakeholder engagement. Testing the evidence base 
of the plans for the delivery of a geological disposal facility  will be a key component of the 
work. As well as ongoing dialogue with Government, the implementing body, local authorities 
and stakeholders, CoRWM will provide an annual report of its work to Government.  
 
A5. CoRWM shall undertake its work in an open and consultative manner. It will engage with 
stakeholders  and  it  will  publish  advice  (and  the  underpinning  evidence)  in  a  way  that  is 
meaningful to the non-expert. It will comply, as will sponsoring departments, with Guidelines 
on  Scientific  Analysis  in  Policy  Making  as  well  as  other  relevant  Government  advice  and 
guidelines. Government will respond to all substantive advice. Published advice and reports 
will  be  made  available  in  respective  Parliaments/Assemblies,  as  will  any  Government 
response.  CoRWM’s  Chair  will  attend  Parliamentary  /  Assembly  evidence  sessions  as  and 
when required.  
 
A6. With the agreement of CoRWM’s sponsoring Ministers, other parts of Government, the 
NDA  and  the  regulatory  bodies  may  request  independent  advice  from  CoRWM.  Relevant 
Parliamentary  /  Assembly  Committees  may  also  propose  work  to  sponsoring  Ministers,  for 
consideration  in  the  work  programme.  CoRWM’s  priority  role  is  set  out  in  paragraph  2 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 49 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
although  sponsoring  Ministers  may  also  ask  the  Committee  to  provide  advice  on  other 
radioactive waste management issues as necessary.  
 
A7.  In  delivering  its  annual  work  programme,  and  where  there  is  a  common  interest,  the 
Committee  will  liaise  with  appropriate  advisory  bodies  including  Health  and  Safety 
Commission  advisory  bodies,  and  any  advisory  bodies  established  by  the  environment 
agencies.  
 
A8.  CoRWM  shall  consist  of  a  Chair  and  up  to  fourteen  members,  one  of  whom  will  be 
appointed by Ministers as Deputy Chair on the recommendation of the Chair. Seats will not 
be representative of organisation or sectoral interests and the skills and expertise which will 
need to be available to the Committee will  vary  depending on the programme of work. For 
example,  the  relevant  skills  may  include:  radioactive  waste  management,  nuclear  science, 
radiation protection, environmental law, environment issues, social science (including public 
and stakeholder engagement), geology / geochemistry / hydrogeology, finance / economics, 
civil  engineering  /  underground  construction  technology,  geological  disposal  facility 
performance  /  safety  issues,  materials  science,  environmental  impact  assessment,  local 
Government,  planning,  regulatory  processes  and  ethics.  Sponsoring  Ministers  may  review 
the membership of the Committee, and the skills and expertise required.  
 
A9.  Appointments  will  be  made  following  the  Office  of  the  Commissioner  for  Public 
Appointments  (OCPA)  code  of  practice.  Initial  appointments  will  be  for  three  years  and 
sponsoring  Ministers  retain  the  right  to  terminate  appointments  at  any  time  in  light  of 
individual  members’  performance,  changes  in  CoRWM’s  work  requirements,  or  completion 
of the work required of CoRWM.  
 
A10. The Committee, as agreed in the annual plans, may co-opt additional expertise to form 
or support temporary sub-groups set up to examine specific and defined problems.  
 
Programme of work 
 
A11.  To  support  its  work,  CoRWM  will  need  to  familiarise  itself  with  Government  policy  in 
this area, including ongoing meetings with relevant Government departments and the NDA. 
The outline framework within which CoRWM is then expected to work is:  
(i)  recognising  the  policy  framework  within  which  it  will  operate  including  the  roles 
and  responsibilities  of  Government  and  the  NDA  in  relation  to  CoRWM’s  own 
advisory role;  
(ii)  scrutinising  Government  and  NDA  proposals,  plans  and  programmes  to 
implement  geological  disposal  and  other  radioactive  waste  management  issues  on 
which Government might seek advice as agreed in CoRWM’s work plan;  
(iii)  formulation  of  advice  and  reporting  to  Government  based  on  the  best  available 
evidence and informed by the views of stakeholders and the public.  
 
A12.  CoRWM  will  prepare  its  draft  work  programme,  within  this  outline  framework,  in 
conjunction  with  Government,  the  NDA  and  regulators,  taking  account  of  work  by  other 
advisory  bodies  (see  paragraph  7  above).  The  programme  will  include  details  of  specific 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 50 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
areas of work, reports which it intends to produce, the proposed use of sub-groups and any 
other  activities  or  events,  including  proposals  for  public  and  stakeholder  engagement. 
CoRWM  will  submit  its  first  draft  three-year  work  programme  proposal  to  its  sponsoring 
Ministers for discussion and agreement at an appropriate early stage following appointment 
of the full Committee. Subsequent three-year work programmes will be agreed annually on a 
rolling basis.  
 
A13.  In  familiarising  themselves  with  the  relevant  background  and  issues,  Members  will 
make  themselves  aware,  and  take  account,  of  previous  engagement  and  reports  in  the 
Managing  Radioactive  Waste  Safely  programme,  the  UK  Radioactive  Waste Inventory  and 
the  nature  of  current  and  expected  future  UK  holdings  of  plutonium,  uranium  and  spent 
nuclear fuel. CoRWM will take account of existing technical assessments and research into 
radioactive waste management in the UK and elsewhere. In particular, it is recognised that 
CoRWM  will  need  to  engage  with  the  NDA  given  that  the  Committee’s  advice  will  directly 
impinge on the long-term responsibilities of the NDA. CoRWM will also take account of other 
relevant policy developments.  
 
A14. The Chair will submit a report to Ministers by 30 June each year on the delivery of the 
agreed work programme. This will be made available in the UK and Scottish Parliament, the 
National Assembly for Wales and the Northern Ireland Assembly.  
 
Access to other sources of expertise 
 
A15. Members of CoRWM itself will not have all the skills and expertise necessary to advise 
Government.  The  Committee  will  need  to  decide  how  best  to  secure  access  to  other 
appropriate sources of expert input during the course of its work. Within this, it will have the 
option of setting up expert sub-groups containing both Members of CoRWM itself and other 
appropriate co-opted persons. A member of CoRWM will chair any sub-group of this nature 
and  ensure  its  effective  operation,  as  well  as  provide  a  clear  line  of  responsibility  and 
accountability to the main Committee, and hence to Ministers. This approach will enable the 
Committee to draw on a broad range of expertise in the UK and elsewhere.  
 
