This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'How can police constables fine motorists when they are following motorists in unmarked police cars ?'.


RESTRICTED 
Driving_Standards_Policy_Ver1.3_Sep16 
 
 
 
POLICY 
 
 
Security Classification 
RESTRICTED 
 
Disclosable under Freedom of 
No 
 
Information Act 2000 
 
 
 
POLICY TITLE 
Driving Standards 
POLICY REFERENCE NUMBER 
A020 
Version 
1.3 
 
 
 
POLICY OWNERSHIP 
DIRECTORATE 
PROTECTIVE SERVICES 
BUSINESS AREA 
FORCE OPERATIONS 
 
 
 
POLICY IMPLEMENTATION DATE 
October 2013 
NEXT REVIEW DATE: 
July 2017 
RISK RATING 
HIGH 
EQUALITY ANALYSIS  
LOW 
 
 
 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police welcome comments and suggestions from the public and 
staff about the contents and implementation of this policy. Please write to the force Business Planning 
Manager, Business Assurance and Improvement at Hindlip Hall, PO Box 55, Worcester, WR3 8SP or 
e-mail xxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xxxxxx.xx 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 1 of 46 
      RESTRICTED 

RESTRICTED 
Driving_Standards_Policy_Ver1.3_Sep16 
 
1.0 
POLICY OUTLINE  
 
 
In support of the strategic aim of Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police to 
protect and manage the risk of harm to those persons who live, work or travel within 
the county, this Driving Standards Policy will ensure that all drivers of police vehicles 
are aware of their responsibilities and the high standards expected of them. 
 
 
The policy is underpinned by a set of ‘Driving Values’ and processes designed to 
provide transparency and clear direction for all drivers of police vehicles (marked and 
unmarked including hire vehicles). 
 
 
The policy incorporates the Authorised Professional Practice of Police Pursuits and 
the associated Tactical Pursuit & Containment, Tactic Directory including pre-emptive 
options. It also reflects changes in Health and safety legislation, corporate 
manslaughter Provisions and the implementation requirements of the Road safety Act 
2006 which has created new demands on the police service. 
 
 
Application of the policy will ensure that all drivers of police vehicles (or vehicles used 
for police purposes) act in a professional and safe manner at all times. 
 
2.0 
PURPOSE OF POLICY 
 
 
To maximise the safety of all road users, including police drivers. Develop trust and 
confidence with the public and contribute towards sustainability by raising driving 
standards and thereby reducing costs for third party liability.  
 
 
It is not within the scope of this policy to cover the policing of the motorway networks 
within Warwickshire and West Mercia. This area of policing will be the subject of a 
separate policy. 
 
3.0 
IMPLICATIONS OF THE POLICY 
 
 
At the point of ratifying this policy the policy owner will be satisfied that this document 
Complies with all relevant legislation, Human Rights, Data Protection and also 
Freedom Of information. Article 2- Right to life applies.  
 
 
As a direct result of this policy there will be some training implications for 
benchmarking the skill level for all Standard and Advanced drivers. There will also 
need to be a robust system in place for refresher training for these drivers. This will 
impact upon driver training resilience and will also by necessity cause abstractions of 
operational officers to undertake the courses. 
 
 
Strategic management of the initiative rests with Protective Services. Operational 
management is devolved to the head of operations. 
 
4.0 
CONSULTATION 
 
 
Development of this policy has been undertaken by the respective leads within 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police in consultation with one another.  Once 
complete the policy will be circulated internally to members of the Joint Negotiating 
Consultative Committee, (JNCC) for consultation. 
 
Page 2 of 46 
      RESTRICTED 

RESTRICTED 
Driving_Standards_Policy_Ver1.3_Sep16 
 
 
 
5.0 
PROCEDURE 
 
 
The procedural elements of this policy are accessed via the following Appendices: 
 
 
APPENDIX 1: 
Introduction and Driving Values. 
 
 
APPENDIX 2: 
Vehicle and Equipment Checks. 
 
 
APPENDIX 3: 
Driver Authorisation and Training. 
 
 
APPENDIX 4: 
S.87 Exemption Notices. 
 
 
APPENDIX 5: 
Incident Reporting and NIP Process. 
 
 
APPENDIX 6: 
Surveillance. 
 
 
APPENDIX 7: 
Post Incident Procedure. 
 
 
APPENDIX 8: 
Pursuit Management: Authorised Professional Practice of 
 
 
Police Pursuits and Tactics Directory. 
 
 
APPENDIX 9: 
Hollow Spike Tyre Deflation System, (HOSTYDS) 
 
 
6.0 
RISK ASSESSMENTS / HEALTH & SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS 
 
 
The public rightly expect a high standard of driving competence from Police Officers 
and Staff, and safety must always take primacy in any circumstances. Emergency 
response driving and pursuits are by their very nature hazardous but necessary 
activities that present a risk to police staff and the public alike. To ensure that such 
activities are carried out as safely as possible, the level and type of driving activity 
that an individual can undertake will be determined by the successful completion of 
appropriate training along with on-going monitoring, supervision and re assessment. 
 
 
The following risk assessments apply:- 
 
 
Patrol, Mobile Patrol, PCSO, CID, Public Order. 
 
 
Page 3 of 46 
      RESTRICTED 

RESTRICTED 
Driving_Standards_Policy_Ver1.3_Sep16 
 
7.0 
EQUALITY ANALYSIS 
 
EQUALITY ANALYSIS - SCREENING ASSESSMENT QUESTIONS 
 
 
Impact on 
Impact on 
staff? 
the public? 
Internal 
External 
Could this activity potentially discriminate against any 
No 
No 
diverse group? 
Could this activity prevent us promoting equality for any 
No 
No 
diverse group? 
Could this activity potentially create harassment against any 
No 
No 
diverse group? 
Could this activity potentially discourage the participation of 
No 
No 
any diverse groups? 
Could this activity promote negative attitudes towards any 
No 
No 
diverse groups? 
Could this activity help to prevent equality of opportunity 
No 
No 
between diverse groups? 
Is there evidence / belief that some groups could be 
No 
No 
differently affected? 
Is there any public concern that the function or policy is 
No 
No 
being carried out in a discriminatory way? 
Total of ‘yes’ answers 


 
Comments/additional information: 
 
Nil 
 
 
Policy/Procedure Owner Signature: 
Date Completed: 
Force Operations 
13th June 2013 
 
 
 
 
Page 4 of 46 
      RESTRICTED 

RESTRICTED 
Driving_Standards_Policy_Ver1.3_Sep16 
 
8.0 
MONITORING / EVALUATION 
 
 
The policy will be reviewed annually to ensure that it is relevant, achievable and 
compliant with all legislative developments. 
 
9.0 
DOCUMENT HISTORY 
 
 
The history and rationale for change to policy will be recorded using the below chart: 
 
Date 
Author/Reviewer 
Amendment(s) & 
Approval/Adoption 
Rationale 
08/05/2013  PS 3118 Godsall 
Alignment of Warwickshire 
JNCC 13/09/2013 
Police and West Mercia 
Police policies 
14/06/2014  PS 23118 Godsall 
Policy Review- Appendix 8 
14/06/2014 
paragraph 8.1 V1.1 
24/03/2015  PS G Morgan 
Policy Review- HOSTYDS 
24/03/2015 
procedure V1.2 
24/09/2015  Simon Vaughan 
Policy Amendment – ref 
24/09/2015 
Hand Held Radio’s V1.3 
July 2016 
Insp Gareth 
Reviewed – No Changes 
20/07/2016 
Morgan 
 
 
 
Page 5 of 46 
      RESTRICTED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Appendix 1 - Introduction and Driving Values 
 
 
This Driving Standards Policy applicable to Warwickshire Police and West Mercia 
Police replaces the previous Driving Standards policy for Warwickshire and also the 
Pursuit management, Driver Authorisation and S.87 exemptions policy for West 
Mercia. It reflects Health & Safety legislation, National Codes of Practice, Corporate 
Manslaughter provisions and the requirements of The Road Safety Act 2006. 
 
 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police are committed to protecting people from 
harm and recognise that the manner in which a police vehicle is driven can have an 
impact upon trust and confidence from the public. The public rightly expect a high 
standard of driving competence from Police Officers and Staff, and safety must 
always take primacy in any circumstances. 
 
 
The following list of Driving Values applies to all authorised drivers for Warwickshire 
Police and West Mercia Police. The policy covers police officers, special constables, 
Community Support Officers, police staff, and volunteers driving any vehicle used for 
police purposes on duty. All drivers, when using a vehicle on duty for police purposes, 
will at all times:  
 
• 
Ensure that they are fit to drive a vehicle (this includes issues around driver 
fatigue, drugs and alcohol). 
• 
Present a professional image in terms of appearance and dress code at all times. 
• 
Take responsibility for the care of any vehicle under their control, including vehicle 
checks, damage / defect reporting and completion of documentation in relation to 
its use (See Appendix 2 for full details).  
• 
Only Drive vehicles within the level of their authorisation, training and in 
accordance with policy (there are particular restrictions placed on basic and 
standard drivers). Where the accreditation for an officer or member of police staff 
has lapsed due to time where a refresher has not been taken then that persons’ 
driving authority reverts to BASIC. 
• 
Demonstrate a calm, considerate and professional manner. 
• 
Set an example to other road users, complying with road traffic legislation and 
driving within speed limits when not engaged in emergency response situations or 
proportionate and necessary enforcement activity. 
• 
Balance the need to protect people from harm by attending incidents promptly but 
safely, conducting a dynamic risk assessment in accordance with training and 
always giving priority to public safety.  
• 
Follow the S87 exemption policy and incident reporting policy where applicable to 
ensure a fair, transparent an auditable process. 
• 
Understand that they are not above the law, and where the manner of their driving 
falls short of that expected, they may need to justify their action (where 
appropriate through misconduct processes and / or the legal system).  
• 
Take responsibility for and undertake refresher training at the prescribed Intervals 
or check drives when requested. Where a refresher course has not been taken 
then the officers’ authorisation will revert to BASIC until further assessment 
undertaken. 
 
Page 6 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
• 
Surrender their driving authorisation on request to an authorised officer in 
prescribed circumstances (see Appendix 5 - Incident Reporting Policy).  
• 
Ensure that the have appropriate business insurance if using their own vehicle for 
work purposes. 
•  Ensure that Professional Standards are notified of any driving offences /               
convictions (including fixed penalty notices).  
•  Use of Airwaves Whilst Driving  
                   Regulation 110(1) of the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use)                      
                   Regulations 1986 makes the use of an interactive communications  
                   device whilst driving an offence. Although no case law has yet  
                   determined a clear definition of such a device, it is likely that a hand  
                   held Airwave terminal will fall within that definition.  As the use of  
                   handheld terminals may be illegal, the use of such terminals   
                   whilst driving is forbidden. 
The force has provided vehicle sets  
                   with hands free facilities and these should be used when driving.    
                   The legal implications aside, staff should also consider the image  
                   Presented by Police employees using hand held devices whilst  
                   driving.  
 