A16. The number of such sub-groups will be kept to the minimum necessary. Their role will 
be that of providing advice for the main Committee to consider and assess as it sees fit, and 
managing any activity which CoRWM delegates to them. It will be for the main Committee to 
assess  and  decide  upon  the  advice  it  receives  from  such  sub-groups.  CoRWM  may  also 
utilise  other  appropriate  means  of  securing  expert  input,  such  as  sponsored  meetings  and 
seminars.  The  Chair  will  ensure  that  sub-group  work  and  all  other  activities  are  closely 
integrated.  
 
Public and stakeholder engagement 
 
A17.  CoRWM  must  continue  to  inspire  public  confidence  in  the  way  in  which  it  works.  In 
order to secure such confidence in its advice it will work in an open and transparent manner. 
Hence, its work should be characterised by:  
• a published reporting and transparency policy;  
• relevant public and stakeholder engagement as required;  
• clear communications including the use of plain English, publishing its advice (and 
the underpinning evidence) in a way that is meaningful to the non-expert;  
• making information accessible;  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 51 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
•  encouraging  people  to  ask  questions  or  make  their  views  known  and  listening  to 
their concerns;  
• providing opportunities for people to challenge information, for example by making 
clear the sources of information and points of view on which the Committee’s advice 
is based;  
• holding a number of its meetings in public.  
 
Responsibilities of the committee and its members 
 
A18. CoRWM will have a corporate responsibility to deliver its advice to sponsoring Ministers 
in accordance with agreed work plans. It will be for Ministers, with appropriate reference to 
their respective Parliaments and Assembly, to take decisions on the advice it receives and to 
give directions to the NDA as necessary on any subsequent changes required in the delivery 
of geological disposal of the UK’s solid radioactive waste.  
 
A19. All members will need to be effective team workers, with good analytical skills and good 
judgement besides a strong interest in the process of decision-making on difficult issues. A 
number  of  them  will  need  experience  of  project  management,  advising  on  scientific  and 
technical  issues  directly  relating  to  radioactive  waste  management,  public  and  stakeholder 
engagement,  excellent  drafting  and  communication  skills,  or  business  experience  and 
knowledge of economics.  
 
A20.  The  Chair,  in  addition,  will  be  capable  of  successfully  and  objectively  leading 
committee-based  projects,  grasping  complex  technical  issues,  and  managing  a  diverse 
group  effectively  and  delivering  substantial  results,  presenting  progress  and  outcomes  in 
public. He or she will be a person with appropriate stature and credibility.  
 
Role of the Chair 
 
A21.  The  Chair  will  be  responsible  for  supervising  the  CoRWM  work  programme  and 
ensuring  that  the  Committee’s  objectives  are  achieved.  The  Chair  will  be  responsible  for 
advising Ministers promptly if he or she anticipates that the Committee will not complete its 
agreed  work  programme  indicating  what remedial  action  might  be taken. He  or  she  will  be 
the  main  point  of  contact  with  the  public  and  the  media,  in  presenting  progress  and 
answering  questions.  The  Chair  will  meet  Ministers  on  appointment,  and  then  at  least 
annually  along  with  other  members  as  appropriate.  Notes  of  these  meetings  will  be 
published.  The  Chair  will  ensure  CoRWM  submits  its  annual  written  report to  Ministers,  by 
30  June  of  each  year.  The  Chair  may  be  required  to  present  the  position  of  CoRWM  to 
Parliament or Assembly committees and representatives as appropriate. The report will set 
out,  among  other  things,  CoRWM’s  progress  with  the  agreed  work  programme,  advice 
deriving from it and costs incurred. Ministers will also appoint a Deputy Chair who can assist 
the Chair as the latter sees fit.  
 
Role of Members 
 
A22.  Members  will  work,  under  the  Chair’s  supervision,  to  the  programme  agreed  with 
sponsoring Ministers, so as to ensure its satisfactory delivery. Members will have a collective 
responsibility  to  ensure  achievement  of  CoRWM’s  objectives  and  delivery  of  its  work 
programme. Individual Members may be appointed by the Chair to undertake specific, active 
roles,  for  example  chairing  sub-groups  or  in  representing  CoRWM  in  meetings  with  the 
public, organisations who are contributing to the work, or the media. All members will abide 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 52 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
by CoRWM’s Code of Practice and will be subject to individual performance appraisal as laid 
down by the Cabinet Office guide (see next paragraph).  
 
Standards 
 
A23.  CoRWM  is  set  up  by,  and  answerable  to  Ministers  and  is  funded  by  the  taxpayer.  It 
must  therefore  comply  with  the  Cabinet  Office  guide  “Public  Bodies:  a  Guide  for 
Departments” 
(http://www.civilservice.gov.uk/other/agencies/publications/pdf/public_bodies_2006/1_case_
assessment.pdf).  
 
A24. These and other relevant procedural requirements will be set out in CoRWM’s Code of 
Practice which Members will agree to, prior to appointment.  
 
Resources 
 
A25. Sponsoring Ministers will provide CoRWM with resources – both staff and financial – to 
enable it to carry out its agreed programme of work. These will include a secretariat which 
will  help  CoRWM  carry  out  its  work  programme  including,  at  the  outset,  providing  reading 
material and arranging for any further briefings and visits. The Chair and Members will have 
a  collective  responsibility  for  delivering  the  work  programme  within  the  agreed  budget, 
although  the  Chair  may  request  sponsoring  Ministers  for  adjustment  to  this  budget  should 
this be considered necessary.  
 
Payments 
 
A26. The Chair and Members will be paid for their work for CoRWM at agreed daily rates. 
They  will  also  be  fully  reimbursed  for  all  reasonable  travel  and  subsistence  costs  incurred 
during the course of their work.  
 
 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 53 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
ANNEX B 
CoRWM MEMBERS  
 
Robert Pickard (Chair) – is Emeritus Professor of Neurobiology at the University of Cardiff, 
Visiting Professor at the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester, and Fellow of the Institute 
of Biology and the Royal Society of Medicine. Formerly he was Chairman of the Consumers’ 
Association  Which?  and  Director-General  of  the  British  Nutrition  Foundation.  For  the 
Department of Health and the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, Professor Pickard 
was  also  Chairman  of  the  national  NGO  Forum,  which  facilitated  the  interface  between 
government  policymakers  and  104  NGOs  working  for  health  improvements.  He  is  an 
international authority on the biology of honeybees and pioneered the development of solid-
state, neural microbiosensors in the UK.  
 
William  Lee  (Deputy  Chair)  –  is  until  August  2010  Head  of  Materials  at  Imperial  College 
London. He has a Physical Metallurgy BSc from Aston, a DPhil in Radiation Damage Studies 
from Oxford and has held academic positions in the USA (Case Western Reserve University, 
Cleveland and Ohio State University) and in the UK, notably at Sheffield University where he 
was  Director  of  BNFL’s  University  Research  Alliance  on  Waste  Immobilisation.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  International  Commission  on  Glass  Technical  Committee  on  Nuclear  and 
Hazardous Waste  Vitrification  and  Chair  of  the  International  Ceramic  Federation  Technical 
Committee  on  Ceramics  in  Nuclear  Applications.  He  is  a  Fellow  of  the  American  Ceramic 
Society, the City and Guilds Institute and the Institute of Materials.  
 
David Broughton – is a Chartered Engineer and a Member of the Institution of Mechanical 
Engineers.  He  has  26  years  experience  in  professional  engineering  and  management  of 
complex  nuclear  projects.  Now  retired,  he  worked  at  UKAEA  Dounreay,  Caithness  from 
1981  until  2007,  where  he  was  responsible  for  Dounreay’s  major  radioactive  waste 
management  projects.  These  included  new  low  level  waste  disposal  facilities,  new 
intermediate  level  waste  encapsulation  and  storage  facilities,  the  future  retrieval  of  waste 
from the Dounreay shaft and the shaft isolation project. He is experienced in both engaging 
stakeholders  in  projects  that  have  many  options  and  technical  issues  to  consider,  and 
guiding projects through the regulatory and planning processes.  
 
Margaret  Burns  –  is  Chair  of  Health  Scotland  and  a  part-time  teaching  fellow  in  the  Law 
Department  of  the  University  of  Aberdeen.  She  was  a  member  of  the  Health  and  Safety 
Commission  for  nine  years,  representing  the  public  interest  and  the  devolved 
administrations.  As  a  Commissioner  she  chaired  HSC's  Rail  Industry  Advisory  Committee 
and  the  Partnership  for  Health  and  Safety  in  Scotland  and  had  particular  responsibility  for 
the  offshore  oil  industry  and  the  nuclear  industry.  In  2003  she  was  awarded  the  CBE  for 
services  to  health  and  safety.  She  has  extensive  experience  of  working  with  consumer 
organisations, such as the Scottish Consumer Council and Consumers' Association, and is 
presently a member of the National Consumer Council's Advisory Group.  
 
Brian  D  Clark  –  is  Professor  of  Environmental  Management  and  Planning  at  Aberdeen 
University.  He  is  a  Board  Member  of  the  Scottish  Environment  Protection  Agency  (SEPA) 
and Chairman of the North Region Board and the Planning & Finance Committee of SEPA. 
He served on the Committee for Radioactive Waste Management from 2003 to 2007. With 
forty  years  experience,  he  is  a  specialist  in  environmental  impact  assessment  (EIA), 
strategic environmental assessment (SEA) and urban and rural planning. He was honoured 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 54 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
in 1987 by being made a founder member of UNEP’s Global 500 Award. He is a governor of 
the  Macaulay  Land  Use  Research  Institute  and  was  a  founder  member  of  the  Institute  of 
Environmental  Assessment  (IEA),  now  the  Institute  of  Environmental  Management  and 
Assessment (IEMA) and chairs its Technical Committee.  
 
Mark  Dutton  –  has  a  doctorate  in  high  energy physics  and  a  38  year  career  based  at the 
National Nuclear Corporation. Specialising in design and safety case issues associated with 
radiological  protection,  nuclear  safety  and  radioactive  waste  management,  he  continues  to 
work  as  a  nuclear  consultant.  He  served  on  the  Committee  for  Radioactive  Waste 
Management  from  2003-2007.  He  is  a  Fellow  of  the  Institution  of  Nuclear  Engineers,  co-
author of two Safety Guides published by the International Atomic Energy Agency and has 
reviewed  the  safety  of  reactors  in  Iran  and  Pakistan  on  behalf  of  the  Agency.  He  is  a 
member of the Defence Nuclear Safety Committee of the Ministry of Defence and a member 
of the Presidential Nuclear Safety Committee of Armenia.  
 
Fergus  Gibb  –  is  Emeritus  Professor  of  Petrology  &  Geochemistry  in  the  Department  of 
Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield. He has over 40 years’ teaching and research 
experience  in  mineralogy,  petrology,  geochemistry  and  other  areas  of  geoscience.  A 
specialist  on  igneous  intrusions,  he  is  a former Vice-President  of  the  Mineralogical  Society 
and  an  Elected  Fellow  of  the  Mineralogical  Society  of  America.  A  long-standing  research 
interest in the geological disposal of nuclear wastes has led to over 25 papers on the subject 
and national and international recognition as an authority on deep borehole disposal. On the 
strength of the potential strategic importance of this research work, Professor Gibb's post at 
the  University  of  Sheffield  was  part-funded  for  a  period  by  the  Nuclear  Decommissioning 
Authority  but  the  conduct  of  the  work  was,  and  remains,  independent  of  the  NDA  and  the 
nuclear industry.  
 