 
 
Page 7 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
• 
Appendix 2 - Vehicle and Equipment Checks 
 
 
In order for police drivers to ensure the safety of other road users, comply with road 
traffic legislation and present a professional image, the condition of a police vehicle 
(or vehicle used for police purposes including hire vehicles) is extremely important 
and should never be treated lightly. 
 
 
It is stressed that a vehicle can become a lethal weapon if not carefully maintained 
and driven with safety in mind at all times. All police drivers must take personal 
responsibility for the care of a vehicle in their charge and should adopt a ‘hire car’ 
mentality to checking the condition of a vehicle before and after use. 
 
 
This approach will ensure prompt reporting of faults before they can develop into 
more serious issues and make staff individually accountable for damage sustained 
whilst the vehicle has been under their charge. In addition to ensuring public safety 
this will also contribute to increasing public confidence and sustainability for the force. 
 
 
It is therefore essential that all police drivers habitually comply with the system of 
visual daily / weekly checks as follows: 
 
 
2.1  AT COMMENCEMENT OF EVERY TOUR OF DUTY VISUAL CHECKS TO BE 
CONDUCTED 

 
• 
Exterior of vehicle Damage/defect. 
• 
Wheels and tyres Damage/tread wear/pressure. 
• 
Boot compartment Tools/spare wheel/issued kit and equipment. 
• 
Under bonnet Oil/water/battery/washer bottle/fan belt tension. 
• 
Electrical equipment Lights/indicators/horn/wipers/blue beacon siren system (if 
fitted). 
• 
Interior Seat belts (operation)/fire extinguisher/breath kit/gazetteer/ first aid 
kit/defect or damage to interior fittings. 
• 
Search Vehicle for prohibited articles. 
 
 
Any defects or damage found to be reported immediately and any necessary remedial 
action promptly taken if necessary and appropriate, prior to use. 
 
 
In addition to the handover checks, every 8 days maximum (usually Sunday morning) 
each vehicle will be thoroughly checked and a check sheet completed: 
 
• 
All issued equipment for the vehicle to be taken out, visually inspected, cleaned 
as appropriate and checked for damage or defect. 
• 
Any necessary repairs or replacements to be effected forthwith. 
• 
Supervisor to complete check sheet and forward to appropriate administration 
officer for recording. 
 
In addition to the visual and equipment checks, vehicles should be regularly cleaned 
inside and out. 
 
Page 8 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Appendix 3 - Driver Authorisation and Training 
 
 
The three recognised standards of Police driving, Basic, Standard and Advanced 
have been reviewed nationally and refined to ensure they meet the needs of modern 
policing. The Driving Standards Agency and Department for Transport have endorsed 
these standards as best practice.  
 
 
The National Police Driving Standards were developed in order to ensure that police 
drivers are trained to a common minimum level. The standards are expressed as 
statements of competence for each level of driving requirement. 
 
 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police have adopted these standards and are 
committed to ensuring that all aspects of the training are delivered by appropriately 
qualified trainers. 
 
 
All students must hold a current full DVLA licence for the category of vehicle being 
driven. Students undertaking a police ‘advanced’ driving course will have completed a 
police ‘standard’ driving course. The student/trainer ratio will vary according to the 
type of training, risk assessment and individual needs. 
 
 
Students for all courses will be expected to familiarise themselves with the contents of 
the ‘Highway Code’ and ‘Roadcraft - The Police Driver's Handbook’. 
 
 
All officers & staff attending driver training courses must undergo an eyesight test, 
and complete a medical declaration form confirming fitness to drive. 
 
 
Each Driving Course is designed around competencies. Trainers will aim to teach 
students to drive to a standard that they become competent in all areas.  The 
competency statements are similar to those found in National Vocational 
Qualifications (NVQs). 
 
 
Competence will be objectively assessed on the basis of the observations made. 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police are committed to being an equal 
opportunity employer and will develop students as individuals. No one will receive 
less favourable treatment on the grounds of gender, colour, race, nationality, ethnic or 
national origin, sexual orientation, disability, marital status, religious belief, age or any 
other irrelevant criteria that cannot be objectively justified. 
 
 
All drivers should comply with the legal speed limit and adhere to legislation whilst 
driving and are reminded that there are times when road conditions and or location 
dictate that it is not safe to drive at the prescribed speed limit.  However, when 
operationally justified, e.g. emergency response, proportionate and necessary 
enforcement activity and during authorised driver training.  Police drivers may exceed 
speed limits but should only drive in accordance within the guidelines contained within 
the Section 87 policy. (See Appendix 4) 
 
 
Drivers should remember no emergency or other operational necessity is so urgent as 
to justify a collision. If you are involved in a collision you cannot respond to the 
incident at all. Staff should be aware that they may have to justify their actions as part 
of any post incident investigation. 
 
 
Page 9 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Vehicle Authorisations   
 
 
The Organisation recognises its duty of care to its staff as well as the public at large 
so to ensure this, only correctly authorised drivers should drive vehicles for which they 
have been trained or assessed to drive. 
 
 
In line with Home Office Guidelines demarcation of police vehicles on Warwickshire 
Police and West Mercia Police are based on the Kinetic Energy output expressed as 
PS’, (pferdestarke or Metric horsepower). Warwickshire Police and West Mercia 
Police have a wide range of vehicles for which the two main categories apply: 
 
• 
Standard: Up to and including 150 PS (148 bhp) 
• 
Advanced: Greater than 150 PS (148 bhp) 
 
 
Police drivers are often called upon to drive and manoeuvre varied types of private 
vehicles at incident scenes including many that they are not familiar with. They should 
be mindful of their own driving experience, capability and authorisation when in such 
circumstances and seek to minimise risk at all times. 
 
 
3.1  VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION: 
 
 
All vehicles (except short term hire vehicles) used in Warwickshire Police and West 
Mercia Police will be issued with a coloured key fob that easily identifies the vehicle 
authorisation Band: 
 
AUTHORISATION 
KEY 
AUTHORISATION 
KEY 
BASIC AND STANDARD 
 
ADVANCED 
 
PERSONNEL CARRIER/VAN 
 
SPECIALIST VEHICLE / TOWING 
 
4 X 4 
 
MOTORCYCLE & SCOOTER 
 
 
 
Page 10 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
3.2  VEHICLE GROUPS 
 
VEHICLE GROUPS 
GROUP NUMBER / USER   
VEHICLE 
1A, 1B, 1C, 1D 
 
BASIC CAR 
2A, 2B 
 
STANDARD CAR 
3A, 3B, 3C 
 
ADVANCED CAR (AND SURVEILLANCE) 

 
BASIC MOTORYCLE AND SCOOTER 

 
STANDARD MOTORCYCLE 

 
ADVANCED MOTORCYCLE 
7A, 7B 
 
PERSONNEL CARRIERS (AND D1) 
8A, 8B 
 
PATROL VANS 
(including Light Vans, such as Vauxhall 
Vivaro up to 3.5 tonnes) 

 
PSU VANS 
10 
 
FOUR WHEEL DRIVE (ON ROAD) 
11 
 
FOUR WHEEL DRIVE (OFF ROAD) 
12 
 
PCV 
13 
 
LGV 
14 
 
SPECIALIST VEHICLES 
15 
 
TRAILER TOWING 
16 
See 
SUPERVISOR 
Sec 
3.38 
17 
See 
TRANSPORT DEPARTMENT 
Sec 
3.39 
 
 
At the commencement of every driving course/ assessment, a driver/rider will undergo 
an eyesight test, and is required to show their DVLA driving licence that authorises 
them to take that type of vehicle on the public roads. It is the licence holder’s 
responsibility to immediately inform Driver Training if there are any changes to their 
DVLA authority to drive. 
 
 
The driving authority will expire after 5/10 years as outlined in this procedure.  If 
a refresher has not been taken prior to the end of the 5/10 year period then the 
officer or member of staffs’ driving authority will revert to BASIC until a further 
course / assessment has been completed. 

 
 
Page 11 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
3.3  BASIC AUTHORISATION  
Groups 1A, B, C and D 
 
 
Basic authorisation is awarded following a driving assessment carried out by the 
Driver Training Unit, during which the driver will be assessed on their ability to drive a 
police vehicle safely on a public road. 
 
 
The assessment will be an assessed drive only, with no practical driving instruction 
given. The driver will be de-briefed and given verbal feedback. If required, a 
development action plan will be formulated. 
 
 
The driver will receive advice on vehicle security, checking fluid levels, oil, 
petrol/diesel, coolants, Ramar / Run Lock, vehicle breakdown, and tyre safety checks. 
 
 
Following successful completion of the assessment, the driver is authorised to drive 
police vehicles as outlined below. 
 
 
The driver is authorised to: 
 
• 
Only drive to the speed limit. 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection – when trained. (Group A and B only) 
 
 
The driver is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Exceed any designated speed limit. 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Mode using blue lights/sirens 
• 
Cause any vehicle to stop on the highway 
• 
Engage in any pursuit driving either initial or tactical 
• 
Engage in surveillance driving 
 
 
The Basic Group 1A authorisation is for police officers, the driver is authorised to 
drive marked & unmarked Standard powered police cars and will be issued with a 
written authority. It remains valid until the driver undertakes the Standard Response 
Course or 10 years whichever is the sooner. 
 
 
The Basic Group 1B is for Police Staff/ PCSOs and Special Constables, who have 
been identified to drive Standard powered marked police vehicles during their duty 
time. It remains valid for 10 years, by which time the driver must undertake another 
Basic Assessment. 
 
 
The Basic Group 1C authorisation is for Police Officers/Police staff/ PCSOs/ Special 
Constables and Volunteers to drive police vehicles or lease vehicles of any group 
where it is a requirement of their role – the type/group of vehicle will be specified in 
the authority. It remains valid for 10 years, by which time the driver must undertake 
another Basic Assessment 
 
 
Page 12 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
The Basic Group 1D authorisation is for Police Officers and Special Constables who 
need to stop vehicles as a requirement of their role. The driver’s authority exists as 
previously indicated with the additional element below: 
 
• 
Stop compliant vehicles from the rear only. 
• 
The driver is still restricted in all other elements except  the element illustrated  
• 
Cause any vehicles to stop on Highway 
 
 
The driver is not authorised to pursue any vehicle that fails to stop .They should 
contact Force Control room with relevant details in that circumstance. 
 
 
It remains valid until the driver undertakes the Standard Response Course or 10 
years by which time the driver must undertake another Basic Assessment whichever 
is the sooner. 
 
 
3.4 Non Assessed 
 
 
 Any member of alliance police staff who drive non-liveried cars (category B), (whether 
 
 it is their own, hired, leased or police owned), on police business can do so without 
 
 attending a basic driving assessment. Permission must be gained by the staff  
 
 
 member's line manager or equivalent rank, who must physically check that the photo 
 
 card driving licence is valid in date and address is correct. 
 
 
 The line manager must also instruct the staff member to read and be aware of the 
 
 POWDER check and any other information relevant to driving the vehicle safely i.e. 
 
 Manufacture's Handbook. Information can be accessed on the Intranet, Transport 
 
 Services Strategy, Transport Services.  
 
 
 
3.5  STANDARD RESPONSE -  Non pursuit 
 
 
Group 2A  
 
 
This refers to Police Officers trained to a nationally recognised standard to carry out 
mobile operational patrol duties. 
 