Simon  Harley  –  is  Professor  of  Lower  Crustal Processes  in the  School  of Geosciences  at 
the University of Edinburgh. An international expert on the evolution of continental crust, his 
research integrates geological mapping with experimental and microanalytical studies of the 
stabilities  of  minerals  and  their  behaviour  at  high  temperatures  and  pressures.  He  has 
conducted geological mapping projects in diverse and complex basement areas in Australia, 
India,  Norway,  Greenland,  Scotland  and  Antarctica.  Professor  Harley  is  a  Fellow  of  the 
Royal  Society  of  Edinburgh  and  in  2002  was  awarded  the  Imperial  Polar  Medal  in 
recognition of his contributions to Antarctic Earth Science.  
 
Marion  Hill  –  is  an  independent  consultant  with  35  years’  experience  in  standards for  and 
assessments  of  the  radiological  impact  of  the  nuclear  industry  on  the  public  and  the 
environment.  She  specialises  in  policies,  strategies  and  standards  for  the  management  of 
radioactive wastes and radioactively contaminated land. Her early career was at the National 
Radiological  Protection  Board  (now  part  of the  Health  Protection  Agency),  from  where  she 
moved  into  consultancy.  Her  experience  includes  national  and  international  work  on  policy 
and regulatory topics, and environmental impact assessments for nuclear installations in the 
UK  and  overseas.  She  was  a  member  of  the  Health  and  Safety  Commission’s  Nuclear 
Safety Advisory Committee (NuSAC) from 2006 to 2008, when it was suspended.  
 
Francis Livens – has held a radiochemistry position at the University of Manchester since 
1991.  He  worked  for  over  25  years  in  environmental  radioactivity  and  actinide  chemistry, 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 55 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
starting his career with the Natural Environment Research Council, where he was involved in 
the response to the Chernobyl accident. At the University of Manchester, he has worked in 
many  aspects  of  nuclear  fuel  cycle  research,  including  effluent  treatment,  waste 
immobilisation  and  actinide  chemistry.  He  was  the  founding  director  of  the  Centre  for 
Radiochemistry Research, established in Manchester in 1999 and is now Research Director 
of  the  Dalton  Nuclear  Institute  and  Director  of  the  EPSRC-funded,  Manchester/Sheffield 
Nuclear Fission Doctoral Training Centre. He has acted as an advisor to the nuclear industry 
both in the UK and overseas.  
 
Rebecca Lunn – is a Reader in Civil Engineering at the University of Strathclyde. She has 
over 15 years of research experience in hydrogeology, with a particular focus on deep flow 
systems,  hydromechanics  and  the  spatial  and  temporal  evolution  of  rock  permeability.  Her 
research  experience  is  multi-disciplinary  and  she  currently  collaborates  closely  with 
structural  geologists,  seismologists,  mathematicians  and,  more  recently,  microbiologists, 
psychologists and statisticians. Current research interests include: development of computer 
models to simulate changes in rock permeability over time surrounding geological faults, with 
a view to improving flow predictions for deep radioactive waste disposal and carbon dioxide 
sequestration;  understanding  the  relationship  between  subsurface  groundwater  flow  and 
earthquakes;  and  exploring  public  understanding  of  uncertain  science,  such  as  flood 
prediction, to inform the regulators’ approach to public information and decision making.  
 
Leslie Netherton – has over 30 years local government experience, where he specialised in 
health and safety, food safety, environmental protection and emergency planning. As Head 
of  Service  with  Plymouth  City  Council  from  1998-2007  he  had  responsibility  for  civil 
protection,  waste  management,  cemeteries,  building  control,  consumer  protection, 
sustainability and environmental health. As lead Authority officer for the nuclear submarine 
refitting  facility  at  Devonport  Royal  Dockyard,  he  was  involved  with  major  planning 
applications,  discharge  consent  consultations,  offsite  emergency  planning  and  extensive 
stakeholder  engagement.  He  is  Chair  of  the  Ministry  of  Defence  Advisory  Group  for  its 
Submarine Dismantling Project and sits on the project Steering Group. He currently runs an 
environmental  health  consultancy  company  and  has  been  an  active  member  of  the 
Chartered Institute of Environmental Health.  
 
John  Rennilson  –  is  a  Chartered  Town  Planner  and  a  Chartered  Surveyor  with  over  37 
years’  experience  in  local  government.  He  served  as  County  Planning  Officer  of  North 
Yorkshire County Council (1984-1996) planning and as Director of Planning & Development 
for  Highland  Council  (1996-2008).  His  career  has  involved  balancing  development  needs 
and environmental issues at a strategic, as well as at a local, level. He has had considerable 
experience  of  the  energy  industry,  including  development  of  the  Selby  Coalfield,  coal-fired 
electricity generation at Drax and Eggborough, and decommissioning Dounreay, as well as 
renewable electricity generation and transmission issues across the Highlands. 
 
Andrew Sloan – is a chartered engineer, a Fellow of the Institution of Civil Engineers and a 
Visiting Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering of the University of Strathclyde. He 
is  a  director  of  the  specialist  consulting  engineering  firm  Donaldson  Associates  Ltd.  He 
graduated  in  geology  from  the  University  of  Edinburgh  and  has  an  MSc  in  Engineering 
Geology from the University of Leeds. With over 20 years’ experience, he is a specialist in 
geotechnical  engineering  with  particular  emphasis  on  the  development  of  underground 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 56 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
space.  He  has  experience  in  the  management  and  delivery  of  technically  challenging  and 
complex  ground  engineering  projects  in  a  range  of  regulated  industries.  He  led  the 
independent  technical  check  of  the  grouting  aspects  of  the  Shaft  Isolation  Project  at 
Dounreay and has worked on underground engineering projects in North America, Europe, 
Africa and South East Asia.  
 
Lynda Warren – is Emeritus Professor of Environmental Law at Aberystwyth University and 
a  member  of  the  Royal  Commission  on  Environmental  Pollution.  She  has  postgraduate 
degrees in marine biology and law and has pursued an academic career first in biology and 
latterly in environmental law. She has over 100  academic publications, including a number 
on  radioactive  waste  management  law  and  policy.  Lynda  has  15  years  experience  of 
radioactive  waste  management  policy.  She  was  a  member  of  CoRWM  from  2003  -  2007 
and,  before  that,  a  member  of  the  Radioactive  Waste  Management  Advisory  Committee 
(RWMAC), chairing its working group on Dounreay. She is currently a member of SEPA s 
Dounreay  Particles  Advisory  Group  and  an  associate  of  IDM,  a  consultancy  engaged  in 
environmental policy advisory work, mainly in the nuclear sector. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 57 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
ANNEX C 
CoRWM EXPENDITURE 2009-10 
 
(to be added) 
 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 58 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
ANNEX D 
RECOMMENDATIONS IN CoRWM’s 2009 REPORTS TO GOVERNMENT 
 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s Report on Interim Storage 
The  recommendations  in  CoRWM’s  March  2009  report  to  Government  on  interim  storage 
(CoRWM doc. 2500) are as follows. 
 