 
This authority is awarded on successful completion of the national ACPO authorised 
Standard Response Driving course. As a result, the driver is able to respond using 
emergency equipment.  
 
 
The principles contained within the Drivers’ National Occupational Standards, 
Roadcraft and the Highway Code will be taught. 
 
 
Following successful completion of the National ACPO Standard Response Driving 
course, the driver is authorised to drive marked/unmarked standard powered police 
cars  for operational uses. 
 
 
The driver is authorised to: 
 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Response mode using blue lights/sirens 
 
Page 13 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
• 
Exceed posted speed limits, where exemptions apply (Reg 87 RTRA 1984) in 
accordance with training guidelines and Force Policy. (See S.4.7, Page 28) 
• 
Cause other vehicles to stop on the Highway. 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection. 
• 
Place out cones/signs at an incident scene. 
• 
Deploy H.O.S.T.Y.D.S. (Stinger) on successful completion of training. 
 
 
The driver is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Engage in any pursuit driving. 
• 
Engage in surveillance driving. 
• 
Engage in pursuit tactics namely TPR and TPAC Tactics. 
• 
Engage in any vehicle familiarisation or driver training outside of any formal driver 
training package. Any training package must be delivered by appropriately trained 
driver trainers. 
 
 
The Standard Response Group 2A authorisation remains valid for five years, by which 
time the driver must undertake the Standard Response Refresher Assessment. (If a 
Group 2B qualification is obtained within the five years the Group 2A authority will be 
extended to coincide with the Group 2B refresher date)   
 
 
3.6  STANDARD RESPONSE:  Initial Pursuit Phase 
 
Group 2B  
 
 
This authority refers to Police Officers with a Group 2A. 
 
 
The principles contained within the Drivers National Occupational Standards, 
Roadcraft and the Highway Code, including national and force pursuit policies will be 
taught. 
  
 
Training will be given in the principles and safety factors of pursuit driving in Standard 
powered cars, according with training guidelines. 
 
 
The authority will be awarded on successful completion of Initial Phase pursuit 
training.  In addition to the drivers Group 2A authorisation the driver is authorised to: 
 
• 
Engage in pursuit driving Initial phase only – in line with training guidelines. 
 
 
The Standard Response (Group 2B) authorisation remains valid for five years, by 
which time the driver must undertake a Standard Response initial Pursuit Refresher 
Course. 
 
 
3.7  ADVANCED RESPONSE:  Non – pursuit 
 
 
Group 3A  
 
 
This authority refers to police officers trained to carry out mobile operational patrol 
duties in vehicles that have a high power, greater than 150 PS output and high speed 
capability. 
 
 
Page 14 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
Police Officers must have successfully completed the Standard Response, preferably 
with recommendation for Advanced training and gained driving experience in an 
operational environment for at least 6 months.  
 
 
Following successful completion of the Advanced Response Course, the driver is 
authorised to drive patrol vehicles, both standard and advanced powered for full 
operational use, excluding 4x4, personnel carrier patrol vans and PSU vans unless 
specifically trained. 
 
 
The principles contained within the Drivers’ National Occupational Standards, 
Roadcraft and the Highway Code will be taught. 
 
 
The driver is authorised to: 
 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Response mode using blue lights/sirens. 
• 
Exceed posted speed limits, where exemptions apply (Reg 87 RTRA 1984) 
according with training guidelines and Force Policy. (See S.4.7, Page 28) 
• 
Cause other vehicles to stop on the highway. 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection. 
• 
Place out cones/signs at an incident scene 
• 
Engage in initial pursuit phase only if trained – in line with training guidelines. 
 
 
The driver is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Engage in surveillance driving (unless the appropriate surveillance driving course 
has been specifically completed). 
• 
Engage in pursuit driving outside of their trained level. 
• 
Engage in any vehicle familiarisation or driver training outside of any formal driver 
training package. Any training package must be delivered by appropriately trained 
driver trainers. 
• 
The Advanced Response (Group 3A) authorisation is valid for five years, by which 
time the Police Officer must undertake an Advanced Refresher Assessment. 
 
 
3.8  ADVANCED RESPONSE TACTICAL PURSUIT  (TPAC) 
Group 3B 
 
 
This section refers to officers authorised for Group 3A. Following successful 
completion of the Advanced TPAC Course the officer is authorised to engage in 
Tactical Pursuit driving. West Mercia officers trained in TPR tactics will retain the 
authority until the expiry of the TPR authorisation. There will be no mixing of TPAC 
and TPR tactics under any circumstances. 

 
 
In addition to the authorities of the drivers Group 3A authorisation. The driver is 
authorised to: 
 
• 
Engage in pursuit driving. Initial and tactical in accordance with training 
guidelines, National and Force Policies. 
 
Page 15 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
 
The Advanced Response Pursuit Group 3B authorisation remains valid for five years 
by which time the Police Officer must undertake an Advanced Response Tactical 
Pursuit, TPAC Refresher. 
 
 
3.9  SURVEILLANCE DRIVING: (See Appendix 6) 
Group 3C  
 
 
This applies to police officers trained to carry out tactical surveillance driving during 
operational policing activities. 
 
 
The police officer must have successfully completed the Advanced Response course 
and the National Level One Surveillance Course. There is no requirement for 
completion of the Advanced Pursuit (Group 3B) course. 
 
 
Following successful completion of the above courses the driver is authorised to drive 
all vehicles designated as such for surveillance driving duties, both standard and 
advanced powered for full operational use within the remit of training undertaken. 
 
 
The Surveillance Driving authorisation (Group 3B) remains valid for five years, by 
which time the driver must undertake an Advanced Refresher Assessment.  
 
 
3.10  BASIC MOTORCYCLE/SCOOTER 
 
 
 
Group 4 
 
 
Basic Motorcycling authority applies following a riding assessment carried out by the 
Driver Training Unit during which the rider will be assessed on their ability to ride a 
motorcycle/scooter safely on a public road. 
 
 
The assessment will be an assessed ride only with no practical riding instruction 
given. The rider will be de-briefed and given verbal feedback. If required, a 
development plan will be formulated. 
 
 
Following successful completion of the assessment, the rider is authorised to ride 
police motorcycles/scooters, both standard and advanced powered, marked and 
unmarked in a non-operational role. This is in accordance with the assessed vehicle, 
i.e. if assessed on a scooter, the individual is authorised to use a police scooter; if 
assessed on a motorcycle, the individual is authorised to use police motorcycles of 
the assessed size for transport purposes only. 
 
 
The rider is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Exceed any posted speed limit or National speed limit. 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Mode using blue lights/sirens. 
• 
Engage in pursuit riding, either Initial or Tactical. 
• 
Engage in any vehicle familiarisation or driver training outside of any formal driver 
training package. Any training package must be delivered by appropriately trained 
driver trainers. 
• 
Engage in any surveillance activities. 
 
 
Page 16 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
The Basic Motorcycling Group 4 authorisation is valid for 10 years, by which time the 
rider must undertake the Standard Motorcycle course or another basic riding 
assessment. 
 
 
Page 17 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
3.11  STANDARD RESPONSE MOTORCYCLE 
 
 
Group 5 
 
 
This authority refers to police officers trained to carry out mobile response duties on a 
motorcycle, and who have completed the ACPO Standard Motorcycle riding course. 
This includes the principles contained within the Drivers’ National Occupational 
Standards, Roadcraft and the Highway Code. 
 
 
Following successful completion of this course the rider is authorised to ride Patrol 
motorcycles for limited operational use. 
 
 
The rider is authorised to: 
 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Response mode using blue lights/sirens 
• 
Exceed posted speed limits, where exemptions apply (Reg 87 RTRA 1984) 
according with training guidelines and Force Policy. (See S.4.7, Page 28) 
• 
Cause other vehicles to stop on the highway. 
• 
Use vehicle for scene protection. 
• 
Place out cones/signs at an incident scene 
• 
Escort Abnormal Loads  (on completion of  relevant training module) 
• 
Ride motorcycles identified for Surveillance riding in a non-surveillance situation, 
e.g. delivery. 
 
 
The rider is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Engage in pursuit riding.  
• 
Engage in surveillance riding. 
• 
Engage in any vehicle familiarisation or driver training outside of any formal driver  
training package. Any training package must be delivered by appropriately trained 
driver trainers. 
 
 
The Standard Response Motorcycle (Group 5) authorisation is valid for five years by 
which time the rider must undertake a refresher assessment. 
 
 
3.12  ADVANCED RESPONSE MOTORCYCLES 
 
 
Group 6 
 
 
This authority applies to police officers trained to carry out mobile operational 
response duties on motorcycles with a high power output and high speed capability. 
 
 
The police officer must have completed a Standard Response Motorcycle course and 
gained experience in an operational environment for at least six months. 
 
 
Following completion of the ACPO Advanced Motorcycle course, the rider is 
authorised to ride patrol motorcycles, for full operational use. 
 
 
Page 18 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
In addition to the Group 5 authorities the rider is authorised to: 
 
• 
Exceed designated speed limits, where exemptions apply (Reg 87 RTRA 1984) in 
line with training guidelines and Force Policy, and Force Policy. (See S.4.7, Page 
28) 
• 
Engage in Pursuit riding in a reporting role only in accordance with force policy 
and training. 
 
 
The Advanced Response Motorcycle (Group 6) authorisation remains valid for five 
years, by which time the rider must undertake an Advanced Response Motorcycle 
Refresher course. If not operational for a period of 6 months, then their continued 
authority will be reviewed by driver training. 
 
Off Road Motorcycle Authority 
 
Off Road is defined as where a metal road or track does not exist or the road is 
covered in snow or water. This is a riding authority that is granted after successfully 
completing the Off Road training Course. The continued authority is subject to 
recording and completing a riding log book in line with driving school guidelines. The 
authority is valid for 5 years but if an officer does not ride off road for a period of 6 
months then their continued authority will be reviewed by driver training. 
 
 
 
3.13  PERSONNEL CARRIERS – (Standard Response)   
Group 7A 
 
D1 Category – DVLA Licence: 
 
 
This authority applies to police officers carrying out mobile operational patrol duties in 
vehicles that can carry more than eight but not more than sixteen people in addition to 
the driver. 
 
 
The police officer is at least 21 year of age, having completed the Standard Response 
Course either Group 2A or 2B, and hold a valid DVLA Driving Licence including 
category D1 prior to Personnel Carrier training. 
 
 
On successful completion of the Personnel Carrier driving course, the driver is 
authorised to drive these vehicles for a wide range of operational uses. 
 
For authorities for this group see section 3.27 below. 
 
 
3.14  PATROL VANS – (Standard Response) 
 
 
Group 8A 
 
B Category - DVLA Licence 
 
 
This authority applies to Police Officers carrying out mobile operational police patrol 
duties in vehicles that can carry a maximum of eight persons in addition to the driver. 
 
 
The Police Officer must have completed the Standard Response Course either Group 
2A or 2B prior to Patrol Van training and assessment, and hold a full, valid DVLA 
driving licence, which includes Category B. 
 
 
On successful completion of the Patrol Van driving course the driver is authorised to 
use such vehicles for a wide range of operational purposes.  
 