Recommendation 1 
CoRWM  recommends  to  Government  that  there  should  be  greater  UK-wide  strategic  co-
ordination of: 
• 
the conditioning, packaging and storage of higher activity wastes 
• 
the management of all spent fuels 
• 
the management of plutonium 
• 
the management of uranic materials 
• 
future transport arrangements for radioactive wastes and nuclear materials. 
The co-ordination should include agreement on priorities. 
 
Recommendation 2 
CoRWM  recommends  to  Government  that  appropriate  information  be  made  publicly 
available on the management of higher activity wastes, spent fuels, plutonium and uranium. 
There  is  a  need  to  summarise,  for  a  variety  of  readerships,  the  progress  to  date,  the 
management options under consideration for the future, and the issues involved in choosing 
between  alternative  options.  The  information    should  complement  that  on  waste  quantities 
and  characteristics  given  in  the  various  documents  about  the  UK  Radioactive  Waste 
Inventory.   
 
Recommendation 3
 
CoRWM recommends to Government that more information be made available to the public 
about  how  the  security  of  the  storage  and  transport  of  radioactive  wastes,  spent  fuels, 
plutonium and uranium is assured. The objective should be to give the public more insights 
into security issues, without compromising security in any way. In deciding what information 
should  be  made  available,  account  should  be  taken  of  existing  and  proposed  practices  in 
countries with similar security needs to the UK and a strong freedom of information culture 
(for example, the USA).  
 
Recommendation 4 
CoRWM recommends to Government that there be more co-ordination of PSE between the 
NDA and other UK nuclear industry organisations, at national, regional and local levels. The 
objective  should  be  to  ensure  that  there  is  sufficient  stakeholder  participation  in  decision-
making  processes  for  the  conditioning,  packaging,  storage  and  transport  of  higher  activity 
wastes,  and  the  management  of  spent  fuels,  plutonium  and  uranium,  without  incurring 
“stakeholder fatigue”.  
 
 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s Report on Geological Disposal 
The recommendations in CoRWM’s July 2009 report to Government on geological disposal 
(CoRWM doc. 2550) are as follows. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 59 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Recommendation 1 
CoRWM recommends to Government that it begins work now to develop the principles to be 
used in deriving Community Benefits Packages and the process by which Packages would 
be  agreed.  This  should  include  work  on  providing  confidence  that,  once  agreed,  such 
packages will be delivered.  
 
Recommendation 2  
CoRWM  recommends  to  Government  that  it  should  explain  how  local  stakeholders  would 
have an opportunity to influence the outcome of the planning application process for a GDF 
if the application is referred to the Infrastructure Planning Commission.  
 
Recommendation 3 
CoRWM recommends to Government that the NDA and the Government should discuss with 
communities, that have expressed an interest, the advantages and disadvantages of single- 
and  two-stage  planning  applications  for  underground  investigations  and  construction  of  a 
GDF.  In  particular,  the  discussions  should  cover  the  hold  points,  that  could  be  subject  to 
conditions  attached  to  approval  of  a  single  application,  and  opportunities  for  local 
stakeholder engagement at such hold points.   
 
Recommendation 4  
CoRWM recommends to Government that it should ensure that the NDA carries out option 
assessments  in  which  a  wide  range  of  geological  disposal  concepts  is  considered.  These 
should include disposal in facilities constructed using various techniques, at depths ranging 
from about 200m to more than 1km, disposal of all higher activity wastes in a single facility, 
separate  facilities  for  various  types  of  higher  activity  wastes,  and  facilities  incorporating 
different degrees of retrievability. A wide range of stakeholders should be involved in these 
assessments. 
 
Recommendation 5  
CoRWM recommends to Government that it should ensure that the NDA has an integrated 
process  in  place  for  geological  disposal  facility  design,  site  assessments  and  safety  case 
development.  The  process  should  be  described  in  publicly  available  documents  that  have 
been reviewed by independent experts and the regulators. 
 
 
Recommendations in CoRWM’s Report on R&D 
The recommendations in CoRWM’s October 2009 report to Government on R&D (CoRWM 
doc. 2543) are as follows. 
 
Recommendation 1 
CoRWM recommends to Government that it ensures that there is strategic co-ordination of 
UK R&D for the management of higher activity wastes. Such co-ordination is required within 
the  NDA,  between  the  NDA  and  the  rest  of  the  nuclear  industry,  amongst  the  Research 
Councils  and  between  the  whole  of  the  nuclear  industry,  its  regulators  and  the  Research 
Councils. 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 60 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Recommendation 2 
CoRWM recommends to Government that it ensures that the Environment Agency and the 
Scottish Environment Protection Agency obtain the resources that they need to access and 
commission  the  additional  independent  research  required  to  support  them  fully  in  their 
regulation of the management of higher activity wastes. 
 
Recommendation 3 
CoRWM  recommends  to  Government  that  it  assigns  to  a  single  organisation  the 
responsibility  for  providing  national  leadership  and  strategic  direction  for  provision  of  R&D 
skills relevant to the long-term management of radioactive wastes.  
 
Recommendation 4 
CoRWM  recommends  to  Government  that  it  ensures  that  facilities  for  research  with  highly 
radioactive  materials  are  improved  and their  capability  enhanced  so  that  they  can  be  used 
for  the  full  spectrum  of  research  relevant  to  the  long-term  management  of  higher  activity 
wastes. These facilities should be accessible to all researchers who need them.  
 
Recommendation 5 
CoRWM recommends to Government that an underground research facility be constructed 
at any site where it is proposed to construct a geological disposal facility.  
 
Recommendation 6 
CoRWM  recommends  to  Government  that  mechanisms  are  put  in  place  to  ensure  that  a 
wider range of stakeholders than to date will be involved in establishing R&D requirements 
for the long-term management of higher activity wastes and that accessible information will 
be made available to the public about R&D needs, plans and progress.  
 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 61 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
ANNEX E 
GLOSSARY AND ACRONYM LIST 
 
Glossary 
 
Active facility 
A facility where radioactive materials can be used. 
[Such facilities are subject to safety, security and environmental 
regulation.

Advanced Gas-
A UK designed, gas-cooled reactor with a graphite moderator. 
Cooled Reactor 
[It uses enriched uranium oxide fuel with steel cladding and 
(AGR) 
graphite sleeves. The primary coolant is carbon dioxide.
Applied research 
Investigation directed primarily towards a specific practical aim or 
objective, which can involve using existing knowledge and 
understanding or acquiring new knowledge.   
Basic research 
See “Fundamental research”. 
Benefits Package 
See “Community Benefits Package”. 
Committed waste 
Radioactive waste that will arise in future from the operation or 
decommissioning of existing nuclear facilities. 
[As distinct from existing waste, which already exists, and new build 
waste, which will only arise if new facilities are built.] 

Community Benefits 
A set of measures to enhance the social and economic well-being 
Package 
of a community that hosts a geological disposal facility, to 
recognise that the community is performing an essential service to 
the country. 
Community Siting 
A partnership of organisations with interests in the community that 
Partnership 
has expressed an interest in hosting a geological disposal facility. 
[The partnership is expected to involve the host community, the 
“Decision Making Body” (or Bodies) and “Wider Local Interests”. It 
will work with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority and other 
relevant organisations to ensure local concerns are addressed 
during the geological disposal facility siting process and will advise 
the Decision Making Body (or Bodies).

Conditioning 
Any process used to prepare waste for long-term storage and/or 
disposal. 
[Usually by converting it into a suitable solid form e.g. incorporation 
in glass (vitrification), encapsulation in cement
.] 
Decision Making 
The Local Authority that will make the decisions for a host 
Body 
community in the geological disposal facility siting process. 
Decision to 
A decision by a community to participate in the geological disposal 
Participate 
facility siting process, without commitment to eventually host a 
facility. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 62 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Desk-based studies 
Review, summary, collation or evaluation of existing knowledge, 
information, facts and research outcomes.  
[In the context of the UK geological disposal siting process, 
assessing the suitability of sites using existing knowledge about the 
geology, surface environment, communities etc.] 

Development 
Progressive, systematic use of knowledge and understanding 
gained from research directed towards the  production or 
improvement of materials, devices, systems or methods. 
[Includes the design and development of processes.] 
Disposal 
Emplacement of waste in an appropriate facility without the 
intention of retrieving it.  
[Retrieval may be possible but if intended the appropriate term is 
“storage”.
]  
Disposable 
A waste package is disposable if it can be safely removed from a 
store, transported to a disposal facility and emplaced in that facility, 
and if it will play its planned role in ensuring the post-closure safety 
of that facility. 
Encapsulation 
A process in which radioactive waste is physically enclosed in a 
material with the aim of preventing radionuclides from escaping. 
[For intermediate level waste encapsulation is a type of 
“conditioning”; the most commonly used encapsulants are types of 
cement and others include polymers.  For spent fuel encapsulation 
is likely to entail placing the fuel in an inner canister that is then 
placed in an outer, disposal canister. The canisters could be made 
of different metals and might be filled with metal.

Environmental 
A permit issued by the Environment Agency under the 
Permit 
Environmental Permitting Regulations. 
[When the Environmental Permitting Regulations 2010 come into 
force, Environmental Permits will replace registrations and 
authorisations under the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 in 
England and Wales.

Exotic fuel 
Term used for any type of nuclear fuel that is not from a commercial 
nuclear power reactor. 
[Mainly fuels from research reactors and nuclear powered 
submarines
.] 
Expression of 
A notification to Government by a community that it is interested in 
Interest 
entering discussions about involvement in the geological disposal 
facility siting process, without commitment. 
Fundamental 
Original, exploratory investigation involving experimental or 
research 
theoretical work undertaken primarily to acquire new knowledge 
and understanding of phenomena and observable facts without 
necessarily having any immediate application or use in view.  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 63 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Generic Design 
The generic assessment being undertaken by the Health and 
Assessment (GDA) 
Safety Executive and the Environment Agency of the suitability of 
new reactor designs for use in the UK. 
Geological disposal 
Generally, emplacement in the Earth’s crust with no intent to 
retrieve. Used specifically in the MRWS programme to mean 
“disposal” of radioactive waste in an underground facility, where the 
geology (rock structure) provides a barrier against escape of 
radioactivity and where the depth, taken in the particular geological 
context, substantially protects the waste from disturbances arising 
at the surface.  
Geological disposal 
Any variant of geological disposal, including the use of a “mined 
concept 
repository”, “deep boreholes” and more than one “geological 
disposal facility”. 
Geological disposal 
Any facility used for geological disposal. 
facility (GDF) 
[Includes mined repositories, natural caverns, disused man-made 
caverns or mines, and deep boreholes
.] 
Geological disposal 
The detailed drawings and specifications that will allow construction 
facility design 
of a “geological disposal facility”. 
[Includes nuclear, civil, mechanical, electrical, materials, chemical, 
geotechnical and geological engineering aspects.

Geological 
See “mined repository”. 
repository 
Higher activity waste  Radioactive waste with activity above the thresholds for low level 
(HAW) 
waste (LLW), i.e. above 4 GBq/tonne alpha activity or above 12 
GBq/tonne beta gamma activity.  
[It is usually also taken to include LLW unsuitable for near-surface 
disposal.

High level waste 
Radioactive waste in which the temperature may rise significantly 
(HLW) 
as a result of its radioactive content, so that this factor has to be 
taken into account in the design of waste storage or disposal 
facilities.   
[In practice the term is only used in the UK for the nitric acid 
solutions arising from reprocessing spent fuels and for the vitrified 
form of the solutes in these solutions.

Historic waste, 
See “legacy waste”. 
historical waste 
Host community 
A community in which a geological disposal facility will be built. 
[It is a community in a small geographically well-defined area, such 
as town or village, and includes the population of that area and the 
owners of the land.