 
 
Page 19 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
 
3.15  Groups 7A and 8A authorities: 
 
 
The driver is authorised to: 
 
• 
Drive at a normal maximum speed of 50 mph on two lane undivided and 
unrestricted roads, having designated speed limits of 60mph. 
• 
Drive at a normal maximum speed of 60 mph on dual carriageways having 
designated speed limits of 70 mph. 
• 
Drive at a maximum of 70 mph on motorways. 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Response mode using blue lights/sirens. 
• 
Exceed posted speed limits, where exemptions apply (Reg 87 RTRA 1984), in line 
with training guidelines, up to a maximum of 80 mph on all roads for personnel 
carriers as defined under Group 7A. 
• 
Cause other vehicles to stop on the Highway. 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection. 
• 
Place out cones/signs at the scene of an incident. 
• 
Engage in pursuit driving, in the Initial Phase only if: 
1.  The driver is already qualified as a minimum to standard response initial 
pursuit phase.  
2.  Patrol Van, Group 8A, is marked as a police vehicle, with audible / visual 
warning equipment. Personnel Carriers, Group 7A, are not authorised to be 
used in any stage of a pursuit. 
 
 
The driver is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Engage in surveillance driving. 
• 
Engage in any vehicle familiarisation or driver training outside of any formal driver   
training package. Any training package must be delivered by appropriately trained 
driver trainers. 
 
 
The Carrier/Patrol Van Groups 7A and  8A authorisations are valid for five years, by 
which time the driver must undertake a formal driving Refresher Assessment.   
 
 
3.16  PERSONNEL CARRIERS – (Basic Authority) 
Group 7B 
 
D1 Category – DVLA Licence 
 
 
This authority applies to Police Staff, PCSOs and Special Constables driving vehicles 
with the capacity to carry more than eight persons in addition to the driver. 
 
 
The driver must hold a full, valid DVLA Driving Licence, which includes Category D1. 
 
 
On successful completion of the Personnel Carrier driving course, the driver is 
authorised to drive these vehicles for police purposes.  
 
 
 
 
Page 20 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
 
 
3.17  PATROL VANS – (Basic Authority)  
 
 
 
Group 8B 
 
Category B - DVLA Licence 
 
 
This authority allows Police Staff/ PCSOs and Special Constables to drive vehicles 
that can carry a maximum of eight persons, in addition to the driver. 
 
 
The driver must hold a full, valid DVLA Driving Licence that includes Category B. 
 
 
On completion of the Patrol Van Driving Course the driver is authorised to use such 
vehicles for police purposes. 
 
 
 
 
3.18  Group 7B and 8B authorities: 
 
 
The driver is authorised to: 
 
• 
Drive at a maximum speed of 50 mph on two lane undivided and unrestricted 
roads, having designated speed limits of 60 mph.  
• 
Drive at a maximum speed of 60 mph on dual carriageways having a designated 
speed limit of 70 mph 
• 
Drive at a maximum speed of 70 mph on a motorway. 
 
 
The driver is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Mode using blue lights/sirens 
• 
Exceed any posted speed limit. 
• 
Cause other vehicles to stop on the Highway. 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection (unless trained) 
• 
Place out signs/cones at an incident scene (unless trained) 
• 
Engage in any vehicle familiarisation or driver training outside of any formal driver 
training package. Any training package must be delivered by appropriately trained   
driver trainers. 
 
 
The Carrier / Patrol Van – (Basic Authority) Groups 7B and 8B authorisations are 
valid for 10 years, by which time the driver must undertake a formal driving Refresher 
Assessment. 
 
 
3.18  PSU VANS   
 
 
 
 
 
 
Group 9 
 
 
This applies to police officers driving PSU vans in PSU conditions. To undertake the 
PSU Van Driving Course officers must have a full and valid DVLA driving licence with 
D1 category, have completed PSU training and the Personnel Carriers Group7A 
Course.  
 
 
(Standard drivers should be “recommended” following their Standard Response 
Course). On completion of the PSU Van driving course the driver is authorised to use 
 
Page 21 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
such vehicles for a wide range of operational purposes as per Group 7A and in PSU 
conditions as trained. 
 
 
The authorisation for PSU vans is valid for five years, by which time a formal driving 
refresher asessment must be completed.  
 
 
3.19  FOUR WHEEL DRIVE: On Road 
 
 
Group 10 
 
 
This authority applies to police officers/ police staff/ PCSOs/ Special Officers who are 
required to drive a vehicle fitted with permanent or selectable four-wheel drive. 
 
 
Training includes the correct use of the High & Low Ratio gear boxes, handling 
characteristics and other non-standard equipment whilst on-road.  
 
 
Police Officers must have completed the Standard Response Course, as a pre-
requirement for the course. Police Staff /PCSOs/ Special Officers should have a basic 
authority to drive police vehicles. 
 
 
On completion of the Four Wheel Drive (on road) Course the driver is authorised to 
drive such vehicles marked or unmarked in accordance with their training. 
 
 
Police officers are authorised to: 
 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Response Mode using  blue lights/sirens 
• 
Exceed posted limits, where exemptions apply (Reg 87 RTRA 1984) in line with 
training guidelines and Force Policy, (See S.4.7, Page 28). 
• 
Cause other vehicles to stop on the Highway. 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection. 
• 
Place out signs/cones at an incident scene.  
• 
Engage in a pursuit or initial pursuit, only if already appropriately trained to so do 
as an Advanced or Standard driver, and the vehicle is equipped with Force radio 
equipment and audible and visual emergency equipment. 
• 
Engage in Surveillance driving if already qualified to so do through Advanced 
driving and Surveillance courses. 
• 
In exceptional circumstances where there are no trained Group 11 officers 
available and a dynamic risk assessment has been carried out and documented 
by a supervisor, the officer may use the vehicle on roads that are covered in snow 
or water (the force risk assessment re driving through water must be adhered to). 
 
 
Police staff/ PCSOs/ Special Officers are not authorised to: 
 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Response mode using blue lights & sirens. 
• 
Exceed any posted speed limit. 
• 
Cause other vehicles to stop on the Highway. 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection, unless appropriately trained. 
• 
Place out cones/signs at an incident scene, unless appropriately trained. 
 
Page 22 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
• 
Engage in pursuit driving. 
• 
Engage in surveillance driving. 
 
 
The Four Wheel Drive: On-road (Group 10) authorisation is valid for five years, by 
which time the driver must undertake a formal driving Refresher Assessment. 
 
 
3.20  Four Wheel Drive: Off-Road 
 
 
 
 
Group 11 
 
 
This authority allows police officers/police staff/ PCSOs/ Special Officers, who have 
previously attended four wheel drive on-road training, to drive a vehicle fitted with 
permanent or selectable four wheel drive, in an Off-Road situation. “Off-road” is 
defined as where a metal road or track does not exist or the road is covered in snow 
or water. 
 
 
Training is given in the correct use of the High & Low Ratio gearboxes, handling 
characteristics and other non-standard equipment. Emphasis is placed on safety 
issues surrounding taking a vehicle into an off-road situation. 
 
 
On completion of the ‘Off road’ course the driver is authorised to use the vehicle off-
road and comply with the training received. 
 
 
The Four-wheel drive: Off-road (group 11) authorisation is valid for five years, by 
which time the driver must undertake four wheel drive: Off-road Refresher 
Assessment.  
 
 
3.21  Passenger Carrying Vehicles (PCV)    
 
 
Group 12 
 
D Category - DVLA Driving Licence 
 
 
There is no in-house PCV training for drivers of vehicles for the carriage of 
passengers with seats for more than sixteen in addition to the driver. As a result, any 
driver, using such a vehicle on behalf of the force will do so under the conditions and 
restrictions surrounding Category D on a full, valid DVLA Driving Licence, which must 
be shown to a supervisor before driving such a vehicle. 
 
 
3.22  Small and Large Goods Vehicle (LGV) 
 
Group 13 
 
C1 and C Category - DVLA Driving Licence 
 
 
There is no in-house LGV training for drivers of vehicles over 3.5 or 7.5 tonnes 
constructed or adapted for the carriage of goods. Any driver, using such a vehicle on 
behalf of the force will do so under the conditions and restrictions surrounding 
Category C on a full, valid DVLA Driving Licence, which must be shown to a 
supervisor before driving such a vehicle. 
 
 
3.23  SPECIALIST VEHICLES    
 
 
 
 
Group 14  
 
 
Any driver required to drive a vehicle outside the specified groups 1-13 above will be 
issued with a “Specialist Vehicle” authorisation, applicable to the particular vehicle’s 
non-standard construction, adaptation, use or load carry capability. 
 
 
Page 23 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
The authority will be issued following consultation with the Driver Training Unit and 
the Head of Transport Services, who will decide on the appropriate driver training 
necessary. 
 
 
The duration of validity of the Specialist Vehicle (Group 14) authorisation is variable 
depending on the expected use and availability of the vehicle. 
 
 
3.24  TOWING TRAILERS/CARAVANS 
 
 
 
Group 15 
 
BE Category – DVLA Driving Licence 
 
 
This authority allows drivers to tow trailers on behalf of the force and is issued on 
completion of the Trailer Towing Course, delivered by Driver Training. 
 
 
The driver must have a full, valid DVLA Driving Licence, including the towing of 
trailers/caravans, Category BE. Where a driver does not hold this category then 
additional training can be provided by the Driver Training Department. 
 
 
Police Officer drivers must have completed as a minimum the Basic driving 
assessment. Police staff/ PCSOs/ Special constables must have completed the basic 
assessment authorisation before attending the course. 
 
 
On completion of the course, all drivers must abide by the restrictions on use detailed 
in their training. In addition the driver is responsible for checking the following: 
 
• 
The intended use / design / purpose. 
• 
Weight capacity. 
• 
Any relevant speed restrictions. 
• 
All lights and attachments are in full working order. 
• 
The security of any load carried. 
 
 
Whilst towing a trailer or caravan the driver is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Respond in the Emergency Mode, using blue lights/sirens. 
• 
Exceed any posted speed limits. 
• 
Cause other vehicle to stop on the carriageway. 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection. 
• 
Engage in pursuits of any kind either Initial or Tactical. 
• 
Engage in Surveillance Driving. 
 
 
The Trailer towing authorisation Group 15 is valid for 10 years, by which time the 
driver must undertake another Trailer assessment. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Page 24 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
3.25  SUPERVISORS 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Group 16 
 
 
Police Officers who are in a substantive or acting/ temporary supervisory role, who 
have qualified as Standard drivers, but not completed the Advanced Course, may 
drive advanced category vehicles when no other vehicle is available. 
 
 
The Supervisor is only authorised: 
 
• 
To drive in accordance with their Group 2A and 2B authorities. 
 
 
The Supervisor is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Drive vehicles in any other groups without the necessary training and 
authorisation. 
 
 
The Supervisors authorisation is valid for five years, by which time the driver must 
undertake a Standard Response Refresher Course. 
 
 
3.26  TRANSPORT STAFF 
 
 
 
 
 
Group 17 
 
 
A member of Transport staff following a Basic Assessment, and is authorised to drive, 
marked and unmarked police vehicles. 
 