2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 64 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Immobilisation 
A conditioning process in which radioactive waste is chemically 
incorporated into a material with the aim of preventing radionuclides 
from moving. 
[“Vitrification” and incorporation in ceramics are types of 
immobilisation processes.

Interim storage 
Storage of radioactive waste prior to implementing a final 
management step, such as “geological disposal”.  
Intermediate level 
Radioactive waste exceeding the upper activity boundaries for “low 
waste (ILW) 
level waste” (i.e. over 4 GBq/tonne alpha activity or 12 GBq/tonne 
beta gamma activity) but for which its heat output need not be 
taken into account in the design of storage or disposal facilities. 
Legacy facility 
A nuclear facility constructed several decades ago where waste 
has been generated or stored. 
Legacy waste 
Radioactive waste that arose several decades ago. 
[A subset of existing waste; sometimes called “historic waste” or 
“historical waste”. The term is usually reserved for wastes kept in, 
or that have arisen in, legacy facilities.

Long-term storage 
Storage for more than about 100 years. 
Low level waste 
“Radioactive waste” with activity levels that do not exceed 4 
(LLW) 
GBq/tonne alpha activity or 12 GBq/tonne beta gamma activity. 
[Subsets of LLW include “very low level waste” (VLLW) and exempt 
waste (i.e. “radioactive waste” with activity levels below those in the 
various Exemption Orders made under the Radioactive Substances 
Act).

Magnox reactor 
A UK designed gas-cooled reactor with a graphite moderator. 
[It uses uranium metal fuel with a magnesium alloy cladding.
Mined repository 
A facility specifically excavated and constructed for the “geological 
disposal” of radioactive waste. 
[“Mined and engineered repository” is a more correct description. 
Most designs consist of shafts or adits leading to tunnels and 
vaults
.] 
Near-surface 
Disposal at or close to the surface of the Earth. 
disposal 
[Includes underground disposal in the Earth’s crust at depths less 
than a few tens of metres, and emplacement in engineered 
structures at or just below ground level. Formerly called “shallow 
land burial” or emplacement in a “near surface repository”.

2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 65 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Optimisation 
A process of showing that risks have been reduced to a level 
beyond which, on a balance of factors, no further reduction would 
be worthwhile. 
[The optimisation principle encompasses various principles and 
concepts used in health and safety regulation, environmental 
protection and radiological protection (e.g. “as low as reasonably 
practicable” (ALARP), “best available techniques” (BAT), “as low as 
reasonably achievable” (ALARA).  In the context of radioactive 
waste management it always implies a need to identify, assess and 
compare options for achieving an objective or carrying out an 
operation.

Overpack 
An additional container for a waste package. 
[Usually to make it more suitable for storage, handling, transport or 
disposal
.] 
Package 
See “Waste package”. 
Packaging 
Placing waste into a container for long-term storage and/or 
disposal. 
[In most cases this includes conditioning but sometimes waste is 
simply placed in containers, with or without compaction to reduce 
its volume
.] 
Primary research 
The obtaining of knowledge, facts and data that did not previously 
exist.  
[All fundamental and much applied research is primary.
Pond 
A water-filled structure in which nuclear fuel is stored. 
[Usually made of concrete, the water provides cooling and 
shielding
.] 
Pressurised water 
A nuclear reactor in which water is used as the coolant and 
reactor (PWR) 
moderator. 
[The fuel is enriched uranium oxide with “zircaloy” cladding. PWRs 
operate above atmospheric pressure to prevent the water boiling.
 ] 
Public 
People who have no particular interest in, and are not affected by, 
radioactive waste management. 
[CoRWM distinguishes between “stakeholders” and the public.
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 66 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Radioactive waste 
Radioactive waste is defined in the Radioactive Substances Act 
1993 and the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) 
Regulations 2010. In essence it is any substance for which there is 
no further use and in which artificial radionuclides are present at 
any level and/or natural radionuclides are present above the levels 
given in Schedule 1 of the Act and the corresponding schedule in 
the Regulations. 
[Note that spent fuels, plutonium and uranium are not radioactive 
wastes unless it has been decided that there is no further use for 
them and they are declared to be wastes
This legal definition of 
radioactive waste is under review and it is expected that a revised 
definition will be put in place in 2010-2011.

Radioactive waste 
All the activities involved in managing radioactive wastes. 
management 
[Includes minimising arisings, all types of treatment (e.g. 
decontamination, sorting, segregation), “conditioning”, “packaging” 
and “disposal”
.] 
Raw waste 
Waste that has not been conditioned.  
Repository 
A facility where waste is emplaced for disposal. 
[Often used as shorthand for “mined repository”, but also used in 
other contexts, e.g. the UK’s Low Level Waste Repository (LLWR)
.] 
Requesting Parties 
The organisations that have requested that their reactor designs be 
considered in the Generic Design Assessment of new reactors by 
the Health and Safety Executive and the Environment Agency. 
[The current Requesting Parties are Westinghouse and 
EDF/AREVA.

Research 
An investigation directed to the discovery of some fact or principle 
by a course of study or scientific enquiry. 
Retrievability 
An ability to withdraw wastes from a disposal facility that is 
achieved by means designed into the facility other than simply 
reversing waste emplacement.  
[See also “reversibility” and “recoverability”.
Safety assessment 
An assessment of whether a nuclear facility or operation is or, if 
particular actions are taken, will be safe. 
Safety case 
The complete set of arguments that demonstrates that a nuclear 
facility or operation is or, if particular actions are taken, will be safe. 
Spent fuel 
Fuel that has been used in a nuclear reactor and for which there is 
no further use as fuel. 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 67 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Stakeholder 
A person or organisation who has an interest in or is affected by 
radioactive waste management.  
[In the context of CoRWM’s work, stakeholders include waste 
producers, regulators, non-governmental organisations, local 
authorities and communities near existing nuclear sites and 
potential disposal sites
.]  
Stakeholder fatigue 
A situation in which stakeholders are overwhelmed by 
communications and consultations on a particular topic, and do not 
respond to requests for their views. 
Storage 
Placing wastes or other materials in a facility with the intention of 
retrieving them at a later date. 
Strategy II 
The name being given by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority 
to its second Strategy. 
[The first NDA Strategy was published in 2006.  There will be a 
public consultation on Strategy II in the autumn of 2010 and the 
final version will be published by early April 2011, after approval by 
Government.

Surface-based 
Investigations of a potential geological disposal site that are carried 
investigations 
out from the surface, rather than underground. 
[For example, seismic investigations and boreholes.
Topic Strategy 
A strategy developed by the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority for 
a particular topic within its remit. 
[For example, topic strategies are being developed for higher 
activity wastes and for various types of spent fuels.

Treatment 
Any process used to make radioactive wastes suitable for the next 
step in their management. 
[Treatment processes include sorting, decontamination, volume 
reduction and all types of “conditioning”.

Underground 
A site or host rock specific underground facility for characterisation 
research facility 
and R&D related to “geological disposal”. 
(URF) 
Vitrification 
The process of converting wastes into a glass or glass-like form. 
Voluntarism 
An approach to siting geological disposal facilities that involves 
communities voluntarily expressing an interest in holding 
discussions with Government, then deciding whether to participate 
any further. 
Waste package 
A container and all its contents . 
[Includes the waste, any encapsulating material, any capping grout, 
etc
.] 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 68 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
Wider Local 
Communities outside the “host community” that have an interest in 
Interests 
the development of a geological disposal facility. 
[For example, nearby villages, communities on transport routes to 
the “host community”.

 
 
Acronym List 
 
AGR 
advanced gas cooled reactor (A type of reactor with a graphite core, and 
uranium oxide fuel in steel cladding with a graphite sleeve.) 
BGS 
British Geological Survey 
COI 
Central Office of Information (of the UK Government) 
CoRWM 
Committee on Radioactive Waste Management 
COWAM 
Community Waste Management (an EU project) 
DECC 
Department of Energy and Climate Change 
Defra 
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs 
DfT 
Department for Transport 
DoENI 
Department of the Environment Northern Ireland 
DSSC 
disposal system safety case (being developed by NDA) 
EA 
Environment Agency, England and Wales 
EDF 
Electricité de France 
EIA 
environmental impact assessment 
EPSRC 
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council 
EU 
European Union 
GDA 
Generic Design Assessment (of new nuclear reactors, carried out by the 
regulators) 
GDF 
geological disposal facility 
GRA 
Guidance on Requirements for Authorisation (for disposal of solid 
radioactive wastes, produced by the environment agencies) 
HAW 
higher activity waste 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 69 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
HLW 
high level waste 
HSE 
Health and Safety Executive 
IAEA 
International Atomic Energy Agency (a United Nations agency) 
ILW 
intermediate level waste 
IPC 
Infrastructure Planning Commission (to be replaced by different fast-
track procedure for major projects) 
IPT 
Integrated Project Team (an NDA team for addressing a particular HAW 
management issue) 
LLW 
low level waste 
LoC 
Letter of Compliance (previously Letter of Comfort) 
MoD 
Ministry of Defence 
MOX 
mixed oxide fuel (contains uranium and plutonium oxides) 
MRWS 
Managing Radioactive Waste Safely (the UK programme for the 
management of higher activity wastes) 
NDA 
Nuclear Decommissioning Authority 
NDARB 
Nuclear Decommissioning Authority Research Board on nuclear 
decommissioning and waste clean-up 
NEA 
Nuclear Energy Agency (part of the Organisation for Economic 
Cooperation and Development) 
NERC 
Natural Environment Research Council 
NGO 
non-governmental organisation 
NIEA 
Northern Ireland Environment Agency 
NII 
Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (part of HSE) 
NNL 
National Nuclear Laboratory 
NPS 
National Policy Statement 
NuLeAF 
Nuclear Legacy Advisory Forum 
NuSAC 
Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee (now disbanded, advised HSE) 
NWRF 
Nuclear Waste Research Forum (a group convened by the NDA) 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 70 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
NWTRB 
Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board (in the USA) 
OCNS 
Office of Civil Nuclear Security (part of HSE) 
OECD 
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development 
ONR 
Office for Nuclear Regulation (An organisation to be set up within HSE, 
incorporating NII, OCNS, UKSO, RMTT and TRANSEC. It is expected to 
be fully operational by April 2011.) 
PCM 
plutonium contaminated material 
PIP 
provisional implementation plan (the NDA plan for implementation of 
geological disposal) 
PSE 
public and stakeholder engagement 
PWR 
pressurised water reactor 
R&D 
research and development 
RMTT 
Radioactive Materials Transport Team (part of DfT) 
RWMAC 
Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee 
RWMD 
Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (of NDA) 
RWPG 
Radioactive Waste Policy Group (a UK Government group) 
SDDG 
Strategy Development and Delivery Group (for NDA, chaired by DECC) 
SEA 
strategic environmental assessment 
SEPA 
Scottish Environment Protection Agency 
SLC 
site licence company (a company that runs an NDA site, under contract 
to the NDA, and holds the nuclear site licence) 
SSG 
Site Stakeholder Group (at NDA sites) 
TRU 
transuranic (in the USA the term TRU wastes is used for long-lived, 
actinide-containing ILW, such as PCM) 
TRANSEC 
Transport Security and Contingencies Directorate (part of DfT) 
UKAEA 
United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (now used only as an 
acronym, mainly as part of the names of the organisations into which the 
Authority was split) 
UKSO 
United Kingdom Safeguards Office (part of HSE) 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 71 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
WAG 
Welsh Assembly Government 
WIPP 
Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (a geological disposal facility in New Mexico, 
USA) 
 
 
 
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 72 of 73 

DRAFT FOR DISCUSSION AND DECISION          CoRWM doc.2807 
Draft 3 (27 May 2010) 
FURTHER INFORMATION 
 
CoRWM contact details (Chair, Members, Secretariat): 
 
 0300 068 6112/6116 
 
 CoRWM Secretariat, Area 3D, 3 Whitehall Place, London SW1A 2AW 
 
 xxxxx@xxxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
 
website www.corwm.org.uk  
2807 Draft 3 Annual Report 2009-10 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 73 of 73