 
Following successful completion of the assessment, the driver will be authorised to 
drive any vehicle on behalf of the force on public roads in accordance with their DVLA 
licence. 
 
 
Since the driver may frequently be in a marked car, training will be provided in scene 
safety measures due to the increased likelihood of encountering an incident. 
 
 
The driver is not authorised to: 
 
• 
Exceed any designated speed limit. 
• 
Respond in the emergency response mode (use blue lights/sirens). 
• 
Cause other vehicles to stop on the Highway. 
• 
Engage in any pursuit driving. 
• 
Engage in surveillance driving. 
 
 
On completion of Scene Safety training, the driver will be authorised to: 
 
• 
Use the vehicle for scene protection. 
• 
Place out cones/signs at an incident scene. 
 
 
The authorisation for Transport personnel is valid for 10 years, by which time re-
assessment is required. 
 
 
 
Page 25 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
3.27  Transferees:  
 
 
Police officers, Special Constables, PCSOs and Police Staff transferring into 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police will be subject to an induction process 
before any driving authority is granted.  
 
 
All staff transferring into force will be required to produce a current DVLA driving 
licence and will be subject to an eyesight test. Dependant on an individual’s job 
description a pass may also be required in theory examinations of Response and 
Pursuit and/or Highway Code before any driving authority is granted. Transferees 
subject to their current driving authority (confirmed with documentary evidence from 
previous force) may also be required to undergo a driving assessment in line with 
their intended role and job description. 
 
 
3.28  Refresher Training / Lapse of driving authority: 
 
 
Health and Safety legislation demands that all skills are reassessed regularly and 
that, where appropriate, suitable refresher training should be given. Line managers 
should take a positive role in identifying and dealing with any concerns highlighted 
about driving standards. They should identify incidents of poor driving, recklessness, 
cavalier attitude or abuse of speed guidance which could trigger the need for 
reassessment and / or refresher training. 
 
Driver training may train officers and staff in vehicles that are available at the time of 
the driving courses/assessments for a driving authority when the usual vehicles are 
not available but this must similar in characteristics but not power. This will be on the 
authority of the Team leader. 
 
 
 
All Standard and Advanced drivers must successfully complete a refresher 
course up to a maximum of five years from the date of their authorisation to 
retain their driving authority.
 A failure to do so will result in the authority being 
removed pending successful completion of the course. Refresher training for 
Standard / Advanced drivers will be delivered by Driver Training. 
 
 
For any member of staff to retain a particular driving authority it is essential that they 
maintain their skills in an operational environment. It is not acceptable for an 
individual to claim occupational competence on the basis that they drive a certain type 
of vehicle on an adhoc basis. A driver must exercise the skills in driving the type or 
category of vehicle in operational circumstances within a rolling 12 month period or 
that authority will lapse. 
 
 
One day Standard / Advanced Assessment: All police officers and staff who are 
required to undertake the formal one day assessment must provide evidence of 
driving activities and experience for all of the vehicle types that they are authorised to 
drive. In addition there will be knowledge based questions relating to each vehicle 
category. This evidence can be produced from ORIGIN together with any other 
practical examples available. This formal assessment will not cover specialist areas of 
training, including: 
 
 
  Initial and Tactical Pursuit accreditation. 
       HOSTYDS, use and deployment. 
 
Page 26 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
       Surveillance. 
       Motorcycles of all categories. 
       Towing. 
       VIP / Cat A escort. 
       4 x 4 Off Road. 
 
 
 On completion of the assessment police officers and staff will be assessed on their on   
 going authority to drive vehicles in different categories. All authorities must be current   
 at the time of the assessment and sufficient evidence has to be provided to the    
 assessor to confirm operational experience. Where appropriate and where sufficient 
 competence is evidenced then multiple vehicle categories will be awarded. 
        
 
 
3.29  Seat Belts: 
 
 
All staff are reminded of the need to wear seat belts at all times when travelling in a 
motor vehicle, either on or off road. Police officers should be aware of the occasions 
when they may choose to apply the exemption to wearing seat belts whilst traveling in 
motor vehicles. 
 
 
 
3.30  Wheels / Tyres: 
 
 
All officers and staff should check their vehicles in accordance with the 
manufacturer’s handbook and their training. Any defect should be reported and 
appropriate action taken. 
 
 
If a puncture occurs, staff should only attempt to change a wheel if they regard 
themselves as fully competent and suitably equipped to so do. The circumstances 
should be dynamically risk assessed. After changing the wheel, arrangements must 
be made to have the wheel nuts correctly torqued. This should be carried out by the 
Transport Department or an accredited force tyre supplier. 
 
 
Page 27 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Appendix 4 - Section 87 Exemption Notices: 
 
 
The legal basis for this section of the Driving Standards Policy is contained in Section 
87 Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984, as amended by the Road Safety Act 2006 which 
states: No statutory provision imposing a speed limit on motor vehicles shall 
apply to any vehicle on an occasion when it is being used for Fire Brigade, 
Ambulance or Police purposes, including training, if the observance of that 
provision would be likely to hinder the use of the vehicle for which it is being 
used on that occasion. 

 
 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police recognise the primacy of public safety 
and its responsibility in that regard. It accepts that any use of a police or other 
emergency service vehicle in excess of the speed limit increases the danger to other 
road users and to the safety of all emergency services’ staff. 
 
 
Training in this context is interpreted to mean a formal training course, driving 
assessment or check drive with an accredited driver trainer. Under no 
circumstances will drivers be considered for an exemption outside this remit. In 
addition the exemptions will not apply to any vehicle familiarisation undertaken 
by an officer or member of police staff. 

 
 
The public has a right to expect that public servants do not abuse their position, and 
that public servants do not assume they have an automatic right to exemption.  
Similarly, staff have a right to guidelines on how best to undertake their work, and full 
support when conscientiously serving within those guidelines.  
 
 
This policy is aimed at all police officers and police staff working within Warwickshire 
Police and West Mercia Police who are required within their role to drive Police 
Vehicles and or hire vehicles used for a policing purpose. It outlines the conditions 
where discretion will be exercised not to pursue a prosecution in light of the statutory 
exemption. It is open to Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police to consider a 
range of managed interventions where it appears that this policy may have been 
breached. Such interventions will range from management support based upon 
the circumstances, low level advice and temporary removal of driving 
authorization through to investigation that could result in the permanent 
removal of authority and internal disciplinary action. In the most serious cases 
prosecution through the courts will be considered based upon the 
circumstances. 

 
 
It is Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police’s position that any of its staff  
driving in excess of the speed limit should only have done so following a clear 
decision based upon Necessity, Proportionality and Reasonableness in light of 
the circumstances existing at the time.
 As a result it will be expected that those 
drivers will make appropriate use of visual and audible warning equipment available 
together with driving training to minimise danger to other road users. Due 
consideration must be given to the purpose to which the vehicle is being used and to 
whether driving within the speed limit will hinder the purpose to which the vehicle is 
being put. Each case will need to be considered on its merits due to the large number 
of factors informing the necessary risk assessment for driving at speed for emergency 
service purposes.   
 
 
Page 28 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
Case law indicates that the exemption is still available not withstanding that the 
vehicle is not displaying blue lights or making use of other warning equipment 
available and that the purpose does not have to be an emergency call involving the 
public. The test is not a self-fulfilling one of being in a hurry. The "need" to speed 
cannot be based on the drivers own fault or mere wish to engage in more work or 
tasks than would not be possible if complying with the limit. Similarly, the test 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police will apply is not merely whether the 
vehicle was being used for legitimate emergency services purposes, but whether 
there was a legitimate reason for it to be used at a speed in excess of the limit for 
those purposes. 
 
 
While an exemption from adhering to speed limits exist, there still remains a statutory 
requirement to maintain safety margins. The use of the exemption needs to be 
Reasonable, Necessary and Proportionate in the circumstances, at that time. Legal 
exemptions do not include driving at a speed or in a manner which would amount to 
driving without due care and attention or dangerous driving.  In the Court of Appeal 
case (R v Bannister [2009]) the court prohibited a jury from taking into account a 
police officer’s skill and training in determining whether the driving was dangerous.  
As a result, a police officer cannot argue that their driving ought not to be considered 
dangerous because he had the skills to deal with the apparent hazards.   
 
 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police have imposed Maximum speeds for 
some driver grades. These are detailed as: 
 
Basic Authorisation:  Drivers are NOT authorised to exercise any exemptions 
under S.87 Road Traffic Regulations 1984.  
 
Standard Drivers: 
Maximum 2 x The Posted speed limit with a Maximum of 90 
mph on Single Carriageway Roads, eg, 
 
 
40 mph in a posted 20 mph area. 
 
60 mph in a posted 30 mph area. 
 
80 mph in a posted 40 mph area. 
 
 
Where there is a posted 50 mph the Maximum authorised 
speed is 90 mph. 
 
 
Single Carriageway where National speed limit applies, 
Maximum authorised speed is 90 mph. 
 
 
100 mph Maximum speed on dual carriageways and 
Motorways where the officer is authorised and suitably trained 
to be deployed to these roads. 
 
 
These speeds are the Maximum permitted speeds for 
Standard Grade Drivers. In many cases it will be 
necessary to travel at speeds much lower than those 
detailed above due to the prevailing environmental 
factors present at the time. In line with their training It will 
be essential for the driver to apply the tests of 
NECESSITY, PROPORTIONALITY and 
REASONABLENESS to their actions together with an on 

 
Page 29 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
going Risk Assessment. In all cases it is the individual 
driver who will be responsible for their actions.
  Where it 
is established that these maximum speeds have been 
exceeded then there will be management intervention as 
detailed above. 
 
Advanced Drivers: 
The requirement for limits in relation to Advanced Drivers has 
been removed in light of the higher level of training delivered 
to them and their experience. This means that the individual 
officer will be responsible for justifying the Necessity, 
Proportionality and Reasonableness
 of their actions and 
the associated speeds.  Where there is no operational 
justification for exceeding the speed limit then speed limits will 
be adhered to. 
 
Personnel Carriers: 
As per 3.27.1 on Pages 22-23 these vehicles are restricted to 
Maximum speed of 80 mph on all roads due to their design 
and handling characteristics. 
 
 
Drivers must apply an ongoing dynamic risk assessment when driving and 
often it will be necessary to travel at much lower speeds than those set out 
above to maintain safety margins, as the maximum speed may be too fast 
dependent upon the prevailing conditions, location, and circumstances. 

 
Procedure: 
 
 
When vehicles are recorded exceeding the speed limit via Safer Roads Partnership 
Technology, actionable subject to service level agreement, Recorded vehicle data, 
Complaint or Endorsable Fixed Penalty ticket the following procedure must be 
undertaken in order to facilitate any appropriate exemption from the alleged offence. 
 
 
A Notice of Intended Prosecution (or combined Notice of Intended Prosecution and 
Conditional Offer) will be sent to the Registered Keeper of the vehicle involved. The 
Registered Keeper should comply with the legislation relating to the duty to provide 
information. 
 
 
If the vehicle is identified as a vehicle being used for policing purposes a senior officer 
/ Manager / Supervisor will arrange for an examination of the use to which that vehicle 
was being put at the time and date of the alleged offence. If on completion of the 
examination that person is satisfied the evidence supports a request for exemption 
under Section 87 the request will be conveyed to the Central Ticket Office with 
supporting documentation. 
 
 
A Decision Maker at the Central Ticket Office will review the evidence and consider 
withdrawing the section 172 notice. If the notice is to be withdrawn written 
confirmation will be sent to the Senior Officer / Manager / Supervisor. This will confirm 
that the original offence is no longer being pursued. 
 
 
Where the evidence provided to the Decision maker does not fit the criteria for 
exemption the Central Ticket Office will provide the necessary documentation to 
complete the legislative process. 
 
 
Page 30 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
If the vehicle is identified as a vehicle being used for policing purposes a Police 
Superintendent should arrange for an examination of the circumstances in relation to 
the use of the vehicle at the time and date of the alleged offence. 
 
 
They will ensure the Section 172 notice is complied with. (Full name of driver 
required) and if satisfied that the circumstances support an exemption under the 
criteria set out within this document they must sign an Exemption Certificate in 
support of the driver. 
 
 
A copy of the evidence considered in support of the exemption plus the signed 
exemption certificate should be returned to the Central Ticket Office Manager. 
Potential evidence could include the Incident report and/or Operational Information 
System log. Normally a report from the driver giving detailed reasoning for his/her 
request for exemption (i.e. outlining circumstances and reasoning behind decision to 
exceed speed limit, along with measures taken to control risk to the public). 
 
 
Where supporting evidence comprises of sensitive information which would not in 
normal circumstances be released into the public domain the officer supporting the 
exemption should clearly outline this on the certificate. The information must be 
retained by the officer supporting the exemption for auditing purposes. 
 
 
In the case of a police driver’s request for exemption being refused at any stage, or 
where its initial endorsement appears inconsistent with the force’s corporate 
approach, the matter may be forwarded by any party via the Superintendent (Criminal 
Justice Support Department) to the Deputy Chief Constable for a final decision. 
 
 
In cases where the exemption is not signed the Central Ticket Office will ensure the 
driver is in receipt of the appropriate paperwork to complete the legislative process. 
 
 
In cases where the above procedure does not result in the identification of the driver 
the corporate body is liable to prosecution under Section 172 Road Traffic Act 
1988(as amended) which places an obligation on a corporate body to maintain 
accurate records of drivers for fleet vehicles. The decision to lay an information in 
these circumstances will be sanctioned by the Deputy Chief Constable. 
 
Nothing in the above procedure overrides the right of the driver to request a court 
hearing in relation to the alleged offence. 
 
 
Page 31 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Appendix 5 - Road Traffic Incidents / Repetitive NIP Issue Process: 
 
 
It is essential that the manner of police driving is kept to the highest standard at all 
times and that the safety of the public is paramount. 
 
 
All motor vehicles that are owned or under the control of Warwickshire Police and 
West Mercia Police are covered by third party insurance only. This means that in the 
event of a road traffic collision where the force is considered blameworthy, existing 
cover only provides compensation to third parties. As such, any damage to police 
vehicles (where the force is to blame or the cause is unknown), is paid for from 
existing force budgets. 
 
 
Under the sustainability strategy, the force is seeking to reduce waste, i.e. 
expenditure that does not directly contribute to the protection of our communities. 
Damage to police vehicles can be an unavoidable consequence of taking appropriate 
and proportionate operational action in the apprehension of offenders or the 
prevention of offences. However, there is evidence to suggest that police drivers 
could do more to reduce the frequency and nature of the damage. 
 
 
Road traffic collisions involving police vehicles are not only costly but can also have a 
negative impact on public confidence where the standard of driving has fallen below 
that expected. 
 
 
It is also important that police drivers understand that there is a clear and transparent 
process, which will be followed on every occasion that they are either: 
 
• 
Involved in a road traffic collision or. 
• 
Are subject to repetitive Notices of Intended Prosecution or, 
• 
Where concern is raised about the standard of their driving. 
 
 
Where the driver of a police vehicle is involved in a road traffic collision (RTC), the 
line manager investigating should grade the incident in accordance with the criteria 
attached and take action as shown. 
 
 
Collisions should be fully investigated by managers using available investigative tools 
such as force vehicle examiners and collision investigators. There should be an audit 
trail from initial investigation to local / team Inspector to TPMU/Decision maker. This 
process will be linked to the reporting process to the fleet manager with a clear audit 
trail. 
 
 
Drivers must be aware that they are not above the law and where the manner of their 
driving falls short of the standards expected, consideration will be given to temporary 
or permanent removal of authority, misconduct proceedings / prosecution. 
 
 
Where the installed data recording device fitted to the vehicle has not activated then 
consideration should be given to manually activating it. If in any doubt supervisory 
advice should be sought immediately. When activated arrangements must be made to 
download the data.  
 
 
 
Page 32 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Grade 
Criteria 
Action re Driver 
A1 
Serious Injury/fatality to any person 
•  Consider CIU callout and full investigation. 
And or 
•  Immediate withdrawal of driving authorisation 
Extensive damage to vehicle and or Property. 
pending review. 
Blame attached to police driver and or 
•  Report to department head and Driver Training. 
manner of driving considered unreasonable. 
•  Formal driving assessment and further course if 
necessary. 
•  Entry on Driving Record. 
A2 
Serious injury/fatality to any person 
•  Consider CIU callout and full investigation. 
And or 
•  Report to department head and Driver Training. 
Extensive damage to vehicle and or property 
•  Formal driving assessment and further course if 
No blame attached to the driver. 
considered necessary and proportionate by all 
interested parties. 
•  Entry on Driving Record. 
B1 
Injury to any person 
•  Consider CIU callout and full investigation. 
And or 
•  Immediate withdrawal of driving authorisation 
Damage caused to any vehicle/property. 
pending review. 
Blame attached to police driver and or 
•  Report to department head and Driver Training. 
manner of driving considered unreasonable. 
•  Formal driving assessment and further course if 
necessary. 
•  Entry on Driving Record. 
B2 
Injury to any person  
•  Consider CIU callout and investigation. Pursuit 
and or  
Review B40 submitted for TPAC. 
Damage caused to any vehicle/property 
•  Report to Driver Training. 
including TPAC tactic. 
•  Entry on Driving Record. 
No blame attached to police driver. 
B3 
3 x Injury/damage RTC’s in a rolling 12 
•  Formal assessment by Driver Training and course 
month period. 
if necessary. 
C1 
Damage to police vehicle beyond the driver’s 
•  Supervision to attend and deal as a POLAC. 
control, eg police vehicle rammed. 
•  PVD1 (insurance) damage report. 
D1 
Concern raised by staff witnessing poor 
•  Supervision intervention and resolution of 
driving behaviour. Also complaints from 
complaint. 
members of the public re driving 
behaviour/standard. 
•  Consider suspension of authorisation, temporary 
or permanent. 
•  Formal assessment by Driver training. 
E1 
Repetitive issue of NIP’s. 
•  Each NIP to be subject of separate Exemption 
report where appropriate. 
•  Formal assessment/refresher through Driver 
Training if considered necessary. 
 
 
Appendix 6 – Surveillance Driving: 
 
 
The nature of Mobile Surveillance means that the driver should be unaware of the 
police presence. However the tactics employed often calls for surveillance drivers to 
make progress out of the subjects view to ensure that contact is maintained. Although 
 
Page 33 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
surveillance driving does not seek to emulate a pursuit, the circumstances under 
which surveillance drivers carry out their duty will require the same degree of 
proficiency as pursuit driving. 
 
 
The National Pursuit Codes of Practice (See Appendix 9) draws attention to the 
proportionality, necessity and intrusion of the decision to continue to pursue a Subject 
vehicle and the personal responsibility that a police driver has in such circumstances. 
Given the similarity in the driving conditions the same criteria will apply to a 
surveillance driver. 
 
 
Only officers who are appropriately trained and who have attained advanced driving 
grades should take part in mobile surveillance. Members of the force Surveillance 
Unit are the only unit in Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police who can carry 
out mobile surveillance. Drivers will be trained in mobile surveillance as outlined in the 
APCO Manual of Surveillance Standards. 
 
 
Unmarked cars, capable of performance at high speeds and covertly fitted with fully 
operational emergency warning beacons and audible warning systems will be 
supplied for the use in mobile surveillance. 
 
 
Surveillance drivers should give due consideration to notification of respective Force 
Control Room or Motorway Control Room, where actions may impact on the 
respective force resources. 
 
 
6.1   Deciding factors when making progress in surveillance operations: 
 
 
One of the first factors when making progress out of the view of a subject is the 
covertness of surveillance drivers and their vehicles. Exceeding speed limits and 
making unusual manoeuvres may in themselves draw attention to the presence of a 
surveillance vehicle. This would be counter productive, especially when repeatedly 
operating in a local area or where counter surveillance may be active. 
 
 
Any action taken by a surveillance driver has to be proportionate, necessary and least 
intrusive to the operational objectives and the offence being investigated. The gravity 
of the offence has to be set against a risk assessment, the responsibility of which 
rests with the surveillance driver. 
 
 
The safety of everyone, which includes the subject driver and any passengers carried 
in/on the subject vehicle, police personnel, other roads users and the general public is 
of paramount importance. 
 
 
Consideration has to be taken of the weather and road conditions, topography of the 
area and any other relevant factors, which increase the risks beyond an acceptable 
limit. In built up areas, once full consideration has been given, excess speed should 
be used in short controlled measures, minimising the dangers identified. 
 
 
Training and operational discipline will generally achieve the operational objectives 
and the expectations of a surveillance driver will be based on these practices. 
 
 
There will never be any expectations of a surveillance driver to take unnecessary 
risks in order to maintain operational objectives. He / she must accept responsibility 
 
Page 34 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
for their actions and the fact that they are involved in mobile surveillance will not 
reduce their liability in law. 
 
 
Where video evidence is obtained the tape may be used as an exhibit and should be 
retained in accordance with disclosure rules. 
 
 
6.2  Training: 
 
 
There is a need to replicate operational conditions within a safe training environment 
to enable students to develop skills.  
 
 
A balance has to be made between creating a realistic training scenario, 
proportionality and necessity of actions taken and the safety of all road users. Public 
safety must always take priority over police training. 
 
 
The driver and not the trainer will always take responsibility in the safe use of a motor 
vehicle on a public road. The driver will draw from his / her training and experience 
when making decisions affecting the safety of other road users and occupants within 
the vehicle. Trainers will provide feedback regarding the appropriate use of any 
manoeuvre effecting surveillance tactics or issues over general road safety. 
 
 
Excess Speed: No specific limit will be set authorising the use of excess speed, as 
circumstances will vary in each case but the manner of driving must never constitute 
Dangerous Driving. 
 
 
Contravening Traffic Signs / Signals: Similarly no specific guidance can be given on 
this issue, but as a general rule extreme care should be taken when contravening 
prohibitive instructions. In a training environment, red traffic signals, one-way streets, 
no entry, stop signs and give way signs are to be observed. 
 
 
6.3  Pursuit and Grave Circumstances: 
 
 
The fundamental aspect of surveillance is that the driver is unaware that he / she is 
being followed. 
 
 
Circumstances may arise where a surveillance subject becomes aware of the 
presence of a surveillance operation and his / her driving behaviour may 
consequently deteriorate, endangering other road users. At this point the senior 
surveillance officer in charge of the surveillance operation will categorise this aspect 
as a pursuit and the force pursuit policy will then apply (Appendix 8). 
 
 
The senior surveillance officer in charge of the surveillance operation will terminate 
the surveillance at this point. 
 
 
Only in the gravest of circumstances will surveillance vehicles engage in a pursuit, 
with the intention of affecting the arrest of the occupants of the vehicle for indictable 
offences, or to prevent the commission of such offences, examples include murder, 
rape, kidnap or similar offences such as terrorism or firearm offences. 
 
 
Gravest of circumstances will include circumstances where the subject vehicle and 
occupants constitute an immediate threat to life or a risk of Serious injury, significant 
levels of damage to property / infrastructure or issues of National Security. 
 
Page 35 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
 
In the event of any collision involving a surveillance driver, the duty of care to any 
casualty will be given priority. 
 
 
Any collision involving a police surveillance vehicle during mobile surveillance will be 
dealt with in accordance with the force collision policy. After any collision all drivers, 
including surveillance drivers, will be breath tested. 
 
 
Any collision during a surveillance operation which has evolved into a pursuit which 
involves a Subject vehicle, or police vehicles, will be deemed to be a 'police collision' 
and includes circumstances where there is no injury to a police officer or damage to a 
police vehicle. The collision will be reported to a uniform supervisor who will attend 
the scene and complete all relevant documentation. 
 
 
In cases of collisions arising from pursuits, the supervisor in charge of the surveillance 
operation will submit a separate report to Head of Operations. The report should 
consider the blameworthiness or otherwise of the officer. 
 
 
Where there is prima facie evidence of blame against the police driver, he / she will 
have their driving authorisation withdrawn in line with the policy at Appendix 5. 
 
 
Collisions involving surveillance drivers may attract media and public attention, 
particularly if a collision where injury is involved. Senior management and the Press 
Office will be closely involved in media management. 
 
 
In the case of cross border incidents, the force on which any incident is resolved will 
take the lead in any subsequent media handling. However, all forces involved must 
reach an early and clear agreement as to the information to be released and how 
press liaison will be managed. 
 
 
Page 36 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Appendix 7 - Post Incident Procedure for Fatal / Serious (Life Changing) Injury 
Road Traffic Collision Involving a Police Vehicle: 
 
 
This guidance covers the procedures to be implemented following a fatal or serious 
(life changing) injury road traffic collision involving a police vehicle.  This appendix 
should be considered together with the force policy related to Post Incident 
Procedures following death in custody/police contact. 
 
 
Incidents of this type are, by their very nature, highly emotive and stressful to all 
involved. As a consequence, both investigative and welfare considerations are to be 
afforded a high priority. The manner in which the Police Service responds to such 
incidents, and the professional standards applied, are naturally of great interest to the 
public as well, providing further reason to investigate such matters thoroughly and 
sensitively. 
 
 
Any incident of this nature requires mandatory referral to the ‘Independent Police 
Complaints Commission’ (IPCC) via PSD who will decide upon the format of the 
investigation, i.e. Managed, supervised, etc. 
 
 
It is essential that an impartial, rigorous and transparent investigation is undertaken to 
establish a true and factual account of the incident. A Senior Investigating Officer 
(SIO, trained in accordance with the Manual of guidance for investigation of Road 
Deaths) of Inspector rank or above will be appointed to facilitate this who will draw on 
relevant expertise, e.g. Forensic Collision Investigators. 
 
 
Comprehensive investigations into all deaths are an essential element of Article 2 of 
the European Convention on Human Rights. Failure to carry out such an investigation 
has been found to be in breach of Article 2. 
 
 
Principal Officer is a term used to identify members of staff most involved in, and most 
affected by an incident. The welfare needs of Principal Officers must be attended to 
whilst maintaining the accuracy and integrity of the investigation. 
 
 
7.1  Senior Investigating Officer (SIO) 
 
 
The SIO will consider application of the Road Death Manual including: 
 
• 
Management of the scene. 
• 
Commencement of the investigation. 
• 
Welfare considerations for officers and their families including appointment of 
family Liaison Officer(s), FLOs. 
• 
Preservation of evidence. 
• 
Media. 
• 
Community Impact Assessment through Local Commander. 
 
 
Page 37 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
7.2  Post Incident Manager (PIM) 
 
 
The role of the Post Incident Manager is to facilitate the investigation, whilst ensuring 
the Principal Officer’s welfare needs are met. This will include procedural 
explanations and practical assistance. 
 
 
Where appropriate the Post Incident Manager in consultation with the Senior 
Investigating Officer should arrange to convey the Principal Officers to the pre-
determined designated location identified as a PIM suite. 
 
 
The force Duty Inspector in liaison with the SIO and PIM should make arrangements 
for representatives of the Police Federation or Unison, to attend the location to 
provide appropriate care and support for the staff involved. 
 
 
7.3  Statements 
 
 
Formal statements should not normally be required immediately and can be left 
(providing initial notes are made) until witnesses have overcome any initial shock of 
the incident usually 24 – 36 hours later and prior to a Critical Incident (Stress) Debrief. 
 
 
7.4  Critical Incident Stress Management / Therapeutic Debriefing 
 
 
The purpose of such processes is ancillary to the investigation - to provide 
appropriate support to police staff (and sometimes others) who have been involved in 
traumatic events. There is a strong expectation that, as a general principle, matters 
discussed during a therapeutic debriefing will remain confidential to those present. To 
do otherwise may deter a full discussion and undermine the purpose of the exercise. 
 
 
However, although courts often take account of the ethical considerations of 
disclosure in these circumstances, such confidentiality cannot be guaranteed.  This 
should be made clear at any therapeutic de-briefing. It remains the individual police 
officer’s responsibility to retain and record any information they perceive as fresh, 
different, or relevant that comes to light during the session and is not recorded 
elsewhere. 
 
 
Ideally, critical incident debriefing should take place 48 to 72 hours after the incident, 
thus allowing operational procedures to take place and participants to get over 
possible shock. This will occur on a one to one or a group basis.  The aims of the 
procedure are to: 
 
• 
Provide a safe environment to talk about the event 
• 
Help organise people’s thoughts and feelings 
• 
Put events and feelings into context 
• 
Reduce feelings of isolation 
• 
Promote mutual support, encouragement and group solidarity 
• 
Facilitate change, by raising awareness, of post traumatic stress reactions and 
self-care. 
 
7.5  Identity of Officers 
 
 
Page 38 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
As would be considered with any witness or suspect, concerns for the safety of some 
Principal Officers and their families may make it necessary to address the 
maintenance of their anonymity at an early stage. However, it should be clear to 
officers that anonymity cannot be guaranteed once the case is heard at a public 
forum, such as a court. In such circumstances the preservation of anonymity is no 
longer within the control of the police service. 
 
 
7.6  Media 
 
 
Actions within the Policy will be the initial responsibility of the Host Force Press / 
Media department in consultation with ACPO, SIO and IPCC.  Fatal accidents 
involving police vehicles will always attract extensive media attention. Immediately 
following such an incident, the force Duty Officer, Communications Room / Control 
room should inform the force Press officer, who will make the necessary 
arrangements to co-ordinate a media response. 
 
 
Subject to any operational imperatives an open media strategy should be adopted. 
The media strategy should be formulated in consultation with the IPCC. At the earliest 
opportunity, a clear factual account of the incident should be provided. Care must be 
taken to avoid compromising any future inquiry. 
 
 
7.7  Officers’ Families and Home 
 
 
The Principal Officer’s force will extend support to all Principal Officers and their 
families. Their families should be alerted as to the possible normal reactions of those 
involved in such incidents. They will be afforded the opportunity to discuss matters 
with: 
 
• 
Occupational Health Unit. 
• 
Post Incident Manager. 
• 
Head of Operations. 
• 
Police Federation / Unison. 
 
 
7.8  Crown Prosecution Service 
 
 
In cases where initial indications are that a criminal offence may have been 
committed by a Police driver, consideration should be given to early contact being 
made with a Senior Lawyer from the CPS. Where the IPCC is supervising an 
investigation, such liaison should only take place after consultation with them. 
 
 
7.9  Notice of Investigation 
 
 
The service of misconduct notices should not be automatic; each case will be 
considered on its merits, with consultation with the IPCC Senior Investigating Officers 
should brief staff associations at the earliest opportunity where the service of such 
notices will be discussed. 
 
 
If there is a formal complaint from the public, then the service of the notice is a 
requirement. It should be made clear to the officers that the notice is being served as 
 
Page 39 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
the result of a complaint. Any notices will be served on an individual as soon as 
practicable and in line with regulations. 
 
 
7.10  Progress of the Enquiry 
 
 
It is important that as far as possible, anyone under investigation is kept informed of 
the progress of the inquiry. It will be the responsibility of both the Senior Investigating 
Officer and the Post Incident Manager to perform this role throughout the course of 
the whole inquiry. 
 
 
Page 40 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Appendix 8 - Management of Police Pursuits 
Authorised Professional Practice of Police Pursuits 
Tactics Directory 
 
 
This Authorised Professional Practice of Police Pursuits (APP), is designed to provide 
a point of reference to any person who may become involved in a pursuit within 
Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police force areas, whether directly or 
indirectly. The document also contains the Tactical Pursuit & Containment Tactic 
Directory including Pre-emptive Options (located on the page “Initial authorisation to 
conduct a pursuit”). 
 
 
APP Police Pursuits 
 
 
All pursuits undertaken in Warwickshire Police and West Mercia Police will be subject 
to a debrief. This will be conducted by either a Sergeant or Inspector and must take 
place as soon as practicable after the conclusion of the pursuit. The purpose of the 
debrief is to highlight any examples of best practice, problem areas, training 
implications and welfare needs.  All parties involved in the pursuit including control 
room staff should be consulted during this debrief process. 
 
 
A B40 Record of Pursuit form must be submitted for every pursuit. This form, located 
on “Force Forms”, will be generated by the FDI / Control Room supervisor and will be 
forwarded electronically to the relevant individuals for their completion. It is the 
responsibility of the FDI / Control Room supervisor to ensure that the form is 
completed and forwarded to the appointed Force Operations lead. Any in car visual 
recording of the pursuit must be made available for review together with the control 
room audio recordings. The pursuit will then be reviewed and forwarded to the Driver 
Training department for final review and retention. 
 
 
This process will look to identify the following: 
 
• 
Examples of best practice. 
• 
Identify training needs and requirements. 
• 
Provide advice on the use of tactics. 
• 
Provide advice regarding any breaches of policy. 
• 
Develop future training packages. 
 
 
Once completed the findings of a review may be recorded on an individual’s driver 
training record, for example to highlight good practice. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 41 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
Appendix 9 – Hollow Spike Tyre Deflation System, (HOSTYDS): 
 
 
This guide explains the operational guidance for the deployment of Hollow Spike Tyre 
 
Deflation System, (HOSTYDS) vehicle stopping equipment by Warwickshire and West 
 
Mercia police officers. 
 
 

9.1 
Legality: 
 
 
The legal basis for this guidance comes from: 
 
 
 
S.3 Criminal Law Act 1967 
 
S.117 Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 
 
Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 
 
Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1999 
 
Common Law. 
 
Article 2 Human Rights Act 1998. 
 
 
9.2 
Background 
 
 
HOSTYDS equipment is ONLY TO BE USED BY AUTHORISED POLICE 
OFFICERS
. The deploying Officer has the responsibility for ensuring the safe 
deployment of the HOSTYDS device and that other motorists do not come into 
contact with it, other than in exceptional circumstances as outlined at 9.6(b). It 
should be fully recognised that the deployment of this equipment is not appropriate 
for use in all cases. The strategic and intelligent use of a HOSTYDS device will 
enable Police Officers to have a viable alternative in dealing with potentially 
dangerous pursuit situations. 
 
 
The deployment of this type of equipment comes under the ethos of ‘Reasonable 
Force’ under S.3 Criminal Law Act 1967 and S.117 of the Police and Criminal 
Evidence Act 1984. Factors influencing the decision to use the HOSTYDS device 
will be: 
 
(a) The driver of the subject vehicle, when required to stop in an approved manner, and 
having had the opportunity to do so, indicates by their actions or continuance of driving 
that they have no intention of stopping, and the police officer believes that the driver of 
the subject vehicle is aware of the requirement to stop. 
 
(b) The driver has shown an intentional and criminal disregard for the safety of other 
road users. 
 
(c) The driver or occupants have committed an offence or are suspected of doing so. 
 
(d) To prevent a motor vehicle leaving the scene of a crime in a pre-planned operation 
with the authority of the Tactical Advisor or Silver Commander or as directed by an 
Operational Order. 
 
(e) A HOSTYDS device will not be applied simply to halt a vehicle that has failed to 
stop, where no factors falling within (a) (b) or (c) apply. 
 
 
 
 
Page 42 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
9.3 
Objectives 
 
(a) To protect the lives of the public and the police. 
(b) To safely terminate a pursuit in a moderated and controlled manner                                
with minimal risk to life and property. 
(c) To reduce time-consuming vehicle pursuits which are a drain on resources. 
(d) To assist police officers in the apprehension of offenders by disabling the suspect 
vehicle as quickly and as safely as possible. 
 
 
9.4 
Training 
 
 

In order to be authorised to deploy HOSTYDS devices officers must have successfully  
 
completed an accredited training programme delivered by appropriately qualified 
 
instructors from the Driver Training Department. An authorisation will last for a 
 
maximum of 5 years from the date that the course was successfully completed. 
 
Where an officer has not received accredited refresher training within that Five year 
 
period then their authority to deploy HOSTYDS will cease pending the successful 
 
completion of a further HOSTYDS course.  
 
A record of authorised officers will be held within the Driver Training Department. 
 
 
UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES WILL AN OFFICER BE AUTHORISED TO DEPLOY 
 
HOSTYDS OR HANDLE THE EQUIPMENT WHERE THEIR 5 YEAR  AUTHORITY 
 
HAS EXPIRED. 
 
 
9.5 
Deployment 
 
 
Officers will check the HOSTYDS equipment at the start of their tour of duty to ensure it 
 is safe to use and that all the spikes are in place, together with the safety goggles. 
Officers should be in possession of suitable gloves. It is envisaged that the HOSTYDS 
equipment will be considered as an appropriate enforcement option in the following two 
areas of police work: 
 
 
(a) In a pursuit management situation, which will include pre-emptive tactics. 
 
(b) In a specific / pre planned crime operation. 
 
 
It is acknowledged that there may be extreme circumstances where self authorization 
to deploy has to be considered. Every effort must be made to communicate with the 
OCC but where there is an immediate threat to life and communication cannot be 
effected then self authorized deployment can be considered. It must be stressed that 
extreme circumstances only relate to an immediate threat to life and officers can 
expect to be asked to fully justify their actions where there has been a deployment in 
these circumstances.  
 
 
Factors to be considered: 
 
 
(a) The deploying officer must consider the use of the equipment to be safe, having full 
regard to the public, the offender, the operator and other police officers. In reaching the 
decision to deploy the device, the officer should take account of prevailing road and 
weather conditions along with the existence of good radio communications with the 
other officers involved. 
 
 
Page 43 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
9.6 
PUBLIC SAFETY MUST REMAIN THE PRIME FACTOR WHEN HOSTYDS 
DEPLOYMENTS ARE CONSIDERED 
 
(b)There may be occasions when other vehicles are in such close proximity to the 
 subject vehicle that it is not possible to deploy the HOSTYDS device without puncturing 
the tyres of the other vehicles. In circumstances where it is essential to bring the target 
vehicle to a halt, because of the seriousness of the offence or the potential harm to 
other persons, the device may be deployed even though it will affect other vehicles. 
Officers may only have a brief period of time in which to consider the options and must 
act in accordance with their training. 
 
 
(c)The use of this equipment to bring a motorcycle or Quad bike to a halt should 
only be considered when there is an immediate threat to life.
 This is due to the 
very real risk of fatal / serious injury to the subject. In all cases the permission of the 
Operations Control Centre (OCC) Inspector must be obtained before Stinger is 
deployed / considered in such circumstances. 
 
 
(d) All officers are reminded that deployment of the HOSTYDS device is an 
individual responsibility, which may have to be justified in any subsequent legal 
proceedings. 

 
 

(e) A police vehicle does not offer sufficient protection for the deploying officer. Some 
other form of physical, immovable object, ie a tree, wall or building should always be 
sought where possible to afford physical protection for the officer deploying the 
HOSTYDS. If some form of immovable cover is not available then cover from view is 
acceptable. If the HOSTYDS deploying officer is out of sight and therefore not a visible 
target to the subject vehicle then, “IF SAFE” out of view site selection may be 
appropriate.    
     
           9.7    NO PROTECTION - NO DEPLOYMENT 
 
 

(f) It is recognised that an officer standing conspicuously could become a target for the 
subject vehicle. So far as is practicable, an officer’s activities should be covert. If this is 
the case, to eliminate conspicuity of the HOSTYDS deploying officer then fluorescent 
jackets need not be worn. However, if an officer needs to walk into a live 
carriageway with a HOSTYDS device they must still wear their fluorescent jacket.
  
 
(g) In every circumstance where the deployment of the HOSTYDS device is 
considered, if there is no communication with a supervisor at the communications 
centre no deployment should be made, and all officers should be aware that any 
decision by the supervisor that the device is NOT to be deployed IS FINAL. 
 
9.8   ‘NO COMMUNICATIONS – NO DEPLOYMENT’ 

 
 

h) It is unlikely that the deployment of such a device will stop a vehicle on its own and 
 
experience has shown that in most cases the driver will choose to abandon the vehicle 
 
and attempt to escape on foot. This may not be the case with vehicles fitted with run 
 
flat or deep treaded tyres on larger vehicles. Should the vehicle continue following a 
 
deployment of HOSTYDS, other Tactical Options must be considered to bring the 
 
vehicle to a controlled stop.   
 
 
 
Page 44 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
9.9 
Pursuits 
 
 

As in all pursuit situations the overall responsibility for the authorisation, continuance 
 
and abandonment of a pursuit lies with the OCC Inspector or OCC Sergeant. However 
 
any person involved in a pursuit can call for it to be abandoned at any time.  
 
For guidance on the deployment of HOSTYDS as part of Pre Emptive tactics, and in 
 
relation to single and multi lane deployments please refer to the “Tactical Pursuit & 
 
Containment Tactic Directory”. This can be located within Appendix 8 of the Driver 
 
Standards Policy within the Pursuit Management APP. 
 
 

Whenever available, Air Support should be used to assist in the siting of the equipment 
 
and as a visual liaison between the deploying officers and the officers involved in the 
 
pursuit. The non availability of Air Support should not preclude the deployment of 
 
HOSTYDS. Officers are encouraged to heed the advice from the Air Support where it is 
 
considered that the deployment is unsafe. 
 
 
If circumstances change from the time that the HOSTYDS device is sited to the time 
 
that the pursuit approaches the site and public safety may be compromised then there 
 
should be no deployment. 
 
 
 
9.10  Cross Border Pursuits 
 
 

In the event of a pursuit crossing force boundaries all officers involved, including those 
 
with HOSTYDS will comply with the directions of the OCC Inspector. This will include 
 
all directions in relation to Airwaves channels and communications. 
 
 
9.11  Pre Planned use of HOSTYDS 
 
 
There will be operational circumstances where known offenders are likely to be leaving 
 
a specified area after committing crime or in the commission of crime. To safeguard the 
 
public and to affect arrests in such circumstances it may be tactically advantageous to 
 
immobilise the subject vehicle(s) using an appropriate HOSTYDS device in order to 
 
prevent a potentially dangerous pursuit from developing. 
 
 
9.12  Communication 
 
 
At all times there must be clear communication between those involved in the pursuit 
 
and its resolution and also between those officers and the OCC. The clear direction is 
 
No Communications No Deployment”
 
The OCC Inspector or Sergeant will direct officers to use INTEROPS1 where 
 
appropriate and all officers must ensure that they are familiar with how to locate this 
 
channel on handheld and vehicle airwave sets. 
 
 
9.13  Accidentally Damaged Vehicles 
 
 
Where an innocent member of the public incurs tyre / vehicle damage as a direct result 
 
of a HOSTYDS deployment, arrangements should be made with a garage or tyre 
 
supplier to recover the vehicle from the road if necessary and replace the tyres with 
 
new ones of an equivalent quality. All costs will be met by the deploying force. 
 
 
9.14  Post Deployment Procedure 
 
Page 45 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 

NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED 
 
 
Whenever HOSTYDS are deployed the deploying officer must complete the relevant 
 
section of the B40 Post Pursuit review form. This form can be located on Force forms. 
 
The information provided will then form part of the post incident review process. 
 
The device is regarded as deployed when the deploying officer intentionally throws or 
 
pulls it across the carriageway(s). Removing the device from its box and placing it on 
 
the carriageway is not classed as a deployment. 
 
 

9.15  Safety Guidelines 
 
 
All authorised officers should familiarise themselves with the manufactures safety 
 
guidelines. 
 
 
Gloves are to be worn at all times when handling and using the equipment. Uniform 
 
leather gloves should be used. Safety glasses are provided to protect the deploying 
 
officers’ eyes from coming into contact with dirt or debris thrown up by the passing of 
 
the subject vehicle. These glasses must be used on every deployment. 
 
 
When not in use, the equipment MUST be carried within its safety case at all times. 
 
 
After the device has been used any missing spikes should be replaced as per the 
 
manufacturers’ instructions. This procedure is covered during training but where there 
 
is any doubt assistance should be sought.  The deploying officer is responsible for 
 
ensuring that the HOSTYDS device is fully operational before being made available for 
 
use again. 
 
 
9.16  Health & Safety Risk Assessment 
 
 
All officers qualified in the use of HOSTYDS should familiarise themselves with the 
 
associated Risk Assessment. This can be located at the Occupational Health & Safety 
 
Site located on the Force Intranet under Risk Assessments.       
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Page 46 of 46 
NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED