This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Departmental Strategic Objectives'.



Nobel House
17 Smith Square
London SW1P 3JR

www.defra.gov.uk
Defra Departmental Report 2009
Departmental Report
2009
Published by TSO (The Stationery Office) and available from:
Online
www.tsoshop.co.uk

Mail, Telephone Fax & E-Mail
TSO
PO Box 29, Norwich, NR3 1GN
Telephone orders/General enquiries 0870 600 5522
Order through the Parliamentary Hotline Lo-Call 0845 7 023474
To secure a healthy environment in which we and future generations can prosper
Fax orders: 0870 600 5533
E-mail: [email address]
Textphone: 0870 240 3701
www.defra.gov.uk
The Parliamentary Bookshop
12 Bridge Street, Parliament Square,
London SW1A 2JX
Telephone orders/General enquiries 020 7219 3890
Fax orders: 020 7219 3866
Email: [email address]
ISBN 978-0-10-175992-2
Internet: http://www.bookshop.parliament.uk
TSO@Blackwell and other Accredited Agents
Customers can also order publications from
TSO Ireland
16 Arthur Street, Belfast BT1 4GD
9 780101 759922
028 9023 8451 Fax 028 9023 5401

Department for Environment, 
Food and Rural Affairs 
Departmental Report 2009
Presented to Parliament by the Secretary of State  
for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs 
by Command of Her Majesty 
June 2009
Cm 7599 
£34.55

© Crown Copyright 2009
The text in this document (excluding the Royal Arms and other departmental or agency 
logos)  may  be  reproduced  free  of  charge  in  any  format  or  medium  providing  it  is 
reproduced  accurately  and  not  used  in  a  misleading  context.  The  material  must  be 
acknowledged as Crown copyright and the title of the document specified.
Where  we  have  identified  any  third  party  copyright  material  you  will  need  to  obtain 
permission from the copyright holders concerned.
For any other use of this material please write to Office of Public Sector Information, 
Information  Policy  Team,  Kew,  Richmond,  Surrey  TW9  4DU  or  e-mail:  licensing@ 
opsi.gov.uk
ISBN: 9786101759922
This is part of a series of departmental reports which, along with the Main Estimates 2009–10, the document 
Public Expenditure: Statistical Analyses 2009, and the Supply Estimates 2009–10: Supplementary Budgetary 
Information, present the Government’s outturn and planned expenditure for 2009–10 and 2010–11.

  Contents
iii
Foreword from the Secretary of State 
vii
Executive Summary 
viii

Strategic Objectives and Departmental Structure 
12
 
Who are we? 
13
 
How we operate 
20
 
The Defra Network 
22
 
Accountability 
23
 
Defra’s Ministers 
24
 
Defra’s Management Board 
25

Priorities and Objectives 
26
 
What do we do? 
27
 
Priority 1: Secure a healthy natural environment for us all and 
28 
deal with environmental risks
 
Improving Biodiversity 
30
 
Land and Soil Management 
34
 
Water Availability and Quality 
38
 
Marine 
40
 
Air Quality 
45
 
Local Environmental Quality 
47
 
Emergency and Business Continuity Planning 
48
 
Exotic Animal Disease 
50
 
Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management 
52
 
Priority 2: Promote a sustainable, low carbon and resource‑efficient 
60 
economy
 
Sustainable Consumption and Production 
62
 
Climate Change Mitigation 
68
 
Socially and Economically Sustainable Rural Communities 
72
 
Priority 3: Ensure a thriving farming sector and a sustainable, 
76 
healthy and secure food supply
 
A Sustainable, Secure and Healthy Food Supply 
78
 
Common Agricultural Policy Reform 
80
 
Farming for the Future 
83
 
Skills for Farming 
84
 
Agriculture and Climate Change 
85
 
Nutrient Management 
87
 
Responsibility and Cost Sharing for Animal Health 
87
 
Bovine Tuberculosis 
89
 
Veterinary Science 
91
 
Animal Welfare 
94
 
Cross‑cutting objective 1: Sustainability 
100
 
Cross‑cutting objective 2: Adaptation 
108
 
Cross‑cutting objective 3: Rurality 
116

iv Departmental Report 2009

Engaged and Effective Operations 
122
 
How do we work? 
123
 
Evidence 
124
 
Departmental Research 
128
 
Better Regulation 
129
 
Knowledge Information, Information Systems and Information 
132 
Technology, and Service Transformation
 
Value for Money (VfM) 
135
 
Working Environment: Health and Safety 
139
 
Working Environment: Recruitment Practice 
140
 
PAC recommendations 
141
 
Legal Group 
142
 
Communication 
143

Our Performance 
146
 
How well have we done? 
147
 
Current Spending Review Targets 
148
 
PSA 28: Secure a healthy natural environment for everyone’s wellbeing, 
149 
health and prosperity, now and in the future
 
DSO 1: A society that is adapting to the effects of climate change, through  151 
a national programme of action and a contribution to international action
 
DSO 2: A healthy, resilient, productive and diverse natural environment 
152
 
DSO 3: Sustainable, low carbon and resource efficient patterns of 
155 
consumption and production
 
DSO 4: An economy and a society that are resilient to environmental risk 
158
 
DSO 5: Championing sustainable development 
161
 
DSO 6: A thriving farming and food sector, with an improving net 
162 
environmental impact
 
DSO 7: A sustainable, secure and healthy food supply 
167
 
DSO 8: Socially and economically sustainable rural communities 
168
 
DSO 9: A respected department, delivering efficient and high quality 
172 
services and outcomes
 
Previous Spending Review Targets 
173
 
PSA 3a: Reversing the long-term decline in the number of farmland birds 
174
 
PSA 3b: Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) 
176
 
PSA 9: To improve the health and welfare of kept animals, and protect 
177 
society from the impact of animal diseases, through sharing the 
management of risk with industry

  
v
Annex A: Better Regulation 
181
Annex B:  Summary of updates to information in earlier 
188 
Departmental Reports
Annex C: The Defra Network 
190
Annex D: Defra responses to PAC recommendations 
195
Annex E: SCS by payband 
202
Annex F: Correspondence with Ministers and the Public 
203
Annex G: Public Complaints 
204
Annex H: Expenditure on Professional Services and Consultancy 
205
Annex I: Core Tables 
208



 Foreword from the Secretary of State
vii
Foreword from the Secretary of State
It has been a year of achievement at Defra. With the Marine and 
Coastal Access Bill we have made progress on protecting our seas 
and opening up our coastline. We’ve put an end to destructive 
dredging in Lyme Bay, begun a comprehensive look at the health of 
England’s ecosystems and created a new national park in the South 
Downs. We've worked with farmers to deal with diseases like avian 
influenza and Bluetongue, and having made a difficult decision on 
bovine TB and badgers, we’re now moving towards testing an 
injectable TB vaccine. In addition, we’ve built more flood defences, 
protecting thousands of homes, and published the Draft Floods and 
Water Management Bill.
With the creation of the Department of Energy and Climate Change and changed 
economic circumstances, our priorities are more than ever about providing practical 
help to individuals, communities and businesses. With our new responsibility for 
coordinating food policy across government we are working to keep supply chains 
secure and we’ve established the Council of Food Policy Advisers. We’ve been tracking 
the impact of the recession on rural communities, and working with Regional 
Development Agencies and others to provide support where it is needed. We’ve also 
made help available to farmers through the Rural Development Programme for England 
and overseen a further improvement in the performance of the single payment scheme.
Defra's task to help us all live within our environmental means, and protecting our 
environment remains a priority, even in tough times; it is one of the most precious 
economic resources we have. The next 12 months will be critical, not only because the 
world will be striving to reach an agreement on climate change at Copenhagen in 
December, but also because we have the chance now to create a more sustainable and 
greener society. This will mean being resource efficient, improving our resilience to a 
changing climate, creating an agriculture sector that is both sustainable and productive, 
and developing the skills, training and innovation that all of this requires.
Finally, I would like to thank the staff at Defra and all of our agencies for their hard 
work, commitment and professionalism. It is a privilege to work alongside them.
Rt Hon. Hilary Benn MP 
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs



viii Departmental Report 2009
Executive Summary
There can be no doubt that 2008/09 has been a challenging year in many ways. In 
the current economic climate, we are putting much of our focus on the economic and 
social issues being faced by our customers and those we seek to 
influence. However, one of the advantages of a Departmental 
Report is that it allows us to take a more considered view over the 
whole year. This shows that 2008/09 has been a year of strategic 
and operational success for Defra across the wide range of 
objectives that we have.
The achievement of those objectives and ability to quickly realign 
our resources to changing circumstances has been greatly helped 
by the success of our Renew Defra programme, which ended 
on schedule at the end of September 2008. Defra is now an 
organisation in which staff and resources work to a programme 
and project structure with the in-built flexibility to adapt quickly to changing priorities. 
Our portfolio management approach helps to prioritise the right activities, our flexible 
staff resourcing system helps to ensure we have the right resource at the right time, 
and our policy cycle framework helps to ensure we deliver the right results. These 
changes have taken considerable effort and so I was delighted that Defra colleagues 
were rewarded for their commitment to these changes with the very positive picture of 
progress reported in our 2009 Capability Review.
In the current economic circumstances, some might be forgiven for thinking that 
the environment is a luxury we cannot afford. As Chapter 1 shows, our evidence-
based strategy illustrates that not only would this be a mistake in the long term 
but it would also be a mistake in the short term. There is a powerful link between 
economic efficiency and sustainability. For example, Defra is helping households and 
businesses save money through the promotion of efficient use of resources, sustainable 
consumption and production and effective management of our waste. Our ‘Real Help’ 
campaign supports businesses in reducing their waste and energy use within this 
economic downturn and the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target provides consumer 
financial benefits for reducing carbon in households. An environmentally sustainable 
world is good for the economy and is essential for food, water, and energy security. This 
is reflected in Defra’s purpose: ‘to secure a healthy environment in which we and future 
generations can prosper’.
So at the same time as dealing with the current economic challenges, it is important 
that we maintain a clear focus on our longer term priorities and objectives. Chapter 2 
demonstrates the many ways in which Defra and our delivery partners are working to 
realise our strategic objectives. Here are some highlights.

 Executive Summary
ix
Climate change adaptation and the promotion of a low‑carbon, resource‑
efficient economy
 has been a key area of our business development over the past 
year. After its incubation in Defra earlier in the year, the Climate Change Act came 
into force in November 2008. In October 2008, Defra launched a ‘carbon footprinting’ 
methodology (PAS 2050) to enable businesses to assess the impacts of their products 
on the environment. Defra also launched two product Roadmap action plans to reduce 
adverse environmental and social impacts of consumer products. The Sustainable 
Clothing Roadmap, for example, was launched during London Fashion Week in 
February 2009. This action plan brings together over 300 organisations, from high street 
retailers to designers and textile manufacturers, to make a significant difference to the 
environmental footprint and social inequalities which blight some of the production and 
retail processes of ‘throw away fashion’. Our ‘Recycle on the Go’ campaign will make it 
easier for people to find recycling points in public places and our ‘Act on CO ’ campaign 
2
launched an advice helpline and advertising campaign to raise awareness of individual 
carbon footprints.
As champion for Sustainable Development (SD), Defra has worked to ensure that 
SD is taken into account in a number of new policy developments, for example, the 
Eco-towns Planning Policy Statement and the Thames Gateway Eco-Region Prospectus. 
In line with the Government’s Olympic Games Legacy Action plan, Defra has helped 
to ensure a genuinely sustainable Games. We also made further progress this year on 
the cross-Government international Sustainable Development Dialogues; broadening 
bilateral relations with key countries on key sustainability issues. Dialogues with China, 
to highlight one case, have led to the establishment of the Sustainable Agriculture 
Innovation Network to promote joint-research and the sharing of experience with China 
on issues such as the impact of climate change on agriculture.
We continue to make good progress in improving environmental quality in a range 
of different areas. For example, Defra is helping to improve the biological and chemical 
quality of our water and ensure key milestones in the implementation of the Water 
Framework Directive are being met. The Nitrate Pollution Prevention Regulations came 
into force in January 2009, aiming to reduce nitrate pollution of the water environment. 
In terms of biodiversity, we’ve also made good progress, for example with 60 square 
nautical miles of Lyme Bay being closed to dredging to protect this valuable marine area 
and the development of the Marine and Coastal Access Bill which will help to build a 
network of well managed marine protected areas.
As part of our work on food and farming; and with our new responsibility for food 
security, we established the Council of Food Policy Advisors in October 2008 to advise 
the Secretary of State on food matters and continue to implement recommendations 
from the Public Sector Food Procurement Initiative. In December 2008 we announced 
the new Uplands ELS Environmental Stewardship scheme which will reward farmers for 
the maintenance of landscape and environmental benefits in the uplands. The Rural 
Payments Agency also again met its Single Payments Scheme target ahead of schedule.

x Departmental Report 2009
In terms of animal health and welfare, in November 2008 a new Bovine TB 
Eradication Group was established and in January 2009 new funding for bee health 
was announced. Defra also collaborated with cross-Whitehall teams to publish a cross-
government pandemic preparedness strategy.
Alongside all this strategic and administrative success, it is also worth recalling that 
2008/09 again tested our operational resilience to emergencies. Defra rose to these 
challenges and responded effectively to avian influenza incidents, Bluetongue, rabies, 
flooding incidents and two industrial disputes impacting the fuel supply. Our revised 
Contingency Plan for Exotic Animal Disease was laid before Parliament in December 
2008, setting out plans to deal with outbreaks, including classical swine fever. Our 
success in responding to the threat posed by Bluetongue, with the control strategy and 
emergency vaccination plan, was a success for cost and responsibility sharing between 
government and industry.
In addition to describing what we do, this report also describes various aspects of 
how we go about our work. Chapter 3 highlights how we use a variety of resources 
including evidence, information, legal advice and communication to help achieve our 
strategic objectives. In particular this shows how Defra is increasingly making use of 
customer insight techniques to deliver better public services, and the role we are playing 
in reducing the administrative burden of regulation on business.
The 2007 Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR) period began on 1 April 2008, 
bringing with it an entirely new performance management framework for all 
Government Departments. Chapter 4 shows that after only one year of this new 
reporting period, in most cases it is too soon for us to see the impact of our work 
showing up in data strictly from this period. However, historical data show that on the 
whole, we are on the right track to achieving our targets. Where our historical targets 
continue to show some slippage, on farmland birds and Sites of Special Scientific 
Interest, we continue to monitor progress and take action through our current strategy.
As part of the various Annexes to the report, the Core Tables demonstrate how Defra 
has once again this year managed its finances very effectively. This is a vital achievement 
at any time, but particularly now when there are so many demands on public finances, 
and we need to make sure that taxpayers money is well spent.
As we look forward to the coming year, Defra has many exciting opportunities ahead. 
In particular, we plan to publish a draft Floods and Water Bill, our Wildlife Management 
Strategy and our noise action plans. Over the next year we will also launch Greener 
Living Fund projects and the Low Carbon Industrial Strategy in collaboration with other 
partners. We will use our new role in food security to ensure that cross-government 
efforts on food policy are collectively consistent and effective. Defra will also develop a 
cost-effective plan of action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture, 
forestry and land management sector to meet the Government’s targets set by the 
Climate Change Act. 2009 marks the 60th anniversary of the National Parks and Access 
to the Countryside Act (1949) and to celebrate this we will be holding a series of 
events to raise awareness of the contribution that our natural landscapes make to local 
economies and to our health and lifestyles.


 Executive Summary
xi
However if recent events have taught us anything, surely it is just how difficult it is to 
predict with any certainty what the future may hold. I believe that my job as Permanent 
Secretary is to work with my team to create an effective and efficient organisation, 
one that has a clear sense of strategic purpose but that is also flexible and responsive 
to events. Our successes this year have certainly shown that Defra is that kind of 
organisation.
Dame Helen Ghosh 
Permanent Secretary



Strategic Objectives and 
Departmental Structure
CHAPTER 1


Chapter 1: Strategic Objectives and Departmental Structure
13
Who are we?
Introduction
This report covers Defra’s performance during the financial year 2008/09, 
the first year of the 2007 Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR07) 
planning period. It describes the work of the Department and sets out 
progress against Defra’s Public Service Agreement (PSA) target and 
Departmental Strategic Objectives (DSOs). We also take a forward look to 
Defra’s activities in the next financial year.
Defra’s strategic objectives
Defra’s Strategy, as il ustrated overleaf, sets out the Department’s Objectives 
and Priorities. Achieving these wil  enable people to prosper in a secure and 
healthy environment. Defra’s Public Service Agreement is one element of 
this strategy.
Securing a healthy environment is al  the more relevant in the current 
economic recession. We are well placed to achieve our wider environmental 
purpose, while saving households and businesses money, and tackling the 
immediate consequences of climate change. Fol owing our success in 
introducing the Climate Change Act, responsibility for this area has passed 
to the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC).


14
Departmental 
Report 
2009
Figure 1.1 A summary of our Strategy, listing Departmental Strategic Objectives, Priorities and overarching Purpose.

Chapter 1: Strategic Objectives and Departmental Structure
15
Defra’s work has three priorities:
•  Priority 1: Secure a healthy natural environment for us all and deal with 
environmental risks
  A healthy natural environment is essential to provide us with life-sustaining services 
and supply us with many of the natural resources we need for a successful 
economy. In managing the natural environment, we need to value the full range of 
services our natural environment provides, its environmental limits, and also its 
interconnected character. For this reason, Defra has been advocating a more 
integrated approach to protecting and enhancing the natural environment alongside 
economic prosperity.
•  Priority 2: Promote a sustainable, low-carbon and resource-efficient economy
  The economic downturn has emphasised the importance of improving resource 
efficiency and we have policies to help save money now for households and 
businesses. By using fewer resources to make the same products, businesses can 
improve productivity, supporting jobs. Resource efficiency supports our goals on the 
wider environment, addressing not only carbon dioxide emissions, but also waste 
and use of water and other essential, scarce resources.
•  Priority 3: Ensure a thriving farming sector and a sustainable, healthy and secure 
food supply
  Food security is both a global and local challenge posing an immediate challenge in 
terms of threats and opportunities. Defra has the lead on food policy across 
Government to ensure a reliable and resilient food supply. Alongside this, we need 
to support a thriving farming sector that is competitive, profitable, that adapts to 
climate change and is sustainable.
Defra aims to achieve the above priorities through nine Departmental Strategic 
Objectives (DSOs):
•  DSO 1: Adapting to climate change
  A society that is adapting to the effects of climate change, through a national 
programme of action and a contribution to international action.
  The national programme of action on adaptation in England is being taken forward 
by the Adapting to Climate Change Programme. This is a cross-government 
programme led by Defra.
  This DSO shapes the delivery of all of our priorities as well as the delivery of cross-
government objectives. More on this is reported under Chapter 2 on page 108.

16 Departmental Report 2009
•  DSO 2: A healthy natural environment
  To protect and enhance the natural environment, and to encourage its sustainable 
use within environmental limits.
  Defra works to protect and enhance the natural environment, and to encourage its 
sustainable use within environmental limits. We aim to ensure that the air we 
breathe and the water we drink are clean, that the management of land, fresh 
water and the seas is sustainably productive, that our landscapes and biodiversity are 
protected, and that people understand, enjoy and care for the natural environment.
  More on a healthy natural environment can be found under Chapter 2 on page 28.
•  DSO 3: Sustainable consumption and production
  Working towards an economy where products and services are designed, produced, 
used and disposed of in ways that minimise carbon emissions, waste and the use of 
non-renewable resources. Supporting innovation and encouraging economic 
prosperity.

  Defra is working to make production and consumption patterns in the UK 
compatible with sustainable living. This requires action to minimise greenhouse gas 
emissions and inputs of non-renewable resources, energy and water.
  Defra is working with businesses and consumers to help them understand the 
impacts of production and consumption, and to influence and lead changes in 
behaviour to address these impacts. This work aims to create better products and 
services, which will reduce environmental impacts across their lifecycle, so 
minimising waste and landfill.
  More on sustainable consumption and production can be found under Chapter 2 on 
page 60.
•  DSO 4: An economy and a society that are resilient to environmental risk
  This is delivered through ensuring that flooding and coastal erosion risks are 
managed sustainably, through the economy, human health and ecosystems being 
protected from environmental risks and emergencies, and through public health and 
the economy being safeguarded from the widespread effects of animal diseases.

  More on addressing environmental risk and emergencies can be found under 
Chapter 2 on page 48.
•  DSO 5: Championing sustainable development
  Defra is the Government’s champion for sustainable development (SD) – 
domestically and internationally – ensuring that policy and delivery at all levels of 
government observe the five principles of sustainable development set out in the 
2005 SD strategy ‘Securing the Future’.


Chapter 1: Strategic Objectives and Departmental Structure
17
  This DSO shapes the delivery of all three Priorities as well as wider work across 
Government. While we act to protect and enhance our natural environment, we 
must also help people and communities to adapt and build resilience to climate 
change and reduce the impacts of products, cut waste and promote resource 
efficiency to create a more sustainable society.
  Defra’s role is also to champion sustainable development across all levels of 
government and internationally. More on this is reported under Chapter 2 on 
page 100.
•  DSO 6: A thriving farming and food sector with an improving net  
environmental impact
  Making the farming industry more innovative, self-reliant, profitable and competitive 
and with better environmental management throughout the whole food chain.
  Farmers have an important impact on our natural environment. In the UK, farmers 
manage 77% of our land, contributing approximately 7% of UK’s greenhouse gas 
emissions and are in the front line both in terms of adapting to climate change and 
in mitigating its effects. A farming sector that is viable in the long term will make a 
major contribution to mitigating the effects of climate change and the protection of 
the natural environment. The economic and environmental outcomes we are 
seeking are reflected in current PSA targets and in DSO 6. Farming has a major role 
to play in delivering a wide range of other Departmental objectives, notably in 
respect of CAP reform, protecting public health and the economy from animal 
disease, and safeguarding animal welfare and the food chain.
  More on a thriving farming and food sector can be found under Chapter 2  
on page 76.
•  DSO 7: A sustainable, secure and healthy food supply
  Working across Government and with stakeholders for sustainable production, 
distribution and consumption of food, ensuring that it is available and affordable for 
all sectors of society, and considering the sustainability impacts of meeting global 
food needs.

  The Machinery of Government changes in October 2008 gave Defra a coordinating 
role in food policy. This requires Defra to work with other Departments on wider 
issues in Government, for example social impacts (food inequalities, food poverty, 
food skills, health and wellbeing) and international activity on global food security 
and sustainability, as well as our lead responsibilities on farming, the food industry 
and their environmental impacts.
  More on a sustainable, secure and healthy food supply can be found under 
Chapter 2 on page 78.

18 Departmental Report 2009
•  DSO 8: Socially and economically sustainable rural communities
  Taking an overview of the effects of Government policies in rural areas and helping 
departments understand better the rural dimension, including by improving the 
evidence base.

  The task of establishing and sustaining strong rural communities is the responsibility 
of everyone in Government. Defra’s role is to maintain a rural overview of a basket 
of national indicators and to use this to determine whether there are any systemic 
problems resulting from geography and other aspects of rural areas.
  Defra maintains strong links with other organisations representing rural communities 
to ensure they have a voice that is heard by national Government; improves the 
evidence base available to other government departments to help them better 
understand the rural context for their policies; and sponsors the Commission for 
Rural Communities (CRC) to act as a rural champion.
  More on this is reported under Chapter 2 on page 116.
•  DSO 9: A respected department
  Respect is gained and maintained in the long-term by doing the day-job well, 
developing and delivering good policy through DSOs 1 to 8. But we also recognise 
that it would be lost easily by messing up in any of our areas: policy, delivery or 
corporate.

  Our work towards a respected Department supports all of our Priorities as well as 
our work with delivery partners and in ensuring good corporate practice. Our 
Customer Focus and Insight Project has set up a cross-Defra network of Customer 
Champions training Defra Senior Civil Servants in customer insight techniques. 
  More on our corporate practice can be found under Chapter 3 on page 122.
We also contribute to PSAs led by other Government Departments:
Defra has signed up to be a formal delivery partner for the following PSAs (lead 
department in brackets):
•  Climate Change (Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC))
•  Olympics (Department for Culture Media and Sport (DCMS))
•  Housing (Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG))
•  Regional Economic Performance (Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory 
Reform (BERR))
•  International Poverty Reduction (Department for International Development (DfID))
•  Counter-terrorism (Home Office)
•  Service Transformation (Cabinet Office)























































Chapter 1: Strategic Objectives and Departmental Structure
19
Defra will also contribute (but not as a formal delivery partner) to these other PSAs:
•  Health and Well-being (Department of Health)
•  Later Life (Department for Work and Pensions (DWP))
•  Safer Communities (Home Office)
•  Community Cohesion (Department for Communities and Local Government (CLG))
All PSA delivery agreements across government have been tested for their rural and 
sustainability credentials, and can be found on the Treasury website:  
www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/.
Cross‑cutting objectives
The way in which our Priorities are delivered is as important as the Priorities themselves. 
Throughout this report we will highlight three key delivery policies (sustainability, 
adaptation and rurality) which cut across all the work undertaken to achieve Defra’s 
Priorities. Furthermore, even the best policies would be impotent without effective 
operational delivery, so the report also features some of the vital work performed by 
our delivery partners.
Priority 1
Priority 2
Priority 3
PSA 28
DSO 1
DSO 2
Sustainability
DSO 3
DSO 4
DSO 5
Adaptation
DSO 6
DSO 7
DSO 8
Rurality
DSO 9
Figure 1.2 Schematic of the relationship between our priorities and our cross-cutting objectives with the 
outcome measured in terms of our Public Service Agreement and Departmental Strategic Objectives.

20 Departmental Report 2009
•  Cross‑cutting objective 1: Sustainability
  On the first of these cross-cutting objectives, Defra continues to act as the champion 
of sustainable development across government and internationally. Defra also 
continues to lead on sustainable consumption and production (working closely with 
BERR, Department for Innovation, Universities & Skills (DIUS) and DECC). In 
particular, we need to ensure that the sectors for which we are responsible – waste, 
water, food and farming – lead the move to more sustainable ways of operation.
•  Cross‑cutting objective 2: Adaptation
  The UK and other countries around the world continue to avoid further dangerous 
climate change by reducing carbon emissions. Defra plays a key role here, through 
responsibility for key carbon sinks in soils and forests, for example. However, it is 
clear that, due to past emissions, we are already committed to 30-40 years of 
temperature rise and around 100 years of sea-level rise. We need to be prepared for 
these changes, so all of us – individuals, businesses, government and public 
authorities – will also need to adapt our behaviour to respond to the challenges of 
climate change. The Government has therefore established the Adapting to Climate 
Change Programme, led by Defra, to bring together the work already being initiated 
by Government and the wider public sector on adapting to climate change, and to 
coordinate and drive forward future work.
  Defra will contribute to the delivery of the Programme’s objectives through the 
delivery of its policies. For example, in the Pre-Budget Report 2008, we announced 
that we were bringing forward funding for flood defences, which will make an 
important contribution to helping the UK to adapt.
  We are working closely with DECC and DfID on international adaptation and on 
other international environmental issues.
•  Cross‑cutting objective 3: Rurality
  Defra champions the equitable treatment of rural areas and communities in 
national, regional and local public policies and programmes. This remit is England-
wide and focuses on the outcomes of the Government’s social and economic 
policies in relation to rural people and places. Our aim is to ensure that the 
evidenced needs of rural people and communities are addressed effectively through 
mainstream public policy and delivery. Throughout the last year, this has included 
increased monitoring of any potential impacts of the economic situation.
How we operate
As outlined in the Autumn Performance Report 2008, Defra is working with new 
structures introduced under our Renew Defra Programme. We organise our work on a 
clear programme and project basis with systems in place to ensure we align our 
resources to our priorities and are able to adapt those as circumstances change. 

Chapter 1: Strategic Objectives and Departmental Structure
21
In order to cement best practice and to maximise our success, Defra has in place 
systems to do the right things, operating in the right way to deliver the right results, 
including a managed portfolio to approve investment decision making.
•  Our portfolio management approach is now in place, providing a means to regularly 
review what we are doing in light of what we are trying to achieve as a department. 
This was put to good use in reshaping the department’s alignment of resources to 
its new priorities following the creation of DECC.
•  Our approvals process is now well embedded, to ensure that activities only start  
or proceed if they have a robust business case. The rigour of this process has been  
a motivator to improve the quality of investment proposals put forward for 
consideration.
•  Our corporate performance management system has successfully allowed the 
Management Board to regularly monitor how we are progressing on our key work 
programmes and achievement of our strategic objectives, giving them clear sight of 
achievements and risks. The system has also created an open environment for 
discussion between the Board and programme managers.
•  Since the launch of the Policy Cycle in June 2008, Defra has put in place 
approaches, tools and guidance, which continue to be developed, to support the 
new ways of working. These include a programme of training available to all staff 
on both the Policy Cycle and Programme and Project Management; revised guidance 
on applying Programme and Project Management; and the development of an 
approach to programme assurance that will be applied across Defra.
•  Our Flexible Staff Resourcing (FSR) system enables staff to move quickly onto new 
work as projects come to an end, thus making the best use of staff resource. We 
have reduced the average time taken to place staff (6 weeks in 2008/09 compared 
to 8 weeks the previous year) at the same time as increasing the number of 
assignments managed by more than three-fold over the same period. There 
continues to be a very small number of people without assignments and most stay 
unassigned for a week or two at most.
•  The new personal development and appraisal system has allowed more consistency 
across the department in ensuring that every member of staff has clear objectives 
and a development plan linked to Departmental aims. An evaluation carried out in 
December 2008 indicated a significant increase in discussions relating to performance 
and an improvement in our ability to identify a range of performances. As a result of 
the evaluation we have implemented improvements to develop further our ability to 
focus on honest discussions, differentiate performance and develop staff.
The Machinery of Government changes in October 2008 were a practical test of these 
new systems and structures, and with them in place we were able to accommodate the 
necessary organisational changes simply and swiftly. Furthermore, the combination of 
these and other changes made in the department were recognised in the positive 
picture of improvement recorded by our Capability Review in 2009.

22 Departmental Report 2009
The Defra Network – overview and changes in 2008/09
The Defra Network is an essential part of how Defra policy is delivered. There are more 
than 70 partners in what we refer to as the ‘Defra network’ – a schematic of this 
diverse network is shown in Figure 1.3. Some of these partners are Executive Agencies 
which work directly with Defra; some are Non-Departmental Public Bodies (NDPBs) 
which are accountable to their boards and to ministers; others are Public Corporations. 
A full list of these may be found in Annex C.
Delivery network partners vary enormously in size, structure and remit. For example, the 
Environment Agency (which is an Executive NDPB) has over 12,000 employees and a 
budget of over £1bn, in comparison to the Sea Fish Industry Authority (which is a levy 
board) that has just 95 employees and an industry-funded budget of over £11m.
On 26 March 2008, the Secretary of State announced in a written statement to 
Parliament the Government’s intention to wind down the activities of Food from Britain 
(FFB) in anticipation of its formal dissolution in law. The wind-down proceeded 
smoothly and FFB ceased operations as planned on 31 March 2009.1
On 1 April 2008, a new Defra-sponsored levy-funded NDPB, the Agriculture and 
Horticulture Development Board (AHDB), came into being. It replaced the five existing 
statutory levy boards (British Potato Council, the Horticultural Development Council, the 
Home Grown Cereals Authority, the Milk Development Council and the Meat and 
Livestock Commission).
With effect from October 2008 the following bodies transferred to the newly created 
Department of Energy and Climate Change: the Carbon Trust, the Committee on 
Radioactive Waste Management, the Energy Savings Trust, the Fuel Poverty Advisory 
Group and the National Non Food Crop Centre.
On 24 March 2009 Defra announced the outcome of the Delivery Landscape Review 
into how delivery bodies could better give advice and support to business, consumers 
and the public sector on resource efficiency. The most significant outcome of the review 
was a decision to simplify the Defra delivery landscape by having only one delivery 
partner (rather than seven). The Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) will 
lead on working with Defra and the other delivery bodies over the coming year to 
determine how best to implement this service from April 2010 onwards.
Ministers announced that the Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera) would vest 
on 1 April 2009. Fera has been created by merging two Executive Agencies of Defra, 
the Central Science Laboratory (CSL) and the Government Decontamination Service 
(GDS), along with Defra’s Plant Health Division (PHD), Plant Health and Seeds 
Inspectorate (PHSI) and the Plant Variety Rights Office and Seeds Division (PVS).
In keeping with its commitment to the Hampton Report recommendations Defra also 
carried out a consultation about the future of the Veterinary Medicines Directorate 
(VDM). Following the consultation it was agreed that the VMD should retain its status 
as a stand-alone Executive Agency.
1  For further information please refer to:  
www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmhansrd/cm080326/wmstext/80326m0001.htm#column_10WS.

Chapter 1: Strategic Objectives and Departmental Structure
23
Highlights from a selection of our delivery partners feature under Chapter 2.
The Defra Network from 1 April 2009
Increasing degree of independence
Executive Agencies
Non Departmental
Public
Others
Public Bodies
Corporations
(larger ones
named)
Fera – Food and
Core Department
Environment
Research
Advisory NDPBs
Veterinary
Agency1 
Laboratories
Agency
Centre for
Environment
Marine
Fisheries and
and Fisheries
Aquaculture
Agency
Other Executive NDPBs2,3
Science (Cefas)
Waste and
Resources
Rural
Action
Animal 
Payments
Programme
Health
Agency
National 
Parks 
Levy Boards4
British Waterways
Authorities
Veterinary
Medicines
Directorate
Others5
Environment Agency
Forestry 
Commission
Covent Garden
Market Authority 
(Non ministerial 
Department)
Natural
England
Kew
1 From 1 April Defra  has a new agency Fera –  this brings the Central Science Laboratory, Defra’s Plant Health Division, Plant Health and Seeds
Inspectorate, the Plant Variety Rights Office and Seeds Division and the Government Decontamination Service together into one agency.
2 Agricultural Wages Board | Agricultural Wages Committee | Commission for Rural Communities | Consumer Council for Water | Gangmasters
Licensing Authority | Joint Nature Conservation Committee | National Forest Company | Sustainable Development Commission
3 Food From Britain, an ENDPB, wound up on 31 March 2009
4 Agriculture & Horticulture Development Board | Sea Fish Industry Authority
5 Includes local authorities and third sector bodies
Figure 1.3 The Defra network of delivery bodies as at 1 April 2009.
Accountability
There are three main pillars of the department’s accountability arrangements.
•  The Secretary of State, Hilary Benn, has overall statutory and political 
accountability to Parliament for all matters associated with the Department. He 
determines the policy framework within which the Department operates, agrees the 
Department’s role in meeting the Government’s objectives and is accountable for 
delivery of PSA 28 on which Defra leads.
•  The Permanent Secretary, Helen Ghosh, as head of the Department and Principal 
Accounting Officer, has personal responsibility for the overall organisation, 
management and staffing of the Department and for Department-wide procedures 
in finance and other matters. The Accounting Officer has personal responsibility for 
the propriety and regularity of the public finances for which she is accountable.
•  The Management Board (chaired by the Permanent Secretary) is responsible for 
corporate strategic leadership of the Department. Managers and staff at all levels 
have the responsibility for delivering the Department’s objectives.





24 Departmental Report 2009
Defra’s Ministers
Hilary Benn
Secretary of State 
for Environment, 
Food & Rural Affairs
 
 
Lord Hunt
Jane Kennedy
Huw Irranca‑Davies
Minister for 
Minister for Farming 
Minister for the 
Sustainable 
and the 
Natural and Marine 
Development and 
Environment
Environment, 
Energy Innovation 
Wildlife and Rural 
and Deputy Leader 
Affairs
of the House of 
Lords
 
 

Chapter 1: Strategic Objectives and Departmental Structure
25
Defra’s Management Board
Helen Ghosh
Permanent Secretary
Bill Stow
Katrina Williams
Director General, Strategy, Evidence  
Director General, Food and Farming
and Finance
Gill Aitken
Peter Unwin
Director General, Law, HR and  
Director General, Environment and Rural
Corporate Services
Robert Watson
Alexis Cleveland
Chief Scientific Adviser
Non-Executive Director
Bill Griffiths
Poul Christensen
Non-Executive Director
Non-Executive Director


Priorities and Objectives
CHAPTER 2

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
27
What do we do?
Introduction
As stated in Chapter 1, the overarching purpose of Defra is “to secure a 
healthy environment in which we and future generations can prosper.” 
This purpose is supported by three Priorities, covering the policy work 
undertaken by Defra.
•  To secure a healthy environment for us al  and deal with the 
environmental risks; 
This Priority covers our work on improving biodiversity, land and soil 
management, water availability and quality, marine environment, air 
quality, and local environmental quality. It also covers our work in 
emergency and business continuity planning, including exotic animal 
disease and flood and coastal erosion risk management.
•  To promote a sustainable, low-carbon and resource-efficient economy; 
This Priority covers our work on sustainable consumption and 
production, climate change mitigation and sustainable rural 
communities.
•  To ensure a thriving farming sector and a sustainable, healthy and secure 
food supply; 
This Priority covers our work on food policy, CAP reform, and future 
farming policy including skil s for farming, agriculture and climate change 
and nutrient management. It also covers our work on animal health and 
welfare including responsibility and cost sharing, bovine TB and 
veterinary science.
These Priorities are delivered in line with three cross-cutting objectives; 
sustainability, adaptation and rurality, and in partnership with our delivery 
network.
This Chapter highlights our work in delivering our purpose, priorities and 
cross-cutting objectives and features highlights from the work of our 
delivery partners.


Priority 1:
Secure a healthy natural environment for 
us all and deal with environmental risks

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
29
Highlights from 2008/09
•  Water quality success measures are being met. Monitored rivers measured 76% 
‘good’ for chemical quality and 72% ‘good’ for biological quality in October 2008 
(as defined under the Environment Agency’s General Quality Assessment).2
•  In June 2008, 60 square nautical miles of Lyme Bay were closed to dredging for 
scallops and bottom trawlers, which drag nets along the seabed, in order to protect 
one of our most valuable areas for marine biodiversity. Whilst we remain committed 
to supporting the fishing industry there is a need to act to protect the best areas of 
our marine heritage from activities that have unacceptable environmental impacts.
•  The Marine and Coastal Access Bill was introduced to Parliament on time and in 
good order.
•  Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZ) regulations came into force in October 2008.
•  6 out of 8 UK Air Quality Strategy objectives continue to be met, with the remaining 
two (particulate matter (PM ) and nitrogen dioxide (NO )) already achieved across 
10
2
99% of the UK.
•  On 16 May 2008 Defra re-launched its award winning Noise Mapping England 
website, which provides interactive noise maps for large urban areas, major 
transportation links and significant industrial sources in England.
•  On 31 March 2009 the Secretary of State announced that he would be confirming 
the designation of the South Downs as a National Park and that he would be 
establishing a National Park Authority to manage it. The Authority will be fully 
operational from April 2011.
•  Defra responded successfully to two avian influenza incidents (HPAI H7); Bluetongue 
(BTV8); rabies; flooding incidents and two industrial disputes impacting fuel supply.
•  Exercise Green Star, led by the Radioactive Waste Preparedness team, successfully 
tested the arrangements for the consequence management phase of a Chemical, 
Biological, Radiological or Nuclear (CBRN) incident in November 2008.
•  On 3 February 2009 the Government published its response to the Anderson Review 
of the Government’s handling of the 2007 Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak in 
Surrey. The Government accepted all 26 of the main recommendations.
•  The Government published its response to the Pitt Review of the 2007 floods on 
17 December 2008. The Government supports changes in response to all of Pitt’s 
recommendations and we have also published an action plan, which sets out how 
Government, Local Authorities and others should implement these recommendations.
2  This is an improvement from 55% rated ‘good’ for biological quality and 55% for chemical quality in 1990.

30 Departmental Report 2009
Introduction
Our first Priority is to secure a healthy environment for us all to deal with environmental 
risks. There are many essential elements to this Priority from improving biodiversity on 
land and in the sea, to maintaining the quality of water and air and encouraging the 
effective use of our land. Underpinning this is the preparation today to cope with 
unexpected risks to our environment tomorrow. This includes mechanisms for dealing 
with animal diseases and flood risk.
A healthy natural environment is essential to build and promote a sustainable and 
resource-efficient economy. The natural environment provides us with life-sustaining 
services, and supplies us with many of the natural resources we need for a successful 
economy. A healthy natural environment also improves our health and wellbeing, for 
example, through opportunities for outdoor recreation in the countryside, on the 
waterways or in local greenspaces. In managing the natural environment, we need to 
value in our decision-making the full range of services our natural environment 
provides, its environmental limits, and also its interconnected character – with one part 
of the natural environment relying on the other parts to work as a whole. For this 
reason, Defra has been advocating a more integrated approach to protecting and 
enhancing the natural environment alongside economic prosperity.
The outcomes we are seeking to achieve through this Priority are reflected in our public 
commitments which include PSA 28 and several of our DSOs. Latest performance on 
these targets can be found in Chapter 4: Our Performance.
Improving Biodiversity
Biodiversity is the variability among living organisms from all sources and the ecological 
complexes of which they are part. This includes diversity within species, between 
species and of ecosystems.
What are we doing?
Defra works to improve Biodiversity within England, at the UK level and abroad, 
through influencing biodiversity issues internationally.
Following an announcement made by the Secretary of State last year that the 
Department would conduct an Ecosystem Assessment for England, Defra has now been 
joined by NERC and the Devolved Administrations in undertaking a UK-wide National 
Ecosystem Assessment. It will assess how the terrestrial, freshwater and marine 
ecosystems across the whole of the UK have changed in the past and how they might 
continue to change in the future. The Assessment will create a compelling and coherent 
narrative on the state and value of the natural environment and ecosystem services, will 
assess policy and management options to ensure their integrity in future, and will help 
raise awareness of their importance to human well-being and economic prosperity.
We have continued to work with our partners to improve the condition of Sites of 
Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs) in England. On the basis of latest condition assessments 
on each unit of land, by 31 March 2009, 88.4% of the total SSSI area was in 
favourable or recovering condition (see PSA 3b, page 176) and we consider our target 
of reaching 95% by December 2010 to be challenging but achievable. In August 2008 
Defra submitted two final land based sites to the European Commission for designation 
as part of Europe’s Natura 2000 network.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
31
November 2008 saw the launch of ‘Securing Biodiversity’, a new framework developed 
by Natural England in partnership with Defra to enhance the recovery of priority habitat 
and species identified under section 41 of the Natural Environment and Rural 
Communities Act 2006.3 We are embedding biodiversity considerations into a range of 
sectors. For example, we have been working with Communities and Local Government 
(CLG) on the draft Eco-towns Planning Policy Statement (PPS) recently published for 
consultation.
We are continuing to focus effort on reversing the long term decline in farmland birds. 
The Government’s Environmental Stewardship Scheme delivers significant benefits for 
England’s biodiversity and, following a review of progress, changes to the Scheme were 
made this year to benefit farmland birds. 
Non-native species that become invasive are a threat both to our environment and to 
economic interests. In May 2008 Defra launched a new GB invasive non-native species 
framework strategy for addressing this threat. We also consulted on the general 
principle of a Wildlife Management Strategy for England and set new priorities for 
wildlife crime including birds of prey persecution, poaching, and the illegal trade in 
endangered species. These were announced in February 2009.
New funding has been provided by Defra in 2008/09 to support local biodiversity 
recording. We also published the results of the 2007 Countryside Survey and updated 
UK and England Biodiversity Strategy Indicators.4
At the international level, Defra has continued its engagement in work under 
International Biodiversity Conventions, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, 
and contributed to ongoing work to develop a new, realistic and challenging global 
biodiversity target to focus activity after 2010. Defra is also supporting a major initiative 
review of the economics of the loss of ecosystems and biodiversity at a global level – 
The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) – and through the Darwin 
Initiative has provided over £8m of new funding over three years for 43 projects in 
developing countries.
In November 2008 the UK hosted and co-chaired the first meeting of the Convention 
on Biological Diversity’s (CBD) Ad Hoc Technical Experts Group (AHTEG) on Climate 
Change and Biodiversity. The purpose of the AHTEG was to provide biodiversity-relevant 
information to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 
(UNFCCC). The AHTEG presented these findings to the UNFCCC meeting in Poznan in 
December 2008.
More on Biodiversity can be found under the reporting for PSA 28, DSO 2 and SR04 
PSA 3 in Chapter 4, pages 149, 152 and 174.
3  Defra published the list of priority habitats and species in England in May 2008. A copy of the full list can be found at  
www.ukbap-reporting.org.uk/news/details.asp?X=45.
4  For more information on the Countryside Survey see www.countrysidesurvey.org.uk/. The UK Biodiversity indicators are  
available at www.jncc.gov.uk/biyp and England Biodiversity Strategy indicators at  
www.defra.gov.uk/wildlife-countryside/biodiversity/indicator.htm.

32 Departmental Report 2009
Natural England
Natural England is here to conserve and enhance the natural environment, 
for its intrinsic value, the wellbeing and enjoyment of people and the 
economic prosperity that it brings. Its work includes:
•  providing statutory advice on landscape and nature conservation issues;
•  helping to deliver the Public Service Agreement (PSA) targets on SSSIs 
condition and farmland birds;
•  overseeing the delivery of Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) targets;
•  delivering Environmental Stewardship, ‘classic’ agri-environment 
schemes and the Catchment Sensitive Farming schemes;
•  providing advice to Defra on increasing access to the natural 
environment including delivery of open access and access to the English 
coast; and
•  working to deliver action that will help to build the resilience of the 
natural environment in the face of climate change.
The total core grant allocated to Natural England for 2008/09 was £219m 
(of which £175m was grant in aid). Additional income received from Defra 
over and above the core grant was £18.4m.
Natural England has recorded key achievements in 2008/09 against its main 
performance indicators:
•  increased percentage of SSSIs land brought into favourable or 
recovering condition to 88%;
•  72% of Natural England led BAP priority species on track to recovery 
with 53,434 ha (65%) of BAP priority habitat brought into Higher Level 
Stewardship;
•  completed a survey of potential marine sites for designation as Special 
Areas of Conservation (SAC) and secured Lundy as the first ever ‘No 
take’ Marine Protected Area (MPA);
•  put in place over 4,000 ha of Entry Level Scheme options specifically for 
farmland birds;
•  inspired more people to value and conserve the natural environment 
through the Walking the Way to Health Initiative, now the largest 
outdoor walking programme in the EU, with over 525 health walking 
groups, involving 32,000 participants in 2,000 health walks every week;

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
33
Natural England (continued)
•  delivered 16,608 advisory contacts with farmers and land managers to 
support the take up of Environmental Stewardship helping to increase 
the total of England’s agricultural land under agri-environment 
agreements to 6.1 million ha (65%);
•  published a review of the role that land and marine managers can play 
as ‘carbon managers’ by protecting and enhancing vital carbon stores, 
especially in peatlands; and
•  developed draft climate change adaptation strategies in four landscape 
Character Areas (Cumbria High Fells, The Broads, Shropshire Hills and 
Dorset Downs) to demonstrate how locally-based action on the ground 
can deliver a natural environment resilient to climate change.
Looking forward, Natural England’s Corporate Plan 2009-12 sets out new 
and ambitious targets against the outcomes described in the Strategic 
Direction. For more information on Natural England, visit:  
www.naturalengland.org.uk.
Biodiversity and Climate Change
Climate change poses an increasing challenge for us in meeting our many 
commitments to conserve biodiversity.
We are working in a number of fora nationally and internationally where 
parties recognise that climate change is one of the biggest challenges 
biodiversity faces. Biodiversity will adapt to climate change and in the UK 
we are already seeing this through changes in the timings of seasonal 
events, changes in species ranges and changes to habitats and ecosystems. 
A change to the timing of spring events for example can lead to loss of 
synchrony between species and the availability of food and other resources 
upon which they depend.
In January 2009 Defra published climate change adaptation principles for 
biodiversity to guide those responsible for planning and delivering actions 
across the different sectors in the England Biodiversity Strategy. This builds 
on UK guidance for conservation practitioners published in 2007.

34 Departmental Report 2009
Biodiversity and Climate Change (continued)
Healthy ecosystems with well-protected biodiversity are better able to 
respond to and recover from disturbances and so will be more resilient to 
climate change. This is particularly important as biodiversity can also play a 
role in mitigating climate change. Woodland, forests and peat bogs all 
have an important role to play, with the potential to absorb carbon into 
their biomass providing a sink for global carbon emissions. In urban areas 
our parks and open spaces will help keep our cities cool as well as add to 
the mosaic of habitats that can allow wildlife to migrate to suitable climate 
space as it adapts. Our action to conserve and enhance biodiversity 
contributes to work to tackle climate change.
Land and Soil Management
One key element to securing a healthy environment and the maintenance of 
biodiversity is the appropriate management of land and soils. This area links strongly to 
Priority 3, ensuring a thriving farming sector and a sustainable, healthy and secure food 
supply. An example is Environmental Stewardship, an agri-environment scheme that 
provides funding to farmers and other land managers in England who deliver effective 
environmental management on their land. Environmental Stewardship and predecessor 
schemes currently cover about 65% of English agricultural land.
What are we doing?
The Environmental Stewardship Entry Level Scheme (ELS) provides a straightforward 
approach to good stewardship of the countryside through simple but effective land 
management, beyond Single Payment Scheme cross-compliance requirements to 
maintain land in good agricultural and environmental condition. Implementation of a 
number of recommendations from a recent review of progress of the scheme is 
currently underway, with the goal of increasing effectiveness whilst maintaining the 
scheme’s attractiveness to farmers and land managers.
Environmental Stewardship is a key component of the Rural Development Programme 
for England (RDPE), a funding programme designed to achieve a number of objectives, 
one of which is to safeguard and enhance the rural environment. RDPE is discussed in 
more detail on page 37.
A key issue affecting Land and Soil Management, as well as Biodiversity in England is 
the loss of set-aside land. Set-aside was first introduced in the UK in 1988 as an EU 
control measure to limit over-production of cereals and other arable crops. From its 
introduction, the percentage of set-aside required has varied between 5 and 15% in 
accordance with market circumstances, reflecting its role as a production control. 

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
35
The proportion of land to be set aside varied over the past 15 years and was set to zero 
in 2007 prior to the formal abolition of set-aside in 2008. Because most set-aside land 
was not actively farmed it provided a range of biodiversity and resource protection 
benefits that will be lost if areas of former set-aside revert to production. A public 
consultation was launched in March running to the end of May 2009 on the measures 
needed to recapture the environmental benefits of set-aside.
Work continued in 2008/09 on developing a new Soil Strategy for England which builds 
on progress made under the First Soil Action Plan for England 2004-06. The Strategy 
seeks to provide a clear framework for action by Defra, delivery partners and 
stakeholders for adequate and effective soil protection. We are now finalising the 
Strategy with the intention of launching it in July 2009.
Defra led on the negotiations on the EU Soil Framework Directive proposed by the 
European Commission in September 2006. Defra developed its impact assessment to 
cost the proposals put by the French Presidency and developed alternative proposals in 
line with the principles of Better Regulation and subsidiarity to inform negotiations.
Defra has developed recommendations for some simplification and improvement of 
soils standards for cross-compliance, which it will seek to introduce in 2010 as part of 
the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) Health Check changes to cross-compliance. 
These include using the soil protection review as the tool for all soil management rather 
than having a number of soil standards and improving guidance.
Defra’s Peat Project, which involves working with delivery agencies, along with 
Devolved Administrations, brings together work on peat relating to a range of land and 
soil objectives including biodiversity, carbon storage and reducing the risk of floods. 
Progress has been made in 2008 in collecting information related to the extent and 
state of our peat resources, putting actions in place to protect peatland and evaluating 
the ecosystem services provided by peat.
In July 2008, Defra announced a package of measures to clarify complex issues around 
deciding when substance levels in soil pose sufficient risk for the land to be considered 
‘contaminated land.’ This included new guidance on the legal definition of 
contaminated land, and significant improvements to the Environment Agency’s 
technical guidance on how to assess risks. Defra also administer the Contaminated 
Land Capital Projects Programme, a pot of money to which local authorities can apply 
for financial assistance to help them investigate and remediate contaminated sites. 
The Programme was modernised over the last year to increase transparency and 
accountability and to align it with recommendations of the National Audit Office. The 
Programme distributed approximately £14m to fund nearly 200 projects taking place in 
2008/09.
More on Land and Soil Management can be found under the performance reporting 
for PSA 28 in Chapter 4, page 150.

36 Departmental Report 2009
Forestry Commission
The Forestry Commission (FC) is the Government Department that, 
throughout Great Britain, delivers sustainable development through 
woodlands and forestry. Across Great Britain it is responsible for 
international policy, research, plant health and forest reproductive material 
regulations and setting standards for and monitoring sustainable forestry. 
In England it leads the delivery of the Government’s Strategy for England’s 
Trees, Woods and Forests (ETWF) through the public forest estate, other 
land owners and partnerships, and manages the forestry grant elements of 
the RDPE on behalf of Defra.
In 2008/09 Defra provided £87m towards the total FC expenditure of 
around £140m.
Key developments in 2008/09 include:
•  publishing, with Natural England, the delivery plan for the 
Government’s Strategy for England’s Trees, Woods and Forests; and
•  bringing 93% (as of January 2009) of SSSI for which the FC has statutory 
responsibility into favourable or recovering condition.
For 2009/10 the FC aims to:
•  support an independent assessment of forestry and climate change in 
the UK;
•  consult on the standards for managing woodlands for carbon and for 
instruments to incentivise the sequestration of carbon in woodlands;
•  consult on the UK Forestry Standard and Guidelines;
•  develop the Biosecurity Strategy to further evaluate and manage the 
threats posed from pests and pathogens;
•  complete the study on the future role of the public forest estate;
•  publish policy on restoring and expanding open habitats from woods 
and forests; and
•  develop opportunities for wind energy on the public forest estate.
For more information and to view FC reports visit www.forestry.gov.uk.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
37
The Rural Development Programme for England
The Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE) is a £3.9bn 
programme of funding that aims:
•  to safeguard and enhance the rural environment;
•  to improve the competitiveness of the agriculture and forestry sectors; 
and
•  to foster competitive and sustainable rural businesses and thriving rural 
communities.
RDPE is funded jointly between the EU and the UK Exchequer and covers 
the period 2007-13. The Government’s priority for the Programme is the 
implementation of England’s agri-environment schemes, covering £3bn of 
the budget, and delivered by Natural England. The remaining funding is 
provided for the socio-economic measures delivered by the Regional 
Development Agencies (RDAs). This includes funding for convergence areas 
(Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly).
The economic downturn is impacting on the uptake of the socio-economic 
measures in the Programme. Defra is working with delivery partners to 
identify any additional flexibility to increase uptake, including reviewing 
aid rates where possible. The CAP Health Check will provide additional 
flexibility to support changes which would address the new challenges. 
These include: climate change; renewable energies; water management; 
biodiversity; measures accompanying restructuring of the dairy sector; and 
innovation linked to the above-mentioned priorities other than the dairy 
sector restructuring.
The Energy Crops Scheme (ECS) continues to provide support for the 
growth of biomass for heat, power or combined heat and power use. 
Policy responsibility for the ECS passed to DECC as part of its action to 
promote renewable energy deployment in the UK. The ECS is delivered by 
Natural England.
As at 31 March 2009, Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) covered around 54% 
of available farmland in England, while the coverage of all Defra agri-
environment schemes, including predecessor schemes, and Countryside 
Stewardship and Environmentally Sensitive Areas, was around 65%.

38 Departmental Report 2009
The Rural Development Programme for England (continued)
In December 2008 the Secretary of State announced the full details of 
Uplands ELS, a new strand of Environmental Stewardship specifically for 
upland farmers. Defra worked very closely with stakeholders throughout 
the development of Uplands ELS to ensure the final design achieved the 
right balance between being practical for farmers and beneficial for the 
uplands environment. Arrangements have been put in place to help 
farmers with the transition from the Hill Farm Allowance to Uplands ELS.
More on RDPE can be found under the performance reporting for PSA 28 
and DSO 6 in Chapter 4: Our Performance.
Water Availability and Quality
In relation to the availability and quality of our water, our vision is for sustainable 
delivery of secure water supplies and an improved and protected water environment.
What are we doing?
The Water Framework Directive (WFD) is designed to improve and integrate the way 
water bodies are managed throughout Europe. The aim is for member states to reach 
good chemical and ecological status in inland and coastal waters by 2015. Good 
progress is being made against milestones to lead to implementation of the WFD.
Water companies have been placed under a duty to prepare and maintain plans that 
set out how they will meet demand for water. Ministers have set a 2010-35 planning 
period in order to factor in information about the consequences of climate change on 
the supply-demand balance. The plans should identify how each company will address 
adverse impacts of abstraction on Natura 2000 sites. Ministers have powers to hold 
public hearings/inquiries into plans and to direct changes to them.
Abstraction is the removal of water from surface water, such as rivers and aquifers, and 
is generally subject to control by the Environment Agency. Most abstractions greater 
than 20 cubic metres per day require an abstraction licence. The Environment Agency 
must consider the impacts of proposed abstractions on the environment and existing 
abstractors before it can issue new licences. There are a number of exemptions, such 
as for most forms of irrigation, dewatering of quarries, and covering some areas of 
England5, which are expected to cease in October 2009. Since October 2001, all 
licences have an end date but some 16,000 licences issued before that date do not and 
will remain in force until revoked.
The Drinking Water Directive sets maximum concentrations of various chemicals in 
drinking water for public consumption. The Directive was transposed into English law 
relating to public water supplies. The existing regulations for private water supplies, 
5  Including areas of Devon, Somerset, Shropshire, Herefordshire and Northumbria.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
39
which set standards for drinking water quality and monitoring requirements, need to be 
amended to transpose the requirements of the Directive. The consultation sets out 
proposals to effect the proper transposition.
An extensive package of advice and support is being rolled out across the country to 
support farmers in Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZs) and help them comply with a new 
mandatory Action Programme of measures to improve the use and management of 
manures and fertilisers. This will help reduce nitrate pollution of the water environment 
and implements the EC Nitrates Directive in England. The package includes a telephone 
helpline, guidance documentation, information events and practical workshops. Defra 
has successfully obtained a derogation from one of the more demanding measures of 
the Directive. This alleviates the burden on dairy farmers whilst maintaining and possibly 
even improving the level of protection provided by the Action Programme.
The Government’s Making Space for Water Strategy (2005) identified the need to 
address surface water flooding. The Strategy also informed the changes in responsibility 
which have been signalled through the Environment Agency Strategic overview role and 
Future Water (the Government’s water strategy published in February 2008). The results 
from 15 Integrated Urban Drainage pilots were published in June 2008 and these 
informed the publication of draft Surface Water Management Plan guidance in March 
2009. Changes to the legal framework have been proposed in the draft Floods and 
Water Management Bill, launched on 21 April 2009.
More on water quality can be found under the performance reporting for PSA 28 and 
DSO 2 in Chapter 4, page 149.
British Waterways
British Waterways (BW) is the UK’s largest navigation authority. It cares for 
around 3,540 km of historic canals, docks and navigable rivers in England, 
Scotland and Wales, aiming for a sustainable and integrated network of 
waterways throughout Britain.
Defra provided £64m towards total BW expenditure in England and Wales 
of around £218m.
Key developments in 2008/09 include:
•  completion of a £8.5m repair of the Monmouthshire & Brecon Canal in 
south Wales, following a major embankment breach at Gilwern;
•  construction of a £22m new lock and water control structure in East 
London to facilitate the supply of construction material to the Olympic 
site and contribute to a green and sustainable Olympics;
•  completion of a new canal link in front of the Three Graces in Liverpool, 
re-connecting the city’s waterfront with the Leeds & Liverpool Canal;
•  completion of the first phase of the restoration of the Manchester, 
Bolton & Bury Canal, which will act as a catalyst for major regeneration 
in Manchester;

40 Departmental Report 2009
British Waterways (continued)
•  installing a low-carbon alternative to traditional air conditioning, which 
uses water from the Grand Union Canal to help cool the data centre at 
the global HQ of GlaxoSmithKline. Estimates suggest up to 1,000 
canalside businesses could follow suit, generating reductions in carbon 
dioxide emissions of approximately one million tonnes; and
•  receiving planning consent for the redevelopment of Wood Wharf in 
London’s docklands, one of the most significant regeneration schemes in 
the Capital.
For 2009/10 BW plans to:
•  work with Olympic planners to begin the operation of waterways 
through the Olympic Park;
•  complete the restoration of the Droitwich Canals;
•  initiate a national debate about the future of the network as part of a 
wider review about the waterways and their contribution to modern 
society; and
•  follow up Treasury Operational Efficiency Programme recommendations 
to establish a wholly-owned property subsidiary.
To view further examples of how BW’s work is helping businesses become 
more resource efficient, visit www.britishwaterways.co.uk.
Marine
In respect of the wider marine environment, the UK’s vision is for clean, healthy, safe, 
productive and biologically diverse oceans and seas.
What are we doing?
The Marine and Coastal Access Bill, which is expected to receive Royal Assent later in 
2009, sets out an ambitious programme of work to help achieve this vision. The Bill is a 
groundbreaking piece of legislation that will greatly improve the way the UK uses its 
marine resources and maximises the benefits it gets from them. The Bill introduces new 
systems for marine planning and licensing and sets out a flexible mechanism to protect 
natural resources, including a process for designating Marine Conservation Zones 
(MCZs) that contribute to an ‘ecologically coherent network’ of well-managed marine 
protected areas. It will provide measures for better management of fisheries, including 
migratory and freshwater fisheries; and it will give people better access to the English 
coast. A new Marine Management Organisation (MMO) will be established to act as a 
strategic delivery body for the marine area.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
41
Marine Management Organisation
The Marine Management Organisation (MMO) will be a Non Departmental 
Public Body and will be built on the Marine and Fisheries Agency (MFA), 
which will continue to deliver its existing functions until the MMO is 
created.
Defra and the MFA are working closely together to ensure that the ground 
work is being laid to enable the MMO to be established in April 2010.
An implementation team was established from April 2008 with the aim of 
achieving a smooth transition from the Marine and Fisheries Agency to  
the MMO.
Key work areas this year for the MMO Implementation team have included:
•  establishing a programme management infrastructure;
•  selecting a location for the headquarters of the new organisation;
•  engaging stakeholders that will need to work closely with the MMO;
•  developing an organisational blueprint for the MMO;
•  developing a new system of marine planning and a new integrated 
licensing regime, which the MMO will undertake;
•  beginning the recruitment of the Chair and Chief Executive as 
designates so they can participate in the design of the MMO before 
formal launch; and
•  developing a transition plan with the MFA to ensure there is a smooth 
transfer of responsibilities on vesting the MMO.
Work is currently ongoing to re-locate the MFA headquarters to its new 
location in Tyneside ahead of the MMO being vested.
For more information on the MMO, visit 
www.defra.gov.uk/marine/legislation/key-areas.htm.
We made progress on implementing Fisheries 2027, our long-term vision for sustainable 
fisheries. In December, the UK secured a fair deal at the annual EU fisheries 
negotiations to safeguard fish stocks, maintain a sustainable fishing industry and 
protect the marine environment. In November, a new Cod Recovery Plan was agreed to 
promote continued recovery of cod stocks in EU waters, including the North Sea. The 
Government has been working to identify priorities for Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) 
reform in 2012, and the Fisheries Minister set out guidelines for reform to draw on 
stakeholder views and the House of Lords inquiry.

42 Departmental Report 2009
In August 2008, Defra consulted on proposals to help bring short-term stability to the 
inshore fleet in England, as a first step towards a sustainable fleet in the long term. 
December’s final package included a new licence to fishermen not targeting quota 
stocks, limiting any increase of effort and safeguarding stocks, and a £5m 
decommissioning scheme. We have established a Sustainable Access to Inshore 
Fisheries project to further develop the evidence base on the impacts of inshore fishing 
in England. In June, the UK agreed an EU regulation to combat Illegal Unreported and 
Unregulated (IUU) fishing. This regulation, due to come into force in 2010, seeks to 
prevent, deter and eliminate the import of IUU fishery products into the Community. 
Defra and DfID worked on Sustainable Development Dialogues with China on fisheries 
and a fisheries governance programme in Southern Africa.
Marine and Fisheries Agency
The Marine and Fisheries Agency (MFA) undertakes a wide range of 
delivery functions and responsibilities for Defra in the marine environment 
and marine fisheries. These include:
•  management of UK fleet capacity;
•  enforcement of sea fisheries legislation and implementation of EU 
marketing regime;
•  management of UK fisheries quotas; fishing industry grants and UK 
state aids;
•  Data Collection Regulation (EC) 1543/2000 and the management, 
recording and provision of data on fishing activities and catches;
•  control and enforcement of marine construction sites; and
•  coordination of environmental aspects of emergency response.
Key developments in 2008/09 include:
•  paying out over £5m to projects associated with the fishing industry in 
grants on over 180 English projects;
•  implementing a new system of administrative penalties for fisheries 
offences. These are designed to be a quicker, simpler alternative to 
criminal proceedings and reduce administrative burdens on businesses;
•  carrying out Joint Deployment Campaigns in EU waters involving other 
Member States and the Community Fisheries Control Agency. This 
involves each fishery protection body contributing ships, aircraft, sea-
going and shore-side inspectors in joint operations to improve the 
effectiveness of enforcement of the Cod Regulations;

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
43
Marine and Fisheries Agency (continued)
•  working closely with Defra in delivering an under 10m decommissioning 
scheme as part of a package of measures which Ministers have 
announced to try to ensure a more sustainable future for this part of 
the industry. £5m has been spent to decommission 65 high-catching 
English under 10m vessels;
•  gaining a new responsibility as the enforcing authority for cases of 
environmental damage to vulnerable species and habitats in the sea 
under the Environmental Damage Regulations;
•  management of new offshore marine regulations, enforcement and 
wildlife licensing;
•  playing a key role in managing emergencies caused by merchant 
shipping in the marine environment; and
•  securing a high profile role in numerous FEPA licence applications for 
construction in the sea including the Gateway Gas Storage project 
involving the construction of a £600m sub-sea gas storage facility 25km 
offshore from Barrow-in-Furness.
For more information about the MFA’s work, visit www.mfa.gov.uk.
The European Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD), agreed in July 2008, 
requires the UK to achieve ‘Good Environmental Status’ for our seas by 2020. Defra 
has been focusing on putting the Directive into national law and preparing for 
implementation. Defra published the Government’s High Level Marine Objectives in 
April 2009 following a consultation process in 2008. The High Level Objectives are 
agreed across UK administrations and Whitehall departments and reflect how 
sustainable development will be delivered in the marine environment. A Marine Science 
Coordination Committee has been established to develop a UK Marine Science Strategy 
to help deliver the evidence to fulfil the UK’s Marine Objectives. Over £1m has been 
invested in a programme to assess the state of UK seas and to fulfil international 
marine monitoring commitments. ‘Charting Progress 2’ will provide evidence to meet 
the requirements of the MSFD and highlight priorities for the MMO.
The Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership has developed a special report card on 
‘Ecosystem Linkages’ with climate change, published in April 2009. Ocean acidification 
is getting more attention as an emerging issue, highlighted in the report. Defra has 
developed a £10m five-year research programme with the Natural Environment 
Research Council (NERC) to understand the impacts of climate change-induced ocean 
acidification including likely effects on commercial fishing.

44 Departmental Report 2009
Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture 
Science
The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (Cefas) is an 
internationally renowned scientific research and advisory centre working in 
fisheries management, environmental protection and aquaculture. It aims 
to be the main source of high quality science used to conserve and enhance 
the aquatic environment, promote sustainable management of its natural 
resources, and protect the public from aquatic contaminants.
Cefas’s strategically located wave-measuring devices provide near real-time 
data for flood forecasting. The data is used by the Environment Agency 
and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency to manage flood-risk 
issues and coastal defences, and forms part of the UK’s Storm Tide 
Forecasting Service.
Cefas’s SmartBuoy programme, part of the UK’s Clean Seas Environment 
Monitoring Programme, underpins the OSPAR Commission assessments of 
UK waters by providing near real-time data for physical and biological 
parameters. The system of buoys provides:
•  improved understanding of environmental variability and biodiversity; 
and
•  new insights into marine ecosystem function.
A new SmartBuoy was added to the network in January 2009, aimed at 
monitoring the freshwater plume emanating from the Humber and the 
Wash.
A flexible package of measures has been devised to implement CFP Council 
Regulations on management of fish stocks. These include:
•  a 30% increase in the North Sea Cod Quota and the establishment of a 
new separate quota for Eastern Channel Cod in 2009;
•  use of more selective fishing gears – like the ‘Eliminator’ trawl that was 
piloted by Cefas in UK waters; and
•  real-time and seasonal closures to fishing grounds.
The intention is to allow fishermen to land more of what they catch, whilst 
ensuring a significant reduction in the wasteful discarding of fish. The 
measures should also help to reduce overall cod mortality, leading to a 
more sustainable and productive fishery.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
45
Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture 
Science (continued)
Cefas scientists have been working with the fishing industry – through the 
Fisheries Science Partnership and other initiatives – to pilot adaptations to 
traditional fishing gears. Using their knowledge of fish behaviour, the 
scientists have suggested simple changes such as changing mesh sizes and 
providing specialist escape panels for different species. These have 
delivered significant reductions in the numbers of discards. In addition, 
Cefas has been working directly with the fishing industry to encourage 
widespread adoption of this approach and to share more sustainable 
solutions among the fishing industry.
For more information about Cefas work, visit www.cefas.co.uk.
The Government published proposals in September responding to the International 
Whaling Commission’s June 2008 meeting decision to discuss its future role, in order to 
lobby and influence other member states so as to protect whales for future 
generations. Defra worked with stakeholders and delivery bodies to develop a draft 
strategy to select and designate a network of marine protected areas, including 
European marine sites and MCZs. It was published for consultation in April 2009. In 
July, the Government ordered that about 10% of Lyme Bay off the South West coast 
would be closed to dredging for shellfish and demersal trawling following public 
consultation in 2007.
Air Quality
Air Quality is key to maintaining health and environmental standards. The UK Air 
Quality Strategy sets out specific standards and objectives to be met in addition to EU 
obligations.
What are we doing?
Six out of eight of the UK Air Quality Strategy objectives continue to be met over the 
whole of the UK. However, some areas remain in breach or are likely to exceed the 
levels of air pollution for the remaining two: PM  (particulate matter) and NO  
10
2
(nitrogen dioxide), which can have serious health impacts. We are working to identify 
what further measures might be needed to reduce levels of NO , which is a major 
2
problem along roadsides in urban areas of the UK.
In February 2009, Defra published extensive guidance to Local Authorities on the 
measures available to them to promote the use of low emission vehicles, low emission 
zones and retrofitment of pollution abatement equipment to vehicles. This guidance 
will assist Local Authorities in their work to reduce pollution at the local level.

46 Departmental Report 2009
Negotiations on a revised EC Ozone-Depleting Substances Regulation were successfully 
completed. This will reinforce existing measures to protect the stratospheric ozone layer 
as well as pave the way for possible new obligations dealing with recovery and 
destruction of ozone-depleting substances. The UK was successful in ensuring that any 
new such measures must include a full economic assessment of costs and benefits, taking 
account of the individual circumstances of Member States (see evidence text-box below).
Defra officials played a key part in the work leading to an historic decision by the 
Governing Council of the United Nations Environment Programme in February 2009 to 
prepare a new legally binding framework to control emissions of mercury, a persistent 
neurotoxin, which is capable of travelling over large distances and can therefore only be 
tackled effectively by global measures.
During 2008, Defra worked with the Department for Transport (DfT) in developing 
policy on the expansion of Heathrow airport in relation to air quality and noise limits 
following the 2007 consultation. In January 2009 the Government confirmed policy 
support for adding a third runway at Heathrow, making clear that safeguards would be 
put in place to ensure air quality and noise limits would be met. Defra is working with 
DfT with a view to consulting on the detail of the compliance mechanism later in 2009. 
A precondition of any expansion will be that air quality and noise limits are already met.
More on Air Quality can be found under the performance reporting for PSA 28 in 
Chapter 4 on page 149.
Evidence: Economics
The economics profession at Defra has provided substantial analytical input 
and helped the Department to deliver on a number of key outcomes that 
will significantly improve air quality in the UK. This includes informing the 
European process to negotiate and agree the Euro VI vehicle emissions 
standards in relation to heavy goods vehicles (HGVs). Combined with the 
Euro 6 standards agreement for light duty vehicles (LDVs), such as 
passenger cars, this has contributed towards the realisation of expected 
benefits of up to £1.2bn as identified in the Air Quality Strategy 2007. Our 
efforts in agreeing this technical standard was further supported by the 
announcement in Budget 2009 that incentives would be put in place to 
increase uptake of Euro VI.
Defra analysis also played an integral part in informing the International 
Maritime Organisation’s (IMO) commitment to reducing emissions from 
shipping, the key provision being the agreement of long-term reductions 
of sulphur in fuel, with an estimated air quality benefit to the UK of up to 
£577m.
Finally to support local improvements in air quality, guidance was also 
provided to Local Authorities to further support their efforts. This work 
provided guidance on the appraisal of all policies that may impact on air 
quality including introducing low emission zones, retrofitment of emission 
control equipment and incentivising low emission vehicles.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
47
Local Environmental Quality
To secure a healthy natural environment for us all, attention needs to be paid to 
improving our local environment. This involves improving the cleanliness of our local 
environment, encouraging local engagement with local environmental issues, and 
continuing to manage the local noise environment. Several strands of Defra’s work 
support this objective.
What are we doing?
National Indicator (NI) 195 is the street cleanliness indicator which measures levels of 
litter, detritus, graffiti and fly-posting on our streets and neighbourhoods. All councils in 
England must survey their areas on a regular basis and report standards of cleanliness 
to Defra. 72 out of 150 Local Area Agreements (LAA) have NI 195 as an improvement 
target.
2008 saw the completion of the roll-out of the extended Local Environment Quality 
Survey of England to all district and unitary councils. This in-depth survey covers 
everything from levels of litter on the streets to extent of graffiti and fly-posting at bus 
stops and is a tool to help Local Authorities improve the services they provide.
ENCAMS
ENCAMS (also known as Environmental Campaigns or Keep Britain Tidy) 
works with Defra to offer direct support to local authorities including 
through work with the Government Offices on the LAA process.
Defra funds ENCAMS to campaign against littering and other forms of anti-
social behaviour. Campaigns in 2008 focused on the two most significant 
elements in litter: smoking related materials and fast-food litter. The Big 
Tidy Up was the first national clean-up campaign in over 8 years, designed 
to encourage a public upsurge in local clean-up events and interest in local 
environmental issues.
Eco-Schools is an international award programme administered in England 
by ENCAMS using funding from Defra. Schools work towards gaining one 
of three awards – Bronze, Silver and the prestigious Green Flag award, 
which symbolises excellence in the field of environmental activity. The 
scheme encourages children and teachers to make their school more 
environmentally-friendly and sustainable.  The number of schools in 
England participating in the Eco-Schools scheme neared the 50% mark 
during 2008/09.
For more information about ENCAMS work, visit www.encams.org.

48 Departmental Report 2009
Defra has been developing strategic noise maps for major roads, railways, airports and 
urban areas. These serve two purposes. Firstly, they can be used to provide information 
on noise levels that can be linked to population data to estimate how many people are 
affected. This leads to the second use – and the main point of noise mapping – to help 
people develop action plans for managing environmental noise in a sustainable way. 
This year we have made the necessary regulations to establish five yearly reviews of 
noise maps and action plans. Consultations on the proposals are expected over the 
forthcoming year.
Emergency and Business Continuity Planning
Emergency Planning requires Defra, working with its operational partners, to be well 
prepared to deal with emergencies for which its business areas are responsible, such as 
animal or plant diseases, food or water supply emergencies, flooding, or coordinating 
the consequence management of a Chemical, Biological, Radiological or Nuclear 
(CBRN) incident.
Business Continuity Planning requires Defra to be well prepared to maintain essential 
business functions in the face of serious disruption to its staff (for example as a result of 
a flu pandemic or serious disruption to public transport) or as a result of serious 
disruption to its infrastructure such as fire, bomb, flood or IT failure or indeed a large 
scale and sustained response to an emergency event.
What are we doing?
During 2008/09 Defra has shown itself to be resilient to emergencies despite 
fundamental departmental changes. There were successful responses to Avian Influenza 
incidents, Bluetongue, Rabies, flooding incidents and two industrial disputes impacting 
fuel supply. There was a successful Exercise Green Star, led by the Radioactive Waste 
Preparedness team. Green Star tested the arrangements for the consequence 
management phase of a CBRN incident.
In line with the recommendations coming out of the Pitt Report (flooding), the 
Anderson Report (animal disease) and an internal review of governance and delivery 
across this subject area, Defra is now working on delivering a greater sharing of 
experience across policy leads as well as setting up a training programme on emergency 
response.
In terms of animal disease, Defra’s revised Contingency Plan for Exotic Animal Diseases 
was laid before Parliament on 9 December 2008. The plan covers arrangements for 
dealing with outbreaks and incidents of exotic animal disease, including Foot and 
Mouth Disease, Avian Influenza, Classical Swine Fever and Newcastle Disease.
The Contingency Plan is comprised of two parts:
•  an Overview of Emergency Preparedness which provides details of how we have 
prepared for the operational response; and

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
49
•  the Framework Response Plan which is an operational manual for those involved in 
managing the response and policy information by specific animal disease, setting 
out current policy on how each of these diseases will be dealt with.
Business continuity planning is being amended to bring it completely in line with British 
Standard BS25999 (the British Standard for business continuity management).
The UK Government Decontamination Service (part of 
the Food and Environment Research Agency from  
1 April 2009)
The UK Government Decontamination Service (GDS) is an Executive Agency 
of Defra. Its purpose is to increase the nation’s resilience to the 
consequences of terrorist or major accidental incidents involving the 
release of CBRN materials. The GDS is also the UK’s national centre for 
providing access to expertise on dealing with decontamination and wider 
remediation of the built and open environment and critical transport 
assets. Our work programme is divided between three main areas:
•  provision of an evaluated Framework of Specialist Suppliers able to offer 
decontamination/remediation services in the event of a CBRN incident;
•  input to the Central Government knowledge on national capability and 
capacity for decontamination of the built and open environment; and
•  provision of operational and tactical advice and guidance to all tiers of 
Government and other potential responsible authorities and 
stakeholders.
Key Developments in 2008/09 include:
•  successful completion of the programme to establish the new 
Framework of Specialist Suppliers – formally launched in Autumn 2008;
•  provision of advice and guidance and practical support to a number of 
responsible authorities to facilitate recovery following local 
contamination incidents; and
•  successful completion of programme to refocus and streamline the GDS 
remit and resources, and to establish the GDS as part of a new Defra 
Executive Agency, the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA).

50 Departmental Report 2009
The UK Government Decontamination Service (part of 
the Food and Environment Research Agency from  
1 April 2009) (continued)
Fera was launched on 1 April 2009 by merging the GDS with the Central 
Science Laboratory (CSL), Defra’s Plant Health and Seeds Inspectorate 
(PHSI), Plant Health Division and the Plant Varieties and Seeds Division 
(PVS). The GDS provision will be maintained as a going concern, and for 
2009/10 our plans include:
•  building on the linkages between GDS and other areas of Fera to 
improve our capability; and
•  ensuring that, as part of Fera, GDS has a stronger cross-government 
presence to support work on influencing and developing CBRN 
contingency strategies, and to provide a practical service to Government 
in the event of a CBRN incident.
For further information about Fera, visit www.defra.gov.uk/fera.
Exotic Animal Disease
Exotic Diseases are diseases that are not typically present in the UK (for example Foot 
and Mouth, avian influenza, classical swine fever).
The health and welfare of animals is central to Defra’s work of protecting and 
improving livestock as well as controlling and eradicating disease. Government works in 
partnership with industry on animal health and welfare issues for four reasons.
•  To protect human health – ‘zoonotic’ diseases are those which are transmissible 
between vertebrate animals and humans.
•  To protect and promote the welfare of animals.
•  To protect the interests of the wider economy, environment and society – some 
animal diseases like Foot and Mouth Disease are highly infectious and can move 
extensively or rapidly through animal populations.
•  International Trade – the presence of animal disease, either at the national or 
regional level, can reduce our ability to trade.
What are we doing?
Defra’s Exotic Disease programme aims to reduce the likelihood and impact of exotic 
disease outbreaks by:
•  rigorous risk-based prioritisation;
•  a visible shift in responsibility to animal keepers;
•  a robust delivery system;

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
51
•  policies and plans that focus on the right risks and stand up to cost-benefit analysis; 
and
•  effective and efficient response to outbreaks, with animal keepers and wider 
industry taking the lead where appropriate.
Defra seeks to reduce the risk of exotic disease outbreaks or incursions through various 
measures including surveillance, import/export controls, publishing guidance for 
industry on bio-security, preventative vaccination schemes and movement controls. On 
farm biosecurity measures to prevent the spread of endemic diseases also confers some 
protection to the undetected spread of exotics. Industry is also applying lessons learned 
from previous exotic disease outbreaks to business.
Government is also working to continuously improve its own preparedness for exotic 
disease outbreaks. These measures are aimed at building on capability and capacity to 
respond. This programme has successfully delivered improved instructions and training 
programmes, an extensive library of templates for disease declarations, notices and 
movement licences for high risk diseases, a standard for measuring policy preparedness 
and cross-team networks to pool knowledge and share resources.
Bluetongue Control Case Study
Bluetongue disease was first confirmed as circulating within the UK in 
September 2007. The Bluetongue Team and its core group of industry 
stakeholders worked together to develop the Bluetongue Control Strategy 
and the 2008 Emergency Vaccination Plan. We were the first country in 
Europe to underwrite a supply of vaccine, making 28 million doses of 
vaccine available for use throughout England. This was successfully rolled 
out, starting with the most at-risk counties. We were the only northern 
European country to have seen no clinical evidence of disease circulating 
in 2008.
The success and unprecedented speed of this campaign was largely due to 
the close working relationship with industry and our delivery partners, and 
of course the action by farmers to vaccinate. A voluntary vaccination 
approach enabled us to distribute vaccine quickly and cheaply. We have 
seen sales of vaccine sufficient to vaccinate 60% of susceptible animals 
throughout England. Experts believe the high uptake of vaccine in the East 
and the South effectively controlled circulating Bluetongue Virus 8 (BTV-8) 
in this area, and protected the rest of England and wider GB from spread 
of the disease.
Therefore our success has not only been visible from a disease mitigation 
perspective, but also in terms of responsibility and cost-sharing. A balance 
has been achieved between the level of Government intervention to 
establish control zones and movement restrictions (as informed by cost-
benefit analysis, underwriting vaccine supply) and industry responsibility 
for encouraging vaccination to protect livestock and businesses.

52 Departmental Report 2009
Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management
Flooding is largely a natural result of severe weather events which are highly variable 
from one year to another. We can’t conclusively attribute any particular event to climate 
change. However, climate change predictions for the UK do suggest we can expect 
changes in rainfall patterns including higher winter rainfall and more intense summer 
storms over the course of the coming century.
The Flood and Coastal Erosion Risk Management programme seeks to promote a broad 
portfolio of measures for managing the risk from all forms of flooding (river, coastal, 
groundwater, surface run-off and sewer) and coastal erosion. We are committed to 
ensuring that the Government’s significant investment in this area yields the maximum 
benefit to society, whilst also ensuring that we are properly equipped to deal with 
future flooding events.
What are we doing?
We are developing a long-term investment strategy for floods and coastal erosion 
which will consider the funding needs and presssures for the next 25 years and how 
the greatest value for money can be achieved in the way that our investment is 
delivered.
We have published for consultation a draft Floods and Water Management Bill which 
will consolidate the existing legislative framework, clarify roles and responsibilities for 
managing risk from all sources of flooding and maximise joint-working between all 
bodies, agencies and communities.
A consultation was launched in December 2008 on proposals for the National Flood 
Emergency Framework (NFEF). The consultation paper kicked-off a proactive 
consultation exercise involving workshops which attracted some 400 responder 
organisations in the period to the end of March 2009.
Defra is leading on an 18 month Flood Rescue National Enhancement project to 
improve flood rescue capability and coordination between agencies. This will include 
putting in place a UK Flood Rescue Operations Framework for all Search and Rescue 
(SAR) organisations to work within, as well as the further development of team typing 
and competency based accreditation. 
The Thames Estuary 2100 (TE2100) project launched a formal public consultation at the 
end of March 2009 and is a good example of the application of research, particularly in 
relation to the understanding of the behaviour of flood risk systems and identification 
of key risks. 
Defra have funded six Local Authorities which have significant surface water flood risk 
to develop surface water management plans, which will test the draft guidance 
contained within the draft Surface Water Management Plan guidance. The Pitt review 
identified an additional £15m of funding to be used by Local Authorities to develop 
further Surface Water Management Plans, mapping of drainage assets and adoption 
and maintenance of sustainable urban drainage systems.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
53
Several recent projects have contributed to a better understanding of the costs and 
benefits of flood and coastal erosion risk management and how these are distributed 
between different groups. Particular progress has been made on understanding the 
benefits afforded by property-level flood protection and resilience. This was strongly 
supported by the Pitt review of the summer 2007 floods and has informed a pilot 
scheme and led to the launch of a £5m property-level protection grant scheme, 
announced in December 2008.
The Environment Agency
The Environment Agency (EA) is the leading public body for protecting and 
improving the environment in England and Wales. With others, it aims to 
make sure that air, land and water are looked after, so that tomorrow’s 
generations inherit a cleaner, healthier world.
The EA was set up under the Environment Act 1995 and given certain 
duties and powers. It has around 12,500 members of staff and a budget of 
just over £1bn. Around 60% of their funding comes from Government, and 
most of the rest comes from various charging schemes set by Parliament.
Key Achievements for 2008/09 include:
•  improved flood defences around the country, including the opening of 
the Selby Flood Alleviation scheme, an £18m scheme reducing flood risk 
to 2,500 properties;
•  working with industry to reduce greenhouse gas emissions e.g. working 
with industrial partners to set up the KES Landfill Gas Umbrella Project, 
a new initiative promoting landfill gas and its potential;
•  working with Local Authorities to continue the downward trend in 
fly-tipping;
•  improving river water quality for the eighteenth consecutive year;
•  using our risk-based approach to reduce illegal waste activity, for 
example, stopping 24 consignments of waste being illegally transported 
to West Africa.

54 Departmental Report 2009
The Environment Agency (continued)
For 2009/10 the EA plans to:
•  continue to implement Pitt Review recommendations concerning lessons 
learnt from the 2007 summer floods;
•  continue with our programme of work to reduce the flood risk faced by 
145,000 houses by March 2011;
•  produce 11 River Basin Management Plans for agreement by Ministers 
in late 2009; and
•  contribute to the feasibility study on tidal power in the Severn Estuary 
towards finding an environmentally acceptable and cost effective means 
of exploiting the tidal range.
For more information on the EA, visit www.environment-agency.gov.uk.
Forward Look for Priority 1
In addition to continuing with our current work in supporting our Priority to secure a 
healthy natural environment and deal with environmental risks, in the forthcoming year 
Defra has the following plans:
Improving Biodiversity
•  We will continue to work with Natural England and all our partner organisations to 
encourage remedial delivery across the SSSI suite to meet the SSSI PSA target of 
bringing 95% of SSSI land in England into favourable or recovering condition.
•  We will complete the 4th National Report to the Convention on Biological Diversity 
by June 2009.
•  We plan to develop and publish our Wildlife Management Strategy.
•  We will publish in July 2009 the report on the UK Biodiversity Action Plan: Highlights 
from the 2008 reporting round.
•  The Wildlife Health Strategy, which supports biodiversity, has received expert review 
and is due to be published on 15 June 2009.
•  We will implement more of the recommendations from the Environmental 
Stewardship review of progress relating to further improving performance for 
farmland birds.
•  In Summer 2009, we aim to develop a Government Strategy for biodiversity 
conservation in the Overseas Territories.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
55
•  Make amendments to the Wildlife and Countryside Act so as to increase protection 
against the threat from invasive non-native species by restricting the release, 
planting and sale of certain species.
•  We will launch a new environmental volunteering campaign, ‘Muckin4Life’, a 
component of the Department of Health’s Change4Life campaign focusing on 
volunteering to improve biodiversity.
•  The findings from the second meeting of the AHTEG will feed into the UNFCCC 
process in Copenhagen in December 2009.
Land and Soil Management
•  Ministerial decision on set-aside mitigation will be taken following consideration of 
the responses to the Environmental Standards in Farming consultation.
•  We will continue to implement the objectives of the new Soil Strategy for England.
•  We will continue negotiations on the Soil Framework Directive, ensuring its 
development in line with the principles of better regulation and subsidiarity.
•  We will continue work on Defra’s Peat Project with the intention of developing new 
policy options in Winter 2009/10.
•  We will continue implementation of the Commons Act 2006 which is contributing 
towards the SSSI target. This includes the establishment of commons councils, which 
will help improve the management of common land, and the introduction of 
powers to stop unauthorised agricultural activities on such land.
Water Availability and Quality
•  We will obtain Ministerial decisions on hearing/inquiries and changes to water 
company Water Resources Management Plans.
•  We will consult on changes to the Water Fittings Regulations to improve water 
efficiency in Summer 2009.
•  We will consult on time-limiting of permanent abstraction licences.
Marine
•  We will consult on the establishment of Inshore Fisheries and Conservation 
Authorities.
•  We will publish the Strategy for Marine Protected Areas for consultation.
•  We plan to ratify the OSPAR amendment to permit all routes for carbon capture  
and storage.
•  We will implement measures to achieve the revised cod recovery plan and to 
manage the 2009 catch limits.
•  We will consult on transposition of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive.

56 Departmental Report 2009
•  We will publish the Draft Marine Policy Statement for consultation.
•  We plan to deliver the Marine Science Strategy.
•  We plan to gain Royal Assent of Marine and Coastal Access Act.
Air Quality
•  We will work with Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT) and DfT to deliver the commitment 
made in the Budget 2009 to encourage the use of Euro V1 HGVs and buses.
•  We will continue to work with DfT and HMT to explore the feasibility of incentivising 
European standards for emissions from cars as announced in the 2009 Budget.
•  We submitted in April 2009 the UK application seeking, for small areas of the UK, 
an exemption from the obligation to apply the limit value for PM .
10
•  We plan to commence work to develop measures on NO  including stakeholder 
2
engagement in Summer 2009.
•  We will continue negotiations on the Industrial Emissions Recast Directive with a 
view to possible political agreement in June 2009.
•  Substantially complete the review for the first group of Local Authority-regulated 
industry sectors of guidance on air emissions standards and begin the review for 
other sectors as part of a three-year programme.
•  We will continue negotiations on a revised Gothenburg Protocol under the United 
Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Convention on Long Range 
Transboundary Air Pollution.
•  We will consult on transposition of the new Ambient Air Quality Directive (2008/50/
EC) later in 2009.
•  We will consult on proposed regulations in 2009 to help implement the EC Ozone-
Depleting Substances (Qualifications) (Amendments) Regulation.
Local Environmental Quality
•  We will continue to campaign via ENCAMS for behaviour change that will lead to 
improved local environmental quality – campaigns are planned on tackling littering 
from vehicles and a further round of the ‘Big Tidy Up’; encouraging and enabling 
communities to play an active role in looking after their neighbourhood and 
promoting good local environmental quality.
•  We will be publishing, following a public consultation, noise action plans for large 
urban areas, major roads and major railways, which will be designed to manage 
noise issues and effects, including noise reduction where necessary. Airport 
operators will do the same for the major airports covered by the Environmental 
Noise (England) Regulations 2006 (as amended).

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
57
•  This year we will be holding a series of events to mark the 60th anniversary of the 
National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949. This landmark Act ensured 
that our most precious places are accessible to the many rather than the few, by 
laying the foundations for National Parks, designated Areas of Outstanding Natural 
Beauty, national and local nature reserves and national trails. We will use the 60th 
anniversary celebrations to raise awareness of the contribution that our natural 
landscapes make to local economic prosperity – and the opportunities they provide 
for people to lead greener, healthier lifestyles.
Local Government Performance Framework
The new performance management framework for local government, 
which was agreed in 2008, was a step-change in the representation of 
environmental interests in local government performance management 
arrangements. The new national indicators set is now the only means of 
measuring national priorities delivered by local government and local 
areas. The number of indicators has been radically reduced, from around 
1,200 to 198. Thirteen of these cover environmental issues. These include 
areas which have long been at the heart of local government delivery such 
as waste management and local environment quality, but for the first time 
also cover wider environmental issues including climate change, 
biodiversity and flood management. The new environmental indicators 
have been widely taken up by local areas in their Local Area Agreements 
with central Government.
Emergency and Business Continuity Planning
•  Defra is one of a number of departments working to make sure that everything 
possible is done to prepare for and minimise the effects of a possible pandemic in 
the UK. Teams in Food and Farming Group and Contingency Planning and Security 
are heavily involved, and have well developed plans, which have been put into 
action. Defra is working closely with all parts of industry to ensure that Government 
provides support where required. We are also working within Defra to ensure that 
services are provided to maintain as far as possible a safe working environment for 
our staff in relation to any possible pandemic.
•  In terms of emergency preparedness, Defra plans to build on our departmental 
capacity for disease response by introducing a programme of activity across Defra to 
share experience from event responses and to train staff, including volunteers.
•  Defra will also work towards further developing our existing exit strategies from 
exotic disease outbreaks to facilitate quick and efficient closedown of outbreak 
recovery phase.

58 Departmental Report 2009
•  We will develop our strategies and control measures for the key medium-high risk 
exotic diseases, building on work done in 2008/09 and focusing particularly on pigs, 
horses and rabies.
Exotic Animal Disease
•  New legislation for Swine Vesicular Disease (SVD) to be laid in June replacing the old 
outdated legislation for the control of SVD with modern, more proportionate 
measures.
•  We will encourage vaccination against Bluetongue Virus 8 (BTV-8) and prepare for 
the risk of incursion of other serotypes.
Flood Risk Management
•  As recommended by the Sir Michael Pitt report, the final National Flood  
Emergency Framework (NFEF) will be produced incrementally and be completed by 
30 June 2010.
•  By May 2009 the Flood Rescue National Enhancement project will have created a 
multi-agency, national register of flood rescue assets.
•  The NFEF and flood rescue capability will be exercised during Exercise Watermark,  
a national flood exercise scheduled for spring 2011.
•  Over the next 2 years we aim to offer an improved standard of protection against 
flooding or coastal erosion risk for 145,000 more homes, including 45,000 of those 
at the highest risk.
•  We will continue consultation on the new Floods and Water Management Bill.
•  We will work with Local Authorities and the Environment Agency to improve 
management of surface water.
•  We will identify options for helping communities adapt to the impacts of coastal 
change.
•  We will publish a new long term investment strategy for flood and coastal erosion 
risk management.
•  Announce results of our new property level flood protection grant scheme and take 
forward a second round of applications.


Priority 2:
Promote a sustainable, low carbon and 
resource-efficient economy

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
61
Highlights from 2008/09
•  A carbon footprinting methodology (PAS 2050) has been developed to enable 
businesses to assess the impacts of their products (launched in October 2008 by  
the British Standards Institute, Defra and the Carbon Trust).
•  Work continues on improving the energy efficiency of energy-using products. 
Measures agreed under the European Union (EU)’s Eco-design for Energy-using 
Products Directive will save just under 7 MtCO  per annum by 2020. This will result 
2
in average annual savings of around £900m resulting from reduced energy bills, the 
sale of EU allowances, and changes in other environmental impacts.
•  Advice on reducing waste and energy use featured in the ‘Real Help’ campaign to 
help businesses best weather the economic downturn.
•  Two of ten product roadmap action plans have been launched setting out the 
commitments to reducing adverse environmental and social impacts across the 
supply chain (Dairy Supply Chain Forum’s Milk Road Map was launched in May 2008 
and the Sustainable Clothing Action Plan was launched at London Fashion Week in 
February 2009).
•  More than 7 million tonnes of packaging have been recovered from the waste 
stream (this is equivalent to about 65% of all packaging), ensuring that we meet 
the EU Packaging Directive targets for 2008.
•  Defra has worked with partners including the Environment Agency and the Waste 
and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) to monitor markets for recycled materials 
and to ensure that recycling continues to be a viable option.
•  The ‘Recycle on the Go’ campaign was launched by Defra, which aims to put 
accessible recycling bins in public places.
•  The Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) commenced on 1 April 2008 and 
runs until 31 March 2011. Under CERT, suppliers are assigned an individual target to 
deliver carbon reduction measures in households in Great Britain. An independent 
review of the scheme has shown that on average, consumers benefit by £9 for every 
£1 spent over the lifetime of the measures. As part of the Home Energy Saving 
Programme, the Government proposes increasing the size of the current CERT by a 
further 20%. This work has currently moved to The Department of Climate Change 
(DECC).
•  The Climate Change Act was given Royal Assent in November 2008 after the 
creation of DECC. However Defra was responsible for taking this through most of 
the Parliamentary process.

62 Departmental Report 2009
•  The Act On CO  marketing campaign launched the Act On CO  advice helpline and 
2
2
campaign bursts on TV, press and via online advertising. On 5 June 2008 the Act On 
CO  personal calculator reached a significant milestone with its millionth unique 
2
visitor and continues to see a steady flow of visitors eager to calculate their carbon 
footprint.
•  The Climate Change Act included enabling powers for a compulsory charge on 
carrier bags (around 10 billion issued in 2008). The British Retail Consortium (BRC) 
made a voluntary agreement with Defra, Welsh Assembly Government and Northern 
Ireland to reduce the number of single use carrier bags issued by the leading 
supermarket chains by 50% by the end of May 2009.
•  The new KES Landfill Gas Umbrella Project is working with our industry partners to 
promote the potential of landfill gas. During 2008/09 the Environment Agency (EA) 
worked closely with industry to audit the top 15 landfill gas producing sites and 
agree action plans at each to reduce emissions.
Introduction
Our second Priority to promote a sustainable, low carbon and resource-efficient 
economy focuses on the work of Defra in areas such as sustainable consumption and 
production, waste management, climate change mitigation and the promotion of 
sustainable rural communities.
The economic downturn has emphasised the importance of improving resource efficiency 
for households and businesses as wel  as our commitment to developing a low carbon, 
resource efficient and sustainable economy in the longer term. Sustainability and resource 
efficiency supports our goals on the wider environment, addressing not only greenhouse 
gas emissions, but also addressing waste and the best use of our resources.
The outcomes we are seeking to achieve through this Priority are reflected in our public 
commitments which include several of our DSOs as well as work with DECC to deliver 
PSA 27. Latest performance on our targets can be found in Chapter 4: Our Performance.
Sustainable Consumption and Production
We are working towards an economy where products and services are designed, 
produced, used and disposed of in ways that minimise carbon emissions, waste and the 
use of non-renewable resources.
Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP) is about achieving more with less, 
finding ways to minimise damage to the natural world and making use of the earth’s 
resources in a sustainable way. This contributes to the wider aim of a more sustainable, 
low-carbon and resource-efficient economy. Our policies are seeking to achieve the 
following results:
•  encouraging business to produce, market and use more sustainable products and 
services;
•  encouraging consumer demand for sustainable goods and services, and reducing 
the environmental impacts of household consumption;

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
63
•  increasing the resource efficiency of business operations and processes;
•  leading by example through sustainable public procurement; and
•  preventing, reducing and recycling waste, and reducing landfill.
Current consumption, production and waste disposal patterns in the UK are 
incompatible with sustainable living. They account for a significant proportion of 
greenhouse gas emissions and are dependent on inputs of non-renewable resource, 
energy and water. Products and materials are currently landfilled that could be reused, 
recycled or have energy recovered from them. Current developed country patterns of 
consumption and production could not be replicated world-wide. Some calculations 
suggest that this could require three planets’ worth of resources.6
Considering the drag on the UK’s economy and costs to business from inefficient 
resource use, achieving sustainable consumption and production remains critical during 
the economic downturn. Our approach is to work with the grain of markets but to help 
those markets work in ways which give full value to environmental impacts. Central to 
achieving our goals is reducing the environmental impact of our lifestyles, the products 
that our economy consumes, and the waste we produce, so that we can live within our 
environmental means without compromising our quality of life.
What are we doing?
SCP is a cross-Government influencing programme led by Defra. It builds partnerships 
with key stakeholders to influence and effect changes in the way business operates and 
how people live their everyday lives. Defra is working to achieve this in three key ways.
1. We are encouraging best practice by providing the tools, guidance, and 
information to help businesses and consumers choose the most sustainable behaviours. 
Relevant work includes the following:
•  helping Government and business understand and assess the lifecycle impacts of 
products and how to market and differentiate those products. A number of relevant 
initiatives include the publication of a Progress Report on Sustainable Products and 
Materials
 which outlined the lifecycle environmental impacts of products, 
development of Product Roadmaps for ten high impact products, PAS 2050 carbon 
footprinting methodology, updating the Green Claims Code, and agreeing 
Government-wide assessment methods and labelling for product lifecycle impacts;
•  continuing to provide resource efficiency support for businesses, consumers and the 
public sector. This work is primarily delivered through our delivery bodies. Following 
a review of the delivery bodies it was announced that the seven existing bodies 
would be brought together under the leadership of WRAP, announced on 27 March 
2009. Further information on the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) 
can be found on page 65; 
6  World Wildlife Fund (WWF), 2004, Living Planet Report.

64 Departmental Report 2009
•  ongoing research on consumption and environmental behaviours is being used to 
ensure continued integration of behaviour change approaches across Defra’s work in 
policy and communications. This has been particularly important for public 
engagement and developing third sector strategy, such as the new Greener Living 
Fund of £6m over 2008-11 which aims to support national third sector organisations 
to encourage pro-environmental behaviours at a community level; and
•  Defra are providing financial support for the pilot phase of the ‘Reynolds-Cheshire’ 
initiative involving business and the third sector to encourage consumers to choose 
seasonable and locally grown produce.
2. We are leading by example by establishing overarching policy frameworks and 
ensuring that the government acts in a sustainable way. Relevant work includes the 
following:
•  working with DECC and The Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory 
Reform (BERR) on the Low Carbon Industrial Strategy, which was launched by the 
Prime Minister at the low carbon economy summit on 6 March 2009. This sets out 
how we will develop low carbon resource efficient businesses in the UK, and builds 
on the response to the report of the Commission on Environmental Markets and 
Economic Performance (CEMEP) Building a low carbon economy: unlocking 
innovation and skills
 published in May 2008; and
•  developing challenging, but achievable, UK Government and EU-wide frameworks 
for the sustainable procurement of products. An evidence base and policy approach 
will be developed by December 2010, with a view to publication and use of 
standards by the UK Government by December 2011.
3. We are setting standards through EU regulatory frameworks and industry guidance 
to ensure that minimum requirements are implemented in product design, production, 
use and end of life considerations. Relevant work includes the following:
•  the sustainability of energy-using products is being raised through EU wide 
minimum energy performance and energy labelling standards, and engagement 
with the supply chain and with our international partners;
•  Defra continues to work with industry to introduce more energy efficient light bulbs, 
ahead of an EU-wide mandatory phase out of incandescent light bulbs;
•  Defra took a lead role with BERR to advocate and successfully develop an EU Action 
Plan for Sustainable Consumption and Production and Sustainable Industrial Policy in 
July 2008 (this includes new proposals to improve the environmental performance of 
products and their uptake);
•  as required in the Climate Change Act, Defra is preparing guidance on how 
organisations should measure and report their greenhouse gas emissions for 
publication later this year; and

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
65
•  Defra, in collaboration with the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, 
launched the voluntary European Code of Conduct on Data Centres in November 
2008. Use of the Code by Data Centres in the UK alone over the next six years 
could save 4.7MtCO , equivalent to taking more than a million cars off the road, 
2
and £700m (note that the savings presented here will overlap to some degree with 
other related polices, and are therefore not entirely additional).
An important aspect of more sustainable consumption and production is the impact of 
products at their end of life as waste. Following the Waste Strategy for England 2007, 
Defra is working to:
•  secure better integration of treatment for municipal and non-municipal waste;
•  secure the investment in infrastructure needed to divert waste from landfill and for 
the management of hazardous waste; and
•  meet and exceed the Landfill Directive diversion targets for biodegradable municipal 
waste in 2010, 2013 and 2020.
The Waste Infrastructure Programme continues to support local authorities to build 
infrastructure. For example, 10 new Private Finance Initiatives (PFI) projects were 
approved in 2008, practical support on the procurement of major waste infrastructure 
was provided to 43 Local Authorities, a procurement advice pack with guidance 
documents to help all waste infrastructure projects has been produced and two, well 
attended, Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) market stimulation events have been staged. A 
minimum standard for SRF which is included in the Renewables Obligation Order came 
into force on 1 April 2009.
Defra has been working with the Business Resource Efficiency & Waste Centre for Local 
Authorities to support 6 Local Authorities in piloting ‘Zero Waste Places’ across England 
ranging in size from a residential street to an entire region.
The Environment Agency (EA) has reduced overall reliance on landfill as a result of 
successful ongoing implementation of the Landfill Directive. Since 2001, the number of 
landfill sites located within England and Wales has reduced from over 2,000 to 
approximately 450 in 2009.
Waste and Resources Action Programme
1) Food Waste
The Food We Waste report, launched by the Waste and Resources Action 
Programme (WRAP) in May 2008, estimated that UK households throw 
away 6.7 million tonnes of food every year, most of which could have been 
eaten had it been planned and managed more effectively. Each tonne of 
food waste avoided saves about 4.5 tonnes of CO  equivalent greenhouse 
2
gas emissions. WRAP has helped to reduce food waste by 137,000 tonnes, 
saving 600,000 tonnes of CO  equivalent greenhouse gas emissions.
2

66 Departmental Report 2009
Waste and Resources Action Programme (continued)
WRAP’s ‘Love Food Hate Waste’ campaign is working with the UK grocery 
sector, food industry, Government and organisations such as the Food 
Standards Agency to encourage behaviour change by making it easier for 
consumers to get the most from the food they buy and waste less of it.
In January 2009 the signatories of the Courtauld Commitment agreed to 
work together to help reduce the amount of food the nation’s 
householders throw away by 155,000 tonnes by 2010, against a 2008 
baseline.
2) Closed Loop plastic bottle recycling
WRAP’s funding has supported the creation of a unique reprocessing plant, 
Closed Loop in London, to convert waste plastic bottles back into recovered 
plastic resins suitable for food grade applications. These resins are used for 
the manufacture of new plastic bottles for drinks and milk as well as 
thermoformed packaging in the UK. The plant opened in 2008 and will 
take 35,000 tonnes per year of mixed plastic bottles from municipal and 
office collections, saving 50,000 tonnes of CO  equivalent greenhouse gas 
2
emissions each year.
3) Halving construction waste to landfill
WRAP is helping the construction industry to achieve the Government-
industry target of reducing by half construction, demolition and excavation 
waste going to landfill by 2012, through the voluntary agreement – The 
Construction Commitments: Halving Waste to Landfill
. Over 100 leading 
organisations representing all parts of the construction supply chain have 
already signed up to the agreement.
Also assisting the construction industry to reduce waste to landfill is the 
Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund (ALSF). A total £24m of ALSF funding 
was distributed in 2008/09 with the aim of reducing the environmental 
footprint of aggregates production and delivering benefits to communities 
in areas where aggregates are extracted.
4) Achievement of the first Courtauld Commitment target
The Courtauld Commitment brokered by WRAP achieved its first objective 
of halting the growth in packaging used in the retail supply chain. Without 
this agreement it is estimated that packaging used would have increased 
by around 2% per annum. Absolute reductions in packaging waste are 
planned by 2010.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
67
Waste and Resources Action Programme (continued)
5) Work on market conditions
With the aim of improving the availability of market information within 
the recycling and re-processing sector, WRAP developed the Market 
Knowledge Portal, which summarises key market trends and pricing 
information and directs users to other key data sources. Additionally, 
WRAP produces regular Materials Pricing Reports and published market 
situation reports on organics, glass and china. This is particularly relevant in 
current economic conditions and volatility in commodity prices.
For more information on reducing your individual or business waste 
contributions, visit www.wrap.org.uk.
Envirowise
Envirowise7 launched a new practical online packaging indicator tool for 
eco-design. The tool is aimed at helping businesses reduce the 
environmental impact of their packaging designs. This has been piloted by 
Mars Snackfood, Diageo and other major companies and 800 businesses 
have registered for the toolkit.
The Food and Drink Federation (FDF) and Envirowise launched the 
Federation House Commitment in January 2008 as a response to the 
challenges in Defra’s Food Industry Sustainability Strategy. The Commitment 
aims to contribute to an industry-wide 20% reduction in water use (outside 
of that embedded in products) by 2020 against a 2007 baseline. A total of 
36 companies (including 30 FDF members) have signed up to the 
Commitment with nearly 200 food and drink manufacturing sites across the 
country working on reducing water usage under the Commitment. Actions 
under the initiative have so far resulted in a 1.7% reduction of absolute 
water use (not embedded in products) since 2007, equating to more than 
475,000 cubic metres of water saved during 2008.
More on Sustainable Consumption and Production can be found under the 
performance reporting for DSO 3 in Chapter 4: Our Performance.
7  More on Envirowise can be found at www.panda.org/news_facts/publications/general/livingplanet/index.cfm.

68 Departmental Report 2009
Climate Change Mitigation
Climate change is the greatest environmental challenge facing the world today. Rising 
global temperatures will bring changes in weather patterns, rising sea levels and 
increased frequency and intensity of extreme weather.
Climate change presents a significant challenge to the UK and to the international 
community. However, there are also opportunities if we are willing to take action. 
Government, business and individuals all have a part to play both in mitigation 
(reducing greenhouse gas emissions to help prevent climate change) and adaptation 
(more on Adaptation to Climate Change can be found under Cross-cutting objective 2, 
page 108).
What is Government doing?
DECC was created on 3 October 2008 to tackle the twin challenges of energy security 
and climate change. Defra is working closely with the new Department to reduce 
greenhouse gas emissions and protect the UK and global environment.
The Climate Change Act came into force on 26 November 2008 and requires 
Government to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. 
In order to achieve this, the Government has set the first three UK carbon budgets 
spanning 2008-22 into law on 22 April 2009. These carbon budgets require a 34% 
reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2020. Defra’s contribution to achieving the 
carbon budgets will be determined during the course of 2009, and will build on our 
action to reduce emissions in sectors such as agriculture, forestry, land management, 
and waste, and our programmes on sustainable consumption and production and the 
food chain.
Government commissions a wide range of scientific research on climate change and 
funds a number of programmes to encourage business to reduce emissions and to find 
cost effective measures to tackle climate change including the Climate Change Levy 
and Climate Change Allowances and emissions trading schemes. Government also 
funds the Carbon Trust and the Energy Saving Trust, who provide advice and help for 
businesses and the public.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
69
DECC and Defra
Until October 2008 Defra led on climate change policy (mitigation and 
adaptation) across Government, but with the relevant Departments leading 
their individual climate-related policies. DECC now leads on all mitigation, 
and international adaptation. Defra retains the lead on UK adaptation.
This means Defra’s role on mitigation is now like that of DECC’s other key 
partner Departments, such as the Department for Transport (DfT), and 
Communities and Local Government (CLG). Defra leads on specific policies 
to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in areas we influence, primarily: 
agriculture, forestry, and soils; waste; some industrial gases (particularly 
fluorinated gases); sustainable consumption and production; and the food 
chain.
Our other key role is to ensure that all of the Government’s mitigation 
policy takes account of sustainability and environmental impacts.
Some of the major policies that Defra used to lead on and that are now 
the domain of DECC include:
•  all EU and international negotiations on all aspects of climate change 
including the EU Emissions Trading Scheme;
•  all energy-related domestic policies; and
•  carbon budget policies.
What are we doing?
Defra’s ‘Save Money, Save Energy, Act On CO ‘ campaign will provide long term 
2
assistance to households to help them tackle rising energy prices and save up to £300 
every year on energy bills, through improved energy efficiency and other measures.
Defra provided a cash boost of £450,000 in 2008/09 to the Regional Climate Change 
Partnerships and made a further funding commitment covering 2009-11.
The highly successful Climate Change Champions initiative, focused specifically on 
inspiring young ambassadors within each of the regions to raise awareness around 
climate change and to promote action to reduce individuals’ carbon footprints. It ran in 
2008/09 and, thanks to the efforts of one young ambassador, the Duke of Edinburgh 
Awards will be incorporating climate change in its awards programme.

70 Departmental Report 2009
Defra helps the agriculture sector to play its part in mitigating greenhouse gas 
emissions. This includes the development of a policy framework for reducing emissions 
from the agriculture, forestry and land management sector, our continued work to 
promote the uptake of anaerobic digestion and also to fund the ‘Farming Futures’ 
communications project until March 2010.
In order to protect the large store of carbon in our soils (about 10 billion tonnes in the 
UK), Defra is working jointly with Devolved Administrations and public sector partners 
on peat protection, developing best practice for protecting peat soils from degradation 
as well as seeking to understand the trends and status of our peat soils. We have also 
commissioned a literature review into the possibility of using biochar, a charcoal-like 
substance created from biomass, as a means of sequestering carbon in our soils in a 
more permanent way.
Defra completed a major consultation in October 2008 on further proposed regulations 
and measures to implement controls and underpin European Community (EC) 
legislation on fluorinated gases.8 The revised regulations came into force in early 
March 2009.
At the international level, Defra/UK took part in negotiations under the Montreal 
protocol in November 2008 that led to a successful replenishment of the Multilateral 
Fund ($490m for 2009-11) that will help developing countries accelerate their phase-
out of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFC) as well as the complete phase out of other 
substances. The UK’s contribution will be almost $11m a year over the three year 
period. Accelerated HCFC phase-out will deliver ozone layer and climate benefits, as 
ozone-depleting substances are also powerful greenhouse gases.
Defra is working closely with The Department for International Development on the 
environmental sustainability of increased global food production, including climate 
impacts. Our food chain programme is also exploring the greenhouse gas emissions 
resulting from the international links in the UK’s food chain.
Funding for Low Carbon Technologies will support low carbon development, clean 
technologies, climate resilience and sustainable forests management in developing 
countries. The UK element of the Environmental Transformation Fund9 has been 
increased to £400m over the next three years.
8  Fluorinated greenhouse gases are covered by the Kyoto protocol and have high global warming potential. They are widely used 
in commercial refrigeration and air-conditioning systems and other more specialised uses. Emissions of these gases amounted to 
just under 2% of UK emissions in 2007.
9  www.defra.gov.uk/environment/climatechange/uk/energy/fund/index.htm

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
71
Evidence: Research & Development
Our Evidence team supports the work of Defra across our purpose and 
three priorities. Our work on bio-lubricants, a carbon emissions indicator 
and product roadmaps contribute to the promotion of a sustainable, low-
carbon and resource-efficient economy.
Concrete made from non-toxic, biodegradable material will take the UK 
one step closer to manufacturing products in more carbon-friendly ways, 
thanks to Defra-funded researchers. Scientists have developed a technique 
that uses bio-lubricants made from vegetable oil to mould concrete. This 
reduced the amount of greenhouse gas emissions released by more than 
half compared to mineral-oil based lubricants. There is increasing demand 
to make concrete environmentally friendly, especially where it comes into 
contact with people, water and food. Bio-lubricants can help reduce the 
carbon-footprint of many products made by the chemicals industry, such as 
soaps, paint and paper.
A carbon emissions indicator was published in the summer of 2008 and 
represented a key piece of research for Defra policy. The indicator shows 
global impacts of products, and helps underpin the scope of some of the 
policy projects in sustainable production and consumption.
Defra is piloting the development of ten ‘product roadmaps’. Product 
roadmapping was conceived as an approach for facilitating collaboration 
between Government, business and other stakeholders to achieve 
improvements in the sustainability of products. Various research projects 
have helped in identifying the environmental impacts and where targeted 
action is needed across the lifecycle and supply chain of roadmap products, 
such as cars, televisions, toilets, domestic lighting and oxy-degradable 
plastics. Over the next year, we are funding projects to inform the 
development of the action plan for the clothing roadmap.
The outputs of a food manufacturing waste mapping survey, commissioned 
jointly by Defra and the Food and Drink Federation (FDF), have provided a 
snapshot of the level of food and packaging waste occurring across FDF’s 
member companies. The survey results will help inform Defra’s, FDF’s 
member companies and WRAP’s work, to continue improving food and 
packaging waste prevention in the food manufacturing industry.

72 Departmental Report 2009
Socially and Economically Sustainable Rural Communities
Supporting and promoting socially and economically sustainable rural communities 
contributes to all of our priorities as well as to the work with our delivery partners.
What are we doing?
To support the promotion of socially and economically sustainable rural communities, 
the Prime Minister invited Matthew Taylor MP to conduct a review on how land use 
and planning can better support rural business and deliver affordable housing. Many 
rural communities are faced with a combination of higher-than-average house prices 
and lower-than-average local wages. This can create challenges for individual families, 
the local economy and the wider sustainability of the community.
The Taylor review was presented jointly to CLG and Defra on 23 July 2008. It made a 
number of recommendations for how these issues can be addressed within the context 
of existing protection for the natural environment through the application of land use 
and planning policy. The Government response was published on 25 March 2009 and 
the Government accepted most of the recommendations of the report.
A major focus of our work in relation to affordable rural housing has been in 
supporting delivery of the Government’s target for affordable housing in rural areas. 
That target commits the Housing Corporation to deliver at least 10,300 affordable 
home completions in settlements of less than 3,000 inhabitants over the period  
2008/11. Initial numbers on completions in the period 2008/11 have been promising. 
However, given current market conditions, it is too early to predict outputs with 
certainty over this time period.
With the support of CLG, Defra is funding a research and good practice project which 
will support the new Homes and Communities Agency to actively promote delivery of 
this target in light of the current challenging economic context.
We have continued to engage with DfT on its plans to make changes to the Bus 
Subsidy Operators Grant (BSOG), which currently provides £413m a year to support 
marginal bus services, many of them in rural areas. We accept the need to improve the 
current subsidy arrangements, but we have been clear that any changes should not 
adversely affect people living in rural areas. We have also engaged with DfT on 
proposals to replace some rural buses with taxis and an emerging EU directive on the 
rights of bus and coach passengers.
We have continued to work with BERR and CLG over the digital agenda, ensuring that 
rural areas are taken into account in broadband policy development. The Government’s 
Digital Britain Interim Report was published in January and gave a commitment to 
develop plans to make broadband a universal service by 2012.
More on Rural Affairs can be found under Cross-cutting objective 3: Rurality and 
performance reporting for DSO 8 in Chapter 4: Our Performance.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
73
Forward Look for Priority 2
In addition to continuing with our current work in supporting our priority to promote a 
sustainable, low-carbon and resource-efficient economy, plans for the forthcoming year 
include:
Sustainable Consumption and Production
•  We will update and publish the Green Claims Code in 2009, which provides 
guidance and principles for the responsible use of product information in green 
marketing. A sector specific document will be published in 2010.
•  Define new environmental standards for key products and services purchased by 
Government and develop an agreed EU framework for Green Public Procurement. 
Robust UK and EU minimum procurement standards are to be developed and rolled 
out by the UK Government by the end of 2011.
•  Further work to develop pilot product roadmaps to reduce the environmental 
impacts of products with a significant environmental impact. Cross-government and 
industry decisions are to be made in 2009 on roadmaps for cars, plastics, palm oil 
and tourism.
•  £6m Greener Living Fund projects and partners are to be launched, with projects 
completed by the start of 2011.
•  The second phase of the ‘Real Help’ campaign for businesses is to be developed and 
implemented, with completion planned for 2009/10.
•  A research centre on sustainable behaviours is due to be established in 2009, to 
continue to build the evidence base on consumer environmental behaviours.
•  The Low Carbon Industrial Strategy is expected to be published in Summer 2009. 
Defra will continue to focus on the opportunities to help the UK transition to a low 
carbon economy from improved resource efficiency in the use of materials, water 
and other resources, and through waste reduction.
•  Defra will also update the carbon footprinting methodology (PAS 2050), publish 
guidance in 2009 on corporate reporting of greenhouse gas emissions as required 
under the Climate Change Act, and publish jointly with BERR a strategy document 
setting out the Government’s vision for optimising packaging and increasing the 
recycling of packaging waste.
•  In terms of further reducing waste, Defra plans to help consumers avoid food waste 
by working with the FSA to clarify food labelling, establish producer responsibility 
schemes for the collection and recycling of used portable batteries, transpose the 
revised EC Waste Framework Directive and work closely with the EA, WRAP and the 
Local Government Association to monitor markets for waste and materials and the 
effects of the recession to maintain public confidence in recycling.

74 Departmental Report 2009
•  We will influence further ambitious agreements under the Eco-design of Energy-
Using Products Directive. The first phase is to be completed by end 2010, with the 
second phase commencing in early 2011.
Climate Change Mitigation
•  Defra has developed with other departments an international strategy statement on 
sustainable biofuels, focused on the need to avoid indirect greenhouse gas 
emissions as well as wider environmental and food security impacts from these 
intended mitigation measures. This will be integrated into a wider Government 
policy statement on biofuels at the UK, EU and international levels.
•  Defra is contributing to a new government project on palm oil to help reduce 
greenhouse gas and biodiversity impacts.
Socially and Economically Sustainable Rural Communities
•  Defra in partnership with BERR, the Commission for Rural Communities (CRC) and 
the Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) will continue to monitor the impact of 
the economic downturn on rural communities. This is to have a focus on any risks 
that may be particularly relevant to rural areas such as issues affecting small and 
medium sized enterprises (SMEs) or those on low wages or in seasonal or part-time 
work.
•  We have commissioned a number of research projects in support of our Socially and 
Economically Sustainable Rural Communities DSO. These include projects looking at 
educational attainment and choices, house values and their effect on rural 
communities, health inequalities and social capital in rural communities. These 
particular projects are due to conclude in Summer 2009 but the portfolio is a 
dynamic one and other projects will be commissioned as necessary.
•  Fuel poverty is an important issue for rural areas. The nature of housing stock and 
lack of access to gas mains means that people living in rural areas face particular 
difficulties. It can be difficult to make the necessary improvements to older housing 
stock, of which there are high numbers in rural areas. To make housing stock more 
fuel efficient we are working with DECC and the CRC to better understand these 
issues and their possible solutions.


Priority 3:
Ensure a thriving farming sector and a 
sustainable, healthy and secure food supply

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
77
Highlights from 2008/09
•  The Machinery of Government changes in October 2008 gave Defra a coordinating 
role in food policy. This will require us to work with other departments on wider 
issues, in addition to our lead responsibilities on farming, the food industry and their 
environmental impacts, for example social impacts (including health, wellbeing and 
food poverty) and international activity on global food security and sustainability.
•  In December 2008 the Secretary of State announced Uplands Entry Level 
Stewardship (ELS), a new strand of Environmental Stewardship designed specifically 
for upland farmers. The scheme will replace the Hill Farm Allowance from 2010, 
rewarding farmers for the provision and maintenance of landscape and 
environmental benefits in the uplands.
•  Following the announcement by the Secretary of State on 6 December 2007 that a 
commemorative badge and certificate would be awarded to the Women’s Land 
Army (WLA) and Timber Corps, during 2008/09 Defra awarded over 33,500 badges 
to veterans and organised a special ceremony hosted by the Prime Minister at 
Downing Street, at which 50 ladies received their badges personally from the Prime 
Minister, in recognition of the contribution to the war effort of all those who served 
in the WLA. Defra has also been working with Lord Lieutenants around the country 
to support them in hosting further events to celebrate the award of the badge.
•  Additional resources totalling £4.3m were announced on 21 January 2009 for bee 
health measures. £2.3m is targeted at implementing the first stage of the ‘Healthy 
Bees’ plan which was launched on 9 March 2009.10
•  On 3 November 2008 a new Bovine TB Eradication Group was launched. The Group 
has met regularly since 27 November 2008.
•  Defra collaborated with cross-Whitehall teams to publish the UK’s first cross-
government international pandemic preparedness strategy in October 2008. The 
strategy recommends how we might best encourage engagement and research 
across veterinary and human health sectors globally in support of a ‘One World, 
One Health’ approach.
10  Out of a new total research and development budget of approximately £600,000 p.a., some £500,000 p.a. will be channelled 
into a new research programme with other funding bodies on threats to pollinators, including honey bees, and the remainder 
will be available for urgent honey bee issues. (The new £600,000 p.a research and development budget has been set for the 
next 5 years and is some £400,000 p.a larger than the current budget). 

78 Departmental Report 2009
Introduction
Our third Priority – to ensure a thriving farming sector and a sustainable, healthy and 
secure food supply – focuses on the work of Defra in areas such as future farming 
policy and practice, the impacts of climate change in the farming sector, food security, 
rural development and animal health and welfare.
Food security is a complex issue, one that is at the same time global and local, an 
immediate challenge and a far reaching one, a threat to be dealt with and perhaps also 
an opportunity. Defra has the lead on food security across Government; to ensure a 
reliable and resilient food supply. Alongside this, it is essential to support a thriving 
farming sector; a farming sector that is competitive, profitable, adapted to climate 
change and sustainable. These aims will help us promote and protect our environment.
The outcomes we are seeking to achieve through this Priority are reflected in several of 
our DSOs, in particular DSO 6 and DSO 7. Latest performance on these targets can be 
found in Chapter 4: Our Performance.
A Sustainable, Secure and Healthy Food Supply
UK food security means consumers having access at all times to sufficient, safe and 
nutritious food for an active and healthy life at affordable prices. To enable this, our 
food supply must be reliable and resilient to shocks and crises; food must be produced 
sustainably, and our food security needs to sit alongside our other, urgent priorities of 
tackling climate change, securing a healthy natural environment, helping consumers 
make the transition to healthier diets as well as ensuring the long-term sustainability of 
the food and farming industries.
What are we doing?
Defra published a discussion paper on ensuring food security in July 2008 and 
contributed to the development of a report by the Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit 
entitled Food Matters: Towards a Strategy for the 21st Century (published in July 2008). 
Together these papers set the scene for the Government’s approach to food policy – 
joining up the economic, health, social and environmental challenges in the food 
system with long-term security.
The Council of Food Policy Advisors was established in December 2008 for two years 
with a remit to provide independent advice to the Secretary of State on all areas of 
food policy. The Council’s initial priorities are: defining healthy and sustainable diet; 
looking at how to increase fruit and vegetable consumption; and advising Government 
on public procurement and demand modification.
Defra has continued to carry out research into the environmental impacts of food, in 
particular on greenhouse gas emissions. This work contributed to the development 
(with BSI and Carbon Trust) of a standard methodology for measuring greenhouse 
gases in goods and services (PAS 2050). This has provided indicative greenhouse gas 
emissions data for certain foods throughout the supply chain and provided indicators of 
the relative merits of different potential food supply systems.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
79
Defra is introducing regulations to protect the £4bn per annum Scotch Whisky industry 
to tackle fraudulent and deceptive practices estimated to be costing industry 
approximately £150m per annum.
Defra is responsible for the Public Sector Food Procurement Initiative (PSFPI) launched in 
August 2003 to help deliver the Government’s Sustainable Farming and Food Strategy. 
A progress report covering PSFPI work in the regions during 2008/09 will shortly appear 
on the the Defra web site.
An evaluation of the PSFPI in March 2009 identified how best to build on the progress 
already made and work will begin on implementing the recommendations approved by 
Ministers in the financial year 2009/10. Defra is also working with the Department of 
Health to develop a Healthier Food Mark – a recommendation in the Cabinet Office 
report Food Matters: Towards a Strategy for the 21st Century. The mark will include 
both nutritional and sustainability criteria and will be piloted during 2009/10.
Defra has worked closely with the Office of Government Commerce and the 
Department for Children, Schools and Families over the last year to link the PSFPI and 
embed sustainability into the Collaborative Food Strategy. The latter was established to 
help public sector organisations work more closely together in their procurement of 
food and catering services.
Defra has funded a consortium led by Dame Fiona Reynolds and Ian Cheshire to direct 
work on reconnecting people with seasonal eating habits and growing their own food. 
The ‘growing your own’ phase of the campaign was launched in March 2009. The 
second and main part of the campaign, that encourages people to eat more in-season 
food, was launched on 28 May 2009.
The United Kingdom Export Certification Partnership was established as a joint 
government/industry pilot project in October 2008 on a three-year trial. Defra is 
investing and working jointly with the UK meat, livestock and genetics industry to 
reopen third country exporting markets for their products.

80 Departmental Report 2009
Covent Garden Market Authority (CGMA)
LowHub provide an eco-friendly service delivering fruit, vegetables and 
flowers from New Covent Garden Market direct to customers using vehicles 
fuelled either by biofuel or electricity. They were the winners of: a ‘green 
gong’ at the City of London Corporation’s annual Sustainable City Awards 
in the Traffic and Transport category; the prestigious Sustain magazine 
Award for Leadership in Sustainability; and Wandsworth Council’s Green 
Business Award in the Innovation category.
CGMA, in partnership with the South East England Development Agency, 
are working to increase the volume of produce grown in the South East 
used by the food service sector in London. In addition to appointing a full 
time Business Development Manager, a number of events have been held 
at New Covent Garden Market bringing producers together with 
wholesalers and buyers to showcase local food. A series of monthly visits 
has been established linking producers with suppliers and end users.
More on Food Security can be found under the performance reporting for DSO 7 in 
Chapter 4: Our Performance.
Common Agricultural Policy Reform
The European Union’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) provides financial support to 
farmers for a range of farming, environmental and rural development activities as well 
as controlling EU agricultural markets.
Despite important changes in recent years, the CAP is more in need of reform than 
ever. Currently, the CAP is highly ineffective in achieving its objectives and results in 
significant costs to EU taxpayers and consumers. Europe needs a fundamentally 
reformed CAP to deal with the key challenges of the 21st Century, including 
globalisation, tackling climate change, creating a sustainable environment and 
protecting natural resources. In 2005, the UK set out a radical blueprint for the future 
of the CAP in the document A Vision for the Common Agricultural Policy. This CAP 
Vision represents our long-term policy position on the CAP.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
81
What are we doing?
Our CAP Vision set out a blueprint for the future, envisaging the abolition of Pillar 1 of 
the CAP by 2015-20. Our model for sustainable European agriculture specified that the 
industry should be rewarded by the taxpayer for producing societal benefits that the 
market cannot deliver. Remaining expenditure would be based on Pillar 2 with rural 
development measures gaining a central rather than a peripheral role under a future 
CAP.
In January 2009, the EU agreed, as a result of the CAP health check, to further 
decouple subsidy from production, reduce market-distorting intervention measures, 
reduce red tape in direct farm payments, and increase the focus on delivering public 
benefits including environmental benefits. The UK would have preferred to go further, 
by phasing out all the remaining coupled payments and ending all forms of market 
invention, while greatly increasing the focus on environmental benefits.
The European Commission is now developing Implementing Regulations. The 
Government is likely to consult publicly this year on some aspects of implementation, 
such as those where there are options for Member States, including minimum single 
farm payments, and Good Agricultural and Environmental condition standards under 
cross-compliance.
The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) is responsible for the delivery of CAP Pillar 1 and 
Pillar 2 payments and the administration of Pillar 1 schemes. RPA also administers the 
Hill Farm Allowance and the British Cattle Movement Service.
RPA met its formal target of making 96.154% of payments by value under the 2007 
Single Payments Scheme (SPS) by the end of the EU payment window of 30 June 
2008.11 This was achieved two weeks ahead of target.
Payments of 2008 SPS claims started at the beginning of December 2008, earlier than 
in previous years, and ministerial targets were met ahead of schedule. Figures published 
on 13 May 2009 showed that just over £1.56bn (96.18%) has been paid.
More on the CAP Health Check and SPS can be found under the performance reporting 
for DSO 6 in Chapter 4: Our Performance.
11  In 2005, the Single Payment Scheme replaced 11 Common Agricultural Policy schemes which the RPA previously administered.  
It is paid in recognition of claimants’ stewardship of the land. To receive payment farmers are required to meet environmental, 
public health, animal and plant health and animal welfare standards.

82 Departmental Report 2009
Rural Payments Agency
The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) administers CAP support payments, and 
manages related schemes itself or through other delegated delivery bodies. 
The Agency tracks livestock and carries out inspections to help deliver 
Defra’s priorities.
A three-year strategy document, published in June 2008, sets out what the 
Agency plans to achieve over the period 2008/09 to 2010/11. It focuses on 
the needs of customers and stakeholders, Defra, the Network, other 
government departments and international bodies. 
An electronic channel using third party farm management software was 
successfully tested for SPS 2008 applications. Subject to further testing and 
roll out, all farmers and their agents will be able to apply for payment 
using the on-line system from the 2010 scheme year.
The Agency’s priority is to continue to improve performance on paying SPS 
claims so that more farmers can be paid as early in the payment window as 
possible. RPA aims to pay at least 95% (by value) of valid claims by 31 
March 2011, for the 2010 scheme year.
The Agency is committed to supporting the Department’s aim of reducing 
the customer administrative burden, or ‘red-tape’, by 25% by 2010. 
Reducing the administrative burden of SPS on customers is a priority for 
RPA.
The Rural Land Register is undergoing a mapping update which will 
provide up-to-date and accurate maps for farmers helping to ensure that 
their CAP payments are correct. The Agency is working with the farming 
industry to help manage the change. The update will also support future 
electronic channels and reduce the risk of EC financial corrections 
(disallowance) associated with inaccurate land data.
Disallowance can be applied by the European Commission, if, in its  
view, there has been a failure or partial failure to meet scheme rules. 
Stronger disallowance management processes in 2009/10 will take  
account of bilateral meetings with the Commission and its audit teams,  
and will focus on the identification and management of potential risks  
of financial correction.
For further RPA plans, reports and other key documents visit  
www.rpa.gov.uk.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
83
Farming for the Future
In support of our Priority to ensure a thriving farming sector, the Defra Farming for the 
Future programme (FFF) aims to ensure that by 2020 English agriculture is competitive 
and profitable without subsidy, makes a net positive environmental contribution and 
manages sustainably the landscape and natural resources that underlie it.
The FFF programme proposes to achieve this by creating a coherent policy and 
regulatory framework to drive up farming’s environmental performance and help the 
sector to re-skill and re-structure itself in support of both its competitiveness and 
improved environmental performance.
The programme is aimed at delivering the behavioural change necessary to realise that 
vision, at the same time setting a new direction for the relationship between 
Government and the farming sector.
What are we doing?
Since the Farming for the Future Conference in November 2007, Defra has worked 
with key agriculture and land management stakeholders to identify a long-term vision 
for English farming and the action needed over the next three to five years to move us 
in the right direction. We are aiming to secure partners’ agreement in the near future 
to a document called Farming for a Changing Future, which will set out key priorities 
for early action.
More on FFF can be found under the performance reporting for DSO 6 in Chapter 4: 
Our Performance.
Evidence: Economics
Defra’s Food and Farming analysts have developed the evidence base and 
contributed to the development of policy across a range of issues.
As part of their ongoing contribution to Defra’s evidence based policy-
making, economists have been working recently on analysis of the 
potential for and robustness of estimates of greenhouse gas abatement 
potential in the agriculture sectors to inform Defra’s position in the carbon 
budget setting process. We are also examining the ability of various types 
of policy instruments to unlock this abatement.
Economic evidence underpinned the UK’s negotiating position for the 
wide-ranging Health Check reform of the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy 
(CAP), agreed in November 2008. State of the art analysis and economic 
modelling identified the most distorting CAP policies and generated 
options for reform, informing our stance in the negotiations. The  
reform takes us a step closer to the UK’s vision for a competitive and 
market-orientated EU farming sector, eliminating more than €4bn of  
trade-distorting agricultural support by 2013.

84 Departmental Report 2009
Evidence: Economics (continued)
An analytical assessment of UK food security is being compiled. This will 
cover many dimensions, reflecting the complex and cross-cutting nature of 
food supply. The assessment will provide a structured compendium of key 
evidence about our food security now and in the medium term. It will be 
published in the Autumn.
Farming has a wide range of complex, significant and long-term impacts on 
the environment. These impacts can be beneficial as well as damaging and 
many of the impacts are external to farming so that the costs or benefits 
are met by other sectors or the general public. The environmental accounts 
for agriculture have been further developed to improve the estimates 
made of the values of these physical impacts and to track changes over 
time, so that the environmental impacts can be compared with each other 
and aggregated together to give a measure of the net overall impact of 
the sector.
The aims of the research Estimating the Environmental Impacts of Pillar I 
Reform
 were to estimate the likely effects of Pillar I reform on agricultural 
production. This included possible changes in land use intensity and farm 
practices, estimating the likely environmental impact of these changes in 
agriculture on environmental objectives, including landscape, biodiversity, 
water quality, greenhouse gas emissions as well as flooding. It also 
provided advice on the potential budgetary requirements for delivering a 
specified level of environmental quality through agri-environment 
measures under Pillar II.
The Farm Business Survey has continued to be developed as a valuable 
microdata source for analysis of the sector. Data has been collected 
through new modules on energy use and management practices to analyse 
the distribution and interaction of economic and environmental farm 
performance.
Skills for Farming
To ensure a thriving farming sector, we also work with industry and stakeholders 
towards delivering an appropriately skilled farming industry, which is fully competitive in 
the marketplace, without subsidy, and delivers against a demanding agenda for the 
mitigation of and adaptation to climate change with an improved environmental 
performance.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
85
What are we doing?
The first phase of this project has been completed successfully and the first, annual, 
industry led Agri-Skills Forum was held on 9 September 2008. The agenda will continue 
to be taken forward by the Agri-Skills Forum’s Management Group, which includes the 
National Farmers Union, Lantra, Landex and the Agricultural and Horticultural 
Development Board.
An Agri-Skills round table meeting was held on 2 April 2009 with the Secretary of State 
and all of the key government and industry players to consider how to accelerate 
progress in training and skills development in farming. As a result of the meeting, the 
Agri-Skills Forum is developing a plan to set out what industry stakeholders will do, and 
how Government can help, to improve tailoring the provision of training to match 
industry needs and to provide the required amount of training.
The development of the virtual Lantra Skills Manager (formerly on-line Competency 
Framework) is being undertaken by Lantra, the Sector Skills Council for the 
environmental and land-based sectors. Defra has led with funding, providing £645,000 
over 3 years up to the end of the 2008/09 financial year. From 2009/10 the Skills 
Manager will be self-financing.
Evidence: Research & Development
Collaborative research that Defra co-funds with industry investigated the 
suitability of different breeds of wheat for bread making. Targeted wheat 
breeding provided improved understanding of raw material functionality 
and processing and facilitated development of methods for objectively 
assessing final product quality for UK bread. The research provided 
information to enable wheat breeders to target breeding programmes.
Defra continues to keep farmers well informed through its quarterly news 
magazine Farming Link. A readership survey in 2008 found that 
approximately nine in ten (88%) felt that the magazine was good. Face-to-
face communication on a variety of topics was consolidated through an 
extensive roadshow at over 80 livestock markets and a number of key 
county shows, around England. An innovative low-carbon stand at the 
Royal Show emphasised Defra focus on adaptation, recycling and 
sustainability.
Agriculture and Climate Change
In order to promote a sustainable economy, healthy environment and thriving farming 
sector, we need to focus on mitigating some of the harmful impacts of agriculture on 
climate change.

86 Departmental Report 2009
Anaerobic Digestion is a proven renewable energy technology. It can reduce 
greenhouse gas emissions by capturing methane from the decomposition of organic 
materials enabling production of biogas that can be used as a renewable energy source 
for both heat and power, or the carbon dioxide and other impurities can be removed to 
produce biomethane which can be used as a transport fuel or added to the gas grid.
What are we doing?
The Government sees anaerobic digestion as a technology with significant potential to 
contribute to our climate change and wider environmental, economic and social 
objectives. We wish to see a much greater uptake by local authorities, businesses and 
farmers.
Defra published the paper Anaerobic Digestion – Shared Goals in February 2009 
developed jointly with stakeholders from the anaerobic digestion industry, agriculture, 
energy and water utilities, the waste management sector, regulators, and local and 
regional government. We now need to drive forward the development of practical ways 
to achieve a major increase in the use of anaerobic digestion. An Anaerobic Digestion 
Task Group has been set up to develop an Implementation Plan. This will set out the 
practical measures that Government and stakeholders will take individually and 
collectively to achieve a major increase in the use of anaerobic digestion.
The Chancellor announced funding in the 2009 Budget of £10m to increase food 
waste processing capacity, including anaerobic digesters, which is additional to the 
£10m identified in 2008 to fund an Anaerobic Digestion Demonstration Programme.
‘Farming Futures’12 is working to raise awareness of climate change among farmers. It 
promotes on-farm adaptation and mitigation and encourages good practice, using 
face-to-face and media channels. In March 2009 the Farming Futures Project phase 2 
concluded. It produced very positive outputs including work to communicate climate 
change responsibilities to farmers, land managers and advisors and promoting 
behaviour change. Both Government and stakeholders involved are keen to ensure the 
long-term future of the project. Defra will be providing further funding until March 
2010, while its long-term future is being decided.
The Secretary of State announced in August 2008 that the Rural Climate Change 
Forum should be reappointed for a further two and a half years, up to March 2011. All 
eight existing member organisations were reappointed, and three new members were 
invited to join – the Soil Association, the Agricultural Industries Confederation and the 
Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board.
On the international level, in November 2008 Hilary Benn and the Chinese Agriculture 
Minister signed a Memorandum of Understanding on Sustainable Agriculture and 
formally launched the China-UK Sustainable Agriculture Innovation Network (SAIN).
More on Climate Change and Agriculture can be found under the performance 
reporting for DSO 6 in Chapter 4: Our Performance.
12  Farming Futures is a collaborative communications partnership between the National Farmers’ Union (NFU), Country Land and 
Business Association (CLA), Agricultural Industries Confederation (AIC), the Agricultural and Horticultural Research Forum 
(AHRF), Forum for the Future and Defra.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
87
Nutrient Management
Another aspect of ensuring a thriving farming sector is the effective management of 
nutrients. The current high price of inorganic fertilisers is impacting on the farming 
industry, creating the opportunity for farmers to source alternative and environmentally 
friendly substitutes (i.e. switching from Ammonium Nitrate to Urea).
What are we doing?
The Nitrate Vulnerable Zones (NVZ) Action Programme completed in October 2008 with 
extended NVZ coverage across England and new measures to ensure farmer compliance 
with the Nitrates Directive. Extended closed periods for fertiliser application will limit 
nutrient losses and encourage best practice for on-farm management of manures/
slurries.
The updated Code of Good Agricultural Practice (CoGAP) was published in January 
2009. This provided the farming industry with best practice advice and guidance on a 
range of on-farm activities. It also includes a comprehensive summary of all legal/
regulatory obligations on farmers.
A Nutrient Management Plan has been developed by industry (National Farmers’ Union, 
Country Land and Business Association, Linking Environment and Farming, Agricultural 
Industries Confederation and Farming and Wildlife Advisory Group) in partnership with 
Defra and the Environment Agency (EA) to deliver a broad range of Defra objectives 
including developing best practice within the sector for management of nutrients.
More on Nutrient Management can be found under performance reporting for DSO 6 
in Chapter 4: Our Performance.
Responsibility and Cost Sharing for Animal Health and Welfare
The work of the Responsibility and Cost Sharing (RCS) Programme aims to reduce the 
frequency and severity of animal disease outbreaks and, by extension, to improve the 
sustainability of livestock farming in England.
RCS is part of a wider agenda aimed at establishing a new framework to reshape the 
relationship between the livestock industry and wider society. It will establish 
mechanisms through which the responsibilities and costs of animal health activities are 
shared more equitably between industry and the taxpayer.
The current financial arrangements for dealing with animal disease outbreaks are 
unsustainable, and the Government is committed to ensuring that costs are better 
shared between main beneficiaries and risk managers. In addition, shared responsibility 
offers the chance for improved decision making and, ultimately, a reduced risk of 
animal disease outbreaks.

88 Departmental Report 2009
What are we doing?
In addition to working up detailed proposals with industry for the public consultation 
(30 March 2009 – 30 June 2009), Defra has continued to develop its partnership-
working in the field of animal health, expanding, where appropriate, the principles of 
disease core groups.
This consultation process is again supported by a number of regional events aimed at 
engaging directly with grass roots farmers and others with an interest. The key 
proposals developed in line with the UK Responsibility and Cost Sharing Consultative 
Forum include developing a new independent body for animal health policy, together 
with sharing the cost of exotic disease surveillance and preparedness via a registration-
based levy. Less well developed in this consultation is a proposal to share the cost of 
actual exotic disease outbreaks via compulsory insurance or an extension of the levy. 
Any development of the insurance model will be supported by a consultation later in 
the year.
We received 78 written responses to our last consultation in April 2008, and over 300 
people attended lasts year’s events. It is hoped that this year’s events and consultation 
will attract even more interest.
More information on RCS can be found on the Defra website.13
Core Groups
Core Groups were established to allow government and stakeholders to 
reach decisions on animal disease policy and controls by mutual consent 
and contribute to joint policy development. Members of Core Groups are 
selected for their knowledge of particular sectors and their standing with 
wider stakeholder organisations, but not as representatives of particular 
organisations. It is hoped and expected that this way of working provides a 
basis for further steps on responsibility sharing between Government and 
stakeholders.
Core Groups are given access to as much information on current situations, 
expert views and risk assessments as possible by government. This equips 
them to give advice on favoured approaches and responses (including to 
Ministers). The objective in all cases is to ensure that government reaches 
decisions which the Core Group is able to inform, endorse, support, and 
advocate with wider industry.
13  www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/ahws/sharing/index.htm

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
89
Bovine Tuberculosis
Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is one of the most difficult animal health problems that the 
farming industry currently faces in Great Britain. Defra’s bTB Programme recognises the 
need to look closely at how the current strategy might be improved. The Government 
recognises that working in partnership with the farming industry and strengthening the 
current programme of research and development will bring about a sustainable 
improvement in controlling bTB in England with measures tailored to reflect regional 
variation in disease risk and emerging evidence. (The Welsh Assembly Government and 
Scottish Government have their own programmes focused on combating the disease.)
At the end of December 2008 around 9% of herds in England were under bTB 
restriction due to a bTB incident. The problem is more severe in the South West and 
West of England with 18.1% of West region herds under restriction. The estimated GB 
herd incidence for 2008, based on confirmed breakdowns was 4.7%, with an average 
of 5.9 bTB reactors per 1,000 animals tested, compared to confirmed breakdown of 
3.8% with an average of 4.4 bTB reactors per 1,000 animals tested in 2007.
What are we doing?
After considering the wide range of evidence, including the final report of the 
Independent Scientific Group on Cattle TB (ISG), the Secretary of State announced in 
July 2008 the Government’s policy that no licences would be issued for culling badgers 
to prevent the spread of bTB in cattle. The Government remains open to the possibility 
of revisiting this policy under exceptional circumstances or if new scientific evidence 
were to become available.
In November 2008 the TB Eradication Group for England was set-up to make 
recommendations to the Secretary of State on bTB and its eradication. The membership 
of the group includes representatives from Defra’s Food and Farming Group, Animal 
Health, the farming industry and the veterinary profession. The Group’s priority is to 
develop an effective and deliverable programme for eradicating bTB in England as well 
as to contribute to a UK Eradication Plan for submission to the European Commission. 
For more information including highlights of the TB Eradication Group’s meetings, visit 
the animal health and welfare section of the Defra website.
Compensation for bTB continues to be a controversial and complex issue. The current 
system, based primarily on table valuations (compensation paid equates to the average 
contemporaneous open sales price for same category cattle), was successfully 
challenged in the High Court in June 2008. In April 2009, the Court of Appeal upheld 
Defra’s appeal against the Court’s decision that table valuations discriminated against 
owners of high value cattle.

90 Departmental Report 2009
Vaccination of either cattle or wildlife is considered to be a potential future policy 
option for reducing the risk of bTB in England. Since 1998, investment in vaccine 
development has reached more than £23.1m and on 7 July 2008 the Secretary of State 
announced that £20m will be spent on bTB vaccine research and development over the 
next three years. Real progress has been made and there are currently seven research 
projects underway. An injectable Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) badger vaccine will be 
licensed in 2010 and consideration is currently being given to how best to use 
injectable vaccines, including through a badger vaccine deployment project. The earliest 
projected date for a licensed BCG oral badger vaccine is late 2014 and the earliest 
projected date for the use of a BCG cattle vaccine with a differential diagnostic test 
(DIVA) is mid to late-2015.
More on bTB can be found under performance reporting for PSA 9 in Chapter 4: Our 
Performance.
Veterinary Medicines Directorate
The aim of the Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) is to protect public 
health, animal health and the environment, and promote animal welfare 
by assuring the safety, quality and efficacy of veterinary medicines. This aim 
is met through proportionate regulation, providing high quality services to 
our stakeholders and clear agreements with service providers.
In 2008/09, the VMD successfully completed the change programme aimed 
at ensuring the VMD is in a good position to deal with developments over 
the next five to ten years. It continued to work with stakeholders on the 
Pollution Reduction Programme, which accumulates evidence to determine 
whether the risks posed to the environment by pollution from 
cypermethrin sheep dips could be reduced to acceptable levels. The VMD 
set up a project to ensure that implementation is efficient and effective, 
both for staff and stakeholders.
Looking forward, the VMD Business Plan is available on the VMD’s website 
and sets out the strategy for the VMD over a three-year period, which is 
taken forward and delivered by a series of projects directed towards 
continuously improving the VMD’s efficiency and effectiveness with 
particular recognition of the increasing importance of the VMD’s work in 
the EU.
To view the VMD’s business plan 2008/09 – 2011/12, visit www.vmd.gov.uk.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
91
Veterinary Science
The Veterinary Science Team (VST) was established to reduce the impact of animal 
conditions on the economy, society and the environment, through:
•  timely, evidence-based, up-to-date veterinary and scientific advice;
•  detecting and assessing new and changing threats to animal and public health, 
wider society (including ensuring sustainability and biodiversity) and the economy;
•  horizon scanning, international networking, surveillance, and risk analysis; and
•  delivering policy to deal with relevant threats to public health and the economy, and 
supporting animal health and welfare, and international trade in animals and their 
products.
What are we doing?
VST has worked closely with the Department of Health and the Food Standards Agency 
(FSA) through a range of formal and informal networks to assess new threats to public 
health from animal diseases and infections.
A multi-criteria decision support tool has been introduced to help prioritise where 
resources are directed for maximum benefit in enhancing veterinary surveillance of new 
health threats. This ensures that the greatest threats are identified and intervention is 
prompt.
Publicity campaigns have been launched to raise awareness of animal product import 
rules. For example, the UK Border Agency (UKBA) was launched on 1 April 2008, and is 
working closely with Defra, HMRC and the FSA to help raise travellers’ awareness of 
the rules on personal imports of animal origin.
Veterinary Laboratories Agency
The Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA) helps deliver the Government’s 
requirements for animal and public health and sustainable agriculture and 
food industries by providing veterinary research, surveillance, consultancy, 
laboratory and epidemiological services, and an emergency response 
capability. The Agency’s main customer is Defra although work is also 
delivered to other Government Departments, the EU and the private sector.

92 Departmental Report 2009
Veterinary Laboratories Agency (continued)
Over the past year VLA’s key achievements include the following:
•  The Brucellosis 2008 International Research Conference, organised by 
the VLA, took place at Royal Holloway, University of London, from 10 to 
13 September 2008. The meeting, co-sponsored by VLA, Defra, the 
World Health Organisation and the Technical Centre for Agricultural 
and Rural Cooperation, attracted over 300 delegates from 60 countries. 
It covered many areas of brucellosis ranging from applied aspects of 
surveillance and control programmes through to the latest cutting-edge 
research.
•  VLA worked closely with the Institute for Animal Health by providing 
testing for bluetongue virus by PCR-ELISA (a technique for virus 
detection) for pre-movement and export purposes.
Progress on TB research includes:
•  generation of safety and efficacy data in collaboration with Fera, 
required for the licensing of BCG as an injectable vaccine for badgers;
•  identification of vaccines that improve the efficacy of BCG in cattle and 
improve the sensitivity of tests that differentiate between infected and 
vaccinated animals (DIVA tests); and
•  development of home-range maps for Mycobacterium bovis genotypes 
and a web-based molecular epidemiology information system, ‘SPIDA’, 
both helping Animal Health target resources for bTB control.
VLA continues to support Defra in the implementation of EU legislation to 
control zoonoses in livestock production. Evidence will be used to support 
the setting of EU targets for pathogen reduction and informing the 
development of National Control Programmes.
A new statutory control programme was introduced to control Salmonella 
Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium in egg laying flocks. A UK target has been 
set to achieve a minimum 10% annual reduction in the prevalence of these 
serotypes over a three-year period. VLA has provided expert consultancy on 
the development of the national control programme and is providing 
laboratory testing through the Salmonella National Reference Laboratory.
For further information on VLA activities and reports, visit www.vla.gov.uk.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
93
The Central Science Laboratory (Food and Environment 
Research Agency since 1 April 2009)
The Central Science Laboratory (CSL) is an Executive Agency of Defra. It 
provides research and information services covering agriculture, food and 
the environment to Defra, other UK Government Departments and industry 
and to governments and industry around the world. Its primary aim is to 
provide Defra with an efficient and competitive service in scientific support, 
research and advice to meet both statutory and policy objectives and 
Defra’s PSA targets. The work programme of CSL is divided between four 
main areas:
•  a healthy environment;
•  sustainable land use;
•  a safe food supply chain; and
•  resilience against contingency events.
Key developments in 2008/09 include:
•  successful completion of a programme to create and launch a new Defra 
Executive Agency, Fera, by merging CSL with the UK Government 
Decontamination Service (GDS), Defra’s Plant Health and Seeds 
Inspectorate (PHSI), Plant Health Division and the Plant Varieties and 
Seeds Divison (PVS);
•  a collaborative project between CSL and Defra’s PHSI won the 
prestigious 2008 Whitehall & Westminster World Civil Service Award for 
Science and Technology; and
•  provision of rapid, high-level testing, expertise and advice to the 
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (DAFF) in the Republic of 
Ireland following the finding of unusually high polychlorinated biphenyl 
(PCB) toxin levels in Irish pork and beef.
Fera was launched on 1 April 2009 with a starting complement of around 
900 staff and a budget of approximately £72m. For 2009/10 our plans 
include:
•  building on the synergies and opportunities for innovation and 
exploitation created by the formation of the new Agency;

94 Departmental Report 2009
The Central Science Laboratory (Food and Environment 
Research Agency since 1 April 2009) (continued)
•  management of a £25m, five-year programme to manage and contain 
the risks of two plant diseases, Phytophthora ramorum and 
Phytophthora kernoviae, from spreading further, following a scientific 
review and stakeholder consultation; and
•  playing a key role in the implementation of a £10m programme to 
undertake more research into the health of bees and other pollinators.
For further information about Fera, visit www.fera.defra.gov.uk.
Animal Welfare
Improved standards of animal welfare are important for society, the economy, the 
environment and sustainability. The development of animal welfare policy involves 
understanding the relevant scientific evidence and practical experience and takes 
account of the wide range of views held by stakeholders.  Recent progress in farm 
animal legislation provides not only protection from cruelty and suffering but also 
introduced a duty of care on keepers to take steps to protect animal welfare. The 
Animal Welfare Act 2006 provides protection to all vertebrate animals kept by man.
What are we doing?
Our work on animal welfare involves meeting EU proposals and regulations. For 
example, Defra issued a public consultation document in January 2009 on our 
proposals for new regulations for meat chickens and a code of practice to implement 
EU legislation on the welfare of meat chickens. The EU rules come into force in June 
2010.
The Department has also issued a public consultation document on new EU proposals 
in January 2009 on the protection of animals and birds at the time of slaughter or 
killing. The new EU proposals will replace the current 1993 Directive on welfare at 
slaughter to take account of recent developments in the slaughter industry.
In June 2008, Defra produced general guidance on the control of dangerous dogs, and 
has issued more detailed guidance on the dangerous dogs legislation for enforcement 
authorities.
The Farm Animal Welfare Council (the Government’s advisory body on farm animal 
welfare matters) issued its report in June 2008 on: castration and tail docking of lambs; 
on the welfare standards for pigs; and its opinions on the welfare of farmed gamebirds.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
95
Animal Health
Animal Health (AH) is an Executive Agency which plays a key part in 
delivering the Animal Health and Welfare Strategy for Great Britain. AH 
works to prevent, control and eradicate exotic and endemic notifiable 
diseases, minimise the economic impact of animal disease, ensure high 
standards of welfare in farmed animals, and guarantee the safety of the 
food chain.
AH does this in a range of different ways: responding to suspected cases of 
exotic notifiable disease; providing advice and guidance to end user 
customers; monitoring the occurrence and incidence of different diseases; 
checking compliance with legislative requirements; issuing approvals and 
licences; and supporting enforcement action where appropriate to ensure 
compliance.
In 2008/09 AH successfully dealt with the following:
•  An incident of rabies in a quarantine facility in Essex in May 2008. 
•  An outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry in Banbury, 
Oxfordshire in June 2008. 
•  Suspect cases of Bluetongue throughout GB and promoted with others 
the vaccination campaign.
•  A consignment of wheat feed with low-level contamination with 
material of animal origin.
In addition, AH:
•  began the centralisation of transactional customer services, including 
the centralisation of international exports, management of cross 
compliance and the control of ID cards for our field officers; and
•  celebrated the Wildlife Licensing and Registration Service (WLRS) 
achieving the Government’s ‘Customer Service Excellence’ standard.

96 Departmental Report 2009
Animal Health (continued)
For 2009/10 AH plans to:
•  restructure to align with Government Office regions in England, and 
appoint Directors in Scotland and Wales;
•  continue to build its expertise in state veterinary medicine and delivery;
•  continue to overhaul its processes and enhance its new core IT system 
(SAM);
•  assume responsibility for the provision of advice and guidance to its end 
user customers; and
•  continue to work with partners and customers to assure its readiness 
and resilience to deal with outbreaks of exotic animal disease through 
exercises, independent assessment and review.
For further Animal Health reports and publications, visit  
www.defra.gov.uk/animalhealth.
Forward Look for Priority 3
In additional to continuing with our current work in supporting our Priority to ensure a 
thriving farming sector and a sustainable, healthy and secure food supply, Defra plans 
to carry out the following over the forthcoming year:
Sustainable, Secure and Healthy Food Supply
•  Over the next 6 months we will be engaging with a wide range of stakeholders to 
develop a shared understanding of what we mean by a sustainable secure food 
system, and on how we might get there. This will be aligned with analytical work 
streams to assess emerging evidence, and build upon existing statistical and 
economic analyses.
•  We will also seek to ensure that cross-Government efforts on food policy reflect the 
four strategic objectives set out in Food Matters.
•  The Government response to the Public Sector Food Procurement Initiative (PSFPI) 
evaluation will be produced and recommendations taken forward in 2009/10 to 
align the initiative with the strategic objectives set out in Food Matters.
•  The Healthier Food Mark will be piloted later in 2009.
•  The UK’s food security is strongly linked to global food security. The Government’s 
Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor John Beddington’s, Foresight project on the Future 
of Food and Farming is looking to 2050 and examining how we will feed a global 
population of nine billion healthily, equitably, and sustainably, and what implications 
this has for UK policy.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
97
CAP Reform
•  Defra will continue to press for further steps in the CAP to the benefit of farmers, 
consumers, taxpayers and the environment. Defra is taking forward work to flesh 
out our vision for a future, environmentally-focused Pillar 2 of the CAP, working 
closely with stakeholders and other member states.
Farming for the Future
•  The document Farming for a Changing Future will be a platform on which we can 
build further collaborative action.
Agriculture and climate change
•  Over the next year Defra will continue to develop a policy framework on greenhouse 
gas mitigation from agriculture. This will include developing a cost-effective package 
of policy instruments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture, 
forestry and land management sector.
•  Defra wil  work with stakeholders in delivering the ‘Shared Goals’ through a new  
Task Group.
•  The Anaerobic Digestion Demonstration Programme will be delivered. This is being 
managed by WRAP.
•  Over the next year Defra will continue to develop a policy framework on adaptation 
measures for the agricultural sector and land managers. This will include a 
programme of advice, information, communications and incentives.
Nutrient management
•  Defra will be publishing The Fertiliser Manual (RB209) that provides farmers with a 
sound framework for decision-making on nutrient inputs to meet crop requirements, 
taking account of all sources of nutrient supply.
•  Defra will be launching PLANET V3 which is an electronic version of Defra’s Fertiliser 
Recommendations (RB209) publication.
•  Defra will use a database of suitable mitigation options aimed at reducing nutrient 
oversupply, to help develop practical tools for farmers and land managers to deliver 
better nutrient management.
Responsibility and Cost Sharing for Animal Health
•  Following further public consultation on specific proposals, Defra intends to publish 
a draft bill for pre-legislative scrutiny during the course of the 5th Session of the 
current Parliament.

98 Departmental Report 2009
Bovine Tuberculosis
•  In 2009, Defra will continue working with stakeholders to bring sustainable 
improvement in the control of bTB. The TB Eradication Group for England will be a 
key part of this and development of an eradication plan for submission to the 
European Commission will be an important milestone.
•  The Government will publish the results of its review of the gamma interferon test 
policy and, with stakeholders, will consider how the conclusions of the review might 
inform further policy development around use of the gamma interferon test in an 
eradication plan.
•  A review of pre-movement testing has begun and the outline scope of the review 
has been discussed with the TB Eradication Group for England. The review will 
gather information on the impacts of pre-movement testing and make any 
recommendations for amendments to the regime to improve its disease control 
objectives and minimise any negative impacts on the livestock sector.
Animal Welfare
•  Over the next year, Defra will prepare input into the EU’s review of its current rules 
on the protection of animals during transport; issue guidance on various species 
under the Animal Welfare Act 2006; and introduce regulations and guidance to 
protect the welfare of racing greyhounds under the Animal Welfare Act 2006.
•  The Farm Animal Welfare Council will publish its reports on a long-term strategy for 
farm animal welfare in Great Britain as well as opinions on the welfare of dairy 
cattle and on the welfare implications of bone strength in laying hens.


Cross‑Cutting Objective 1:
Sustainability

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
101
A key element running through all of the Department’s priorities is to ensure that 
Sustainable Development (SD) is integral to the development of new policies and 
delivery of intended outcomes. This applies both to the way in which the Department 
operates (through work that we are doing within Defra and across our delivery network 
in the form of our Sustainable Development Action Plan) and the way in which we 
support the UK Government to drive sustainability, both domestically and internationally 
(through the cross-government Securing the Future strategy published in 2005).
Defra, in its champion role, convenes the cross-government Sustainable Development 
Programme with a specific role of engaging with key policies and processes across all-
levels of government. This programme encourages and enables taking an SD approach, 
and ensures delivery of the SD strategy, Securing the Future. This programme works 
with four main groups, within Defra itself, with local and regional government, across 
Government in Whitehall and internationally.
Defra also acts as sponsor of the Sustainable Development Commission (SDC) which 
combines advice and capability building with a government “watchdog” role. For 
example, it has convened the Regional Champion Bodies for sustainable development 
and published the Sustainable Development in Government 2008 watchdog report. On 
1 February 2009, the SDC’s official status changed from an advisory Non-Departmental 
Public Body (NDPB) to an executive NDPB. This change completes a Government 
commitment made in the 2005 UK sustainable development strategy to review the 
SDC’s formal status in order to enable it to fulfil its expanded remit.
Progress toward SD is measured through the sustainability indicators which Defra 
publishes annually as Sustainable Development Indicators in Your Pocket. It includes 
indicators covering a wide range of factors from health, education and employment to 
greenhouse gas emissions and various measures of environmental quality. The 2008 
edition demonstrated that 53 indicators show improvement over their position on the 
base year of 1999 (over half of those it is possible to make an assessment of), while 30 
show little or no change. Those measures showing improvement include renewable 
electricity, emissions of air pollutants, crime, housing conditions and fuel poverty.

102 Departmental Report 2009
Highlights from 2008/09
Within Defra
Defra’s credibility as a champion of SD depends on its ability to act as an exemplar.  
The Department is currently implementing new policy making and assurance processes. 
A key element of this work is to ensure that SD is integral to the development of new 
policies and intended outcomes. As part of this we have also been promoting the use 
of, and training for, an online tool to assess the sustainability of a policy, called 
‘Stretching the web’, and its accompanying guidance.
All Government Departments (and some NDPBs) have Sustainable Development Action 
Plans (SDAPs). Defra plans to publish its next SDAP in early Summer 2009. This will 
include high-level priority actions showing how Defra will deliver SD through its 
programmes, and contribute to the commitments of Securing the Future over the next 
two years. The plan covers Defra’s policy as well as other parts of the way we work 
covering the themes of people, communications, operations, procurement, IT, etc.
Working across government in Whitehall
The Sustainable Development Programme and Securing the Future are cross-
government owned and delivered. Oversight of progress is undertaken by the cross-
government Board with representatives from a number of Government Departments, 
focusing on a set of sustainable development measures agreed between Defra, SDC 
and HMT. Other departments have been working closely with SDC to embed 
sustainability into their policies, notably Department of Health and Department for 
Children, Schools and Families. The SDC has also undertaken capability building with 
departments including CLG and HMT. Full details of SDC activity are contained in their 
annual report to be published in Summer 2009.
1. Sustainable procurement and operations across Government
Data collection, performance measurement arrangements and commitments have been 
strengthened by the setting up the Centre of Expertise in Sustainable Procurement 
(CESP) in the Office for Government Commerce (OGC). CESP, reporting the newly 
created post of government Chief Sustainability Officer now leads on oversight of the 
delivery of the Sustainable Operations on the Government Estate (SoGE) targets and 
implementation of other commitments in the Sustainable Procurement Action Plan. 
Defra transferred its resource to CESP to enable it to undertake this work, which is also 
supported by all other Government Departments. OGC published a comprehensive set 
of delivery trajectories for the government estate targets. Other work includes 
integrating sustainability into all major collaborative procurements. For the first time,  
all Permanent Secretaries had SoGE objectives in their 2008/09 performance contracts. 
Defra continues to lead on overall policy toward the SoGE targets and will be leading 
the review of them in 2009.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
103
2. Housing, planning, transport and the Thames gateway
Future housing developments, transport strategies and planning reforms are 
strategically important policy areas for the achievement of SD. Defra has worked to 
ensure SD is taken into account in a number of new policy developments under these 
banners across Whitehall. For example the consultation on the Eco-towns Planning 
Policy Statement sets out the toughest green standards ever applied to development in 
this country, agreement of strict environmental conditions for 21 second round New 
Growth Points and publication of the Thames Gateway Eco-Region Prospectus.
We worked closely with CLG to develop the Thames Gateway eco-region prospectus,14 
an ambitious plan to make the Gateway an exemplar for a holistic set of environmental 
interventions. We are currently working across Government with a wide range of 
partners to deliver the plans covering sustainable water and wastewater management, 
innovative approaches to flooding, waste management, air quality and biodiversity 
protection and enhancement, and protecting and enhancing the Gateway’s biodiversity 
and greenspace resources. These provisions will help to make the Gateway a more 
attractive and healthier place to live and work in.
3. Olympics
The Government’s Olympic Games Legacy Action Plan, published in June 2008, 
confirmed Defra’s role in leading work on the Games as an inspiration for sustainable 
living. London 2012 published an update to its Sustainability Plan in December 2008, 
providing a snapshot of the progress made over the last 12 months and showing that 
London 2012 is on track to achieve its goal of being a truly sustainable Games. In late 
March Defra convened a workshop of stakeholders, Olympic delivery bodies, 
commercial sponsors and other government departments to take forward the “inspiring 
sustainable living” promise.
Local and Regional
The draft Local Democracy, Economic Development and Construction (LDEDC) Bill will 
bring into being a Single Integrated Strategy at regional level to replace the Regional 
Spatial and Regional Economic Strategies. Defra has successfully influenced a number 
of clauses and is now monitoring the Bill’s passage through parliament closely. Work 
has commenced on the National Core Sustainability Framework, a guidance document 
against which all emerging Single Integrated Regional Strategies will be appraised. 
Defra’s Permanent Secretary, Helen Ghosh, led a session of Permanent Secretaries and 
Local Authority Chief Executives on sustainability against a backdrop of recession at the 
annual Local Government “Sunningdale” in January.
14  The prospectus can be downloaded at: www.communities.gov.uk/documents/planningandbuilding/pdf/ppsecotowns.pdf

104 Departmental Report 2009
1. Regional Development Agencies and Government Offices
During 2008, Defra initiated a series of Strategic Dialogues with Regional Development 
Agencies (RDAs) leading to the co-development of a Defra/RDA Strategic Partnership 
Agreement. In their Corporate Plans (2008-11), RDAs are now required to demonstrate 
regard to the cross-cutting principles of sustainability and equality in delivery of the 
Regional Growth Objective. Defra has also negotiated a new Strategic Agreement with 
the Government Offices, which will see them act as champions of SD in the regions 
and take an active role in helping partners integrate social, economic and 
environmental outcomes within their plans and programmes.
2. Comprehensive Area Assessment (CAA)
Through its close working relationships with CLG and the Audit Commission, Defra was 
able to influence the new system of assessing Local Authority (and wider services) 
delivery, which was launched in February 2009. The CAA has sustainability as a core 
theme and requires service providers within an agreed area to explicitly demonstrate 
evidence of integrated outcomes. The SDC has worked to train Audit Commission 
Inspectors on how to make the “sustainable use of resources” judgement which is a 
key part of the CAA.
Internationally – the Sustainable Development Dialogues
Defra has a wide ranging programme to ensure the delivery of Defra’s objectives 
internationally. In particular, the SD Programme lead on the cross-Government 
Sustainable Development Dialogues with China, India, Brazil, Mexico and South Africa. 
An external evaluation reported in December 2008 that the Dialogues had succeeded in 
adding value by improving cross-Whitehall policy coordination, broadening and 
deepening bilateral relations with the five countries and securing tangible impacts for 
those countries in terms of improved knowledge, expertise, capacity and changes to 
policy.
Highlights under the Dialogues over the last year include the following:
•  China: The Secretary of State visited China in November 2008 and agreed the 
extension of the Sustainable Dialogue for a further three years and the addition of  
a fifth theme on ‘Financing for Sustainable Development.’ We have established a 
Sustainable Agriculture Innovation Network, jointly funded by the UK and Chinese 
Governments, which aims to promote joint-research and the sharing of policy and 
research experience on issues such as the impact of climate change on agriculture. 
The network will ensure that policy-making in agriculture is better informed by 
research;

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
105
•  Brazil: Lord Hunt visited Brazil in November 2008 and agreed the extension of the 
Sustainable Development Dialogue. This decision has since been announced by the 
Prime Minister and President Lula, who welcomed the role of Dialogue in developing 
cooperation between our countries in their joint-statement of 26 March 2009 
during the Prime Minister’s state visit to Brazil. Key areas include collaboration on 
climate change and energy, sustainability of biofuels, forestry, food security 
biodiversity, sustainable consumption and production, and international 
environmental governance; and
•  Mexico: The Secretary of State and Environment Minister Elvira agreed an extension 
of the dialogue for another two years during the Mexican President’s state visit in 
March 2009. The next phase of the dialogue aims to deepen strategic elements 
around governance for sustainability and sustainable consumption and production. 
Sustainable Development Commission Chair, Jonathon Porritt, visited Mexico in 
February under the auspices of the dialogue and addressed a meeting of senators in 
the Mexican Parliament on the theme of sustainability governance. There has been 
good progress across all Defra funded projects, for example, our work to support 
the sustainable closure of municipal waste sites has already reduced methane 
emissions by 25,000 tonnes of CO -equivalent. This will increase to 34,000 tonnes 
2
of CO -equivalent when all sites are closed.
2
Progress in India and South Africa has been slower than expected but we reached 
agreement at senior official level to extend the UK–India Sustainable Development 
Dialogue for a further three years and have recently received confirmation of this 
extension. In South Africa we have agreed the priorities under the Sustainable 
Development Dialogue, which are climate change and energy, greening of the 2010 
FIFA World Cup, implementing the national framework for SD and environmental 
governance and enforcement. On the latter, a project led by the Environment Agency 
to build capacity of pollution inspectors has led to the first ever prosecutions and fines 
under South Africa’s national environmental legislation.
Sustainability Operations in Defra
As part of the government-wide campaign to reduce government emissions and 
improve energy efficiency, known as Sustainable Operations on the Government Estate 
(SoGE), Defra has completed a number of high profile refurbishment projects over the 
past few years which have all been acclaimed for sustainability in design, build and 
operation. For example, 3-8 Whitehall Place achieved a Building Research 
Establishment’s Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM) rating of excellent and 
also won the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) Sustainability Building of 
the Year Award 2005. The Nobel House refurbishment completed in 2006 achieved the 
then highest ever BREEAM rating for a project of its type and was awarded the RICS 
London Regional Award for Sustainable Building.

106 Departmental Report 2009
Measures taken to improve the energy performance of Nobel House included the 
installation and operation of natural ventilation, a Combined Heat and Power (CHP) 
plant, automatically dimmed energy-efficient lighting, PIR controls added to toilets and 
offices, sheep wool insulation and the replacement of ICT equipment with more 
efficient alternatives (LCD flat screen monitors & laptop computers).
The newest addition to the Defra portfolio is the new office at Alnwick which has been 
designed to operate as carbon neutral, incorporating a number of low and zero carbon 
technologies. These include three wind turbines, photovoltaic panels, a biomass boiler 
and a solar thermal system.
Defra’s Environmental Management System (EMS) is certified to ISO14001. The 
standard requires commitment to the prevention of pollution, legal compliance and 
continual improvement as part of the normal management cycle. This year’s SoGE 
report cited progress against this target as excellent, with 90% of the staff within Defra 
currently covered by its EMS.
Defra’s proactive approach to improving the energy efficiency of its estate was 
recognised through accreditation to the Energy Efficiency Accreditation Scheme (EEAS) 
in July 2007. Defra Estates Office portfolio was one of only 12 UK organisations to 
achieve the Carbon Trust Standard in April 2008. The Carbon Trust Standard is awarded 
to organisations that have genuinely reduced their carbon footprint and that are 
committed to making further reductions year on year.
Defra is currently on target to exceed the 2010 SoGE target to reduce carbon emissions 
by 12.5%, relative to 1999/2000 figures.
On Travel, Defra’s aims are to raise awareness of travel choices and ensure that travel 
decisions are both efficient and low carbon. The latest trajectory on Defra’s 
performance on CO  emissions from business travel indicates that Defra is close to 
2
meeting the 2010/11 SoGE target, to reduce carbon emissions from road vehicles used 
for government administrative operations by 15% relative to 2005/06 levels, and 
forecast to exceed it. Defra is working towards a new fleet emissions average of  
130 g/km by 2010 and is exploring the use of Portable Video-Conferencing (PVC) as a 
means to effective travel management.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
107
Bin-the-bin
Defra ‘walked the talk’ and rolled out its own behavioural change 
programme aimed at staff to increase recycling rates across the Defra 
estate. The department went “binless” in both London and York which was 
supported by a considered and comprehensive staff engagement and 
awareness campaign.
Bin-the-bin rolled out in London on 28 April 2008 and as a result, London 
recycling rates have increased from 65% in 2007/08 to 78% in 2008/09. In 
York recycling rates increased from 56% to 90% and in Alnwick when the 
new building opened, recycling rates increased from an average of 58% in 
2007/08 to 92% in 2008/09 thanks to the Bin-the-bin programme.
Procurement is a lever for achieving more sustainable outcomes and Defra has publicly 
committed to be a leader by example in sustainable procurement. As well as directly 
influencing procurements, we are also working closely with suppliers to identify their 
major impacts and help them reduce their footprint. Defra successfully piloted the 
Carbon Disclosure Project, selecting 20 of its key suppliers for disclosure, which has 
enabled us to have a better understanding of our suppliers’ emissions and will give us 
the opportunity to work together to reduce them. Our supplier engagement activity has 
received a lot of interest and we will continue to work with our suppliers.
The Government’s Timber Procurement Policy was introduced in Summer 2000, and has 
since developed into an internationally recognised policy tool. Defra is taking forward 
efforts to implement the step change policy on public timber procurement by 1 April 
2009.
The policy is aimed at both providing market incentives for legal and sustainable timber 
as well as for partner countries signed up to a Voluntary Partnership Agreement (VPA) 
or Forest Law Enforcement Governance and Trade (FLEGT) license, and also to tackle 
illegal logging and deforestation and improving forest governance. From 1 April 2009 
only timber and timber products originating from independently verifiable legal and 
sustainable sources, or from a licensed FLEGT partner will be demanded for use on the 
Government estate, appropriate documentation will be required to prove it. From 
1 April 2015 only legal and sustainable timber will be demanded.


Cross‑Cutting Objective 2:
Adaptation

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
109
The Government has set up the Defra led, Adapting to Climate Change (ACC) 
Programme to bring together work already being done within Government and across 
the public sector on adaptation, and to help drive it forward. Further information can 
be found in the document Adapting to Climate Change in England: a Framework for 
Action
, published in July 2008.15
The ACC Programme is being taken forward in two phases. Phase 1 (2008–11) will lay 
the groundwork necessary to implement Phase 2, a statutory National Adaptation 
Programme, as required by the Climate Change Act 2008. The Government’s intention 
is to have the Phase 2 statutory Programme in place by 2012, to fulfil the requirements 
of the Climate Change Act. The Programme will then report progress to Parliament on 
a regular basis.
The work within the Programme seeks to deliver on the overarching aim of a well 
adapting society. Within the principles of sustainable development, the Government 
considers that sustainable adaptation should be the goal of the Programme.
What does Sustainable Adaptation look like?
•  Society: where people, particularly the vulnerable, are protected from 
being disproportionately affected by the impacts of climate change, and 
there is an equitable distribution of the burden of climate change.
•  Economy: businesses are prepared for risks and able to take advantage 
of the opportunities from climate change.
•  Environment: we maintain a healthy, sustainable and resilient natural 
environment.
In this way, Defra’s work on cross-cutting objectives 1 and 2 is linked and 
complementary. Effective sustainable development means being well-prepared for the 
future climate. Adaptation needs to be sustainable if it is to be as effective as possible.
Phase 1 of the ACC Programme has four workstreams with the following objectives.
1. To develop a more robust and comprehensive evidence base about the 
impacts and consequences of climate change on the UK.
The key element to this workstream is the launch of new UK Climate Projections in 
early summer 2009, which will give organisations evidence to help them take informed, 
cost-effective and timely decisions on preparing for a changing climate.
15  www.defra.gov.uk/environment/climatechange/adapt/pdf/adapting-to-climate-change.pdf

110 Departmental Report 2009
Projects under this workstream also include the production of a National Climate 
Change Risk Assessment (as required by the Climate Change Act) and the Adaptation 
Economic Analysis. These will tell us about the likely impacts of climate change and 
help resolve some of the uncertainty around future benefits, providing decision makers 
with a more robust and reliable evidence base.
2. To raise awareness of the need to take action now and help others to take 
action.
The ACC Programme is working with a range of organisations from the public, private 
and third sectors to raise awareness of the need for action, provide and promote the 
information and tools needed to take action, and build capacity and capability within 
organisations to understand the impacts of climate change and take action. The work 
of the UK Climate Impacts Programme (UKCIP) organisation is a key part of this  
(www.ukcip.org.uk/). Defra contributes around £900,000 a year to UKCIP.
The Government’s Adapting to Climate Change website (www.defra.gov.uk/adaptation) 
also helps people to find the information, tools and advice they need.
The new UK Climate Projections, and the training programme that will accompany 
them, are a key part of the raising awareness process.
The impacts of climate change will vary, even within regional and local areas. The 
Programme is therefore working closely with a range of organisations at the local and 
regional level, including the Government Offices, the Regional Development Agencies, 
Local Government and the Regional Climate Change Partnerships.16
The work in this stream also involves helping to adapt national infrastructure. In a 
changing climate with increased risk of extreme weather events it is important that our 
new and existing infrastructure is resilient to the long-term impacts of climate change. 
Recognising that effective adaptation responses will be needed (e.g. by commissioners 
and operators of infrastructure) to ensure a more robust and resilient new and existing 
nationally significant infrastructure, a two-year cross-departmental project, under the 
ACC Programme, has been set up (from April 2009), focusing on transport, water and 
energy sectors.
3. To measure success and take steps to ensure effective delivery.
Under the Climate Change Act, the Government has a new power – the Adaptation 
Reporting Power – to require any public body or statutory undertaker (e.g. a utility 
company) to produce a report on how they have assessed and are addressing the risks 
from climate change to the delivery of their objectives. The Programme is currently 
developing the strategy for the use of this power, in consultation with stakeholders.
16  Each English region has already established an independent Regional Climate Change Partnership (RCCP). The RCCPs are made 
up of local stakeholders, ranging from the Regional Development Agencies through to small local charities, and work very 
closely with UKCIP. They investigate and advise on the impacts of climate change regionally, assessing how this may affect 
regional economic, social and environmental well-being. 

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
111
In addition, as required by the Climate Change Act, the Government is setting up an 
Adaption Sub-Committee of the independent Committee on Climate Change, that will 
provide external scrutiny of the Programme.
Defra and the Devolved Administrations have recently announced the appointment of 
Lord John Krebs as the Chair of this Committee.
Adaptation Indicators
The Government has already made “Leading the global effort to avoid dangerous 
climate change” one of thirty cross-government priorities (PSA 27). The existing six 
indicators for this overall climate change priority include one measure of success related 
to adaptation. The existing indicators will be a useful benchmark of success. However, 
because there are many other areas of life where we need to adapt, we will need to 
develop additional indicators.
Government has also set out, as part of the local government performance framework, 
an indicator for all English local authorities on embedding adaptation in the full range 
of their work, National Indicator (NI) 188. All local authorities will need to report on 
their progression through different levels of the indicator, and this will be assessed by 
the Audit Commission, the auditor for local government. In order to help Local 
Authorities respond, the ACC Programme team, working with a range of partners, has 
put in place targeted support for Local Authorities and their partners in Local Strategic 
Partnerships.
4. To work across Government in order to embed adaptation into Government 
policies, programme and systems.
Work, coordinated by the ACC Programme team based in Defra, is being undertaken 
on a number of cross-Government projects to ensure that Government systems which 
guide investment decisions, planning, and the efficient use of public resources have 
adaptation considerations embedded within them. This includes the Government’s own 
appraisal guidance, the Green Book, which is being updated to ensure that policy and 
investment decisions incorporate adaptation, as well as work on the Government Estate 
(i.e. the Office of Government Commerce and other Government Departments) on 
increasing the estate’s long term resilience to the impacts of climate change.

112 Departmental Report 2009
Adapting the Marine Environment to Climate Change
Ocean acidification is emerging as a major global environmental issue. 
Ocean acidity caused by increased amounts of carbon dioxide (CO ) in the 
2
oceans, has risen 30% in the last 200 years, faster than at any time in the 
last 65 million years. This will have significant and far-reaching 
consequences for marine ecosystems and the industries that depend on 
them (e.g. fishing), and the capacity for our oceans to act as sinks to store 
further CO .
2
Climate change is happening now and has already caused changes in 
plankton abundance, fish distribution and species composition in the seas 
around the UK. However we need to understand much more about the 
scale and nature of the effect CO  is having on our oceans and marine life 
2
and so we are supporting marine research to support our decisions on 
mitigating and adapting to climate change. In April 2009, Defra and 
Natural Environment Research Council announced support for a five-year 
£11m study into the effects of climate change and ocean acidification on 
biodiversity, habitats, species and wider socio-economic implications in the 
North East Atlantic, Antarctic and Arctic oceans.
Defra is working with the fishing industry to ensure that the fishing 
management systems, established through the Common Fisheries Policy 
and our inshore fisheries arrangements, maintain the flexibility and 
resilience needed to adapt to changing circumstances and maximize 
economic and environmental sustainability.
The Marine Bill will provide flexible management tools to ensure 
appropriate use of the marine environment to mitigate and adapt to the 
effects of climate change. The combination of licensing reforms, clearer 
marine planning, a single delivery organisation (the Marine Management 
Organisation, MMO) and better data management will simplify licensing 
applications for projects supporting climate change mitigation e.g. offshore 
renewable projects.
Plans to implement an ecologically coherent network of marine protected 
areas aims to maintain and support the role marine biodiversity plays in 
supporting the ocean’s role in absorbing CO  and minimising climate 
2
change.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
113
Highlights from 2008/09
Climate Change Bill received Royal Assent
The Climate Change Act 2008 creates a framework for building the UK’s ability to 
adapt to climate change.
Introducing the Adaptation Indicator (NI 188) in to the Local Government 
Performance Framework
A new Local & Regional Climate Change Adaptation Partnership (LRAP) Board, drawing 
the support for Local Authorities together, met for the first time in July 2008. The 
Board’s members include the Local Government Association, Improvement and 
Development Agency (IDeA) and the Nottingham Declaration Action Partnership. To 
date, the LRAP partners have already delivered two series of nine regional workshops 
through Autumn 2008 and Spring 2009, targeted at Local Authorities who have chosen 
NI 188 as a priority in their Local Area Agreement and produced guidance for how to 
go about meeting the requirements of NI 188. The Board currently has several further 
projects ongoing ranging from guidance for practitioners in specific professional 
disciplines through the evaluation of tools to help organisations measure their progress.
In addition, the ACC Programme provided a cash boost to the Regional Climate 
Change Partnerships of £450,000 in 2008/09. Topics covered by funding provided by 
the Programme include biodiversity, economic development (such as workshops on the 
business and technology opportunities of adaptation), assessing regional resilience and 
vulnerability, capacity building and community engagement and guidance on 
adaptation for schools and transport.
Helping people to find information about adaptation
Defra have launched the ACC Programme website www.defra.go.uk/adaptation. The 
website is constantly updated with the latest developments and news as well as 
providing an additional platform to distribute ACC Programme publications including 
Adapting to Climate Change in England: a Framework for Action, published in July 
2008.
Scoping stage of the Risk Assessment and Adaptation Economic Analysis 
complete
The Risk Assessment is one of the most ambitious assessments to be undertaken 
worldwide, and will need to take some important steps forward in developing the 
methodology for such studies.
Adaptation Partnership Board
The ACC Programme has set up a new Adaptation Partnership Board consisting of key 
stakeholders. The Board will provide advice to the cross-Government Programme, and 
will also help to spread messages about adaptation. The Partnership Board met for the 
first time on 10 March 2009.

114 Departmental Report 2009
Response to Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution (RCEP) study  
on adaptation
Defra submitted, on behalf of Government, full and comprehensive evidence to the 
RCEP’s study on the institutional arrangements for adaptation in the UK.
Developing work on adaptation indicators
The ACC Programme has carried out some initial scoping work to identify the issues 
relating to the establishment of new performance measures on adaptation. This is a 
complicated task, because some of the most important outcomes will not be 
measurable for decades to come, for example reducing deaths in heatwaves and floods 
in the 2040s. It is therefore important to develop intermediate measures too which will 
also need to measure success on a local level.
For more information visit the ACC Programme website.17
Forward Look
Over the next year work undertaken by the ACC Programme will include the following:
The launch of new UK Climate Projections in 2009
The UK Climate Projections are the most comprehensive package of future climate 
information to made available for the UK to date. They provide information on current 
and future climate change for the UK up to 2099 over both land and sea, down to 25 
km grid squares. They are an important step forward for us all in understanding our 
complex climate and how it might change in the decades ahead. They begin to 
quantify uncertainty and help us understand the relative risks in the future.
The projections will be accompanied by a comprehensive roll-out programme of advice 
and training for organisations on how they can use the projections, in Autumn 2009. 
The events and training sessions will help to raise awareness of adaptation across a 
wide audience, and illustrate how the projections can be used to support adaptation 
planning.
Establishing the Adaption Sub‑Committee for Summer 2009
The Adaptation Sub-Committee of the Committee on Climate Change will scrutinise 
progress on the ACC Programme and advise on the risk assessment. The Chair of the 
Sub-Committee has already been appointed. Members are currently being recruited and 
the full Committee is expected to be set up by Summer 2009.
Consultation on the use of the Reporting Power and on the Statutory Guidance
A public consultation on the use of the Reporting Power and the Statutory Guidance 
will be launched in early summer 2009, before the strategy and list of reporting 
authorities are laid before Parliament in November 2009. Reporting authorities are 
expected to be directed to report during early 2010.
17  www.defra.gov.uk/environment/climatechange/adapt/programme/objectives.htm#success

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
115
Tendering for the National Climate Change Risk Assessment and Adaptation 
Economic Analysis
Now that the scoping study has been completed, the full tender exercise will begin in 
summer 2009. The Risk Assessment will be presented to Parliament in 2011, and will 
provide an important basis for the development of the statutory programme. The 
Adaptation Economic Analysis will be produced to the same timescale.
Expanding our programme of working with Local and Regional Government
We will work with the 56 Local Authorities that have made the ACC Indicator (indicator 
NI 188) a priority for their Local Area Agreement, to complete the first comprehensive 
area assessment on the indicator in Summer 2009.
The Programme has also made a further funding commitment to the Regional Climate 
Change Partnerships covering 2009-11.
Propose options for adaptation performance indicators
The ACC Programme is committed to proposing a basket of indicators in Autumn 2009 
for consultation that reflects the breadth of the adaptation agenda.


Cross‑Cutting Objective 3:
Rurality

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
117
Rural Affairs, in addition to being core to Defra’s remit, partially delivers through the 
over-arching Rural Development Programme for England 2007-13. This involves the 
work of many delivery partners, including other departments, Defra Non-Departmental 
Public Bodies (NDPB) and the Regional Development Agencies (RDAs). In addition, Defra 
champions the equitable treatment of rural areas and communities across England in 
national, regional and local public policies and programmes. Defra also works with 
other Government Departments to encourage them to “rural proof” their policies. 
“Rural proofing” is the policy tool to ensure that the principle of rural mainstreaming is 
observed, namely that domestic policies across government take account of rural 
circumstances and needs, and also do not discriminate against the rural population in 
favour of urban or suburban populations. Defra’s resources are deployed in three ways:
•  promoting the effective mainstreaming of rurality within government;
•  working with national, regional and local government to ensure that they 
understand and address their rural responsibilities; and
•  maintaining strong links with organisations representing rural communities to ensure 
they have a voice that is heard by national Government.
One important contribution to this work is in improving the evidence base, in terms of 
data collection and analysis, specifically rural research and development that is made 
available to other Government Departments, to help them better understand the rural 
context for their policies. This work follows from the Rural White Paper 2000 and is 
managed in part through Defra’s sponsorship of the Commission for Rural Communities 
(CRC) to act as a rural adviser, advocate and to challenge Government, to the tune of 
£6.4m in 2008/09.
Highlights from 2008/09
The Rural Advocate’s Report on Rural Economies
In the summer of 2007 the Prime Minister asked Stuart Burgess, the Rural Advocate, to 
undertake an analysis of the impact of flooding and Foot and Mouth Disease on the 
rural economy, and to advise on how rural economies might be further strengthened. 
In compiling his report, Stuart Burgess analysed the rural economy as a whole and in 
June 2008 published his recommendations in England’s rural areas: steps to release 
their economic potential
. The recommendations set out a package of proposals to 
improve support for people and enterprises in rural areas. The Prime Minister broadly 
welcomed the report shortly after publication and asked Defra to work with others 
across Government to reflect upon it and to take forward actions in response to its 
recommendations. To do this, a cross-Whitehall working group (including HMT, BERR, 
CLG, DIUS, Defra and DWP) was brought together under the chairmanship of Defra to 

118 Departmental Report 2009
develop a joint response to the recommendations. On 5 February 2009, the Secretary 
of State published a response on behalf of the Government, setting out the 
Government’s rural agenda. The central messages of the Government’s response are 
that:
•  rural areas already make an important economic contribution, more so than has 
perhaps been historically recognised;
•  the best way to support and enhance this contribution is to recognise the dynamic, 
diverse nature of economic activity in rural areas, and to avoid out-dated 
assumptions about the nature of rural businesses; and
•  in recognising rural areas as places of economic opportunity we also need to 
recognise that they can provide a range of public goods over and above their 
economic contribution.
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee report on the potential of 
England’s rural economy
The Environment Food and Rural Affairs Select Committee’s report on the potential of 
England’s rural economy, published on 29 October 2008, suggested that Defra was not 
taking the rural agenda seriously enough (by having a Departmental Strategic Objective 
rather than a Public Service Agreement on rural communities and by reducing available 
resources), not being pro-active enough in rural-proofing Government policies and 
needed a better strategy for working with RDAs and local bodies.
The Government’s response was published by the Committee on 21 January 2009. It 
addressed all of the issues in the report. One of the Committee’s recommendations that 
Defra accepted was to rename the DSO as “Socially and Economically Sustainable Rural 
Communities” (from “Strong Rural Communities”). Defra also responded to the 
recommendation of a more proactive approach to rural-proofing and mainstreaming by 
setting up a joint initiative with the CRC. The report and Government reply may be 
viewed at:
www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmselect/cmenvfru/544/544i.pdf
www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200809/cmselect/cmenvfru/155/155.pdf
Mainstreaming
The CRC and Defra officials worked during the year on a joint project to reinforce the 
rural mainstreaming message and refresh the rural-proofing tools available to policy-
makers. This involves a clear statement of the principles underpinning the concepts and 
their meaning (at national, regional and local levels), the launch of a revised rural-
proofing tool-kit, and the development of a plan for closer working with key 
Government Departments, regional offices and others to support them in improving 
their mainstreaming and rural-proofing performance. The project was due to complete 
its first phase with the launch of a new rural-proofing during 2009/10.

Chapter 2: Priorities and Objectives
119
Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)
During the year we invited OECD to conduct a study into rural policy in England. This 
will be one in a series of studies carried out by the organisation, principally on member 
countries. They will bring to bear their extensive international experience in examining 
the approach we have taken to rural affairs and make recommendations that we can 
consider taking forward in the longer term. The fieldwork for the study started in 
March 2009.
The Rural Community Action Network (RCAN)
Defra is funding RCAN over 2008-11 (£10.35m in total) to deliver socially and 
economically sustainable rural communities. Funding of £3.45m was made available in 
2008/09 and was managed and distributed through Action with Communities in Rural 
England (ACRE). The grant is intended to ensure that the RCAN network (made up of 
Rural Community Councils at County level across England) are able to work with Local 
Authorities, regional bodies and central Government to ensure that the needs of rural 
communities are understood and addressed at the local and regional levels. Defra 
works closely with ACRE over management of the RCAN contract. Separately, Defra 
has commissioned Capacitybuilders to provide an independent assessment of ACRE’s 
delivery of the programme, drawing on its experience as a funder of third sector 
support services.
Defra and the East of England Development Agency (EEDA) (lead Rural Development 
Agency on rural issues), on behalf of the RDA network signed a Joint Strategic 
Partnership Agreement. The Agreement sets out how Defra and the RDAs will work 
together in partnership and some priority areas for joint action over the next 12 months 
as we help businesses and people in all communities through the economic downturn.
Forward Look
Defra in partnership with BERR, the CRC and the RDAs will continue to take an 
overview of intelligence received by the Government (and in particular the National 
Economic Council) on the impact of the current economic situation to ensure that it is 
effectively rural-proofed. This will take a particular focus on any risks that may be 
particularly relevant to rural areas such as issues affecting Small and Medium-sized 
Enterprises (SMEs) or those on low wages or in seasonal or part-time work.
We will continue with the joint Defra/CRC project to restate and refresh the 
Government’s commitment to mainstreaming and rural-proofing. One element of this 
involves supporting a major conference on 19 May 2009 to clarify and promote 
mainstreaming and rural-proofing to representatives of all levels of government and to 
their stakeholders. During 2009, Defra and CRC will be developing a long-term 
engagement plan to promote the mainstreaming and rural-proofing messages to raise 
their profile with Government Departments, regional, sub regional, local bodies and 
agencies, to increase and improve compliance with rural-proofing responsibilities.

120 Departmental Report 2009
We will maintain an active participation in the OECD rural working party of its Territorial 
Development Committee. The OECD will complete its rural policy study on England 
during the coming year. We anticipate a draft report in Autumn 2009 with sign off and 
publication in 2010.
Defra will undertake work to better understand the potential impact of reform of the 
Common Agricultural Policy on rural communities.
Defra will continue to sponsor the CRC to act as rural adviser and advocate, and to 
continue to challenge Government. Their work plan for 2009 includes many projects 
including work on the Uplands Inquiry, Rural Summits, Rural Experience days and 
continuing work on issues facing disadvantaged people.


Engaged and Effective 
Operations
CHAPTER 3

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
123
How do we work?
Introduction
The Report so far has focused on the work we do under our Priorities 
and cross-cutting Objectives. In order to achieve these Priorities and 
Objectives, it is important that we engage in effective and efficient 
operations. This Chapter highlights the ways in which Defra works and our 
achievements to be regarded as a respected department (Departmental 
Strategic Objective 9). These include the following:
•  the way in which scientific evidence is managed and used in policy 
making, and the research and development which the Department 
supports;
•  a drive for simpler and more effective business regulation. Our Better 
Regulation, Better Business simplification plan was published on 10 
December 2008, this covers progress on reducing the administrative 
burden on business and progress on impact assessments;
•  improved knowledge information management and information 
systems and technology services;
•  a target and extensive review process for achieving sustained cash 
releasing annual Value for Money (VfM) savings worth £381m by the 
end of the 2007 Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR07) period;
•  providing, sustaining and improving a working environment within Defra 
where health and safety of staff is embedded into normal working 
practices and business decisions;
•  ensuring that our recruitment practice is maintained and strengthened;
•  fol owing up on recommendations from public scrutiny bodies such as 
the Public Accounts Committee (PAC) and our Select Committee;

124 Departmental Report 2009
•  high quality advice to support policy, delivery and legislation by our 
Legal Group; and
•  high quality and consistent communication with the public, across 
government and within our department.
Evidence
Evidence is reliable and accurate information that can be used to support sound 
decisions in developing, shaping and evaluating policy. Examples of evidence include, 
but are not limited to:
•  research (as outlined in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and 
Development (OECD) Frascati Manual17);
•  monitoring and surveillance;
•  economic and statistical analysis and modelling;
•  secondary analysis and synthesis; and
•  analysis of stakeholder views.
Evidence is key to good policy-making. So we need to ensure that Defra’s investment in 
evidence, (including our specialist people resource):
•  supports the delivery of Defra’s departmental priorities;
•  reflects our view of future opportunities and threats;
•  is strategically aligned with the Priorities and spend of other UK and international 
funders;
•  supports and delivers the required internal skill needs of Defra;
•  takes account of our key capability and capacity needs;
•  reflects the strategic needs of the whole of the Defra network; and
•  delivers maximum value.
Defra has a dedicated Evidence Strategy Project team, whose task it is to drive the 
delivery of these objectives.
Highlights from 2008/09
We engaged academics, interest groups and evidence specialists from numerous 
organisations throughout the UK in a three-day workshop to review Defra’s current 
evidence activities and identify gaps and pressing cross-cutting issues.
17  browse.oecdbookshop.org/oecd/pdfs/browseit/9202081E.pdf

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
125
We set up an Evidence Forum to improve strategic management of evidence in Defra 
by drawing together policy and specialist colleagues to facilitate collaborative working 
and coordination. The Evidence Forum will provide advice on evidence investment 
priorities, explore cross-policy and interdisciplinary evidence issues, share insights and 
knowledge on current and future evidence needs, procurement and engage with other 
funders to influence forward strategies and funding. Over 80 people, representing a 
good mix of policy and evidence specialists, have signed up from across Defra, Natural 
England and the Environment Agency.
We improved the ability of Defra to address evidence gaps with a new £3m 
Strategic Evidence Fund for 2009/10. This will provide money for research that is cross-
cutting, has co-funding with other organisations or meets new or emerging needs. We 
identified six suitable projects for funding, covering work on the impacts and 
implications of ocean acidification on marine ecosystems; options for adaptation to 
climate change in the UK; avoiding dangerous climate change through stabilising 
greenhouse gas concentrations; adaptation of biodiversity and ecosystem management 
to climate change; changes in ecosystem goods and services in UK seas; and 
development of a holistic view of farming systems.
UK Partnerships
Living with Environmental Change Programme
Defra is playing a key role in the development of the Living With Environmental Change 
programme, an unprecedented partnership of 20 research and policy-making 
organisations working together to find ways of coping with the environmental changes 
that are already starting to affect people’s wellbeing and livelihoods. We are already 
seeing important research collaborations agreed on many topics (e.g. the Changing 
Water Cycle, the National Ecosystem Assessment, Ocean Acidification, and a Research 
Centre on Sustainable Behaviours), with many more in the planning stage.
Cranfield University Risk Centre
In response to recommendations from an earlier investigation by the Science Advisory 
Council, Defra has established the Collaborative Centre of Excellence in Understanding 
and Managing Natural and Environmental Risks. This Risk Centre is a three-year, 
co-funded partnership between Defra and three of the UK Research Councils (the 
Natural and Economic Research Council, the Economic and Social Research Council and 
the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council), based at Cranfield University. 
The Centre will help build Defra’s capability in risk appraisal, by working with policy 
teams in conjunction with experts across the Defra Network, elsewhere in the UK and 
internationally, and to help Defra tap into current and emerging good practice and 
apply this to a range of risk-related policy and delivery problems.

126 Departmental Report 2009
EU and International Partnerships
EU Research Framework Programme (FP7)
Working with the Research Councils, other Government Departments, and the 
European Commission, Defra is ensuring that the FP7 reflects UK priorities and that we 
are one of the more successful country participants, with British researchers winning 
over €100m of EU funding in the environment and food/agriculture areas since 2007.
European Research Area Networks (ERA-NETs)
We continue to collaborate with other countries through ERA-NETs in a variety of areas 
such as biodiversity, fisheries, flood management and plant health, maximising the 
value from funding through linking national research programmes. In 2008 a new, 
Defra-coordinated ERA-NET was established in the animal health area, bringing 
together 26 funding organisations from across Europe to address research on emerging 
and infectious animal diseases.
Forward Look
We are developing an Evidence and Investment Strategy together with the Chief 
Scientific Adviser to ensure that Defra remains first with the best evidence for cost-
effective and high-quality policy formulation.
In the coming year we hope to extend the UK, EU and international cooperation 
mentioned above to include other scientific areas, such as marine research and organic 
farming, and actively participate in coordination activities taken forward by the EU’s 
Standing Committee on Agricultural Research, including research in the agriculture and 
climate change/energy areas.
Evidence: Social Research
Social research has provided robust evidence and the methodological 
underpinning to deliver significant improvements in our approach to 
customer insight. We are developing a deeper understanding of our 
customers, who they are and what they think and feel. Customer insight 
was highlighted in an earlier Capability Review which advocated ‘a deeper 
understanding of Defra’s wider range of customers, not just its ‘traditional’ 
customers such as farmers and land managers, but also different business 
sectors and citizens in general.’

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
127
Evidence: Social Research (continued)
Social researchers, together with internal social marketing experts, 
successfully commissioned a series of ‘public understandings’ research, 
provided expert advice to policy teams, developed methodologies and 
facilitated the uptake of greater customer insight. Examples of good 
practice have been demonstrated within the Environmental Behaviours 
Unit (EBU) who have established themselves as a source of expertise both 
within Defra and across Whitehall (working with DfT and DECC in 
particular). The EBU pioneered a segmentation model to provide a 
framework for thinking about policy options. This has been used widely 
from within surveys to ‘customer immersion’ sessions where senior staff 
discussed complex issues with customer segments. The adoption of 
segmentation models for consumers and for one of our key customer 
groups (farmers), provides a way of thinking about policy targets in terms 
of real people with different values, preferences and capabilities and helps 
to frame policy options. Social researchers have been key in translating 
these models into applied policy tools as a way of strengthening the 
evidence base.
Social researchers within the Performance and Strategy Programmes have 
also encouraged action (and are monitoring results) as customer insight is 
embedded into the policy cycle and approvals process and emphasis has 
been placed on encouraging our delivery bodies to develop, share and act 
upon customer insight.
Evidence: Operational Research
Operational Researchers in Defra are playing a significant role in 
developing the UK Climate Change Risk Assessment. This will allow policy 
makers across the whole of government to identify where action will be of 
most benefit to allow the UK to adapt to the inevitable consequences of 
climate change. This is a statutory obligation under the Climate Change Act 
2008, and the first time that a risk-based approach has been used to assess 
the impacts of climate change on the UK. It will interpret how future 
climate change will impact the UK and assess the interactions between 
these impacts. For example, increased tourism may result from a warmer 
climate, which the UK may want to capitalise on, or there may be increased 
pressure on health services cause by heatwaves, so health policy may need 
to be adjusted.

128 Departmental Report 2009
Evidence: Operational Research (continued)
Defra’s analysts have also contributed to the Farming in 2020 project. The 
project will help provide the evidence on which future policy directions will 
take over the next decade. It will work by allowing policy makers to 
explore the impacts of possible policy scenarios on agriculture in England 
in 2020. The results will help us ensure that future farming policies deliver 
both an economically sustainable farming sector and environmental 
benefits.
From a corporate perspective, Operational Researchers have been at the 
centre of the implementation of Defra’s system of managing the funding 
of new pieces of work (portfolio management). This has helped Defra to 
better manage its financial resources whilst still delivering the objectives 
that we have committed to.
Departmental Research
Defra invests around £130m a year on research and development (in the natural and 
physical science as well as economics, social research and operational research) to 
support evidence-based policy development and service delivery. This represents 
approximately 5% of total Defra programme expenditure. In addition, Defra spends an 
equivalent sum each year on other non-research science and evidence activities, 
including surveillance, monitoring, field trials and knowledge transfer, much of this 
activity is undertaken by delivery bodies, such as the Environment Agency and Natural 
England.
Defra’s Chief Scientific Adviser
Defra’s Chief Scientific Adviser (CSA), provides an independent challenge to Defra’s use 
of evidence. As a department, we know that our thinking needs to be tested rigorously 
against the evidence. The CSA continues to raise the public profile of Defra science on 
issues such as biofuels and adaptation to climate change. He has provided expert advice 
in a range of key areas, for instance, bovine tuberculosis, ecosystems services and on 
climate change.
Science Advisory Council
The Science Advisory Council (SAC) continues to advise, offer support and challenge 
Defra’s CSA on many of the pressing and emerging evidence issues. Alongside this, 
SAC’s input remains crucial in helping to establish the strategic direction and priorities 
for Defra science.
In the last 12 months, SAC has investigated a range of issues including the use of social 
research in Defra and the scientific evidence base for bluetongue. In October 2008, 
SAC held its most successful public open meeting to date, which was attended by 
almost 200 people, thereby demonstrating a considerable public interest in Defra 
science issues.

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
129
Horizon Scanning and Futures
The Defra Horizon Scanning and Futures programme aims to provide the tools that can 
be applied to enable Defra to look as far ahead as the Department can possibly see. 
The aim is to analyse what is seen, react to it and use that insight to strengthen policy 
approaches. Most importantly, the programme aims to demystify horizon scanning and 
futures and show that the techniques can easily be used by any team to enhance policy 
and strategy development.
Highlights from 2008/09
Development of a Futures Toolkit to facilitate and embed horizon scanning and 
futures research and analysis, in policy and strategy development across the 
Department.
Development of a partnership project to undertake continuous horizon scanning 
and analysis for the Defra Delivery Network.
Participation in International Scientific Meetings
The CSA has been invited to co-chair international meetings under the United Nations 
Environment Programme (UNEP) and on behalf of the World Bank. In November, the 
CSA co-chaired a meeting of the Ad Hoc Technical Expert Group (AHTEG) on 
Biodiversity and Climate Change, which has been established under the Convention on 
Biological Diversity (CBD). The purpose of the AHTEG is to provide timely scientific and 
technical advice and assessment on the integration of the conservation and sustainable 
use of biodiversity into climate change mitigation and adaptation activities.
Better Regulation
Defra has committed to improving the way we make policy and use regulation, as well 
as reducing its administrative burden on business. We are pursuing a radical 
programme to simplify the regulatory landscape and reduce the burdens associated 
with our more onerous regulations, produce quick-win solutions on minor legislative 
burdens and improve our overall approach to regulating.
Our aim is to provide business with a clear, responsive and appropriate regulatory 
framework which provides recognised protection and benefits. Part of this is to strike 
the right balance, ensuring policy outcomes, reducing burdens and giving business 
certainty to operate effectively in today’s market whilst providing reassurance to the 
public that protections are maintained.
Well designed regulation plays a significant role in delivering required outcomes and 
associated benefits. It is pivotal in addressing market failure and internalises the costs 
that business impose on the environment. It delivers meaningful benefits for the 
environment, public health, the economy and wider society as a whole.
An important aspect of better regulation is reducing the administrative burden our 
regulations place on business. Administrative burden is defined as the cost of 
administrative activities over and above what a business would choose to do, commonly 

130 Departmental Report 2009
known as Business As Usual (BAU), in the absence of regulation. The administrative 
burden of regulation costs UK business and third sector organisations approximately 
£20bn a year. Some examples of the administrative burden of regulation are filling in 
forms, cooperating with inspections and keeping records.
Highlights from 2008/09
Between June 2005 and May 2008 Defra introduced a range of initiatives which are 
estimated to deliver administrative burden reductions of around £130.5m by May 2010. 
Based on figures thus far, we have delivered an 8% (£56.1m) administrative burden 
reduction on Defra’s revised baseline figure of £459.7m18. This includes 38 new 
initiatives identified this year, which have delivered or plan to deliver savings of £2.8m 
in administrative burden reductions and wider savings to business and third sector 
organisations. We are projected to deliver a further 11% net administrative burden 
reduction by May 2010, meaning the total administrative burden imposed by the 
Department will be an estimated £372.6m.
A major highlight from 2008/09 was the publication of the 3rd Simplification Plan, 
Better regulation, Better Business on 10 December 2008.19 Simplification and reducing 
administrative burdens is cross-cutting and implicit in delivering against the majority of 
Defra’s DSOs.
Working closely with stakeholders across our regulatory landscape, the simplification 
programme has helped in the development of well designed regulation to ensure 
administrative burdens are reduced and kept to a minimum, and existing mechanisms 
are used as far as possible. The programme has also addressed other issues such as 
improving the provision of guidance and advice across the delivery network to our 
customers and reducing the data burdens on Local Authorities as part of the wider 
Public Sector Burden Reduction drive. For example, on the latter, Defra has worked to 
refine its National Indicator set in response to the recommendations of the Lifting the 
Burdens Taskforce Review. We have reviewed the old Best Value Performance Indicator 
(BVPI) set, and of the 20 original Defra BVPIs, 12 have been removed with a further 
four consolidated into two indicators. Through this work, Defra has met its target to 
reduce the number of data sets collected from Local Authorities by 30%, while still 
maintaining the ability to assure and ensure delivery through Local Authority partners.
Forward Look and Summary
Defra is committed to delivering a net 25% reduction in administrative burdens by May 
2010. Over the next year we will be managing and mitigating risks to deliver existing 
projections. We will be addressing the 6% deficit between the 25% target and our 
forecast out-turn of 19% via the implementation of an Action Plan agreed with the 
Better Regulation Executive, and through active collaboration with delivery partners and 
stakeholders.
18  In 2005 Defra’s baseline was estimated at £527.8m; however we have since found an error in relation to the Pollution 
Preventions and Control Regulation which included a one-off cost of £23.8m and the TSE Regulations 2006 removed duplicate 
requirements equal to £44.4m. These have now been removed, making Defra’s revised baseline £459.7m.
19  www.defra.gov.uk/corporate/regulat/better/simplify/pdf/simplification-plan-081210.pdf

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
131
We will be working to obtain stakeholder views on how measures are being felt on the 
ground and to identify further savings that will deliver real benefits to businesses and 
third sector organisations.
We will be seeking to minimise the burden of new regulations through effective 
negotiations in Brussels. We will be working with delivery bodies and businesses to 
develop practical and light-touch ways to implement new legal requirements and 
deliver outcomes effectively and efficiently.
We will promote and review the use of non-regulatory approaches, e.g. voluntary 
Codes of Practice, to deliver our goals and objectives. We will bed-down the better 
regulation requirements of the new policy-cycle to ensure they are part of day-to-day 
policy development and service delivery.
Annex A (see page 181) describes the specific examples of our better regulation 
initiatives.
Customer Focus and Insight
Defra’s 2007 Capability Review found that the Department needed to develop:
“... a deeper understanding of [its] wider range of customers, not just its ‘traditional’ 
customers such as farmers and land managers, but also different business sectors, and 
citizens in general.”
As a result of the Review, the Customer Focus and Insight (CFI) project was established 
to drive forward a greater focus on customers across Defra. The project, which is 
halfway through its three-year lifespan, will continue to build on the work already 
identified in this Report as part of a continuous programme of improving customer and 
stakeholder capacity. Improved processes, better defined systems and nurturing of a 
cultural shift which is based on understanding and responding to behaviours and 
motivators, will ensure Defra, better delivers policies and services that meet customer 
needs and achieve our strategic objectives.
There have also been cross-cutting insight projects to gain a greater insight into Defra’s 
business, farming and fishing customers, greater joining up with the large delivery 
bodies on customer insight, and increased consideration of how better to join up policy 
development and service delivery around the needs of the customer.
Defra’s 2009 Capability Re-Review recognised that while some advances had been 
made, the Department:
“... now needs to increase its focus on customers, and to engage and enthuse the 
wider delivery network and stakeholders to achieve its strategic objectives.”

132 Departmental Report 2009
The Capability Review
The Capability Review 2009 was published on 31 March 2009. The results 
were good news for Defra. Our overall score increased by six points, and 
we moved up two assessment categories from ‘Urgent Development Area’ 
to ‘Well placed’ for D1 ‘Plan, resource and prioritise’. Defra was the most 
improved Department in our tranche of reviews and equal second most 
improved, together with DWP, in Whitehall.
In his Foreword to the Report, Gus O’Donnell said “I would like to 
congratulate Defra for making significant progress over the last two years. 
In particular, I have been pleased to hear about the positive way in which 
the Department has responded to the 2007 Capability Review and the 
machinery of government changes which affected it in October 2008. Defra 
has made considerable progress in implementing its ambitious organisational 
vision and demonstrated an appetite for transformational change”.
Planning is under way to follow up on the recommendations of the review 
so that Defra can build upon the progress made so far and demonstrate 
further improvement by the 12 month assurance process in early 2010.
Knowledge Information, Information Systems and Information 
Technology, and Service Transformation
This section covers the way in which the necessary infrastructure to maintain secure, 
accessible and efficient information handling and support sustainable and effective 
ways of working in the Department is provided. This can be broken up into the three 
main areas of knowledge information, information systems and information technology 
and service transformation.
Knowledge Information Management – Data Handling
This involves implementing procedures to correctly handle, store and manage personal 
and other data in line with statutory and legislative data handling and records 
management requirements. These procedures facilitate operational effectiveness in 
enabling access to information, supporting our project and programme approach and 
collaborative ways of working, and instil a working culture that properly values, 
protects and uses information.
Information Systems/Information Technology (IS/IT)
An essential part of effective delivery is ensuring that the Department’s IS/IT systems, 
supporting kit and infrastructure, function effectively, are in line with the sustainability 
agenda and enable the Department to deliver its business objectives and meet 
Government targets. This involves delivery of a range of services ranging from provision 
of hardware through to managing the flow of traffic over the IT network. The services 

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
133
are subject to measurement against agreed target levels of performance in areas such 
as: provision of Helpdesk support; levels of customer satisfaction; incident 
management; and user down time. This includes monitoring and management of the 
Authority/Supplier relationship through a jointly agreed plan describing what IBM and 
Defra are contracted to deliver.
Government is driving savings through economies of scale as well as energy and carbon 
reductions from adoption of sustainable practices and technologies (e.g. server 
virtualisation, audio and video conferencing) via Cabinet-led Operational Efficiency and 
Green ICT Strategies. These cross-government initiatives include commonality of 
approach to procurement, streamlining delivery through shared services, and driving 
innovative solutions such as those in the field of data sharing.
Delivery of Service Transformation Projects
The Transformational Government Strategy and its remit to improve customer services 
across Government is a significant driver to the projects undertaken. The Department 
continues to have a number of successful service transformation projects such as the 
International Trade Single Window in partnership with HMRC and BusinessLink, the 
Whole Farm Approach and Spatial Information Repository (SPIRE). These projects aim to 
reduce burdens on businesses and deliver efficiencies through provision of integrated 
electronic channels for handling all transactional, regulatory and enforcement processes 
and by limiting the volume of paperwork.
The Government, through the Cabinet-led Operational Efficiency Programme, is 
encouraging cross-government collaboration to drive savings through economies of 
scale and commonality of approach and sharing of best practice.
Highlights from 2008/09
Knowledge Information Management – Data Handling
Results of the second quarterly assessment of the risks to the Department’s key assets 
with personal protected information show continued improvement. In respect of IS/IT 
data security, improvements have also been made to protect data, for example, via use 
of encryption software.
A programme of work stemming from the Data Handling Review (DHR) has been 
established to improve levels of assurance that information is correctly handled, 
protected and stored, and that Defra achieves compliance with level 1 of the Cabinet 
Office’s Information Assurance Maturity Model along with other Government 
Departments. The mandatory on-line training was undertaken during the weeks leading 
up to end of March 2009 with the Department being obliged to report back to Cabinet 
Office by October on the level of uptake.

134 Departmental Report 2009
IS/IT
Delivery of a range of robust IT services is well underway to allow secure, mobile and 
‘greener’ working practices, including energy 4-star rated laptops. These services enable 
access to information from anywhere, at anytime, and support more agile ways of 
working, thereby increasing productivity and reducing energy costs and carbon emissions.
Delivery of Service Transformation Projects
The Department has continued to contribute to the Transformational Government 
agenda in 2008/09. The Whole Farm Approach (WFA) is Defra’s flagship service 
transformation programme. By March 2009, over 7,500 farmers had registered to use 
the service and during the year a new feature was added to enable farmers to more 
readily understand how they need to operate in order to qualify for single farm 
payments. 
Good progress was made on a number of data sharing initiatives. Defra, as the UK 
government lead on the EC Infrastructure for Spatial Information in Europe (INSPIRE) 
Directive for sharing environmental spatial data, issued a public consultation document 
and impact assessment as part of the Transposition process. Defra also took the lead 
across government for the UK Location Programme, a joint venture to implement 
INSPIRE and the wider UK Location Strategy (UK government policy published by 
Communities and Local Government (CLG) in November 2007) and established the 
cross-government Location Council made up of senior representatives from key 
departments and the devolved executives, the aim of which is to provide direction and 
governance to maximise the exploitation and the benefits of location information across 
government. Across the Defra network, we added datasets and capabilities to the 
Spatial Information Repository (SPIRE) service and extended the reach to over 3,000 
users in 33 organisations. We also implemented the initial release of a Customer and 
Land Data sharing service (CLAD) which has already been used as a key resource in 
dealing with emergencies.
Forward Look
Knowledge Information Management – Data Handling
Following the Prime Minister’s Data Handling Review (DHR), Defra has undertaken 
quarterly assessments of the risks to the Department’s key information assets and 
shared the findings with the Audit and Risk Committee. Although results of the second 
assessment showed improvements, more work is needed, particularly in the areas of 
staff awareness and behaviours, system accreditation and assuring the privacy 
implications of new projects. Work to address this, and other requirements from the 
DHR, will be implemented through an Information Assurance Programme.
Defra's IT Delivery Refresh (ITDR) Programme
This programme is structured as a series of projects which will run between the end of 
February 2009 and September 2009 when a decision to extend the existing IBM 
contract or procure alternative supplier(s) will be required.

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
135
Defra’s Network Green ICT Programme and Government’s Green IT Strategy
By the end of the first quarter 2009 the Green ICT programme aims to have produced 
a cost-benefit analysis and plans for harvesting reductions from existing and new 
activities in order to achieve carbon neutrality for ICT (against a baseline measured in 
Winter 2008) across the Defra Network estate before January 2012. Carbon neutrality 
will include savings that ICT enables in the footprints of other areas such as travel and 
accommodation. Whilst there are significant costs associated with this, there are 
expected to be equivalent, if not higher cost savings from energy reductions for the 
Department and its network of delivery bodies.
Delivery of Service Transformation Projects – UK SDI (INSPIRE)
During 2009/10, Defra will implement important new self-service arrangements for 
single farm payments and cattle tracing as part of the WFA, which will use new 
standardised identity and access control facilities integrated with the Government 
Gateway. We will transpose the EC INSPIRE Directive into UK law and work with the 
Scottish Executive to implement complementary Scottish legislation. We also aim to 
progress the cross-government UK Location Programme by designing the operational 
model and setting up the initial web services for the programme. Within the Defra 
Network, we aim to improve the speed to market and reduce costs for new geo-spatial 
systems using SPIRE services, design the Defra Network publication arrangements for 
access via the UK Location Programme web services, and extend the data, users and 
capabilities of CLAD.
Value for Money (VfM)
The Government has a commitment to Parliament that it will report openly on progress 
towards achieving the CSR VfM targets, so it is important that both HM Treasury and 
departments agree on effective VfM reporting that supports and enables Parliamentary 
scrutiny. This section provides that information.
The Department has a target of achieving sustained, cash releasing VfM savings worth 
£381m by the end of the CSR07 period. This is a change from the original Defra target 
of £379m. It takes account of:
•  a reduction of the target to £306m following the creation of DECC in October 
2009, which took responsibility for delivery of £73m of the original target; and
•  an increase to the target of £75m as Defra’s contribution to additional cross-
Government VfM savings confirmed in the 2009 Budget.
Table 3.1 below sets out the target profile across the CSR07 period. Details of savings 
areas are set out in our CSR07 VfM Delivery Agreement, published on our website at 
www.defra.gov.uk/corporate/busplan/spending-review/index.htm.

136 Departmental Report 2009
Table 3.1: CSR07 VfM target profile
2008/09
2009/10
2010/11
£177m
£244m
£381m
At the end of March 2009, the Department had delivered £175.36m of full year savings 
against its 2008/09 target of £177m. All gains are cash-releasing, sustainable, conform 
with CSR07 VfM methodology and are reported net of costs. By the end of 2010/11, 
the Department has confidence in delivering £324.7m against the target of £381m. 
This forecast does not include options for meeting the additional £75m efficiency 
contribution which are still to be finalised.
Savings are being delivered across a number of areas as follows:
Table 3.2: CSR07 VfM target grouped by savings area
Grouping
Original 
Post Budget 
Defra 
2009 
2010/11 
Targets for 
Targets 
2010/1120 
(£m)
(£m)
Zero Based Review Areas (Natural Resource Protection; 
107.4
107.4
Flood Risk Management; Animal Health & Welfare)
Review of minor Programmes & Projects
33.5
14.8
Cross-Departmental Initiatives
104.4
56.6
SR04 Overdelivery
38.0
34.0
Allocative Savings from reprioritisation of work during 
122.5
114.9
2008/09 and 2009/10 budget setting
Total (including contingency)
405.8
327.7
Original CSR Target
379.0
306.0
Additional efficiency contribution confirmed in 2009 
75.0
Budget
Revised CSR Target
381.0
Examples of savings delivered in 2008/09 are listed below.
•  £6.46m delivered in the Animal Health area, where proposals for cost sharing took 
effect from January 2009. Additional savings have been found against the collection 
and disposal of over 24 month old fallen stock to offset a shortfall in planned 
savings from the National Fallen Stock Company, where a short term subsidy is 
being paid.
20  Post Machinery of Government Defra 2010/11 Targets (reflecting transfers to DECC and additional savings contribution).

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
137
•  £4.87m delivered through efficiencies at Natural England including £1.5m from back 
office staff reductions, £1m from estate rationalisation, £0.7m from strategic 
procurement savings and £1m from other workforce reductions and improved 
vacancy management.
•  £10.06m delivered by closing or scaling back a number of minor projects and 
programmes, including the Rural Social Community Programme, and cost savings at 
NDPBs, committees and commissions.
•  £25.71m from cross-Departmental initiatives, including procurement (£3.3m), 
Environment Agency efficiencies (see below), lower IT support costs (£1m) and 
estates rationalisation (£7.8m).
•  £34m counted as SR04 overdelivery, largely made up of savings from the 
Environment Agency and Defra Executive Agencies.
•  £75.61m delivered through allocative VfM savings made as part of settling budgets 
for the CSR07 period. These savings are separate from the review of minor 
programmes and projects mentioned above. They are based on reduced input costs 
in lower value activities, allowing savings to be released and factored into budgets 
for higher value activities, leading to a better output and outcome overall. The 
budgets in question have been reduced by the amount of the allocative savings.
Case study: the Environment Agency (EA)
The Environment Agency has delivered some £30m of savings in 2008/09 
through: a strong focus on commercial procurement negotiations 
delivering savings which have been reinvested to enable additional projects 
to progress; the National Capital and Programme Management Service 
which uses recognised best practice value management to deliver 
additional Flood Risk and Coastal Management capital projects, so 
increasing the number of houses protected from flooding; and centralised 
system support work and automation of some of the processes involved 
(through the Flood Warnings Direct project). As a result EA has raised 
public awareness of this service and reduced maintenance costs.
A review by Defra Approval Panels has been completed to validate VfM outturns and 
forecasts. Approval has also been given to establish a new efficiency programme to 
secure delivery of efficiencies across the Department and its delivery network for the 
remainder of the CSR07 period. All savings will be reviewed by the National Audit 
Office (NAO), which will report on each Department’s claim during the CSR07  
spending period.
Looking ahead, Defra and its delivery bodies will be working together to identify and 
deliver the additional £75m of efficiencies required by 2010/11 confirmed in the  
2009 Budget.

138 Departmental Report 2009
Examples of areas already identified are:
•  the Sustainable Built Environment Workplace Support (SBEWS) initiative will bring 
much of the Defra estate (which currently covers over 234 sites across the 
Department and its Agencies) into a single Facilities Management contract. Defra 
will save £6m each year from 2010/11 onwards through economies of scale and 
increasing the flexibility and quality of Defra’s facilities;
•  £17m will be saved on transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) surveillance 
through a more risk-based approach to monitoring and enforcement and by sharing 
costs with industry;
•  the Animal Health Agency will save £7m through modernised working practices 
supported by IT-enabled process change;
•  creation of the Food and Environment Research Agency (Fera) will reduce overhead 
costs by £2.5m through the merger of the Central Science Laboratory, the 
Government Decontamination Service and Defra’s Plant Health Service and Plant 
Variety Rights and Seeds Office; and
•  Defra’s waste management and resource efficiency activities will be delivered 
through a single delivery channel, the Waste and Resources Action Programme 
(WRAP), saving £3m.
A revised CSR07 VfM Delivery Agreement will be published once the full package of 
savings has been identified.
Progress on relocating posts from London and the South East
Under the Lyons Relocation Programme, Defra has a target to relocate 390 posts from 
London and the South East by March 2010.
As at 31 March 2009, a total of 413 posts in Defra and its delivery network had been 
relocated, thus exceeding its 2010 target. This represents an increase of 24 on the last 
reported figure in Autumn 2008 of 389 posts, made up of 15 Natural England posts 
relocated from London to various locations outside the South East and 9 Agriculture 
and Horticulture Development Board (AHDB) posts from various locations to Stoneleigh, 
Warwickshire.
The current overall forecast for the number of posts the Department may be able to 
relocate by March 2010 stands at 776. This forecast, which significantly exceeds Defra’s 
original target, includes a further 223 AHDB posts (relocating to Stoneleigh, 
Warwickshire from various locations in the South East) and 140 posts to form the 
Marine Management Organisation which is to be established in Tyneside, largely drawn 
from Marine and Fisheries Agency posts currently based in London.

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
139
Working Environment: Health and Safety
Defra is committed to providing, sustaining and improving a healthy and safe working 
environment where health and safety is embedded into normal working practices and 
business decisions.
Highlights 2008/09
Defra:
•  developed a new Safety Policy setting out the health and safety management 
system for the core-Department which was signed by the Permanent Secretary in 
November 2008;
•  introduced new risk assessment processes with the help of trained coordinators, 
requiring whole team input and senior management support and sign off;
•  provided workshop training to staff on workstation ergonomics, focusing on smart 
working and laptop use;
•  rolled out a new health surveillance programme for our high risk field staff;
•  inspected all our HQ buildings and progressed remedial actions with local facilities 
teams and Estates Division;
•  submitted six monthly health and safety performance reports to the Management 
Board for review; and
•  revised and simplified policy and guidance documents and forms including those on 
the subjects of Computers and Workstations, Home-working, Driving and Travel, 
and Accident Reporting.
Accidents and ill health reports in 2008/09
In 2008 there were 64 incidents reported which is a decrease on the 2007/08 figures. 
There were no fatalities or diseases as defined by the RIDDOR Regulations, nor were we 
served any enforcement notices or convicted on any breach of health and safety law.

140 Departmental Report 2009
Table 3.3: Numbers of reported incidents for 2008/09
Type of Incident
No. of Reports
Fatal injuries
0
Major injuries
1
Dangerous occurrences
0
Over 3 day injuries
1
Minor injuries
31
Near misses 
14
Road traffic accidents
1
Acts of violence (including verbal abuse)
3
Ill health cases
13
Total
64
Forward Look
The aim for 2009 and future years is to continue:
•  to encourage visible and active leadership of health and safety matters by staff at all 
levels;
•  to work to ensure our information, policies and procedures are fit for purpose and 
flexible to fit team variations under Defra’s new structure; and
•  to provide a programme of training and education for staff at all levels to help 
improve health and safety awareness.
Working Environment: Recruitment Practice
The Civil Service Order in Council 1995 sets out the legal basis for Defra recruitment 
policies and practice. The Civil Service Commissioners’ Principles for Recruitment and 
the Recruitment Code are mandatory and must be followed when any post is opened 
to competition from outside the Civil Service.
Highlights 2008/09
Recruitment Practice in Defra has been maintained and strengthened through:
•  implementing a multi assessment approach to our recruitment and promotion 
activity;
•  prioritising our most immediate resourcing requirements and moving available staff 
in a much more flexible way than has ever previously been possible;
•  identifying a group of talented people at our key policy delivery grades of HEO and 
Grade 7 through a promotion board and placing them in the highest priority 
assignments;

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
141
•  beginning work on identifying our people needs (i.e. the numbers, skills and 
experience required) for the next 2-3 years so that we can plan better to meet  
them; and
•  implementing more rigorous pre-employment checks on all new recruits.
Forward Look
•  Embedding the amended Civil Service Commissioners Recruitment Principals into the 
Department.
•  Ensuring policies and procedures are fit for purpose.
•  Providing appropriate guidance and support to help meet diversity targets.
PAC recommendations
Management of Expenditure
The House of Commons Committee of Public Accounts (PAC) published a report on  
4 September 2008 entitled Defra: Management of Expenditure. The report focused  
on Defra’s budget management during the financial year 2007/08.
During 2007/08 Defra faced unprecedented challenges through a summer of 
unforeseen circumstances with serious flooding across many parts of England and a 
series of animal disease outbreaks (Foot & Mouth Disease, Avian Influenza and 
Bluetongue). The animal disease outbreaks were contained to relatively small 
geographical areas and the response to the unseasonal flooding tested the emergency 
response capabilities of the Environment Agency and Local Authorities.
Defra was able to discharge its responsibilities and respond to the various emergency 
situations within its budget for the year and did not need to make a call upon the 
taxpayer for any additional resources. In response to the PAC recommendations, the 
Department was also able to point to various improvements which have since been 
introduced under portfolio management to further strengthen financial management, 
including more transparent monthly financial reporting to the Management Board. The 
Department also achieved ‘Faster Close’ of its Annual Accounts in laying its Accounts 
before the Summer Recess in July 2008.
The 40th PAC Report of Session 2007/08 may be viewed at:  
www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmselect/cmpubacc/447/447.pdf
Defra’s response to the PAC recommendations can be viewed in Annex D.
Single Payment Scheme
PAC published a report on 15 July 2008 entitled A progress update in resolving the 
difficulties in administering the Single Payment Scheme in England
.

142 Departmental Report 2009
The Committee re-examined the problems experienced by the Rural Payments Agency 
(RPA) in implementing the Single Payment Scheme (SPS) on the basis of a report by the 
Comptroller and Auditor General (C&AG) A progress update in resolving the difficulties 
in administering the Single Payment Scheme in England
.
Since the C&AG’s report in December 2007, RPA has continued to consolidate a series 
of measures to improve the delivery of SPS. These helped the Agency to meet its 
Ministerial targets for SPS 2007 and SPS 2008 payments. RPA’s central focus continues 
to be on improving its customer service, with the longer-term aim of reducing the cycle 
from claim to payment.
The 29th report of Session 2007/08 may be viewed at:
www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmselect/cmpubacc/285/285.pdf.
A summary of Defra’s response to the PAC recommendations can be viewed in  
Annex D.
Sites of Special Scientific Interest
The National Audit Office published its report Natural England’s Role in Improving Sites 
of Special Scientific Interest
 in November 2008. Evidence was subsequently taken by 
the PAC at which Natural England and Defra attended as witnesses. The Committee’s 
report is expected imminently at which stage Defra and Natural England will respond. 
Full details will be included in the 2010 Departmental Report.
Legal Group
The work of Defra’s Legal team is essential for the delivery of all three Priorities. 
Particular highlights of 2008/09 include: involvement in preparing the Marine Bill and 
taking it through Parliament; the enforcement of fisheries and conservation legislation 
and drafting legislation requiring waste and pollution to be managed in such a way as 
to minimise risks to human health and the environment; and advising on enforcement 
of such legislation.
The Defra Legal Group has supported our first Priority through:
•  securing agreement at the UNEP Governing Council in February 2009 to put in place 
a legally binding instrument on controlling mercury. This is a landmark agreement, 
receiving extensive media coverage;
•  supporting negotiations, under the auspices of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, 
to elaborate an international regime for liability and redress for damage resulting 
from trans-boundary movements of living modified organisms;
•  supporting negotiations, within the framework of the Convention on Biological 
Diversity, to elaborate an international regime to promote and safeguard the fair 
and equitable sharing of benefits arising out of the utilisation of genetic resources;
•  acting as legal advisor to Defra and DfT on the negotiations for a new global 
agreement on ship recycling;

Chapter 3: Engaged and Effective Operations
143
•  working on the transposition of the Marine Strategy Directive, which establishes a 
framework for the achievement of good environmental status of the marine 
environment by 2020; and
•  advising the Marine and Fisheries Agency in relation to the regulation of deposits 
(including construction) in the sea, and marine dredging, through licensing and 
consents.
Under our second Priority the Legal Group have been working together with Defra’s 
Procurements and Contracts Division and Office of Government Commerce to ensure 
that new guidance for Local Authorities and other contracting authorities specifies that 
Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (FLEGT) timber and legal and 
sustainable timber are part of the specification for supplies.
Defra also supported new legislation in February 2009 on Ozone Depleting Substances 
and Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases, with which the Legal Group was involved.
Support to our third Priority is through legislation related to the CAP and animal health 
as well as supporting and advising our Executive Agencies. This involves:
•  implementation of the new CAP regimes, both in relation to the EU implementing 
rules and subsequent domestic implementing legislation;
•  updating animal disease legislation and providing 24 hour readiness to give legal 
services in the event of an animal disease outbreak and to ensure that no 
contaminated or infected material enters the food chain;
•  advising on RPA’s response to EU Commission Audits of the Single Payment Scheme 
for 2005/06; and
•  advising on the Update of the Rural Land Register project which underpins the work 
of RPA, Natural England and the Forestry Commission.
Communication
Our Communications team play an important role in ensuring we deliver the right 
messages to the right audiences at the right time. It is essential that we keep the 
public, Government and our own Department informed of what we are doing, how we 
are doing it and how well we are doing it. This report has so far included many 
highlights from our work which have been communicated effectively. In particular the 
communications team have made the most out of positive announcements over the 
past financial year.
•  Communicating directly with the business community became increasingly important 
for the department this year with the need to engage them on issues such as the 
Carbon Reduction Commitment and resource efficiency, which was principally 
delivered through the Real help for business now campaign.

144 Departmental Report 2009
•  2008/09 was also a good year for positive announcements including marking the 
successful introduction of the long awaited draft Marine Bill into parliament with a 
stakeholder and media event.
•  The Secretary of State announced on 6 December 2007 that a commemorative 
badge and certificate would be awarded to the Women’s Land Army and Timber 
Corps. Defra awarded over 33,500 badges in 2008/09 to veterans and organised a 
special ceremony hosted by the Prime Minister at Downing Street. 50 ladies received 
their badges personally from the Prime Minister in recognition of the contribution to 
the war effort of all those who served in the WLA. Defra has also been working 
with Lord Lieutenants around the country to support them in hosting further events 
to celebrate the award of the badge.
•  The communications team participated in the successful launch of the Sustainable 
Clothing Action Plan at London Fashion Week.
•  Closer to home, we ensured that we communicated some significant departmental 
changes to our staff including Defra’s new performance management system, the 
formation of DECC and adopted new and innovative channels to ensure more 
proactive engagement between staff, the management board and ministers, for 
example through online diaries and new cascade mechanisms.


Our Performance
CHAPTER 4

Chapter 4: Our Performance
147
How well have we done?
Introduction
This Chapter covers our performance during the first year of the 
Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR07) period. In most cases it is too 
early for us to definitively judge the impact of our work using the data from 
this period. This reflects the fact that most of our strategic outcomes are 
long-term in nature and one year’s worth of data is too little upon which to 
make clear statements of progress under the new performance 
management framework. In some cases it also reflects the fact that work is 
ongoing to develop intermediate outcomes and indicators as part of the 
new performance management framework.
The format and language of performance assessment used in this Chapter 
is specified by Her Majesty’s Treasury (HMT), along with the criteria to be 
used for reaching those assessments which are based on the performance 
of the set of indicators underpinning the Public Service Agreement (PSA) 
target or Departmental Strategic Objective (DSO).
•  Strong progress – more than half of the indicators have improved.
•  Some progress – half or less of the indicators have improved.
•  No progress – none of the indicators have improved.
•  Not yet assessed – at least half of the indicators are yet to have data 
from this CSR period.
Although this is the first year of a new CSR period, we have comparable 
data in some areas for earlier periods. This historical data on our ongoing 
commitments indicates that we are wel  placed to face the chal enges 
ahead. This is supported by the noticeable progress that has been made 
over the last six months since our Autumn Performance Report 2008 was 
published. In December 2008, 94% of our DSO indicators fell into the ‘not 
yet assessed’ category with 5% of them showing improvement, according 
to HMT guidelines. Currently, excluding those that are under review, 43% 
of our DSO indicators remain in the ‘not yet assessed’ category with 45% 
of them showing improvement.

148 Departmental Report 2009
Current Spending Review Targets
Table 4.1: Summary of performance assessment against each DSO.
CSR07 Target
Overall Assessment
PSA 28: Secure a healthy natural environment  Not yet assessed
for everyone’s wellbeing, health and 
1 indicator shows improvement
prosperity, now and in the future
4 indicators are yet to be assessed
DSO 1: A society that is adapting to the 
Not yet assessed
effects of climate change, through a national  Work is ongoing to develop the 
programme of action and a contribution to 
Intermediate Outcome and indicator 
international action
framework for this DSO
DSO 2: A healthy, resilient, productive and 
Not yet assessed
diverse natural environment
5 indicators show improvement
9 indicators are yet to be assessed
DSO 3: Sustainable, low carbon and resource  Not yet assessed
efficient patterns of consumption and 
3 indicators show improvement
production
3 indicators are yet to be assessed
1 indicator is under review
DSO 4: An economy and a society that are 
Some progress
resilient to environmental risk
3 indicators show improvement
3 indicators are yet to be assessed
DSO 5: Championing Sustainable 
Not yet assessed
Development 
1 indicator shows improvement
3 indicators are yet to be assessed
1 indicator is under review
DSO 6: A thriving farming and food sector, 
Not yet assessed
with an improving net environmental impact
3 indicators show improvement
4 indicators are yet to be assessed
DSO 7: A sustainable, secure and healthy 
Not yet assessed
food supply
Work is ongoing to develop the 
Intermediate Outcome and indicator 
framework for this DSO
DSO 8: Socially and economically sustainable 
Some progress
rural communities
8 indicators show improvement
4 indicators show no improvement
DSO 9: A respected department, delivering 
No Intermediate Outcomes have 
efficient and high quality services and 
been defined for this DSO
outcomes

Chapter 4: Our Performance
149
PSA 28: Secure a healthy natural environment for everyone’s 
wellbeing, health and prosperity, now and in the future
The Government’s vision is to secure a diverse, healthy and resilient natural 
environment, which provides the basis for everyone’s well-being, health and prosperity 
now and in the future; and where the value of the services provided by the natural 
environment are reflected in decision-making.
Overall summary: Not yet assessed
Progress towards delivering this PSA will be measured using five key indicators:
Indicator 28.1: Water quality as measured by parameters assessed 
by Environment Agency river water quality monitoring programmes
This indicator has not yet been assessed in this PSA period. Most recent data (for 
2007/08) indicates that both chemical and biological water quality has improved since 
1990. 76% of monitored river lengths are assessed as ‘good’ in relation to chemical 
quality, and 72% in relation to biological quality. Data for 2008/09 will be available at 
the end of 2009.
Indicator 28.2: Biodiversity as indicated by changes in wild breeding 
bird populations in England, as a proxy for the health of wider 
biodiversity
This indicator has not yet been assessed in this PSA period. Most recent data for the 
2007 breeding season show that there has been a small decrease in the wild breeding 
bird index. Data for the 2008 breeding season will be published in October 2009.
Indicator 28.3: Air quality – meeting the Air Quality Strategy 
objectives for eight air pollutants as illustrated by trends in 
measurements of two of the more important pollutants which 
affect public health: particles and nitrogen dioxide
Some progress has been made against this indicator. Six of the eight pollutant 
objectives are being met, and air quality continues to be good across about 99% of the 
UK. However, objectives for Particulate Matter (PM ) and Nitrogen Dioxide (NO ) are 
10
2
not currently being achieved along a small number of major roads in urban areas. The 
latest projections indicate that we should achieve the PM  objective by 2011, but 
10
without further action by 2015 we will still have exceedences of the NO  limit value 
2
along some 850 km of major roads, mainly in Greater London.

150 Departmental Report 2009
Indicator 28.4: Marine health – clean, healthy, safe, productive and 
biologically diverse oceans and seas as indicated by proxy 
measurements of fish stocks, sea pollution and plankton status
This indicator has not yet been assessed in this PSA period. Most recent data (2007) 
indicates that both fish stocks and sea pollution have improved since 1990, but that 
plankton status has declined (largely due to climate change impacts).
Indicator 28.5: Land management – the contribution of agricultural 
land management to the natural environment as measured by the 
positive and negative impacts of farming
This indicator has not yet been assessed in this PSA period. The positive and negative 
impacts of farming are based on a range of measures associated with water, air, soil, 
landscape and biodiversity. Most recent data (2007) indicates that both positive and 
negative impacts have improved since 2000. Data for 2008 will be available at the end 
of 2009.

Chapter 4: Our Performance
151
DSO 1: A society that is adapting to the effects of climate 
change, through a national programme of action and a 
contribution to international action
Cutting greenhouse gas emissions is a priority. But some climate change is now 
inevitable and all of us – as individuals, businesses, Government and public authorities – 
will need to adapt to respond to the challenges of climate change.
Overall summary: Not yet assessed
Defra’s work on adaptation was previously reported through DSO 4: Managing 
environmental risk. This DSO was revised after the creation of the Department of 
Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and the climate change adaptation part removed 
to form the new DSO 1. This reflects Defra’s lead on domestic adaptation, and the 
important role we play on international adaptation, where the lead is held by other 
Government Departments.
Work is ongoing to develop the intermediate outcomes and indicator framework to 
support this DSO.
This work will build on some of the existing performance measures that relate to 
adaptation. The Government has already made “Leading the global effort to avoid 
dangerous climate change” one of thirty cross-government priorities (PSA 27). The 
existing 6 indicators for this overall climate change priority include one measure of 
success related to adaptation.
Government has also set out, as part of the local government performance framework, 
an indicator for all English Local Authorities on embedding adaptation in the full range 
of their work, National Indicator 188. All Local Authorities will need to report on their 
progression through different levels of the indicator, and this will be assessed by the 
Audit Commission, the auditor for local government.
These existing indicators will be a useful benchmark of success. However, because there 
are many other areas of life where we need to adapt, we will need to develop 
additional indicators. We have carried out some initial scoping work and plan in 
Autumn 2009, to propose a basket of indicators for the Adapting to Climate Change 
Programme for consultation. We will then need to supplement these with indicators 
that measure specifically what Defra is doing.

152 Departmental Report 2009
DSO 2: A healthy, resilient, productive and diverse natural 
environment
This DSO has 8 intermediate outcomes and aims to protect and enhance the natural 
environment, and to encourage its sustainable use within environmental limits.
Overall summary: Not yet assessed
As with the Natural Environment PSA, we have significant historical data on the health 
of our natural environment, but we do not yet have data within the CSR period for all 
indicators.
Intermediate Outcome 2.1: Air with minimum practicable harmful 
levels of pollutants
Indicator 2.1.1: Meeting the Air Quality Strategy targets for eight air pollutants 
as illustrated by trends in measurements of two of the more important 
pollutants, particles and nitrogen dioxide

This is reported on under indicator 28.3 of PSA 28.
Intermediate Outcome 2.2: Biodiversity valued, safeguarded and 
enhanced
Indicator 2.2.1: Trends in populations of wild birds: population index for 
farmland; woodland; water and wetland

This is reported on under indicator 28.2 of PSA 28.
Indicator 2.2.2: Percentage of SSSIs meeting target condition
This is reported on under the SR04 PSA 36 Sites of Special Scientific Interest target.
Intermediate Outcome 2.3: Sustainable water use aiming to achieve 
a balance between water quality, environment, supply and demand
Indicator 2.3.1: Water quality as measured by parameters assessed by 
Environment Agency river water quality monitoring programmes

This is reported on under indicator 28.1 of PSA 28.
Indicator 2.3.2: The number of Environment Agency Catchment Abstraction 
Management Strategies (CAMS) that are not either over‑abstracted or  
over‑licensed

This indicator has not yet been assessed. The next update is due in June 2009. The 
baseline in March 2008 recorded that 297 (32%) of catchment assessment units had 
sustainable abstraction, and 630 (68%) of catchment assessment units had actual or 
probable unsustainable abstraction.

Chapter 4: Our Performance
153
This indicator is also reported under indicator 27.2 of PSA 27 by DECC.
Intermediate Outcome 2.4: Clean, healthy, safe, productive and 
biologically diverse oceans and seas
Indicator 2.4.1: Riverine and direct inputs of metals from the UK to marine 
waters around the UK

Indicator 2.4.2: Number of fish stocks around the UK at full reproductive 
capacity and harvested sustainably

Indicator 2.4.3: Plankton status
These indicators make up indicator 28.4 of PSA 28 and are reported on there.
Intermediate Outcome 2.5: Land and soils managed sustainably
Indicator 2.5.1: Land managed sustainably as measured by overall area 
coverage of the Environmental Stewardship Scheme and previous agri‑
environment schemes

This data shows that, as at 31 March 2009, 65.1% of agricultural land in England was 
being managed under agri-environmental management schemes. This is on track to 
meet the 70% target by March 2011.
Indicator 2.5.2: Soil status (chemical and physical)
The Countryside Survey of 2007 (results published in November 2008) found no overall 
change in the average carbon concentration in soils in Great Britain since 1978, 
contrasting with a previous study in England and Wales. The differences between the 
results of the two surveys need to be investigated given the important role that the 
soils play in carbon storage.
Soil acidity was found to have decreased from 1978 to 2007 in Great Britain, with the 
average pH (a measure of acidity) changing from 5.67 to 5.87 (the smaller the number 
the more acid the soil). The trend mirrors declining emissions and deposition of sulphur 
(and is consistent with previous studies), though other factors such as liming and 
fertiliser use on agricultural land are also important drivers of change in some habitats.
Indicator 2.5.3: Soil management as measured by compliance with cross‑
compliance and take‑up of agri‑environment options

There has continued to be good uptake of soil protection relevant options within 
Environmental Stewardship, meaning that more farmers are taking actions which will 
protect their soils. The data comes from the Natural England database into which the 
records of new agreements are entered. Between April 2008 and March 2009 there 
have been 1,443 new agreements with buffer strip options, 327 agreements with 
overwintered stubbles, 36 new agreements with undersown spring cereals and 53 with 
erosion control under maize. These figures are mostly down compared to new 

154 Departmental Report 2009
agreements in 2007/08, which were 2,198, 558, 77 and 50 respectively. This means 
that the total number of agreements that include each of these options now stands at 
16,319, 4,762, 499 and 434 respectively.
The inspection statistics for cross-compliance for 2008 have not yet been published by 
the Rural Payments Agency (RPA).
Intermediate Outcome 2.6: People enjoy, understand and care for 
the natural environment
Indicator 2.6.1: The proportion of the adult population taking part in visits to 
the outdoors from home for leisure purposes and the frequency of these visits

This indicator has not yet been assessed. We have relied on recreational data collected 
in past English Leisure Visits Surveys. The survey has now been renamed the Monitor of 
Engagement in the Natural Environment, with the fieldwork for it starting in 2009. The 
first full year of data is expected to be ready in March/April 2010.
Intermediate Outcome 2.7: Improved local environmental quality
Indicator 2.7.1: Local street and environmental cleanliness, as measured 
through the percentage of relevant land and highways that is assessed as 
having combined levels of litter, detritus, graffiti and flyposting that fall below 
an acceptable level

This indicator has not yet been assessed. Returns for the year 2008/09 will be made up 
of an aggregation of the three four-monthly survey returns from local authorities that 
have adopted National Indicator 195 (street cleansing). Preliminary results will be 
available in the first quarter of 2009/10. This will represent the baseline year for this 
indicator.
Intermediate Outcome 2.8: Sustainable, living landscapes with best 
features conserved
Indicator 2.8.1: Length of linear features managed under agri‑environment 
schemes

Around 30,000 km of hedgerows have been restored or planted under agri-environment 
schemes with a further 128,000 km under environmentally friendly management under 
Entry Level Stewardship; about 2,500 km of dry stone walls have also been restored. 
Data on the length of hedgerows and walls are provided by the Countryside Survey, 
which reports every 6-10 years on the state of the British countryside. The latest data 
from the 2007 Survey indicate that the total length of hedgerows in England is around 
547,000 km, while the length of walls is around 82,000 km.

Chapter 4: Our Performance
155
DSO 3: Sustainable, low carbon and resource efficient patterns 
of consumption and production
This DSO has two intermediate outcomes that seek to achieve sustainable patterns of 
consumption and production by reducing the environmental impacts of products and 
services and minimising waste.
Overall summary: Not yet assessed
This DSO cannot be assessed as we do not yet have baseline data for any of the 
indicators under Intermediate Outcome 3.1.
Furthermore, two of the indicators under this DSO are being revised, to bring them 
closer into line with the activities of the Sustainable Consumption and Production 
programme. At the same time we are working to improve the quality of the existing 
indicators, taking into account any findings from the recent National Audit Office 
review.
Intermediate Outcome 3.1: More sustainable products, business 
processes and consumer lifestyles, which reduce environmental 
impacts and contribute to an innovative and productive economy
Indicator 3.1.1: Resource efficiency: Gross Value Added, CO  emissions, water 

2
use, and waste to landfill by the UK manufacturing and service sectors
This indicator assesses the environmental impact of the manufacturing and service 
sector in England in relation to their output in terms of the Gross Value Added. Baseline 
data on environmental impacts in the first year of the CSR07 period will not be 
available before June 2009.
The most recent and available data shows that between 2000 and 2006, there were 
reductions in CO  emissions (by less than 5%), water use (8%) and waste to landfill 
2
(just under 25%), while output increased by about 17%.
Indicator 3.1.2: Consumption: CO  emissions from fossil fuel and electricity use 
2
in the home, and water use and household residual waste
This indicator assesses the environmental impact of households in England. Data on 
environmental impacts in the first year of the CSR07 period will not be available before 
June 2009.
Available data shows that, between 2000 and 2006, carbon dioxide emissions have 
remained stable with a slight reduction of around 1%, and there has been a slight 
increase in water use (3%) in the home, although there was a large reduction in waste 
not recycled (20%).

156 Departmental Report 2009
Indicator 3.1.3: Products: Annual year on year reductions in energy use in the 
UK from changes in the design of domestic appliances covered by the Market 
Transformation Programme

This indicator assesses the contribution of changes in product design on energy use and 
resulting CO  emissions in the home. This indicator is under review and is expected to 
2
be revised in June 2009. The revised indicator will assess progress towards the 
commitments for reductions in carbon dioxide emissions from energy efficient products 
given in the 2007 Energy White Paper18.
Data for the currently defined indicator shows that the take-up of new technology 
reduced CO  emissions relating to electricity use in UK homes by between 1 and 2 
2
million tonnes of carbon dioxide a year between 2000 and 2007, compared to total 
emissions relating to use of products in the home of about 50 million tonnes of carbon 
dioxide in 2006.
Indicator 3.1.4: Environmental impacts of the UK Public Sector.
This indicator uses data collected by the Sustainable Development Commission (SDC) to 
assess progress in reducing environmental impacts (carbon dioxide emissions, water use 
and waste arisings) from the Government estate. Data for baseline performance in 
2007/08 were published by the SDC in December 2008. The SDC report shows that 
CO emissions from offices on the Government estate are on track to meet the 2010/11 

target, although this is primarily due to reductions achieved by the Ministry of Defence. 
The August 2008 Government Delivery Plan suggests that departments are largely on 
track on most other target areas, providing they meet their published trajectories. Data 
on changes between 2007/08 and 2008/09 should be available in December 2009.
Following the transfer of responsibility for sustainable operations on the Government 
estate to the Office for Government Commerce, this indicator will be revised to cover 
the environmental impacts of public procurement. The development of the indicator 
will require new research, which will be commissioned during 2009/10.
Intermediate Outcome 3.2: Less waste, more material recovery and 
energy from waste and much less landfill
Indicator 3.2.1: Household residual waste per head (i.e. after prevention re‑use, 
recycling and composting)

This indicator uses data collected from WasteDataFlow, which is the web based system 
for municipal waste data reporting by UK local authorities to government. Residual 
waste per head has been decreasing year on year since the 2000/01 baseline, and in 
2007/08 it was 324 kg per head, compared with 452 kg per head in 2000/01. The 
2010 target is to reduce household waste after reuse, recycling and composting from 
over 22.2 Mt in 2000 by 29% to 15.8 Mt in 2010, equivalent to 307 kg per person.
18  Meeting the energy challenge: a white paper on energy [Cm 7124] can be found at  
www.berr.gov.uk/energy/whitepaper/page39534.html. 

Chapter 4: Our Performance
157
Indicator 3.2.2: Household waste recycling
This indicator also uses data collected from WasteDataFlow. The household recycling 
and composting rate increased year on year between 2000/01 and 2007/08, reaching 
35% in the latest year data are available. This compares with the 2010 target of 40% 
recycling.
Indicator 3.2.3: Non‑inert, non‑municipal waste landfilled
This indicator uses data on municipal waste to landfill from WasteDataFlow and other 
landfill data from statutory returns made to the Environment Agency. Non-municipal/
non-inert waste to landfill is a proxy for commercial and industrial waste, calculated by 
subtracting municipal and inert waste landfilled from total waste going to landfill. Total 
waste to landfill in England has decreased over time, by 24% (19 Mt) from 80 Mt in 
2000/01 to 61 Mt in 2007. During this time there has been a small decrease in non-
municipal, non-inert waste to landfill, which was 21 Mt in 2007.

158 Departmental Report 2009
DSO 4: An economy and a society that are resilient to 
environmental risk
This is delivered through ensuring that flooding and coastal erosion risks are managed 
sustainably, through the economy, human health and ecosystems being protected from 
environmental risks and emergencies, and through public health and the economy 
being protected from animal diseases.
This DSO has three intermediate outcomes, which focus on building resilience in the 
areas of flood risk management, handling animal disease, implementing chemicals 
regulation and Defra’s response to emergencies, where it has ‘lead department’ 
responsibility. We are in the process of revising the suite of indicators which support 
this DSO, to help provide a better picture of progress across the range of policy areas 
that feed into the three intermediate outcomes.
Overall summary: Some progress – improvement for 3 out of  
6 indicators
Intermediate Outcome 4.1: Risk from flooding and coastal erosion 
managed sustainably
Indicator 4.1.1: Reduction in the number of households at significant or greater 
risk of flooding

A target was announced in February 2008 to remove 45,000 households from 
significant risk by the end of the CSR07 period. As of the end of June 2008, it was 
estimated that nearly 6,000 households had already been removed from significant risk. 
The Environment Agency’s current best estimate is that slightly more than 45,000 
households will have been removed from the significant risk category by the end of the 
CSR07 period.
Target: reduction of 45,000 households from significant risk over the CSR07 period.
Already delivered: 5,983 households.
The current best estimate of households at significant or greater risk is over 430,000, 
based on 2006 results (using the Environment Agency’s National Flood Risk Assessment 
model – NaFRA). An improved estimate of the number of households at significant or 
greater risk is expected from NaFRA in 2009.
Intermediate Outcome 4.2: Protection of the economy, human 
health and ecosystems from environmental risks and emergencies
Indicator 4.2.1: Assessment of implementation of REACH

This is a process indicator, based on an internal assessment of the UK’s progress with 
implementing the EU’s REACH (registration, evaluation, authorisation and restriction of 
chemicals) regulation. Pre-registration of REACH opened on 1 June 2008 and ran until 
1 December 2008. According to figures from the European Chemicals Agency, 22,227 

Chapter 4: Our Performance
159
UK companies made a total of 418,753 pre-registrations. This represents the highest 
number of companies from any of the EU member states. There was some increase in 
awareness of REACH among UK small and medium enterprises (SMEs), from a low level 
in January 2008, with increasing activity along the supply chain and with the Health 
and Safety Executive’s (HSE) helpdesk.
Following public consultation, the UK’s enforcement regulations came into force on 
1 December 2008. The HSE, as Competent Authority and lead enforcement authority, 
has drawn up a strategy to focus enforcement activity from this date. The UK will 
continue to play a full and constructive part in the ongoing implementation processes 
within the EU. The UK nominated Short Chain Chlorinated Paraffins (SCCPs) for the 
first list of Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) which will lead to authorisation. 
The UK is continuing to investigate chemicals for potential nomination as SVHCs and 
will also look for opportunities to act as rapporteur within the subsequent European 
Chemicals Agency procedures for dealing with them.
Indicator 4.2.2: Defra emergency preparedness
This is a process indicator, based on an internal assessment of the preparedness of the 
Department to respond effectively to the range of emergency situations for which it has 
‘lead department’ responsibility (which includes flooding, animal disease outbreaks, 
clean-up following CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear) incidents, 
water supply, water contamination, and food supply). Details of Defra’s preparedness 
are given at page 48. This shows that the level of resilience has been maintained in the 
face of fundamental Departmental changes in the last year.
Intermediate Outcome 4.3: Public health and the economy protected 
from animal diseases
Indicator 4.3.1: Number of BSE cases

The 2006 target, to reduce the number of cases of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy 
(BSE) detected by both passive and active surveillance to less than 60, was reached in 
2007. In 2008, the number of cases in Great Britain fell by 38 per cent to 33. Defra 
continues to work towards its target of eradicating BSE in Great Britain by 2010. 
Although the incidence of BSE in Great Britain is very low and declining there is a high 
risk that we will not meet the 2010 target. However, any cases in 2010 will be the 
result of infection several years previously because of the long incubation period of BSE. 
We expect the number of new infections in 2010 to be close to zero although it will 
not be possible to confirm this until at least 2015.
Indicator 4.3.2: Number of bTB cases
The bovine TB (bTB) statistics for Great Britain for the calendar year to end December 
2008 have shown an increase in the number of new herd incidents. There were 4,986 
new herd incidents in 2008 compared to 4,172 for the same period in 2007. Over 
the same time period the overall incidence rate, which considers the number of 
new incidents as a proportion of herd tests performed each month, increased by 
1.4 percentage points from 7.4% in 2007 to 8.8% in 2008.

160 Departmental Report 2009
It is important not to read too much into short-term changes. Bovine TB is a chronic 
disease and is cyclical in nature, with variations occurring both seasonally and over 
longer timescales. Factors such as testing patterns can also influence the amount of 
disease being detected (e.g. with increased and more targeted testing we would expect 
to detect more disease). Trends should therefore only be considered in the long term 
over a number of years.
The DSO 4 indicator provides a measure of the overall level of new disease disclosed as 
a result of the herd surveillance programme. This is different to the measure used in 
PSA 9 from the 2004 Spending Review (SR04), which considered the number of 
confirmed new incidents in new parishes and is a proxy measure for the spread of 
disease to new areas. The SR04 PSA 9 target is reported as -4.8 for December 2008, 
well below the target of +17.5 Confirmed New Incidences (CNIs) per annum.
More on bTB SR04 PSA 9 target reporting and calculation details can be found on 
page 177.
Indicator 4.3.3: Proportion of farms engaged in farm health planning
Farm Health Planning (FHP) should be a proactive process where a farmer and their 
adviser measure, manage and monitor herd health and performance. There is no single 
indicator that readily captures the proportion of farms doing this across the country. To 
get an understanding of what was happening ADAS prepared for Defra a snapshot of 
FHP practice across a statistically representative sample of the English livestock industry. 
This was published in December 2007 as An Independent Evidence Baseline for Farm 
Health Planning in England
. Amongst many other things, this found that over half 
(56%) of the farm businesses surveyed had a documented plan, while a further 29% 
had one in mind, while 15% had no plan. However, this, by itself, cannot be taken as 
an indication of the proportion of farms involved in FHP. Possession of a plan does not 
necessarily mean that proactive FHP is happening.
Future uptake of FHP can be assessed against this baseline by those promoting the 
practice. Defra, in particular, is planning to track some of the key measures in the 
baseline through the Farm Practices Survey, which will take place later in 2009.

Chapter 4: Our Performance
161
DSO 5: Championing Sustainable Development
Defra is the Government’s champion for Sustainable Development (SD) – domestically 
and internationally. DSO 5 is supported by two intermediate outcomes with 
underpinning indicators which aim to ensure that policy and delivery at all levels of 
Government observe the five principles of SD as set out in the 2005 SD strategy 
Securing the Future.
Overall summary: Not yet assessed
Intermediate Outcome 5.1: SD successfully championed across 
government
•  Indicator 5.1.1: Performance of Government as a whole against the Sustainable 
Operations on the Government Estate (SOGE) targets and against SD action plans as 
summarised in the Sustainable Development Commission’s (SDC) reports
•  Indicator 5.1.2: Indicator on Government estate water use and waste to landfill, and 
CO  emissions from the wider Government estate
2
•  Indicator 5.1.3: Stakeholders’ perceptions of Defra’s (and the SDC’s) effectiveness 
and usefulness as champion of SD
This work is led by the new Centre of Expertise in Sustainable Procurement (CESP) in 
the Office for Government Commerce (OGC). It has taken on the role for the delivery 
of the SOGE targets from Defra.
In December 2008, the SDC published the latest Government performance figures, 
based on data provided by departments for the period 2007/08 and measured against 
SOGE targets. Overall performance on the targets showed an improvement, and 
Government as a whole is forecasting that it will meet the 2010/11 targets on Carbon 
emissions from Offices and Road Transport, Waste and Recycling. Data for this CSR 
period will be available late in 2009.
Intermediate Outcome 5.2: Evidence of progress on SD Dialogues
•  Indicator 5.2.1: An indicator (still under development) weighted by country 
measuring engagement of country and impact of the SD Dialogues
•  Indicator 5.2.2: Stakeholders’ perceptions of Defra’s (and the SDC’s) effectiveness 
and usefulness as champion of SD
A survey is currently underway to measure stakeholders’ perceptions of progress on SD 
Dialogues (combined with the survey for indicator 5.1.3 and 5.2.2). In the five countries 
where we have Dialogues, we have around 70 live projects designed to deliver positive 
outcomes across all key policy themes. Following an external evaluation of the Dialogue 
project, the development of an indicator is underway.

162 Departmental Report 2009
DSO 6: A thriving farming and food sector, with an improving 
net environmental impact
Making the farming industry more innovative, self-reliant, profitable and competitive 
and with better environmental management throughout the whole food chain.
DSO 6 is supported by four intermediate outcomes.
Overall summary: Not yet assessed
Intermediate Outcome 6.1: Farming has an improving net 
environmental impact
Performance indicators have now been developed to establish clearer evidence about 
the current relationship between farming practice and environmental impact. Proxy 
indicators are: uptake of Single Payment Scheme (SPS) and failure rates of cross-
compliance inspections; uptake of Entry Level Scheme (ELS); use of soil management 
plans; use of Integrated Farm Management; and length of hedgerows environmentally 
managed under ELS.
No assessment is possible on the progress of these proxy indicators as none of them 
have generated data sets during this reporting period.
Indicator 6.1.1: index of farming’s positive benefits on the natural environment
This is reported on under indicator 5 of PSA 28.
Indicator 6.1.2: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from agriculture
This indicator is also reported on under PSA 27 by DECC. Total GHG emissions from 
agriculture continue to show a steady decline, but the sector still accounts for a 
significant proportion of the UK’s methane and nitrous oxide emissions (it is responsible 
for 38% of methane emissions and 68% of nitrous oxide). The next update will be in 
June 2009.
Indicator 6.1.3: index of farming’s negative impacts on the natural environment 
(excluding GHGs)

This is reported on under indicator 5 of PSA 28.

Chapter 4: Our Performance
163
Intermediate Outcome 6.2: Profitable and competitive farm based 
businesses
Indicator 6.2.1: Gross Value Added (GVA) per person, as a ratio of UK to EU 14
The 2007 ratio of UK GVA to EU 14 stands at 1.32. This represents a 1% rise on the 
2006 figure of 1.31, and continues the recovery towards the trajectory seen since 2004.
Intermediate Outcome 6.3: CAP reform vision delivered
Indicator 6.3.1: production linked support as measured by projections of 
reductions in the sum of EU 15 support to the Amber and Blue boxes

Indicator 6.3.1 shows the extent of EU production-linked support which is trade 
distorting. It includes a measure of market support and direct payments linked to 
production. This support is classified by the World Trade Organisation’s (WTO) Amber 
and Blue Box definitions.
During the year, there was good progress in the WTO Doha Development Agenda 
negotiations, which will agree reductions in the levels of overall trade distorting 
domestic support allowed (including Amber and Blue Box spending) when a deal is 
reached: the EU’s ceiling would be cut by 80%.
A final overall agreement remained unattainable and negotiations at the political level 
have paused whilst the new United States Administration takes office. Delays affect the 
Government’s ability to secure progress in reducing agricultural tariffs.

164 Departmental Report 2009
Figure 4.1: The Trajectory of Production Linked Support in the EU 15.
production linked support
(million euros)
80 000
70 000
60 000
50 000
40 000
30 000
20 000
10 000
 0
1994/95
99/00
2004/05
2009/10
EU15 Production linked support
Projected trajectory pre Health Check agreement
Projected trajectory post Health Check agreement
Source: WTO notifications and Defra projections
Figure 4.1 shows production linked support in the EU 15. Numbers exclude production 
linked support under Article 69 (payments for specific types of farming) and the larger 
replacement for it agreed in the Health Check (Article 68). It is not yet clear how Article 
68 will be implemented, but we estimate that in a worst-case scenario, by 2013/14 it 
could add a maximum of approximately €1.3bn to the post Health Check trajectory.
The estimates shown in Figure 4.1 are compiled by the European Commission, including 
returns by each member state on their commodity support expenditure, and using the 
methodology specified in the Uruguay Round Agreement on Agriculture, which are 
then notified to the World Trade Organisation. The estimates include both market price 
support and production-linked direct payments. The former are calculated by 
multiplying the volume of production by the difference between the domestic support 
price and a historic world price; the latter are calculated by summing expenditures on 
direct payment budget lines which are deemed to fall under the Amber and Blue Boxes.
Indicator 6.3.2: securing Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) Health Check 
reforms

The Health Check was a scheduled review of the major CAP reform of 2003, which 
aimed to ensure those reforms were operating smoothly, make necessary adjustments, 
and to take further the reform principles established then, including decoupling, 
modulation and reduced intervention. Political agreement on the Health Check was 
reached in Agriculture Council in November 2008, followed by adoption of legal text in 
January 2009.

Chapter 4: Our Performance
165
In the Health Check, progress was achieved in a number of areas towards the UK’s 
longer-term aims for a fully reformed CAP. These included steps to further decouple 
subsidy from production, reduce market-distorting intervention measures, reduce red 
tape in direct farm payments, and increase the focus on delivering public benefits 
including environmental benefits. However the UK would have preferred the Health 
Check to go further in phasing out all the remaining coupled payments and ending all 
forms of market intervention, while greatly increasing the focus on environmental 
benefits.
Specifically, strong progress was made in the following areas that were identified as 
indicative of progress.
•  Compulsory set-aside of a proportion of agricultural land was abolished from 2009.
•  Potato starch support arrangements will be phased out by July 2012 – along with 
other reductions in the market intervention system (the purchase by the EU of 
excess EU production).
•  Agreement was reached on the process for phasing out Milk Quotas by 2015, 
gradually enabling more freedom of production by annual increases and final 
removal of quotas.
•  In January 2008, even before the Health Check, Single Payment Scheme (SPS) rules 
were simplified so that the land supporting annual payment claims only needs to be 
at a farmer’s disposal for a single day rather than 10 months.
•  As a result of the Health Check and previous EU reforms, a number of restrictions in 
land eligibility rules under the SPS have been eased, such as the inclusion of all 
permanent crops and short rotation coppice from 2009.
•  The number of types of ‘entitlements’ (effectively a ‘certificate’ of variable value that 
entitles you to claim direct farm payments) in the SPS has been decreased by ending 
separate set-aside and national reserve entitlements from 2009.
•  An upper limit on the size of individual payments, as suggested in earlier papers 
from the European Commission, was not imposed.
•  Better targeting of cross-compliance – the environmental, animal health and welfare 
standards that farmers are required to meet as a condition of direct payments – was 
achieved.
•  The rate of compulsory modulation – which transfers a proportion of money from 
direct payments for farmers to the delivery of environmental and other public 
benefits – will increase across the EU from the current 5% to 10% by 2012.

166 Departmental Report 2009
Progress was not fully achieved in three areas:
•  Wheat intervention has not been fully phased out but it will be limited to 3 Mt each 
year from 1 July 2010. Once this threshold has been reached, intervention will take 
place by way of buying-in through a tendering system.
•  The first €5,000 of direct farm payments will continue to be exempt from 
modulation. However, in practice, for the additional modulation under the Health 
Check, the franchise has no effect in the UK since the arrangements allow it to be 
offset by voluntary modulation.
•  The UK did not achieve budget neutrality as a result of the Health Check, as it will 
allow Member States to spend unclaimed farm payment funds, at an estimated cost 
to the UK of around €80m in 2011, although there is likely to be a net gain for UK 
taxpayers in the following years.
In one other area – simplification of cross-compliance requirements – it is too soon to 
determine whether progress has been made, as the outcome depends on the details of 
implementing regulations and how they are implemented in the UK.
Intermediate Outcome 6.4: Improved welfare of kept animals
Indicator 6.4.1: percentage of Animal Health random inspections which achieve 
full compliance with welfare code and law per annum

Since 2005, there has been no significant change in the percentage of random 
inspections which achieve full compliance. Assessments will only be made using the 
annual figures as there is too much variability in the quarterly figures to provide an 
accurate basis for assessing progress.
The non-significant reduction in the percentage of random inspections which achieve 
full compliance seen in 2007/08 figures may reflect the change in the inspection 
process for welfare under the single farm payment scheme where more detailed and 
consistent data collection has been carried out since 2007.
Table 4.2: Percentage of Animal Health random inspections which achieve full 
compliance with welfare codes and law per annum.
2005
2006
2007
2008
All random welfare inspections
93
91
89
87
Non SPS Claimants
93
91
90
88
Cross Compliance Inspection


88
87
Source: Animal Health Agency

Chapter 4: Our Performance
167
DSO 7: A sustainable, secure and healthy food supply
This DSO was introduced in December 2009 when Defra was given a new remit to lead 
for the government in developing a coherent approach to ensuring a sustainable, 
healthy and secure food supply. Work is underway to develop the intermediate 
outcomes and indicator framework to support this DSO.
Overall summary: Not yet assessed
We are developing a framework for assessing UK food security which is close to 
completion. A key element of the development has been the involvement of key 
stakeholders and experts who have helped shape the framework.
This consists of a scorecard of indicators of UK food security. The scorecard has two 
functions:
(a)  communicating the key elements of and risks relating to the security of our food 
system, so as to inform intelligent and evidence-based discussion of food security 
policy; and
(b)  monitoring changes in these indicators over time to assess any material 
improvement or deterioration in the different dimensions of our food security.
The scorecard gives a balanced analysis across the main themes of UK food security, 
namely:
1.  global availability;
2.  global resource sustainability;
3.  UK availability and access;
4.  UK food chain resilience;
5.  household food security; and
6.  safety and confidence.
For each theme, a headline indicator has been selected to provide an initial high level 
indication of the state and change in the theme. Where they do not reflect all aspects 
of the theme they are selected as covering the most important aspects. Additionally, 
supporting indicators are given to add breadth and depth to the process of monitoring 
change.
We are also developing indicators on sustainability, the foundations of which will be 
completed by the end of July when we will draw on all the evidence to consult on a 
suite of indicators, some or all of which could be used for reporting against the DSO.

168 Departmental Report 2009
DSO 8: Socially and economically sustainable rural communities
Two intermediate outcomes have been identified for this DSO:
•  Intermediate Outcome 8.1: The evidenced needs of rural people and communities 
are addressed through mainstream public policy and delivery; and
•  Intermediate Outcome 8.2: Economic growth is supported in rural areas with the 
lowest levels of performance.
The DSO includes a suite of socio-economic indicators covering a wide range of the 
Government’s policy priorities. In July, these indicators were published on the Defra 
website. They will be updated on an annual basis. It is worth noting that the indicator 
set does not lend itself to more frequent updates. So in-year risk assessment relating to 
individual policy areas will be limited and based on qualitative analysis of events (such 
as the economic downturn).
Overall summary: Some progress – improvement for 8 out of 12 
indicators
Tables 4.3 and 4.4 provide key figures for the main indicators. On most of these 
measures the data shows that overall rural people experience more positive outcomes 
than the national average. Areas where rural areas fare worse or equally as well as the 
national average are: waiting lists and affordability of housing; pensioner poverty, where 
there is no advantage in rural areas; earnings; and capital investment per employee.
Where local authority data has been used, ‘Rural areas’ refers to the most rural 
category, Rural-80. Where the Rural Definition has been used, data for less sparse 
villages has been used to represent ‘rural areas’. However, these are not the only data 
for rural areas and further detail in addition to commentary can be found on our 
website19.
19  http://www.defra.gov.uk/rural/dso/index.htm 

Chapter 4: Our Performance
169
Intermediate Outcome 8.1: The evidenced needs of rural people  
and communities are addressed through mainstream public policy 
and delivery
This is to be measured by data that compares outcomes for rural areas with the 
national average, rather than against a historical baseline.
Table 4.3: Performance of rural areas compared to the national average measured 
against each of the indicators held under Intermediate Outcome 8.1.
Rural 
England  Source and 
 
areas
average
year
Intermediate Outcome 8.1
Sub-theme/indicator
Indicator 8.1.1: Education
1.1 Percent of pupils leaving school with 5 A*-C at GCSE
68
59
DCSF 2006/7
1.2 Full time entrants to higher education per 1,000 population
170
131
DIUS 2007/8
Indicator 8.1.2: Social capital
2.1 Percent of people who feel people from different 
87
82
backgrounds get on well together in their area
2.2.Percent of people who have meaningful interactions with 
63
79
people from different backgrounds
CLG, 2007
2.3 Percent of people who feel that they belong to their 
81
75
neighbourhood
2.4 Percent of people who feel they can influence decisions in 
46
38
their locality
2.5 Percent of people who participate in regular formal 
38
27
volunteering at least once a month
Indicator 8.1.3: Health 
3.1 Life expectancy at birth (males; females)
79.0; 
77.7; 
ONS 2007
82.9
81.6
3.2 Infant mortality rate per 1000 live births
3.7
4.8
ONS 2007
3.3 Potential years of life lost (PYLL) from all cancers
137.8
151.7
Information 
Centre for 
3.4 PYLL from stroke and related
13.4
17.5
Health and 
3.5 PYLL from coronary heart disease
40.4
52.3
Social Care 
2007
3.6 PYLL from suicide and undetermined injury
26.5
25.5

170 Departmental Report 2009
Table 4.3: Performance of rural areas compared to the national average measured 
against each of the indicators held under Intermediate Outcome 8.1 (continued).
Rural 
England  Source and 
 
areas
average
year
Intermediate Outcome 8.1
Sub-theme/indicator
Indicator 8.1.4: Affordable housing
4.1 Waiting lists as a proportion of housing stock
48
45
CLG 2008
4.2 Homelessness; temporary accommodation per 1,000 
1.9; 1.2
3.1; 3.8
CLG 2007/8
population 
4.3 Ratio of lower quartile house prices to lower quartile 
9.3
8.1
CLG 2008
earnings
Indicator 8.1.5: Crime
5.1 Violence against the person offences per 1000 population
10.2
17.8
5.2 Sexual offences per 1000 population
0.7
1.0
5.3 Robbery offences per 1000 population
0.2
1.6
Home Office 
2007/8
5.4 Burglary offences per 1000 households
5.0
12.8
5.5 Theft of motor vehicles per 1000 population
1.5
3.2
5.6 Theft from a motor vehicle offences per 1000 population
4.1
8.1
 
Indicator 8.1.6: Poverty (after housing costs) and 
unemployment

6.1 Proportion of households with income below poverty 
19
22
thresholds
6.2 Proportion of working age people in households with 
16
21
income below poverty threshold
DWP 2006/7
6.3 Proportion of children in households with income below 
22
31
poverty threshold
6.4 Proportion of pensioners in households with income below 
19
19
poverty threshold
6.5 Unemployment rate
3.0
5.4
ONS 2007

Chapter 4: Our Performance
171
Intermediate Outcome 8.2: Economic growth is supported in rural 
areas with the lowest levels of performance
This is to be measured by data that compares outcomes for rural areas with the 
national average, rather than against a historical baseline.
Table 4.4: Performance of rural areas compared to the national average measured 
against each of the indicators held under Intermediate Outcome 8.2.
Rural 
England  Source/year
areas
average
Intermediate Outcome 8.2
Sub-theme/indicator
Indicator 8.2.1: Headline indicator – district level GVA per 
89.0
100.0
ABI, ONS 
workforce jobs
2006
 
Indicator 8.2.2: Earnings
1.1 Workplace based earnings
18,180
20,350
ASHE 2007
1.2 Residence based earnings
19,440
20,350
ASHE 2007
 
Indicator 8.2.3: Employment
2.1 Employment rates
79.1
74.5
ONS 2007/8
2.2 Economic activity rates
82.0
78.8
 
Indicator 8.2.4: Skills
3.1 No qualifications (% working age pop)
10.3
12.9
ONS 2007
3.2 Proportion of working age population with NVQ2+
70.4
68.4
3.3 Higher qualifications (% working age pop)
31.3
32.1
3.4 Proportion of working age pop having on the job training 
10.2
10.3
in past 4 weeks
 
Indicator 8.2.5: Enterprise
4.1 Businesses per 10,000 population
450
340
ONS 2007
4.2 Business Start-ups per 10,000 population
36
35
 
Indicator 8.2.6: Investment
5.1 Capital investment per employee
2,607
3,297
ABI, ONS 
2006

172 Departmental Report 2009
DSO 9: A respected department, delivering efficient and high 
quality services and outcomes
Defra has adopted an approach to monitoring this DSO which is different to the others. 
No intermediate outcomes have been defined. Instead, progress with delivering the 
policy outcomes for DSOs 1-8 is tracked in combination with a range of internal 
management indicators which touch on customer service, stakeholder perspectives, 
public opinion, staff engagement and efficiency. For example, the speed, efficiency and 
quality with which Defra responds to correspondence and complaints are important in 
terms of Defra’s reputation.
Ministers and the Defra Management Board continue to recognise organisational 
reputation as a key indicator of competence. Gaining respect is often hard won, over 
the long-term, by doing the ‘day job’ well – developing good policy across DSOs 1 to 8 
and translating this into effective delivery for our customers. However, it is also easily 
lost by failing in any area of our business – policy, delivery or corporate – in any part of 
the wider Defra Network. Our reputation is also affected by the performance of other 
parts of Whitehall and by the general perception of Government. So, it is encouraging 
that we have much to look back on over the last 12 months where we have done the 
‘day job’ well across all of our DSOs, as outlined elsewhere in this report.
For example, Defra’s reputation as a Department that is adept at managing its finances 
is increasingly being recognised. The recent Cabinet Office Capability Review 
acknowledged this and in 2008 Defra succeeded for the first time in laying its Annual 
Accounts (which were unqualified) before Parliament rose for its Summer Recess.
The new portfolio management regime introduced to support the Renew structure has 
also helped ensure that the Department is allocating its resources to support priorities, 
and has a flexible mechanism through an Approvals Panel process to quickly move 
budgets as and when necessary. Representatives from other Government Departments 
have observed the new Approvals Panel in action over the last 12 months and have 
been encouraged by HM Treasury to adopt a similar framework for their Departments.
The overnight creation of DECC in October 2008 required agreement with DECC and 
BERR for the transfer of budgets to support the inception of a totally new entity. 
HM Treasury, who arbitrated over the final settlement for DECC, acknowledged the 
openness and speed with which Defra was able to supply the necessary budget 
transfers, and enable the new Department to begin operating with immediate effect.
Over the 2004 Spending Review period (2005/06-2007/08) Defra lived within its 
budget, delivering a total net under-spend of less than 0.1% against an £11bn budget 
across the three years. For the CSR07 period (2008/09-2010/11), Defra has made 
budget allocations for all three years well before the start of each financial year and 
successfully managed its business within budget for the first year 2008/09.

Chapter 4: Our Performance
173
Previous Spending Review Targets
In line with HM Treasury guidance, we continue to monitor and report on any 
outstanding PSA targets from the 2004 Spending Review (SR04).
Table 4.5: Summary of Performance assessment against each previous spending 
review PSA target.
SR04 Targets
Overall Assessment
PSA 3a: Reversing the long-term decline in 
There is currently slippage against 
the number of farmland birds
this target
PSA 3b: Sites of Special Scientific Interest 
There is currently slippage against 
(SSSI)
this target
PSA 9: To improve the health and welfare of 
Defra has met the remaining part of 
kept animals, and protect society from the 
PSA Target 9
impact of animal diseases, through sharing 
the management of risk with industry

174 Departmental Report 2009
PSA 3a: Reversing the long‑term decline in the number of 
farmland birds
The Public Service Agreement target is a Spending Review 2004 (SR04) target and 
relates to the long-term trend in farmland bird populations. The target is measured by 
the Farmland Bird Index which is compiled using data provided by the Royal Society for 
the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), taken from the 
annual Breeding Bird Survey.
Overall assessment: There is currently slippage against this target
The farmland birds index for England showed a period of steep decline between the 
mid-1970s and mid-1990s, followed by a shallower decline until the late 1990s. 
Following a period of no significant change between 1999 and 2004, the index has 
fallen in recent years. In particular the ‘smoothed’ 2007 data published in October 
2008 show that the index fell by almost 2 percentage points between 2006 and 2007 
relative to the 1966 level. The long term decline in the farmland birds index for England 
is primarily driven by the farmland specialists (those species that breed solely or mainly 
on farmland). The populations of the non-specialists in the index have remained 
relatively stable since 1970.
Figure 4.2: Population of farmland, generalist and specialist birds 1966-2007.
140
120
Generalists (7)
100
80
All farmland species (19)
60
Index (1966 = 100)
40
Specialists (12)
20
0
1966
1971
1976
1981
1986
1991
1996
2001
2006
Source: British Trust for Ornithology, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.
Source: British Trust for Ornithology, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds.

Chapter 4: Our Performance
175
Figure 4.3: Year-on-year changes in the England farmland bird population index. 
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
–1
centage change –2
Per –3
–4
–5
–6
–7
–8
1966
1971
1976
1981
1986
1991
1996
2001
2006
Source: British Trust for Ornithology, Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, Joint Nature Conservation 
Committee.
Figure 4.3 shows the year-on-year changes in the smoothed England farmland bird 
index. In the last three years the error bars have been below zero suggesting that there 
has been a statistically significant decrease in farmland bird populations in England 
between in 2004 and 2007. The combined effect of the latest decline in numbers and 
the smoothing method has retrospectively made the results for 2005 and 2006 more 
negative.
This target contributes to PSA 28 as it is one part of a wider composite indicator, 
indicator 28.2, measuring biodiversity.

176 Departmental Report 2009
PSA 3b: Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI)
Overall assessment: There is currently slippage against this target
Further good progress was made towards the target of having 95% of SSSI area in 
England in favourable or recovering condition by December 2010. A close working 
partnership between Defra, Natural England and other delivery bodies resulted in a net 
increase of 5.7 percentage points in the land in target condition during 2008/09 leaving 
a further 6.6 percentage points to be achieved over the remaining 21 months of the 
PSA. This has been assessed as challenging but achievable.
Table 4.6: Progress to date against trajectory milestones.
Trajectory Milestone
SSSI area meeting the 
PSA Target
31 March 2000
50.0%*
31 March 2003
56.9%**
31 March 2004
62%
62.9%
31 March 2005
67%
67.4%
31 March 2006
72%
72.3%
31 March 2007
78%
75.4%***
31 March 2008
83%
82.7%
31 March 2009
89%
88.4%
31 March 2010
93%
31 December 2010
95% 
* Estimated figure ** Baseline 
*** In this year NE was created

Chapter 4: Our Performance
177
PSA 9: To improve the health and welfare of kept animals, 
and protect society from the impact of animal diseases, 
through sharing the management of risk with industry
This has three parts:
1.  a reduction of 40% in the prevalence of scrapie infection (from 0.33% to 0.20%) 
by 2010;
2.  a reduction in the number of cases of BSE detected by both passive and active 
surveillance to less than 60 in 2006, with the disease being eradicated by 2010; 
and
3.  a reduction in the spread of Bovine TB to new parishes to below the incremental 
trend of 17.5 confirmed new incidents per annum by the end of 2008.
Parts 1 and 2 had their final assessment in the Autumn Performance Report 2008. Part 
3 is reported on below.
Assessment: This part of PSA 9 has been met
The latest available figures indicate progress is in line with the target. As at 31 December 
2008, the value for the PSA 9 indicator is –4.8 Confirmed New Incidents (CNIs) per 
annum in comparison with the target of no more than +17.5.
Details of the calculation:
The basic statistic used for calculating the PSA 9 indicator is the number of confirmed 
new bovine TB incidents (CNIs) in parishes where no CNI had been disclosed during the 
previous 48 months, so-called ‘new’ parishes. A 48-month period was chosen to 
ensure that herds would have been routinely tested at least once. The PSA 9 indicator 
is the difference between two 5-year averages of the basic statistic; for the period 
ending 31 December 2008, the average for 1 January 2003 to 31 December 2007 was 
subtracted from the average for 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2008.
In the six 12-month periods ending in 31 December 2003 through to 31 December 
2008, there had been 308, 313, 291, 295, 248 and 284 CNIs in ‘new’ parishes. Hence 
the PSA 9 indicator for 31 December 2008 is (313 + 291 + 295 + 248 + 284)/5 minus 
(308 + 313 + 291 + 295 + 248)/5, i.e. 286.2 minus 291.0, i.e. –4.8.
In order to ensure a practically complete count of CNI, the downloaded data contained 
records for CNI that were disclosed on or before 17 February 2009, which is 48 days 
after the end of the period being studied (31 December 2008). The minimum 
recommended delay is usually 60 days.

178 Departmental Report 2009
Progress in 2008
The PSA indicator has been negative throughout 2008. It increased gradually, from 
–32.8 at the end of 2007, through –28.0 at the end of March 2008, –18.0 at the  
end of June 2008, –13.8 at the end of September 2008 to –4.8 at the end of 
December 2008.
The low figure for the end of 2007 had been expected, since it was based on an 
average for 2002–2006 subtracted from an average for 2003–2007. The data for 2002 
was greater than usual because testing had resumed after Foot and Mouth Disease. 
This resulted in a low figure for the PSA 9 indicator. The data used to calculate the 
PSA 9 indicator for the end of 2008 will use data for 2003-2007 and for 2004–2008, 
so that the disturbance seen in 2002 will have no effect. The expected value for the 
PSA 9 indicator for bovine TB at the end of 2008 is well below the target of +17.5 CNIs 
per annum.


Annex


Annex
181
Annex A: Better Regulation
This section describes specific examples of our Better Regulation initiatives.
Simplification and Modernisation of existing regulations
Defra’s 2008 Simplification Plan Better Regulation, Better Business20 provided a 
comprehensive overview of action the Department is taking to meet our commitment 
to reduce the administrative burden our regulations impose on business, design better 
and more focused regulation, and ensure risk-based regulation is integrated into the 
policy development process as early as possible.
The following examples are of some of the simplification measures that have been 
pursued, a number of which will specifically improve the position of small businesses. 
Review of the Bird Registration Scheme
Schedule 4 to the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and associated Regulations were 
amended on 1 October 2008 reducing the number of birds, if kept in captivity, that 
needed to be registered with the Secretary of State. Deregulation (a reduction in the 
number of birds requiring registration) resulted in a decrease in the administration 
burden of £14,300 and a net benefit (NPV best estimate) of £1,190,300 over five years.
The Public Rights of Way (Combined Orders) (England) Regulations 2008
This enables a modest reduction to the administrative burden on rights of way sections 
within those Local Authorities that are also surveying authorities (generally County 
Councils and Unitaries).
These Regulations replace the previous law, where a Local Authority, that is also a 
surveying authority, makes an order which changes the network of public rights of way, 
(for example, a public path creation order under the Highways Act 1980, section 26) 
they must subsequently make a further order under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 
1981, section 53, in order to record the change to the network on the definitive map 
and statement. Paragraph 2 of Schedule 5 to the Countryside and Rights of Way Act 
2000 inserted a new section, 53A into the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. This 
enables authorities to make a combined order to both change the rights of way 
network and at the same time modify the definitive map to take account of the 
change. These Regulations implement this new legislation.
20  www.defra.gov.uk/corporate/regulat/better/simplify/pdf/simplification-plan-081210.pdf

182 Departmental Report 2009
Local Authority Pollution Control 
Government consulted in September 2008 on extension of the risk-based regulatory 
method, linked to operator charges, for those sectors not already subject to it (e.g. dry 
cleaners and petrol stations) with the prospect of three-yearly rather than annual 
inspection for low-risk premises with the result that the Risk Method was introduced on 
1 April 2009.
Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) Cross Compliance
This involved a Soil Protection Review to include all cross-compliance standards in a 
single soil management tool and simplification of cross-compliance standards on 
waterlogged soil to avoid the need for applications by farmers for derogations.
Upland Entry Level Scheme (ELS)
This is a new strand of Environmental Stewardship designed specifically for upland 
farmers. The scheme, which will replace the Hill Farm Allowance from 2010, will reward 
farmers for the provision and maintenance of landscape and environmental benefits in 
the uplands.
Defra worked very closely with stakeholders throughout the development of Uplands 
ELS to ensure the final design achieved the right balance between being practical for 
farmers and beneficial for the uplands environment. 
Implementation of the Nitrates Regulations
In line with the Department’s commitment to evidence-based policy, the nitrate 
vulnerable zone (NVZ) designation methodology was updated to reflect an improved 
understanding of the underpinning science. Using this methodology for the 2008 
review of NVZ areas, some former NVZ areas have subsequently been de-designated. 
This means action is targeted where it is needed and unnecessary burdens are not 
imposed. The Nitrates Pollution Prevention Regulations 2008 revoke 13 pieces of related 
legislation and some areas of land formerly designated as nitrate vulnerable zones have 
been de-designated. Free software is available for farmers (generally categorised as 
‘small businesses’) to simplify record-keeping and assist with compliance.
Detailed Guidance was issued in October 2008 to provide clarity for farmers on what they 
need to do to meet the new requirements and what they can expect by way of 
compliance-checking by the Environment Agency, the competent authority for 
enforcement. We note here some key features of the Nitrates Directive and its 
development.
•  Defra carried out a four-month (August-December 2007) public consultation on 
regulation proposals. There were over 600 responses and we published a detailed 
analysis of responses on the internet. Further discussion post consultation 
considered possible changes in policy, particularly to deal with the practical 
difficulties of implementation. The final Regulations very much reflect decisions 
taken in response to stakeholder input. 

 
Annex

183
•  The Directive establishes criteria for identifying waters as polluted, or likely to 
become polluted, and requires Member States to designate all land draining to 
waters so identified to be designated as nitrate vulnerable zones (NVZs). Farmers 
must follow an Action Programme to reduce and prevent nitrate loss.
•  The Nitrates Directive is very prescriptive in defining what must be included in the 
Action Programme which farmers in NVZs must follow. We ensured that the limited 
discretion allowed to Member States in drawing up the detail of the Action 
Programme was fully exercised, using an extensive evidence base (including the IA) 
to support our approach. A sound evidence base was also crucial in persuading 
different factions (the EU Commission, farmers, environmental groups) that the 
approach we were taking in developing the Regulations was the most appropriate.
•  More efficient use of manures and fertilisers is a key element of the new 
Regulations. This requires farmers to undertake some quite complex calculations 
using prescribed standards and processes set down in the Regulations. The free 
software is a practical tool for helping farmers carry out the necessary assessments 
and calculations. 
•  Negotiations on revising the Action Programme measures in light of the recent 
review have been protracted and difficult, with key stakeholders (farmers, non-
governmental organisations and the EU Commission) often having very different 
agendas. Early and regular consultation with the farming sector (through meetings, 
workshops and seminars) proved invaluable in getting some acceptance of the 
environmental message which underpins the Directive and hence some buy-in to  
the new Regulations. 
The new UK European Fisheries Fund (EFF)
EFF is designed to secure a sustainable European fishing and aquaculture industry.  
There is approximately £111m funding available for the UK, of which there is just  
over £38m for projects in England. The programme opened to applications on  
15 September 2008. The types of projects eligible for grant include:
•  modernising fishing vessels, e.g. to reduce discards, improve gear selectivity and 
minimise environmental impact. Not to increase catching capacity;
•  improving product quality;
•  investment in aquaculture and diversification of farmed species;
•  marketing fisheries products;
•  improvements to processing and port facilities;
•  pilot and collective actions by industry;
•  the development of sustainable fisheries; and
•  development support towards fisheries-dependent communities.

184 Departmental Report 2009
This scheme replaced the old Financial Instrument for Fisheries Guidance (FIFG). EFF is 
more streamlined, simplified and modernised than the old FIFG scheme, providing new 
and innovative measures to take account of the changing needs of the sector. 
Legislative Reform Orders
No Legislative Reform Orders (LROs) were made by Defra in 2008. One is in 
preparation, the Legislative and Regulatory Reform (Local Government) (Animal Health 
Functions) Order 2009. Defra will continue to monitor the situation and come forward 
with proposals to use LROs where it is appropriate to do so.
Improvement of design of new regulation
Progress on Impact Assessments in the UK
Defra’s new policy cycle process closely maps to Impact Assessment (IA) development, 
and policy teams will be advised to include production of IAs in their Project Plans from 
the outset. 
We will also be re-launching guidance on producing IAs and Defra Regulatory 
Improvement Units will be redoubling efforts to advertise their bespoke 1:1 advice 
service to policy colleagues drafting IAs, which includes looking to ensure IAs commit to 
a review. We will be monitoring the quality of IAs as we make these changes.
Available data show that IAs on 26 policies were produced in the third quarter of 
2008/09. Of these, 21 included a commitment to review the legislation at a specific 
point in the future (either within a defined period of years following implementation or 
by a set date), and the remaining five committed to a review without a timeframe.
We are also looking more widely at other initiatives that can improve the overall quality 
of IAs. For example, The Agriculture Monitoring Group Draft Action Plan includes 
asking business representatives to regularly assess a sample of Defra IAs for clarity, but 
this has yet to be agreed. 
Progress on Impact Assessments in the EU
In respect of EU Commission impact assessments, Defra has tried to supplement their 
often general nature, and help negotiation, by seeking information from business 
between publication of the Commission’s proposals and adoption. Some examples are: 
•  Animal By Products rules apply general requirements potentially to a wide range of 
very different businesses, the impact assessment process was an opportunity to seek 
information at a level of detail not addressed by the Commission; 
•  new welfare at slaughter rules proposed specific new regimes in abattoirs, these 
were considered in detail in the draft impact assessment and the information 
obtained will provide important evidence in discussions in 2009; 

 
Annex

185
•  presentation of a robust and detailed impact assessment helped the UK to obtain 
some concessions/changes in the proposals for sheep electronic identification; and
•  the Soil Framework Directive which is currently under negotiation. Impact 
assessment of costs and benefits was carried out to understand better the potential 
burdens on government as well as industry. Findings have directly informed the UK 
negotiating position.
Impact Assessments to inform policy
There are a number of positive cases where Defra has used the IA process to inform 
policy development. These include:
•  use of extensive impact assessments to determine whether installations regulated 
under Local Authority Pollution Control (LAPC), which are not directly required to be 
regulated by EA directives, should continue under LAPC, some other form of 
regulation or should be deregulated. A Better Regulation review consultation 
running from November 2008 to February 2009 contained proposals for three 
sectors to be deregulated and a significant number of industry sectors to be 
examined for suitability for simplified permitting; and
•  a partial impact assessment accompanied public consultation launched in August 
2007 on proposals to revise the nitrates regulations while an updated and full IA 
was laid with Regulations in September 2008. This partial impact assessment 
contributed to EU officials accepting our approach to implementation of the Nitrates 
Directive. Defra made full use of the limited discretion allowed to member states in 
implementing the prescriptive requirements of the Nitrates Directive. Since 2004 the 
Regulations have been subject to four-yearly reviews.
Use of Flexible Regulations and alternatives to Regulation
Defra aims to introduce flexibility into its regulatory approach to ensure that new 
Regulations are modern and responsive. For example, there are provisions in the 
Veterinary Medicines Regulations for fee reductions, e.g. annual fees for a wholesale 
dealer’s authorisations and for inspections of wholesale dealer premises.
The Veterinary Medicines Directorate (VMD) is proposing to change the frequency of 
inspections from a fixed cycle to a risk-based frequency in 2009. The VMD also have 
alternative enforcement procedures, e.g. seizure and improvement notices. Streamlined 
and simplified guidance notes accompany Veterinary Medicines Regulations and provide 
details for those covered on the legislative requirements.

186 Departmental Report 2009
Similarly, we seek to ensure that a fundamental part of the new policy-cycle and IA 
process is for policy officials to question the need for Regulation, particularly domestic 
regulation, and to consider if there are any alternatives. Examples of effective use of 
alternatives to classic regulation include the following:
•  since April 2008 the Marine and Fisheries Agency (MFA) has been permitted to 
impose fines for fisheries offences as an alternative (for the offender) to taking them 
to court. Reduction in court cases has saved time and money for MFA and the 
industry, without impairing the effectiveness of enforcement activity; and 
•  the Paint Products Directive provides for licensing of paints with high solvent content 
required for use in restoring vintage vehicles and historic buildings. This was criticised 
on cost and bureaucracy grounds. A Review, conducted in consultation with 
stakeholders, arrived at an alternative approach involving an administrative option, 
pragmatic enforcement, and a code of practice. This is currently being consulted on.
Changing attitudes and approaches to regulation
Defra continues to work with delivery bodies, business and others to ensure we address 
the real regulatory irritants that impair performance. However, we are conscious that 
many businesses, particularly smaller enterprises, find that a flexible and responsive 
legislative framework allows them to operate confidently and to ensure that 
environmental abuses are identified and penalised. 
Defra’s Network Delivery Group brings together Chief Executives (or their nominated 
and empowered representatives) from organisations across Defra’s delivery network to 
take shared decisions to commit joint investment, resources and funding for specific 
collaborative action in order to deliver business functions and services to customers. 
Recent meetings have focused on how the network can work together to continue to 
deliver services with reduced budgets.
Defra also recognises the importance of meeting Common Commencement Dates 
(CCDs). We publish lists of forthcoming legislation bi-annually on the internet which 
include details of regulations entering into force on CCD dates.21 Where possible, Defra 
complies with CCDs but it should be borne in mind that around 70% of Defra’s 
Regulations originate in the EU and often we are required to adhere to dates laid down 
in EU Instruments. 
In respect of EU measures, 30 completed EU Directive transposition plans have been 
received. Each plan gives details of the key contacts throughout the UK who are 
responsible for overseeing transposition, the means of transposition (whether by 
legislative or administrative measures, primary or secondary legislation) and the target 
dates for laying and making of regulations in England, Wales, Scotland, Northern 
Ireland and Gibraltar (if appropriate). Outstanding transpositions are monitored, in order 
to avoid a breach of the Commission’s deadline for transposition.
21  www.defra.gov.uk/corporate/regulat/

 
Annex

187
Defra carries out a large number of public consultation exercises each year on a range 
of proposed regulatory measures. From 1 April 2008 to 1 April 2009 a total of 80 
consultations were carried out. Of those, 68 lasted a minimum of 12 weeks, which is 
the best practice standard set down in the Code of Practice. The remaining 12 lasted 
less than 12 weeks. There were a number of reasons for shortened consultations 
including the purely technical nature of proposals, narrow and specialised target 
audiences, compliance with timescales laid down in EU legislation and delays at 
European level in agreeing EU texts. All consultations, including shortened 
consultations, were agreed by a Defra Minister.

188 Departmental Report 2009
Annex B: Summary of updates to information in earlier 
Departmental Reports
Whole Farm Approach
The Whole Farm Approach has been identified as a strategic enabler for the 
Government’s Service Transformation Strategy. It is working closely with Business Link 
looking at how Defra services for farmers, and online farming content, can be made 
available via the Business Link portal. 
Since its release in March 2006, the Whole Farm Approach portal has achieved take-up 
in line with predictions with over 7,500 farmers having completed the registration 
process by March 2009 and deemed active users. During the past year the system has 
been enhanced by providing self-assessment tools to support farmers in understanding 
and meeting cross compliance requirements.
The Whole Farm Approach programme is working with the Defra delivery network to 
identify further services and products suitable to be made available online in order to 
support the farming industry in understanding regulatory requirements and reducing 
their administrative burdens. The key areas of focus are the provision of Single Payment 
Scheme and cattle Tracing Scheme services online.
Farm Inspections project
Following an initial review of inspection activities, and in particular duplicate activities, 
Defra, through the Rural Payments Agency and Animal Health, has been running a pilot 
to join up Cattle Identification Inspections with TB tests, where possible. Early feedback 
from this pilot is very positive with 94% of keepers and 86% of inspectors reporting 
this to be a positive experience. 
Defra is continuing to work with delivery partners and stakeholders to develop a 
consistent, risk-based approach to enforcement including improved sharing of data.
Regulatory Enforcement and Sanctions Bill
Defra has continued to develop its relationship with the Local Better Regulation Office 
through regular engagement and membership of their Programme Board to deliver a 
world class regulatory service.
Local Authority Enforcement Targets
In working to design the new, reduced National Indicator set, Defra consulted widely 
with stakeholders to develop a set of indicators that enable local authorities to continue 
to support their local communities, and deliver the wider Government policy agenda. 

 
Annex

189
Defra have reviewed the old Best Value Performance Indicator set, and of the 22 
original Best Value Performance Indicators, 13 have been removed, with a further four 
consolidated into two indicators. Through this work, Defra has met its target to reduce 
the number of data sets collected from Local Authorities by 30%, while still maintaining 
the ability to assure and ensure delivery through local authority partners.
Hampton Implementation
The Plant Health and Seeds Inspectorate (PHSI) and the Plant Variety Rights Office and 
Seeds Division (PVS) will merge with the Central Science Laboratory (CSL) and the 
Government Decontamination Service (GDS) on 1 April 2009 to form the Food and 
Environment Research Agency (Fera). The National Bee Unit (NBU), which is already part 
of CSL, will also be part of Fera.
The Environment Agency and Animal Health have completed their Hampton 
Implementation Reviews, the Animal Health Report is yet to be published. The 
Environment Agency are working with the better Regulation Executive to assess their 
progress in addressing the issues raised.

190 Departmental Report 2009
Annex C: The Defra Network
Executive Agencies
Although there is no one agency model, common features of agencies usually include a 
certain level of financial and human resource flexibility to get the job done and 
operating performance targets that are agreed between Defra and the Minister. Defra 
had the following executive agencies during 2008/09.
Table C.1: Executive Agencies
Executive Agencies
Website
Animal Health
www.defra.gov.uk/animalhealth/
Centre for Environment, Fisheries and 
www.cefas.co.uk
Aquaculture Science
Central Science Laboratory
www.csl.gov.uk
Government Decontamination Service
www.defra.gov.uk/gds
Marine and Fisheries Agency
www.mfa.gov.uk
Regulatory Science Agency (a shadow 
N/A
body until 31 March 2009)
Rural Payments Agency
www.rpa.gov.uk
Veterinary Laboratories Agency
www.vla.gov.uk
Veterinary Medicines Directorate
www.vmd.gov.uk
Non-Departmental Public Bodies
Non-Departmental Public Bodies (NDPBs) are delivery bodies that operate at arms 
lengths from Ministers and Departments. Each NDPB is overseen by a sponsor team 
which agrees the NDPB’s remit and monitors performance. The sponsor teams work 
with the NDPBs, providing support for their high-level aims and also for the purpose of 
budgetary control. Executive Agencies are overseen by a Defra Corporate Owner whose 
role is to provide corporate governance and strategic purpose.
Executive NPDBs (eNDPBs) are set up either by legislation or as companies to have a 
separate legal identity from that of the sponsoring department. eNDPBs are usually 
funded through grant in aid by the sponsoring department. Advisory NDPBs differ from 
eNDPBs in that they are usually set up as ad-hoc organisations and the fairly minimal 
resources they require are provided directly by the Department. During 2008-09 Defra 
sponsored the following NDPBs.

 
Annex

191
Table C.2: Executive Non Departmental Bodies
Executive Non Departmental Bodies Website 
Agricultural and Horticultural 
www.ahdb.org.uk
Development Board
Agricultural Wages Board
N/A
Agricultural Wages Committee
N/A
Commission for Rural Communities
www.ruralcommunities.gov.uk
Consumer Council For Water
www.ccwater.org.uk
Environment Agency
www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Food from Britain
www.foodfrombritain.com
Gangmasters Licensing Authority
www.gla.gov.uk
Joint Nature Conservation Committee
www.jncc.gov.uk
National Forest Company
www.nationalforest.org
Natural England
www.naturalengland.org.uk
Royal Botanic Gardens Kew
www.kew.org
Sustainable Development Commission
www.sd-commission.org.uk
Table C.3: Advisory NDPBs
Advisory NDPBs
Website
Advisory Committee on Hazardous 
www.defra.gov.uk/environment/chemicals/
Substances
achs/
Advisory Committee on Organic 
www.defra.gov.uk/farm/organic/standards/
Standards
acos/
Advisory Committee on Packaging
www.defra.gov.uk/environment/waste/
topics/packaging/
Advisory Committee on Pesticides
www.pesticides.gov.uk/acp_home.asp
Advisory Committee on Releases to the  www.defra.gov.uk/environment/acre/
Environment
Advisory Group on Sustainable 
N/A
Consumption and Production Evidence 
Base
Agricultural Land Tribunal
www.defra.gov.uk/farm/working/alt/
default.htm
Agricultural Dwelling House Advisory 
N/A
Committee

192 Departmental Report 2009
Table C.4: Advisory NDPBs (continued)
Advisory NDPBs
Website
Air Quality Expert Group
www.defra.gov.uk/environment/airquality/
panels/aqeg/
Animal Health and Welfare Strategy 
www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/ahws/eig/
England Implementation Group
Bovine TB Advisory Group
www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/tb/partnership/
advisorygroup.htm
Darwin Advisory Committee
www.defra.gov.uk/darwin
Expert Panel on Air Quality Standards
www.defra.gov.uk/environment/airquality/
panels/aqs/
Farm Animal Welfare Council
www.fawc.org.uk/
Independent Agricultural Appeals Panel N/A
Independent Scientific Group on Cattle  www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/tb/isg/
TB
Inland Waterways Advisory Council
www.iwac.org.uk/
Pesticide Residues Committee
www.pesticides.gov.uk/prc_home.asp
Science Advisory Council
www.defra.gov.uk/science/how/sac/
Spongiform Encephalopathy Advisory 
www.seac.gov.uk/
Committee
Trade Union Sustainable Development 
www.defra.gov.uk/environment/tusdac/
Advisory Committee
Veterinary Products Committee
www.vpc.gov.uk/
Veterinary Residues Committee
www.vet-residues-committee.gov.uk/
Zoos Forum
N/A

 
Annex

193
Table C.5: Levy Boards
Levy Boards
Website
Agriculture & Horticulture Development  www.ahdb.org.uk
Board
Sea Fish Industry Authority
www.seafish.org
Table C.6: Public Corporations
Public Corporations
Website
British Waterways
www.britishwaterways.co.uk
Covent Garden Market Authority
www.cgma.gov.uk
Table C.7: Others
Others
Website
English National Parks Authority 
www.nationalparks.gov.uk
Association
Forestry Commission (a non-ministerial 
www.forestry.gov.uk
department)
National Fallen Stock Company
www.nfsco.co.uk
Waste and Resources Action 
www.wrap.org.uk
Programme
Levy Boards are NDPBs that are funded through statutory levies from particular industry 
sectors. Defra has responsibility for two Public Corporations. Public Corporations are 
industrial or commercial enterprises under direct Government control. They have a 
Board whose members are appointed by Ministers, employ their own staff (who are not 
civil servants) and manage their own budgets. We have also listed several other 
independent organisations with very close involvement in, or ties to, the Defra Network.

194 Departmental Report 2009
Changes to the Defra Network during 2008/09
With effect from October 2008 the following bodies transferred to the newly Created 
Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC).
Table C.8: Non Departmental Bodies transferred to DECC
Non Departmental Bodies (Other)
Website
Carbon Trust
N/A
Committee on Radioactive Waste 
www.corwm.org.uk/
Management
Energy Savings Trust
www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/
Fuel Poverty Advisory Group
www.berr.gov.uk/energy/fuel-poverty/fpag/
National Non Food Crop Centre
www.nnfcc.co.uk
Performance reporting on Agencies and NDPBs
All Executive Agencies and most NDPBs also publish their own annual reports and 
accounts which provide full information on targets and performance of the relevant 
organisation as well as its financial information. These can be obtained from their 
websites (listed above) or The Stationery Office.

 
Annex

195
Annex D: Defra responses to PAC recommendations
Management of Expenditure
40th PAC Report (19 March 2008):  
www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmselect/cmpubacc/447/447.pdf
Conclusion 1: 
Defra’s priorities were protected and policies 
delivered. 
Policy and operational delivery 
within the department and its 

•  Around £1bn invested in expanding and 
delivery bodies have been 
renewing important assets that both 
adversely affected by financial 
safeguard and improve the environment 
management failings.
including flood defences and waste 
management and recycling plants.
•  Defra’s agencies and sponsored bodies, 
crucial in achieving our strategy, have 
clearly agreed budgets.
•  The Environment Agency received over 
£500m (included in the £1bn above) to 
fund flood management activities e.g. 
building and maintaining defences, flood 
forecasting, supporting Local Authority 
and Internal Drainage Board projects.
•  Over £200m spent on schemes such as 
the Rural Development Programme for 
England which will leave a durable legacy 
in the countryside and environment.

196 Departmental Report 2009
Conclusion 2: 
•  The demands made on the Department’s 
budget in 2007 were exceptional, with 
The Department’s budget setting 
avian influenza, flooding and Foot and 
process did not contain sufficient 
Mouth Disease all occuring close to one 
flexibility to deal with events 
another.
which were unforeseen at the 
start of the year.

•  The Department therefore took a fresh 
look at its priorities for 2007/08 and the 
budget reflected these.
•  It would be imprudent use of taxpayers’ 
money to set aside large sums of money 
that may not be used.
•  Measured risk management and 
reprioritisation of funds meant that other 
important spending areas of Defra’s work 
were not neglected.
•  It was testament to its financial 
management that Defra was able to 
manage the cost of these unforeseen 
events by re-prioritising within its annual 
budget and avoiding the need to make 
any additional burden on taxpayers.
•  Robust planning, portfolio management 
and setting balanced budgets before the 
beginning of the financial year has 
ensured Defra will stay within spending 
limits for 2008/09.
•  2009/10 balanced budgets were notified 
to business areas and arms length bodies 
in July 2008, 2010/11 budgets will be 
agreed and settled in Spring 2009 to 
facilitate effective forward planning and 
financial control.
•  Budgets for the CSR period contain a 
contingency for emergency situations.

 
Annex

197
Conclusion 3: 
•  A regular system of monthly financial 
reporting to the Management Board is in 
The financial management 
place.
failings arose largely from 
unwillingness within the 

•  Defra achieved “Faster Close” of its 
Department’s Management Board 
Annual Accounts for the first time by 
to tackle budgetary problems, 
laying its Accounts before the Summer 
and from a failure to instil a 
Recess of Parliament in July 2008.
culture of tight financial 
management throughout  

•  The “Renew” change programme resulted 
the organisation.
in changes to the Management Board and 
financial management teams, including a 
new permanent Finance Director.
•  Portfolio management by a Central 
Approvals Panel (a sub-committee of the 
Management Board) ensures scrutiny and 
challenge of business cases for new 
projects and programmes of work and 
reprioritisation of activities and 
expenditure at its monthly meetings. This 
has resulted in a tougher financial and 
outcome monitoring system by the 
Management Board, representing a more 
rigorous approach to what we do in order 
to provide better value for money for the 
taxpayer.
•  The creation of DECC in October 2008 
was achieved through collaborative 
working with BERR and DECC colleagues.

198 Departmental Report 2009
Conclusion 4: 
•  A refreshed Financial Management 
Improvement project is delivering more 
The Department’s financial 
effective and focused financial 
management challenges arise in 
management across the department, 
part from the number and 
including relationships with delivery 
variations in scale of the delivery 
agents.
bodies used to achieve its 
objectives, as well as the 

•  Parliamentary decisions to set up NDPBs 
significant variations in financial 
create a level of independence for the 
management skill and practice 
bodies and gives them certain freedoms to 
within those bodies.
manoeuvre. We must continue to work 
together to build up a standardised flow 
of information and we are doing this 
through the Corporate Owners of our key 
delivery bodies within Defra.
Administering the Single Payment Scheme 
29th PAC Report of Session 2007/08 (15 July 2008):  
www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200708/cmselect/cmpubacc/285/285.pdf
Conclusion 1:
•  Corrective work on SPS entitlements data 
has been undertaken by the RPA to date 
The Rural Payments Agency has 
leading to better data being held for those 
not yet managed to bring the 
customers leading to fewer errors in 
administration of the Single 
payments. However, it is likely that further 
Payment Scheme properly  
corrections will be necessary, on an 
under control. 
on-going basis, as a result of, for example, 
changes to the Rural Land Register (RLR), 
additional checks on land data and the 
results of on-farm inspections.

 
Annex

199
Conclusion 2:
•  The RPA concentrated resources on 
making full payments for the 2007 SPS 
The Agency has been slow to 
scheme year rather than focusing on 
investigate possible 
recovering overpayments. 
overpayments, and only began 
taking action to recover excess 

•  The investigation and recovery of 
payments made under the 2005 
overpayments has proven to be 
Scheme in November 2007. 
particularly difficult due to the inter-
relationship between the entitlements of 
individual farmers, the newness and 
complexity of scheme rules and the impact 
on the accuracy of the partial payments 
made in 2005 and 2006.
•  The RPA’s overpayments recovery work is 
now well underway. 
Conclusion 3:
•  The RPA now has an improved process in 
place for recording overpayment and 
By mid November 2007, the 
recovery action.
Agency had reviewed 33,592 
claims, but had failed to keep an 

•  Regular management information is 
accurate central record of 
provided to the RPA’s Agency 
overpayments made under the 
Management Board and a financial 
2005 and 2006 Schemes. 
summary of recoveries is presented to the 
RPA’s Audit Committee which meets at 
least four times a year. 
Conclusion 4:
•  Various initiatives are being taken forward 
within the RPA to reduce the risk of 
The Agency’s failings in 
disallowance in future years. For example, 
implementing the Scheme have 
as part of an exercise to improve the RLR, 
led to the risk of significant 
a trial is underway which includes 
disallowance of expenditure and 
updating the land information held. 
the imposition of penalties by 
the European Commission, and 

•  A Disallowance and Accreditation 
added to the Agency’s business 
Committee has been established at RPA to 
change project costs. 
identify and advise the Board and senior 
management on disallowance risks. 
•  An additional programme of work was 
agreed with the Department for the 
period 2007/08 to 2009/10. This covered 
business process and technology changes 
and benefits will accrue from the SPS 
2009 scheme year.

200 Departmental Report 2009
Conclusion 5:
•  Significant IT improvements, including 
steps towards converting the main IT 
The Agency’s service to farmers is 
system from being task-based to claim-
still undermined by weaknesses 
based, have been delivered since the PAC 
in its IT systems, such as its 
hearing. Further system improvements are 
inability to provide farmers with 
planned on an ongoing basis.
a predicted amount and payment 
date to assist them with their 

•  During 2007 and 2008 RPA has stabilised 
financial planning. 
its workforce and developed an SPS Training 
System designed to provide whole case 
workers with the skills and competencies 
to better administer the scheme. 
•  Taken together, these improvements 
helped enable the Agency to meet its 
payment targets since 2007 without the 
need for partial payments. Independent 
quarterly customer surveys have recorded 
significant improvements in the level of 
farmer satisfaction. 
•  RPA is moving towards achieving a stable 
12-month process from claim submission 
to payment. This will give farmers year on 
year predictability for receipt of payments. 
Conclusion 6:
•  RPA is driving through a number of 
performance and efficiency improvements 
The average cost of processing 
and value for money initiatives to reduce 
claims exceeded the value of 
SPS administration costs. 
over a third of the 106,000 claims 
under the 2006 Scheme, making 

•  RPA is working with the Department and 
improvements in the Agency’s 
its network to improve efficiency (as well 
efficiency essential. 
as levels of customer service) through 
Delivery Transformation initiatives such as 
Better Regulation and the Whole Farm 
Approach. In the 2008 and 2009 SPS 
scheme years, for example, it released the 
first phases of an electronic channel 
option to farm software providers and 
electronic claim submission screens to pilot 
customers. 
•  Through improved corporate, business 
planning and performance management 
processes, RPA aims to reprioritise resources 
to deliver further efficiency savings. 

 
Annex

201
Conclusion 7:
•  The Department has made changes to the 
way it presides over the work of RPA to 
In preparing policy papers for 
improve information exchanges and levels 
Ministers, the Department had 
of collaboration. For example, RPA’s Chief 
not drawn sufficient attention to 
Executive now reports to the Director 
all the risks to implementing the 
General, Food and Farming Group who 
complex dynamic hybrid scheme 
chairs a Strategic Advisory Board. In year 
and the likely impact on  
performance issues and priorities are also 
delivery timescales. 
considered by the Defra-led Delivery 
Review Board. 
•  RPA’s Chief Executive has regular dialogue 
with Defra Ministers and the Permanent 
Secretary concerning risks to RPA’s 
performance, especially those affecting 
customers. 
•  RPA’s Chief Executive has also made 
improvements to Agency governance by 
creating a new Agency Executive Group. 
•  Other changes within RPA include a new 
Programmes and Projects Directorate with 
responsibility for evaluating, prioritising 
and selecting the right programmes and 
projects to ensure alignment with RPA’s 
strategic objectives and ensuring that 
projects are effectively and efficiently 
planned and delivered. 
•  Performance management processes have 
also been strengthened. RPA aims to 
minimise delivery risks through a robust 
process of challenge and review from its 
non-executive (external) Directors, Audit 
Committee members and Defra’s Strategic 
Advisory Board.

202 Departmental Report 2009
Annex E: SCS by payband
Table E.1: Senior Civil Service numbers by pay band as of 31 December 2008
Core Defra
Executive 
Outward 
Inward Loans
Agencies
Loans
Pay band 1
104
27
18
2
Pay band 2
21
6
1
0
Pay band 3
6
0
1
0
Sub total
131
33
20
2
Total
186

 
Annex

203
Annex F: Correspondence with Ministers and the Public
The Department has a centralised Customer Contact Unit (CCU) to handle Ministerial 
and public correspondence and to provide a consistent and high performing service to 
the customer. 
In 2008, the Department handled 20,626 letters and emails from the public, 11,819 
letters from MPs and/or stakeholders and 132,339 telephone calls from the public to 
the Defra Helpline.22
 23
 24
 25
Table F.1: Performance levels achieved for letters and emails from the public, and 
letters signed by Defra Ministers in the last two financial years  
Type of correspondence
2007
2008
Ministerial correspondence 22
72
61
“Deal with officially” cases 23
94
88
Departmental email 24
96
93
Telephone calls 25
Not available
80
(All figures are reported in percentages)
The introduction of centralised correspondence handling in 2006 has resulted in a 
substantial and steady improvement in overall performance. The creation of the 
Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) in October 2008 interrupted the 
flow of correspondence and this had a significant, but temporary, impact on 
performance. Defra’s CCU continues to handle DECC’s correspondence on issues where 
Defra previously took the lead, although the figures in the table above exclude such 
correspondence.
Looking ahead to 2009/10, volumes of correspondence are expected to increase. Waste 
and recycling, animal health and welfare, and local environment quality issues, among 
other issues, are likely to continue to generate both Parliamentary and public interest.
22  Letters signed by Ministers.
23  Letters signed by officals on behalf of Ministers.
24  Public enquiry emails handled by the Department’s Customer Contact Unit.
25  Telephone calls received by the Defra Helpline.

204 Departmental Report 2009
Annex G: Public Complaints
Table G1: Complaints on the Department to the Parliamentary Ombudsman 2007-08 
Complaints 
Complaints 
Complaints 
Complaints  Complaints 
reported on
accepted for  fully upheld
partly 
not upheld
invetigation
upheld
TOTAL Defra
12
8
25%
25%
50%
Core Defra
6
4
17%
33%
50%
Rural Payments 
3
2
67%
33%
0%
Agency
Environment Agency
2
1
0%
0%
100%
Consumer Council 
1
1
0%
0%
100%
for Water
Source: Data obtained from figure 2 on page 11 and figure 3 on page 13 of the Parliamentary and 
Health Service Ombudsman Annual report 2007/08.
Complaints Handling in Defra:
Complaints are received and dealt with at three levels within the Department: 
•  level one – at the point where the problem has occurred;
•  level two – at group programme level; and
•  level three – by the Service Standards Complaints Adjudicator. 
Most complaints are resolved at levels one and two. Complainants who remain 
dissatisfied can take their complaint to the Ombudsman once level three has been 
completed. 
The Service Standards Complaints Adjudicator, also the Ombudsman/Defra liaison 
contact, is Trevor Cook ([email address]). 
The Defra complaints procedure can be found at:  
www.defra.gov.uk/corporate/complain/index.htm.

 
Annex

205
Annex H: Expenditure on Professional Services and Consultancy
The expenditure of the Department and its executive agencies26 on Professional 
Services, which includes consultancy and staff substitution/interim management, 
was £573.3m for 2007/08. Published data was submitted in October 2008 in 
response to the Office of Government Commerce (OGC)/Treasury Public Sector 
Procurement Expenditure Survey (PSPES) and is based on the OGC Professional 
Services Forum definitions.
Table H.1: Professional Services expenditure for 2007/08
Name
Status
1 Professional 
2 Professional  3 Professional 
Services Other
Services Temp  Services 
Staff

Consultancy
Department for 
Core Dept
412,443,355
12,344,109
37,290,720
Environment, Food and 
Rural Affairs
Centre for Environment, 
Executive Agency
7,415,371
522,452
206,855
Fisheries and Aquaculture 
Science
Veterinary Laboratories 
Executive Agency
8,881,796
2,026,407
Agency
Rural Payments Agency
Executive Agency
12,359,518
47,948,467
20,636,899
Central Sciences 
Executive Agency
2,617,119
15,457
344,322
Laboratory
Marine and Fisheries 
Executive Agency
59,710
429,955
142,715
Agency
Government 
Executive Agency
46,500
12,657
138,110
Decontamination Service
Animal Health
Executive Agency
5,522,607
846,741
1,042,202
449,345,976
62,119,838
61,828,229
In previous Departmental Reports, the Professional Services analysis for Defra focused 
on supplier categorisation. The implementation of a new Category Coding Schema27 in 
March 2007 has provided the source data for the analysis in Table H.1. 
The new schema focuses on spend categorisation and improves the reporting accuracy 
and has captured 81.6% of the total expenditure with third party suppliers in 2007/08. 
The success of this schema has enabled the department to analyse its Professional 
Services expenditure to a greater level of detail. 
Professional Services Other includes £358.2m for the Warmfront programme which has 
been categorised under Environmental Services at the direction of the OGC.
26  Excludes Veterinary Medicine Directorate.
27  Used by Defra, Animal Health Agency, Natural England, Marine & Fisheries Agency, Government Decontamination Service.

206 Departmental Report 2009
Professional Services Temporary Staff includes staff substitution/interim management.
Table H.2: Professional Services Consultancy for the core department  
Defra – Professional Services Sub-groups
2007/08
Professional Services Corporate. Business Strategy
14,714,033
Professional Services Corporate. Policy Delivery
3,880,213
Professional Services Corporate. Procurement
2,383,586
Technical/Specialist Services. Communication Advice & Studies
223,593
Professional Services Corporate.Audit
70,367
Professional Services Corporate. Communications
749,538
Professional Services Corporate. Finance
2,149,258
Professional Services Corporate. Human Resources
1,966,773
Professional Services Corporate. Information Technology
9,711,804
Professional Services Corporate. Legal
163,738
Professional Services Corporate. Property & Estates
1,277,817
Total
37,290,720
Defra has played an active role in the OGC’s Consultancy Value Programme (CVP). In 
2008/09 Defra developed a Professional Services Procurement Policy which was signed 
off by the Management Board and sets out how and when consultancy may be used in 
the department.
As part of the ongoing work, Defra measures itself against 12 key behavioural change 
indicators provided in the High Level Action Plan required by the CVP programme. At 
the end of December 2008, Defra achieved a Green status in 9 of the behavioural 
change indicators and Amber in the remaining 3. Those given an Amber assessment 
will form the main focus of our work during 2009.
Key messages of the CVP:
•  The Government’s Consultancy Value Programme continues to deliver significant 
achievements in controlling departmental expenditure on consultants, and we 
continue to work with the NAO in ensuring value for money for the taxpayer.
•  The Government uses consultants because it needs access to temporary specialised 
advice, skills and experience which are not available within Government and would 
not make commercial sense to retain in house.
•  The use of consultants is an essential part of running any large public or private 
sector organisation and it is common practice to use consultants to speed up 
change processes. 

 
Annex

207
•  Consultants provide specific skills, either as individuals or as a group, which are 
either not available within that organisation or are not needed on a permanent 
basis. 
•  The NAO were consulted on the process used for capturing the data, and the 
methodology used was the same as part of their 2006 study and report into 
consultant spend. 

208 Departmental Report 2009
Annex I: Core Tables
The aim of the published tables is to provide an explanation of what Defra spends its 
money on. They provide an analysis of departmental expenditure in resource terms, 
showing resource consumption and capital investment. The information includes Voted 
and Non-Voted expenditure and includes tables outlining how Defra spends its money 
by country and region. 
The details of the Parliamentary Main Estimate are published separately.
Table 1 – Defra Total Departmental Spending
This table sets out a summary of the expenditure on Departmental Strategic Objectives 
(DSOs) which underpin the Department, covering the period from 2003/04 to 2010/11. 
Future year figures reflect the budgeted figures agreed with HM Treasury for the 
Department.
Table 2 – Defra Resource Budget DEL and AME
This table provides the resource consumption details in Table 1, broken down into 
greater detail. It shows the expenditure for each of the Department’s DSOs and 
Intermediate Outcomes.
Table 3 – Defra Capital Budget DEL and AME
This table provides details of the capital expenditure plans in the same format as Table 2.
Table 4 – Defra Capital Employed
This table shows the capital employed by the Department, in a balance sheet format. It 
provides a high-level analysis of the various categories of fixed assets, debtor and 
creditor values, and also the extent of provisions made.
Table 5 – Defra’s Administration Costs
This table presents, in more detail, information concerning the administration costs of 
running the Department. For the current year and past years there is an analysis of 
administration expenditure showing pay bill costs and other costs.
Table 6 – Staff Numbers 
This table shows actual and projected staffing in the Department from 2002/03 to 
2009/10 split between permanent staff, casuals and overtime.
Table 7 – Defra’s identifiable expenditure on services, by country and region
This table shows actual and projected identifiable expenditure on services, by country 
and region.

 
Annex

209
Table 8 – Defra’s identifiable expenditure on services, by country and region, 
per head
This table shows actual and projected identifiable expenditure on services by country 
and region per head.
Table 9 – Defra’s identifiable expenditure on services by function, country and 
region for 2007/08
This table shows actual identifiable expenditure on services by function, country and 
region for 2007/08.
Commentary on core tables
Introduction
These tables are an authoritative statement of how the Department has used its 
resources. The tables are split by Departmental Strategic Objectives (DSOs) to be 
consistent with the layout of the Parliamentary Estimate and are sub-analysed by 
Intermediate Outcome (IO). The Estimate was restructured in the 2008 Winter 
Supplementary Estimate (WSE) and now reflects the new DSO structure agreed with 
HM Treasury as part of the Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR07) settlement. This 
structure was further updated in the Spring Supplementary Estimate (SSE) following the 
creation of a new Department, the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), 
that brought together much of Defra’s climate change responsibilities with the energy 
component from the Department for Business Enterprise and Regulatory Reform. These 
tables are also now structured on a DSO basis and therefore show a different view of 
the data to that shown in previous Departmental Reports. The tables are also split 
between Departmental Expenditure Limit (DEL) & Annually Managed Expenditure 
(AME), both terms being explained below.
HM Treasury publishes a glossary in the Public Expenditure Statistical Analyses report28 
(HC 489) that explains most of the terms used in the common core tables and in the 
commentary below so these are not all repeated here.
There are many references to individual programme budgets within the main text of  
the Report so the comments below are restricted to the trends shown by the common 
core tables.
28  www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/d/pesa0809_complete.pdf

210 Departmental Report 2009
Table 1 – Total Departmental Spending
Background
Total Departmental Spending is the sum of the Resource Budget and Capital Budget 
less depreciation (excluded so as to avoid double counting). Both the Resource and 
Capital Budgets are split into DEL and AME elements for control purposes.
DEL budgets are negotiated with HM Treasury via Spending Reviews (SRs) that cover 
three years. The most recent Comprehensive Spending Review (CSR07) covers 2008/09 
to 2010/11. DEL includes the accruals-based consumption of the Non-Departmental 
Public Bodies (NDPBs) that the Department sponsors and excludes the grant-in-aid 
which provides them with the necessary cashflow.
AME budgets are usually demand led and not easily controllable by departments so are 
set at the beginning of each year via the Parliamentary Main Estimate. They can be 
updated during the year via the Winter and Spring Supplementary Estimates, subject to 
approval by Parliament.
Defra has a very small AME Budget. It is limited to the impact of the costs associated 
with the provision for the water industry closed pension fund (£59m charge for the 
unwinding of the discount rate, £85m credit for the utilisation of the provision and 
£35m credit for the associated cost of capital charge) and the consumption of the Levy 
Funded Bodies (LFBs) that the Department sponsors (£66m per annum). The levy 
income of the LFBs is classified as Non-Voted Non-Budget.
As this table is a summary of Tables 2 and 3, only commentary on the overall totals is 
added here.
Comparisons – current and forward looking
2009/10 Main Estimate
The plans for 2009/10 agree to the 2009/10 Main Estimate. The plans for 2010/11 are 
based on the 2007 Comprehensive Spending Review settlement, amended for changes 
processed during the preparation of the subsequent Main and Supplementary 
Estimates. The main change is the transfer of the majority of Defra’s Climate Change 
responsibilities to DECC.
Comparison of 2008/09 estimated outturn with the 2008/09 Spring 
Supplementary Estimate
The resource outturn for 2008/09 was estimated, at the beginning of the fourth quarter, 
to be £101m lower than the budget made available via the SSE. That was made up of a 
£34m forecast underspend in Resource DEL and a £67m forecast underspend in 
Resource AME. The forecast underspend in Resource DEL is due to a number of small 
underspends across the programme portfolio. The £67m forecast underspend in 
Resource AME is mainly caused by: 

 
Annex

211
•  £12m underspend on the interest on scheme liabilities for the water industry closed 
pension fund. This underspend will not continue to the year end as more up to date 
information indicates the forecast being fairly close to that provided for in the SSE; 
•  £13m underspend relating to a provision for the Food from Britain pension scheme. 
There were uncertainties at the time of the SSE about the timing and requirement 
for this provision. Cover was included in the SSE as the most prudent option; and 
•  £40m credit relating to the utilisation of the CAP disallowance provision that has 
been scored to AME to reflect the element of the provision that was initially created 
in AME. 
The estimated capital outturn for 2008/09 is £23m more than the budget made 
available in the SSE. This forecast overspend is almost entirely within DEL and reflects a 
movement in spend from Resource to Capital in respect of flood defences where the 
exact nature and classification of the expenditure is determined by the Environment 
Agency as they undertake the work. A Written Ministerial Statement was made on the 
26 March to announce that Defra would switch £20m from Resource DEL to Capital 
DEL to cover this. The Department has continued to manage away the risk of any small 
remaining overspend through to the year end. 
Comparison of the 2008/09 estimated outturn with 2008/09 Plans published in 
the 2008 Departmental Report 
Comparing the total Resource Budget for 2008/09, the estimated outturn is £317m 
lower than the Plans that were published in the 2008 Departmental Report. This is 
due to:
•  £282m decrease to the DEL Budget:
 
– £232m decrease as a result of the DECC machinery of government change 
reflected in the SSE;
 
– £34m forecast underspend in DEL at the time the tables were prepared (explained 
above); and
 
– £16m decrease in the WSE mainly due to a transfer of the Departmental 
Unallocated Provision (DUP) to Capital for the Energy Efficiency Package 
•  £35m decrease to the AME Budget: 
 
– an increase of £12m in the WSE for the interest on scheme liabilities for the water 
industry closed pension fund;
 
– an increase of £7m in the SSE for the Agricultural & Horticultural Development 
Board;
 
– an increase of £13m in the SSE to provide cover for a provision for the Food from 
Britain Pension Scheme; and
 
– offset by the £67m forecast underspend in AME (explained above).

212 Departmental Report 2009
Comparing the total Capital budget for 2008/09, the estimated outturn is £379m lower 
than the plans that were published last year. This is almost entirely within DEL and is 
mainly due to:
•  £418m decrease due to the DECC machinery of government change reflected in the 
SSE;
•  £16m increase in the WSE mainly due to a transfer of the DUP to Capital for the 
Energy Efficiency Package; and
•  £23m forecast overspend (explained above).
Comparison of the 2009/10 Main Estimate with the 2008/09 Spring 
Supplementary Estimate
The Resource DEL Budget is £21m higher in the 2009/10 Main Estimate than in the 
2008/09 SSE, an increase of less than 1%. The Resource DEL Budget then decreases 
due to Defra's contribution to the value for money and operational efficiency 
programme for 2010/11.
The Capital DEL Budget is £70m higher in the 2009/10 Main Estimate than in the 
2008/09 SSE, mainly due to £8m additional funding in the 2009 budget for developing 
reprocessing facilities for food waste, £20m flood risk management spend being 
brought forward from 2010/11 due to HM Treasury’s fiscal stimulus package and 
additional funding for flood risk management secured by the CSR07 settlement. This 
Budget then decreases into 2010/11 due to the fiscal stimulus package mentioned 
above and a larger transfer of Capital Budget to DECC, mainly relating to the 
Environmental Transformation Fund. 
Comparisons – backward looking
Review of movements within previous years outturn
Since the last Departmental Report, these tables have been restructured and now 
reflect the new DSO structure as agreed with HM Treasury as part of the CSR07 
settlement and subsequently adjusted following the creation of DECC. How internal 
programmes map to the new DSO structure has mainly been resolved but may require 
finessing over time. There has also been a decrease to all previous years outturn 
primarily due to the removal of most of the Climate Change responsibilities on the 
formation of DECC. Other small changes include the transfer of the Chemicals 
Regulation Directorate (formerly known as the Pesticides Safety Directorate) to the 
Health and Safety Executive.
Comparison of 2007/08 actual outturn with the estimated outturn published in 
the 2008 Departmental Report
The actual resource outturn for 2007/08 is £373m lower than the estimated outturn 
published in last year’s Report. This is made up of £360m DEL and £13m AME.

 
Annex

213
The decrease in outturn for DEL is mainly due to:
•  £204m transfer of Climate Change responsibilities to DECC;
•  approximately £40m more Environmental and Flood Management actual 
expenditure being classified as Capital rather than Resource; and
•  the Department’s actual spend for 2007/08 was lower than estimated in last year’s 
report as the Department ensured it did not overspend against its Resource budget 
after the core tables were prepared. 
The decrease in outturn for AME is mainly caused by a £12m credit relating to the 
utilisation of the CAP disallowance provision that has been scored to AME to reflect the 
element of the provision that was initially created in AME.
The actual capital outturn for 2007/08 is £351m lower than the estimated outturn 
published in last year’s Report. This all relates to DEL and is mainly due to the £381m 
transfer of Climate Change responsibilities to DECC partially offset by more 
Environmental and Flood Management actual expenditure being classified as Capital 
rather than Resource. 

214 Departmental Report 2009
Table 1 Total Departmental Spending
£’000
2003/04  2004/05  2005/06  2006/07  2007/08  2008/09  2009/10  2010/11  2011/12 
Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Estimated 
Plans
Plans
Plans
Outturn
Resource budget
Resource DEL
A Healthy Natural Environment
877,455
869,420
735,077
879,590
894,476
977,042 1,007,970 1,003,207

Sustainable Consumption and 
65,307
116,784
129,904
194,957
231,889
81,588
95,289
94,198

Production
Addressing Environmental Risk and 
271,682
546,760
608,259
682,430
683,066
694,385
746,805
772,752

Emergencies
A Thriving Farming and Food Sector
97,939
96,739
116,663
101,936
104,139
101,404
88,404
100,526

Championing Sustainable 
2,319
3,800
9,143
11,823
7,641
9,765
8,413
7,109

Development
Strong Rural Communities
120,746
112,575
134,125
105,562
93,540
48,741
81,260
75,339

A Respected Department
247,939
318,693
252,123
234,662
303,903
294,496
277,656
251,970

Area Based Grant





2,997
2,997
5,500

Departmental Unallocated Provision






26,000
50,000

Rural Payments Agency
453,757
444,222
499,409
582,137
290,638
328,816
263,263
234,126

Forestry Commission
76,071
69,244
77,027
66,297
85,018
84,729
75,179
68,148

Adapting to Climate Change
55,002
34,822
41,670
17,659
6,226
19,373
31,669
14,865

A Sustainable, Secure and Healthy 
7,653
4,569
4,934
7,424
3,060
10,705
3,727
3,801

Food Supply
Total resource budget DEL
2,275,870 2,617,628 2,608,334 2,884,477 2,703,596 2,654,041 2,708,632 2,681,541

of which: Near-cash
2,038,088 2,273,496 2,146,763 2,330,543 2,319,977 2,280,502 2,373,200 2,339,117

Resource AME
A Healthy Natural Environment
9,553
9,777
62,522
–56,884
–70,962
–64,252
–53,400
–57,097

A Thriving Farming and Food Sector
63,292
61,821
62,998
51,602
54,859
51,822
57,849
48,000

Rural Payments Agency




–12,400
–40,000



Total resource budget AME
72,845
71,598
125,520
–5,282
–28,503
–52,430
4,449
–9,097

of which: Near-cash
63,236
60,965
69,188
60,758
61,597
59,289
64,271
56,603

Total resource budget
2,348,715 2,689,226 2,733,854 2,879,195 2,675,093 2,601,611 2,713,081 2,672,444

of which: depreciation
118,139
184,055
137,083
156,175
211,893
214,708
224,926
209,681

Capital budget
Capital DEL
A Healthy Natural Environment
97,659
72,997
73,839
86,557
72,239
105,304
99,723
80,239

Sustainable Consumption and 
86,574
47,295
58,489
58,573
60,788
81,501
117,185
35,325

Production
Addressing Environmental Risk and 
132,849
126,987
401,823
298,980
339,024
385,752
388,195
422,055

Emergencies
A Thriving Farming and Food Sector
4,355
15,081
19,983
1,322
–2,872
1,367
1,300
360

Strong Rural Communities
777
152
21,105
30,390
28,206
27,859
22,766
16,967

A Respected Department
19,383
42,885
54,655
73,797
33,595
–5,907
18,198
42,241

Rural Payments Agency
35,928
7,362
5,271
20,039
24,391
24,135
19,548
13,183

Forestry Commission
5,209
546
3,875
–1,642
2,525
–2,000
2,000
–2,000

Adapting to Climate Change
18,703
525


794




A Sustainable, Secure and Healthy 
1,242








Food Supply
Total capital budget DEL
402,679
313,830
639,040
568,016
558,690
618,011
668,915
608,370


 
Annex

215
Table 1 Total Departmental Spending (continued)
£’000
2003/04  2004/05  2005/06  2006/07  2007/08  2008/09  2009/10  2010/11  2011/12 
Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Estimated 
Plans
Plans
Plans
Outturn
Capital AME
A Healthy Natural Environment
353
500

208
40




A Thriving Farming and Food Sector
964
896
2
173
192
183
500
846

Total capital budget AME
1,317
1,396
2
381
232
183
500
846

Total capital budget
403,996
315,226
639,042
568,397
558,922
618,194
669,415
609,216

Total departmental spending†
A Healthy Natural Environment
968,252
917,694
842,705
892,419
851,140
979,265 1,016,315
986,762

Sustainable Consumption and 
151,881
164,079
188,222
253,288
292,562
163,089
212,474
129,523

Production
Addressing Environmental Risk and 
343,888
611,846
940,468
890,146
946,018
995,485 1,050,730 1,097,937

Emergencies
A Thriving Farming and Food Sector
166,161
173,469
197,246
150,546
152,416
153,684
146,827
149,340

Championing Sustainable 
2,319
3,800
9,143
11,016
7,442
9,765
8,413
7,109

Development
Strong Rural Communities
121,523
112,727
153,694
136,881
118,219
76,584
94,010
92,306

A Respected Department
244,665
276,226
289,963
286,321
277,635
226,124
232,049
244,379

Area Based Grant





2,997
2,997
5,500

Departmental Unallocated Provision






26,000
50,000

Rural Payments Agency
475,801
451,584
488,825
583,524
281,711
288,226
258,086
224,809

Forestry Commission
77,482
69,056
79,619
62,954
85,260
79,800
74,273
65,648

Adapting to Climate Change
73,705
35,347
41,037
17,097
6,802
19,373
31,669
14,865

A Sustainable, Secure and Healthy 
8,895
4,569
4,891
7,225
2,917
10,705
3,727
3,801

Food Supply
Total departmental spending†
2,634,572 2,820,397 3,235,813 3,291,417 3,022,122 3,005,097 3,157,570 3,071,979

of which:
Total DEL
2,560,410 2,748,053 3,111,459 3,296,782 3,051,253 3,058,125 3,153,699 3,080,230

Total AME
74,162
72,344
124,354
–5,365
–29,131
–53,028
3,871
–8,251

† Total departmental spending is the sum of the resource budget and the capital budget less depreciation. Similarly, total DEL is the sum of the resource 
budget DEL and capital budget DEL less depreciation in DEL, and total AME is the sum of resource budget AME and capital budget AME less depreciation  
in AME.

Spending by local authorities on functions relevant to the department
Current spending

3,836,902 4,082,831 4,440,822 4,656,771 4,962,252 5,311,002
of which:
financed by grants from  
–12,664
2,401
51,486
34,962
86,996
31,921
budgets above
Capital spending
300,804
415,932
433,264
382,147
453,533
595,244
of which:
financed by grants from  
158,244
121,880
143,677
140,197
124,453
187,250
budgets above††
†† This includes loans written off by mutual consent that score within non-cash Resource Budgets and aren’t included in the capital support to local 
authorities line in Table 3.


216 Departmental Report 2009
Table 2 – Resource Budget DEL and AME
Movements within Administration spend are dealt with in the Table 5 commentary.
Resource Budget DEL
A Healthy Natural Environment
Under Biodiversity the 2006/07 figure includes funding transferred to Natural England 
from Defra in respect of the Shared Services and IBM Enabling contracts. The forward 
years budgets have built in efficiencies agreed as part of the Modernising Rural Delivery 
Programme. There was a further decrease to Biodiversity as some Rural Policy capital 
grants have been switched from Resource to Capital.
The decrease in 2005/06 for both Sustainable Water Use and Improved Local 
Environment is due to the transfer of capital grants from Resource to Capital. The 
figures for the following years are much higher, due to increased spending in this area. 
The increase to Land Management Sustainability from 2008-09 is due to increase 
expenditure on the Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE). 
Sustainable Consumption and Production
Spending on Less Waste reduced in 2008/09, following the end of the Business 
Resource Efficiency and Waste (BREW) programme. The programme operated from 
2005 to 2008 and funded a range of delivery bodies that provided sustainability advice 
and support to businesses. In 2008/09, to realise greater value for money, the 
Department changed its approach to how the remaining funding was deployed, 
resulting in a reorganisation of expenditure lines. There was a further reduction due to 
an element of the Carbon Trust that was held under Less Waste being transferred to 
DECC.
Addressing Environmental Risk and Emergencies
Spending in Flood Management rose sharply in 2004/05 due to a baseline transfer from 
the then Office of the Deputy Prime Minister for flood management purposes. The 
figures for 2006/07 onwards are much higher, due to increased spending in this area. 
Spending on BSE under Animal Disease Protection rose in 2006/07 because of the start 
of the testing regime, funded here, for cattle over 30 months old to enter the food 
chain. This allowed for the termination of the culling and compensation scheme 
(OTMS) that was funded from the RPA OTMS line. Expenditure for Animal Disease 
Protection has risen steadily over the last few years. This is due to the creation and 
continued increased investment in a new agency, the Animal Health agency, whose 
functions were previously carried out within the Core Department. Spending will 
increase in later years due to the Animal Health’s investment in the Business Reform 
Programme, which will produce savings in later years. 

 
Annex

217
Spending on Addressing Environmental Risk and Emergencies Administration costs 
reduced in 2007/08 due to consultancy spend that had previously been allocated to 
Business Areas on the HM Treasury database (COINS), and are now being held centrally.
Championing Sustainable Development
Spending on Sustainable Development from 2006/07 reflects an increase in project 
activity on Sustainable Development dialogues as the dialogues developed and matured.
Strong Rural Communities29
The drop in expenditure for Rural Economy in 2006/07 relates to the transfer of functions 
relating to the Rural Delivery Service from the Core Department to Natural England.
The lower estimated outturn for Rural Economy in 2008/09 relates to reductions in 
Regional Development Agencies (RDA) spending due to an agreement with HM 
Treasury. There was also a transfer of a small element of the RDA’s budget to DECC for 
the CSR07 period. More up to date forecasts show increases in spending relating to 
Genesis, a Defra IT system used for scheme processing.
A Respected Department
The relatively low outturn on Effective Delivery (Skills) for 2006/07 was mainly due to a 
non cash adjustment to the cost of capital charge. The relatively high estimated outturn 
for 2008/09 was due to non-cash forecasts for various provisions that are held centrally.
The increase in Administration Costs in 2007/08 is mainly due to £22m allocated in the 
2007/08 WSE to cover the costs of voluntary early retirement and voluntary early 
severance schemes. There was also a further increase due to previous years consultancy 
spend being allocated to the Business Areas in the HM Treasury database (COINS) and 
much of the 2007/08 budget and onwards being held centrally. Additionally there were 
non-cash increases in 2007/08 relating to various property impairments.
Spending on Emergency Response starts in 2005/06 due to the formation of the 
executive agency Government Decontamination Service (GDS). 
Area Based Grant
Area based grants to Local Authorities (LAs) were introduced in the CSR07 settlement. 
They were part of the reforms to LA funding and the reduction in ring-fenced funding.
Departmental Unallocated Provision
As part of the CSR07 settlement, Defra created a Departmental Unallocated Provision 
(DUP) to meet unforeseen pressures. This was set at £50m per year. In 2008/09 and 
2009/10 the DUP was reduced to meet increased spend on Warm Front as announced 
in the Energy Efficiency package in the Pre Budget Report (November 2008). This was 
subsequently transferred to DECC as part of the Machinery of Government changes.
29  The title of this DSO has since been amended to Socially and Economically Sustainable Rural Communities.

218 Departmental Report 2009
Rural Payments Agency
OTMS spend fell significantly from 2005/06 onwards as the cattle culling and 
compensation scheme (OTMS) was replaced by a testing regime, funded under the 
Animal Disease Protection line. The much smaller Older Cattle Disposal Scheme funded 
here ended in 2008/09. 
The reduction in Direct Payments Under CAP and CAP income in 2007/08 was due to  
a change by the EU in the applicable accounting policy. The increase in 2008/09 and 
2009/10 was to mitigate against RPA exposure to the declining sterling/euro exchange 
rate on their European Union Single Payment Scheme payments. The effect of 
exchange rates on 2010/11 payments will be assessed nearer the time. 
The increased expenditure in 2006/07 for Other Funding is due to increase provisions 
for potential disallowance of payments made to farmers under the EC Common 
Agricultural Policy (CAP) schemes. The negative spend in 2007/08 relates to a write 
back of a previous year's CAP provision. This also had an effect on the AME budget.
RPA administration costs fall towards 2010/11 as the efficiency gains from their 
recovery plan are realised. 
Forestry Commission
Expenditure for the Forestry Commission remains fairly constant across the years.
Adapting to Climate Change
This DSO was created due to a restructure of the Department following the creation  
of DECC.
A Sustainable, Secure and Healthy Food Supply
This DSO was created due to a restructuring of the Department following the creation  
of DECC.
Resource Budget AME
A Healthy Natural Environment
There has been a large decrease in the AME Budget for Sustainable Water Use due to 
the credits for the utilisation of the provision for the water industry closed pension fund 
and the associated capital charge on the remaining provision.
Rural Payments Agency
The negative value in 2007/08 on Direct Payments under CAP relates to the write back 
of a previous years provision that was originally created in AME.
The credit entry in 2008/09 on Other Funding relates to the utilisation of the CAP 
disallowance provision that has been scored to AME to reflect the element of the 
provision that was initially created in AME. 

 
Annex

219
Table 2 Resource budget DEL and AME
£’000
2003/04 
2004/05 
2005/06 
2006/07 
2007/08 
2008/09 
2009/10 
2010/11 2011/12 
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn Estimated 
Plans
Plans
Plans
Outturn
Resource DEL
A Healthy Natural 
877,455
869,420
735,077
879,590
894,476
977,042 1,007,970 1,003,207

Environment
of which:
Pollutant Free Air
14,401
13,875
2,094
1,513
3,015
10,903
10,855
6,037

Biodiversity
225,100
211,814
188,892
302,198
288,138
266,298
255,704
215,777

Sustainable Water Use
72,972
68,555
48,543
88,828
96,300
120,820
123,405
130,046

Clean Healthy Oceans
31,527
38,549
29,153
20,253
44,521
62,496
76,283
68,141

Land Management 
201,621
202,658
163,838
165,252
187,417
212,564
215,809
247,658

Sustainability
Natural Environment 
25,120
28,330
43,538
43,318
44,743
47,422
51,882
61,200

Enjoyment
Improved Local Environment
147,128
149,663
116,130
133,229
126,252
152,801
163,667
144,357

Sustainable Living Landscapes
133,838
131,257
110,306
93,142
80,873
78,205
83,624
99,706

A Healthy Natural 
25,748
24,719
32,583
31,857
23,217
25,533
26,741
30,285

Environment Administration 
Costs
Sustainable Consumption 
65,307
116,784
129,904
194,957
231,889
81,588
95,289
94,198

and Production
of which:
Better Products
6,080
5,948
8,770
6,754
7,335
17,517
18,897
11,207

Less Waste
53,643
103,649
110,263
179,312
215,514
58,700
71,303
75,611
 

Sustainable Consumption and 
5,584
7,187
10,871
8,891
9,040
5,371
5,089
7,380

Production Administration 
Costs
Addressing Environmental 
271,682
546,760
608,259
682,430
683,066
694,385
746,805
772,752

Risk and Emergencies
of which:
Flood Management
1,369
285,754
282,324
346,134
346,203
346,227
394,162
443,418

Environmental Risk Protection
1,462
3,490
7,241
387
10,879
15,968
17,379
15,500

Animal Disease Protection
220,063
210,536
259,364
280,979
307,932
314,200
318,332
287,477

Addressing Environmental 
48,788
46,980
59,330
54,930
18,052
17,990
16,932
26,357

Risk and Emergencies 
Administration Costs
A Thriving Farming and Food 
97,939
96,739
116,663
101,936
104,139
101,404
88,404
100,526

Sector
of which:
Environmental Farming
9,248
7,738
11,773
6,659
18,804
27,627
31,697
24,538

Competitive Farming
34,701
47,308
34,464
32,593
33,771
43,403
25,010
30,879

CAP Delivered
14,291
6,012
3,570
9,657
3,361
539
585
769

Animal Welfare
7,345
2,709
19,404
11,125
15,889
7,223
7,587
14,005

A Thriving Farming and Food 
32,354
32,972
47,452
41,902
32,314
22,612
23,525
30,335

Sector Administration Costs
Championing Sustainable 
2,319
3,800
9,143
11,823
7,641
9,765
8,413
7,109

Development
of which:
World Summit on Sustainable 
536
895
1,119
2,727
2,737
3,145
3,313
4,630

Development
Sustainable Development


 

1,806
2,965
3,505
3,505
1,338

Championing Sustainable 
1,783
2,905
8,024
7,290
1,939
3,115
1,595
1,141

Development Administration 
Costs

220 Departmental Report 2009
Table 2 Resource budget DEL and AME (continued)
£’000
2003/04 
2004/05 
2005/06 
2006/07 
2007/08 
2008/09 
2009/10 
2010/11 2011/12 
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn Estimated 
Plans
Plans
Plans
Outturn
Strong Rural Communities
120,746
112,575
134,125
105,562
93,540
48,741
81,260
75,339

of which:
Rural Economy
112,262
104,990
121,072
92,430
79,349
37,469
58,878
55,436

Rural Needs
1,826
1,675
3,154
9,607
10,013
9,482
20,648
16,500

Strong Rural Communities 
6,658
5,910
9,899
3,525
4,178
1,790
1,734
3,403

Administration Costs
A Respected Department
247,939
318,693
252,123
234,662
303,903
294,496
277,656
251,970

of which:
Effective Delivery (Skills)
40,470
94,953
52,297
22,700
19,288
40,366
18,526
15,831

Effective Delivery (Policy)
21,004
17,054
16,861
18,458
24,524
23,594
26,024
24,881

Communications
6,685
5,671
2,227
1,832
7,623
5,850
8,983
19,348

Emergency Response


951
2,204
1,876
3,127
3,508
2,670

A Respected Department 
179,780
201,015
179,787
189,468
250,592
221,559
220,615
189,240

Administration Costs
Area Based Grant





2,997
2,997
5,500

of which:
Area Based Grant





2,997
2,997
5,500

Departmental Unallocated 






26,000
50,000

Provision
of which:
Departmental Unallocated 






26,000
50,000

Provision
Rural Payments Agency
453,757
444,222
499,409
582,137
290,638
328,816
263,263
234,126

of which:
OTMS/OCDS
161,045
130,243
77,573
73,789
44,780
43,359



Direct Payments Under CAP
2,000,663 2,257,989 2,030,580 1,831,701 1,582,255 1,840,410 1,871,433 1,554,928

CAP Income
–1,919,065 –2,175,984 –2,008,684 –1,819,892 –1,580,766 –1,840,361 –1,871,433 –1,554,928

Other Funding
13,101

159,476
273,382
–7,784
53,750
55,750
55,338

Rural Payments Agency Front 
198,013
231,974
240,464
223,157
252,153
231,658
207,513
178,788

Line Administration Costs
Forestry Commission
76,071
69,244
77,027
66,297
85,018
84,729
75,179
68,148

of which:
Forestry Commission (England)
62,096
56,354
62,657
49,854
67,103
65,245
56,860
55,455

Forestry Commission (GB 
13,975
12,890
14,370
16,443
17,915
19,484
18,319
12,693

Core)
Adapting to Climate Change
55,002
34,822
41,670
17,659
6,226
19,373
31,669
14,865

of which:
Climate Change Adaptation
45,188
21,746
26,412

1,105
17,302
25,319
7,878

Adapting to Climate Change 
9,814
13,076
15,258
17,659
5,121
2,071
6,350
6,987

Administration Costs
A Sustainable, Secure and 
7,653
4,569
4,934
7,424
3,060
10,705
3,727
3,801

Healthy Food Supply
of which:
Reduce Impact of Food 
5,950
2,834
2,417
5,198
1,341
5,902
2,012
2,194

Production
A Sustainable, Secure 
1,703
1,735
2,517
2,226
1,719
4,803
1,715
1,607

and Healthy Food Supply 
Administration Costs
Total resource budget DEL
2,275,870 2,617,628 2,608,334 2,884,477 2,703,596 2,654,041 2,708,632 2,681,541


 
Annex

221
Table 2 Resource budget DEL and AME (continued)
£’000
2003/04 
2004/05 
2005/06 
2006/07 
2007/08 
2008/09 
2009/10 
2010/11 2011/12 
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn
Outturn Estimated 
Plans
Plans
Plans
Outturn
of which:
Near-cash
2,038,088 2,273,496 2,146,763 2,330,543 2,319,977 2,280,502 2,373,200 2,339,117

of which:†
Pay
802,750
922,746
975,560
994,062 1,073,484 1,076,388
Procurement
584,133
713,240
669,757
870,995
776,389
774,178
835,529 1,039,773

Current grants and subsidies 
527,798
516,709
343,678
349,461
295,599
329,370
285,734
322,587

to the private sector and 
abroad
Current grants to local 
–12,664
2,401
51,486
34,962
86,996
31,921
36,466
52,300

authorities
Depreciation
118,139
183,405
135,915
155,711
211,033
213,927
223,848
209,681

Resource AME
A Healthy Natural 
9,553
9,777
62,522
–56,884
–70,962
–64,252
–53,400
–57,097

Environment
of which:
Sustainable Water Use


54,900
–66,814
–78,560
–72,500
–60,900
–65,700

Clean Healthy Oceans
9,553
9,777
7,622
9,930
7,598
8,248
7,500
8,603

A Thriving Farming and Food 
63,292
61,821
62,998
51,602
54,859
51,822
57,849
48,000

Sector
of which:
Competitive Farming
63,292
61,821
62,998
51,602
54,859
51,822
57,849
48,000

Rural Payments Agency




–12,400
–40,000



of which:
Direct Payments Under CAP




–12,400




Other Funding





–40,000



Total resource budget AME
72,845
71,598
125,520
–5,282
–28,503
–52,430
4,449
–9,097

of which:
Near-cash
63,236
60,965
69,188
60,758
61,597
59,289
64,271
56,603

of which:†
Pay
15,448
–10,400
32,588
26,216
25,038
27,455
Procurement
47,788
71,718
38,799
37,193
37,693
32,871
40,475
41,305

Current grants and subsidies 









to the private sector and 
abroad
Current grants to local 









authorities
Depreciation

650
1,168
464
860
781
1,078


Total resource budget
2,348,715 2,689,226 2,733,854 2,879,195 2,675,093 2,601,611 2,713,081 2,672,444

† The breakdown of near-cash in Resource DEL by economic category may exceed the total near-cash Resource DEL reported above because of other 
income and receipts that score in near-cash Resource DEL but aren't included as pay, procurement, or current grants and subsidies to the private sector, 
abroad and local authorities.


222 Departmental Report 2009
Table 3 – Capital Budget DEL and AME
A Healthy Natural Environment
The reducing level of expenditure in Land Management Sustainability from 2005/06 
was due to funding for the RDPE system winding down. The increase on the same line 
from 2008/09 onwards is due to the end of the Local Area Agreements and subsequent 
re-allocation of funding to this area.
Expenditure on Natural Environment Enjoyment only started in 2007/08 as the schemes 
relating to grants to Local Authorities only started in this year. 
Sustainable Consumption and Production
The high value in 2003/04 for Less Waste was because all Local Authorities’ waste 
management was classified as Capital. The large increase on the same line in 2008/09 
and 2009/10 is due to the end of the Local Area Agreements and subsequent 
re-allocation of funding to this area. 
The decrease for Less Waste in 2010/11 reflects the planned decrease in the CSR07 
settlement. In order to meet landfill targets, investment must peak by 2009/10.
Addressing Environmental Risk and Emergencies
The increase in Flood Management from 2005/06 onwards reflects increased 
Government investment in flood risk management. 
Strong Rural Communities
The increase in Rural Economy reflects the transfer of capital grants for the Regional 
Development Agencies from Resource for 2005/06 onwards.
A Respected Department
The spike in 2006/07 for Effective Delivery (Skills) was because the budgets for IT 
project capital spend were held centrally but in subsequent years they have been 
progressively delegated out to business areas to increase accountability. This was the 
same for 2007/08 but the figures are lower due to capital disposals for various sites 
including High Mowthorpe Farm, Malton and Rosemund Farm, Worcestershire. 
The negative estimated outturn for 2008/09 for Effective Delivery (Policy) relates to the 
capital receipts from the sale of the Guildford site.
Rural Payments Agency
The increased capital spend for RPA from 2006/07 reflects the increased investment in 
their recovery plan. 

 
Annex

223
Table 3 Capital Budget DEL and AME
£’000
2003/04  2004/05  2005/06  2006/07  2007/08  2008/09  2009/10  2010/11  2011/12 
Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Estimated 
Plans
Plans
Plans
Outturn
Capital DEL
A Healthy Natural Environment
97,659
72,997
73,839
86,557
72,239
105,304
99,723
80,239

of which:
Pollutant Free Air
3,507
2,497
2,402
2,297
2,376
2,365
4,965
4,965

Biodiversity
13,465
7,041
25,310
14,423
13,866
14,892
17,042
16,077

Sustainable Water Use
1,611
65

21,723
10,936
16,599
5,129
253

Clean Healthy Oceans
10,025
1,600
8,846
3,732
2,079
3,000
3,150
4,600

Land Management Sustainability
50,923
43,807
26,005
13,597
5,021
15,011
17,500
19,000

Natural Environment Enjoyment




362
5,500
2,900


Improved Local Environment
11,338
14,820
8,149
22,700
21,077
20,959
23,489
25,114

Sustainable Living Landscapes
6,790
3,167
3,127
8,085
16,522
26,978
25,548
10,230

Sustainable Consumption and 
86,574
47,295
58,489
58,573
60,788
81,501
117,185
35,325

Production
of which:
Less Waste
86,574
47,295
58,489
58,573
60,788
81,501
117,185
35,325

Addressing Environmental Risk 
132,849
126,987
401,823
298,980
339,024
385,752
388,195
422,055

and Emergencies
of which:
Flood Management
80,613
99,781
360,690
267,187
289,214
344,700
360,390
400,000

Environmental Risk Protection
11,475
1,520
11,061
483
1,875
210



Animal Disease Protection
40,761
25,686
30,072
31,310
47,935
40,842
27,805
22,055

A Thriving Farming and Food 
4,355
15,081
19,983
1,322
–2,872
1,367
1,300
360

Sector
of which:
Environmental Farming
634
524
1,473






Competitive Farming
70
65
10,008
1,642
–3,806
865
1,000
60

CAP Delivered



–6
80
200



Animal Welfare
3,651
14,492
8,502
–314
854
302
300
300

Strong Rural Communities
777
152
21,105
30,390
28,206
27,859
22,766
16,967

of which:
Rural Economy
777
152
21,105
30,302
28,199
23,126
17,466
16,967

Rural Needs



88
7
4,733
5,300


A Respected Department
19,383
42,885
54,655
73,797
33,595
—5,907
18,198
42,241

of which:
Effective Delivery (Skills)
12,887
40,399
53,277
70,588
29,304
–1,019
16,698
40,741

Effective Delivery (Policy)
4,606
1,940
1,378
1,217
1,543
–4,888
1,500
1,500

Communications
1,890
546

1,954
1,823




Emergency Response



38
925




Rural Payments Agency
35,928
7,362
5,271
20,039
24,391
24,135
19,548
13,183

of which:
Rural Payments Agency Front Line 
35,928
7,362
5,271
20,039
24,391
24,135
19,548
13,183

Administration Costs
Forestry Commission
5,209
546
3,875
–1,642
2,525
–2,000
2,000
–2,000

of which:
Forestry Commission (England)
3,299
–2,143
987
–3,547
307
–3,913
40
–2,000

Forestry Commission (GB Core)
1,910
2,689
2,888
1,905
2,218
1,913
1,960



224 Departmental Report 2009
Table 3 Capital Budget DEL and AME (continued)
£’000
2003/04  2004/05  2005/06  2006/07  2007/08  2008/09  2009/10  2010/11  2011/12 
Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Estimated 
Plans
Plans
Plans
Outturn
Adapting to Climate Change
18,703
525


794




of which:
Climate Change Adaptation
18,703
525


794




A Sustainable, Secure and 
1,242








Healthy Food Supply
of which:
Reduce Impact of Food Production
1,242








Total capital budget DEL
402,679
313,830
639,040
568,016
558,690
618,011
668,915
608,370

of which:
Capital expenditure on fixed assets 
196,626
187,203
220,878
184,456
185,944
208,018
221,152
257,995

net of sales†
Capital grants to the private sector 
46,076
3,986
252,781
221,851
204,620
184,942
172,171
164,295

and abroad
Net lending to private sector
–28








Capital support to public 
1,761
761
204
7,640
15,618
26,548
24,548
9,048

corporations
Capital support to local 
158,244
121,880
143,677
140,189
124,453
187,250
233,688
150,165

authorities††
Capital AME
A Healthy Natural Environment
353
500

208
40




of which:
Clean Healthy Oceans
353
500

208
40




A Thriving Farming and Food 
964
896
2
173
192
183
500
846

Sector
of which:
Competitive Farming
964
896
2
173
192
183
500
846

Total capital budget AME
1,317
1,396
2
381
232
183
500
846

Total capital budget
403,996
315,226
639,042
568,397
558,922
618,194
669,415
609,216

Of which:
Capital expenditure on fixed assets 
197,943
188,599
220,880
184,837
187,918
208,201
221,652
258,841

net of sales†
Less depreciation†††
118,139
184,055
137,083
156,175
211,893
214,708
224,926
209,681

Net capital expenditure on tangible 
79,804
4,544
83,797
28,662
–23,975
–6,507
–3,274
49,160

fixed assets
†  Expenditure by the department and NDPBs on land, buildings and equipment, net of sales. Excludes spending on financial assets and 
grants, and public corporations’ capital expenditure.
††  This does not include loans written off by mutual consent that score within non-cash Resource Budgets.
††† Included in Resource Budget.


 
Annex

225
Table 4 – Capital Employed
The figures for the years 2007/08 and earlier are extracted from the audited Resource 
Accounts for those years, including those of the NDPBs that are not consolidated into 
Defra’s own accounts but which form part of the DEL group.
The figures for 2007/08 onwards have been amended to reflect the DECC transfer.
Tangible assets have shown significant growth since 2003/04 reflecting investment in 
both the building estate and IT projects. This investment has slowed down and the 
impact of depreciation has begun to reduce the net book value. 
In 2006/07 a reclassification of assets occurred between Land and Buildings and 
Fixtures and Fittings. 
The reduction in the net book value of Equipment and IT from 2006/07 to 2007/08 
reflects the planned transfer of IT assets from Core Defra to Natural England.
The increase in current assets and creditors due within one year for 2005/06 and 
2006/07 relates to balances with the EC for CAP Pillar 1 payments. 2005/06 shows a 
much larger creditor and corresponding EC debtor figure because of the delays in 
making payments to land owners on the Single Payment Scheme (SPS) 2005 following 
the issue of their entitlements in February 2006. The creditor is higher than the debtor 
because this also includes a creditor with HM Treasury, as the Department has to 
surrender this EC income as a Consolidated Fund Extra Receipt (CFER). There is also a 
relatively high level of accrued payments and income for 2006/07, but still lower than 
2005/06, as the timing of payments under the SPS has improved. These improvements 
are expected to continue for future years. The creditors and debtors balances from 
2007/08 onwards have been amended since the last Departmental Report to better 
reflect the SPS debtors/creditors.
Provisions increased in 2003/04 due to the provision for the water industry closed 
pension scheme and again in 2005/06 and 2006/07 due to the CAP disallowance 
provision.
NDPB net assets are forecast to increase from 2008/09 through to the end of the CSR 
period. This is mainly due to significant additional projected investment in flood risk 
management by the Environment Agency. In addition to this, in 2007/08 there was a 
planned transfer of IT equipment from the Core Department to Natural England. 

226 Departmental Report 2009
Table 4 Capital Employed
£ million
2002/03  2003/04  2004/05  2005/06  2006/07  2007/08  2008/09  2009/10  2010/11 
Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Estimated  Projected Projected
Outturn
Assets and liabilities on 
the balance sheet at 
end of year:
Assets
Fixed assets
Intangible
6
13
16
17
16
12
7
6
6
Tangible
599
741
813
893
957
960
920
870
836
of which: 
Land and Buildings
383
444
461
563
538
551
545
520
507
Fixtures and Fittings
26
25
30
28
60
47
46
45
40
Vehicles, Plant & Machinery
35
33
31
30
29
28
27
15
19
Equipment & IT
155
239
291
272
330
212
207
200
180
Assets under construction
122
95
90
90
Investments
16
16
12
11
9
8
7
6
5
Current Assets
1,417
983
1,486
4,429
2,419
2,160
2,033
1,674
1,674
Liabilities
Creditors (<1 year)
–1,378
–944
–1,512
–6,120
–3,311
–2,528
–2,455
–2,010
–2,010
Creditors (>1 year)
–42
–38
–25
–21
–19
–50
–109
–21
–21
Provisions
–238
–1,038
–1,125
–1,319
–1,533
–1,534
–1,488
–1,085
–1,111
Capital employed within main 
380
–267
–335
–2,110
–1,462
–972
–1,085
–560
–621
Department
NDPB net assets
1,984
2,150
2,336
2,387
2,223
2,554
2,965
3,231
3,499
Total capital employed in the 
2,364
1,883
2,001
277
761
1,582
1,880
2,671
2,878
Departmental Group

 
Annex

227
Table 5 – Administration Costs
The total Administration Budget across all years has changed since the last 
Departmental Report. This is mainly due to the removal of most of the Climate Change 
responsibilities on the formation of DECC. Other small changes include the transfer of 
the Chemicals Regulation Directorate (formerly known as the Pesticides Safety 
Directorate) to the Health and Safety Executive.
The total administration expenditure and total administration income from 2009/10 
onwards have both decreased significantly. This change, which doesn’t affect the total 
net administration budget, was agreed with HMT to ensure that internal income 
between the core Department and executive agencies is not included on a gross basis 
within the Estimate.
The total Administration Budget shows a downward trend towards 2010/11, reflecting 
the 5% reduction required by CSR07.
Table 5 Administration Costs
£’000
2003/04  2004/05  2005/06  2006/07  2007/08  2008/09  2009/10  2010/11  2011/12 
Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Estimated 
Plans
Plans
Plans
Outturn
Administration Expenditure
Paybill
217,439
228,870
241,284
239,171
227,429
217,316
Other
320,617
308,891
330,402
364,227
373,457
303,692
Total administration expenditure
538,056
537,761
571,686
603,398
600,886
521,008
425,055
392,184

Administration income
–223,909 –199,600 –216,051 –246,562 –255,290 –215,028 –120,759
–93,847

Total administration budget
314,147
338,161
355,635
356,836
345,596
305,980
304,296
298,337

Analysis by activity
A Healthy Natural Environment
26,409
24,719
26,332
31,629
23,130
25,389
26,741
28,630

Sustainable Consumption and 
5,584
7,187
10,871
8,891
9,040
5,371
5,089
7,380

Production
Addressing Environmental Risk and 
50,387
46,980
50,386
54,911
18,267
19,323
16,932
29,133

Emergencies
A Thriving Farming and Food Sector
32,031
32,972
46,093
41,513
31,647
22,559
23,525
30,756

Championing Sustainable 
1,783
2,905
8,024
7,290
1,939
3,115
1,595
1,141

Development
Strong Rural Communities
6,658
5,910
9,899
3,525
4,178
1,790
1,734
3,403

A Respected Department
179,778
202,677
186,255
189,192
250,555
221,559
220,615
189,300

Adapting to Climate Change
9,814
13,076
15,258
17,659
5,121
2,071
6,350
6,987

A Sustainable, Secure and Healthy 
1,703
1,735
2,517
2,226
1,719
4,803
1,715
1,607

Food Supply
Total administration budget
314,147
338,161
355,635
356,836
345,596
305,980
304,296
298,337


228 Departmental Report 2009
Table 6 Staff Numbers
2002/03
2003/04
2004/05
2005/06
2006/07
2007/08
2008/09
2009/10
Actual
Actual
Actual
Actual
Actual
Actual
Actual
Plans
Department for Environment,   CS FTEs 
10,034 
10,132 
9,732 
9,326 
8,604(4)      8,572 
7,734 (6)       7,553 (8)
Food and Rural Affairs
Overtime
245 
174 
144 
209 
194
224 
136 
126 
(Gross Control Area) (2)
Casuals (1)
925 
642 
775 
1,004 
670
223 
89 
88 
TOTAL
11,204 
10,948 
10,651 
10,539 
9,468 
9,019 
7,959 
7,767 
Veterinary Laboratories Agency  CS FTEs
1,244 
1,303 
1,244 
1,210 
1,226 
1,201 
1,164 
1,160 
(Net Control Area)
Overtime
26 
25 
35 
35 
34 
34 
34 
30 
Casuals (1)
36
32
17
20
24
29
16
10
TOTAL
1,306 
1,360 
1,296 
1,265 
1,284 
1,264 
1,214 
1,200 
Food and Environment
CS FTEs
642 
646 
644 
635 
628
630
611
868
Research Agency
Overtime







12 
(Net Control Area) (7)
Casuals (1)
47
32
41
44
52
28
15
18
TOTAL
697 
686 
693 
687 
688 
665 
635 
898 
Veterinary Medicines
CS FTEs
116 
124 
125 
128 
136
135 
137 
149 
Directorate 
Overtime
1
1
0
1
1
1
1
1
(Net Control Area)
Casuals (1)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
TOTAL
117 
125 
125 
129 
137 
136 
138 
150 
CEFAS
CS FTEs
514 
521 
515 
504 
533
520 
522 
509 
(Net Control Area)
Overtime
15
12
12
13
12
11
11
12
Casuals (1)
7
7
2
5
1
0
0
0
TOTAL
536 
540 
529 
522 
546 
531 
533 
521 
Pesticide Safety Directorate
CS FTEs
182 (3)         191 
181
178 (5)     
(Net Control Area)
Overtime
0
1
0
0
Casuals (1)
8
7
7
2
TOTAL


190 
199 
188 
180 


TOTAL Defra
13,860 
13,659 
13,484 
13,341 
12,311 
11,795 
10,479 
10,536 
(1)  The outturn and estimated figures include casuals filling vacant permanent posts.
(2)   Gross Control Area includes core-Defra, PSD (from 1 April 1993 to 31 March 2004), RPA (from 16 October 2001), Animal Health 
(from 1 April 2005 (named State Veterinary Service until 31 March 2007)), MFA (from 1 October 2005) and GDS (from 1 October 2005 
to 31 March 2009).
(3)  PSD became a Net Control Agency from 1 April 2004.
(4)   The Rural Development Service (RDS) transferred from Defra to Natural England on 1 October 2006.
(5)   PSD transferred to the Health and Safety Executive on 1 April 2008.
(6)   Approximately 320 Defra staff transferred to the newly-created Department of Energy and Climate Change on 3 October 2008 and 
46 Defra staff transferred to the Sustainable Development Commission NDPB on 1 February 2009.
(7)   Fera was created on 1 April 2009 from CSL, GDS and 170 staff from core-Defra.
(8)   The planned figure for 2009/10 for the Defra GCA is an estimate which will vary depending on the available budget, turnover and the 
needs of the business. 170 staff transferred to Fera and 60 staff transferred to Interserve (Facilities Management) Ltd under TUPE on 1 April 
2009.

 
Annex

229
Table 7, 8, 9 – Regional tables
Please note, Tables 7, 8 and 9 are consistent with the Pre-Budget Report. The tables 
include spending that now forms a part of the newly formed DECC.
Tables 7, 8 and 9 show analyses of the department’s spending by country and region, 
and by function. The data presented in these tables are consistent with the country and 
regional analyses (CRA) published by HM Treasury in Chapter 9 of Public Expenditure 
Statistical Analyses (PESA) 2009. The figures were taken from the HM Treasury public 
spending database in December 2008 and the regional distributions were completed in 
January and February 2009. Therefore the tables may not show the latest position and 
are not consistent with other tables in the Departmental Report.
The analyses are set within the overall framework of Total Expenditure on Services (TES). 
TES broadly represents the current and capital expenditure of the public sector, with 
some differences from the national accounts measure Total Managed Expenditure. The 
tables show the central government and public corporation elements of TES. They 
include current and capital spending by the Department and its NDPBs, and public 
corporations’ capital expenditure, but do not include capital finance to public 
corporations. They do not include payments to local authorities or local authorities own 
expenditure.
TES is a near-cash measure of public spending. The tables do not include depreciation, 
cost of capital charges, or movements in provisions that are in departmental budgets. 
They do include pay, procurement, capital expenditure, grants and subsidies to 
individuals and private sector enterprises. Further information on TES can be found in 
Appendix E of PESA 2009.
The data are based on a subset of spending identifiable expenditure on services which 
is capable of being analysed as being for the benefit of individual countries and regions. 
Expenditure that is incurred for the benefit of the UK as a whole is excluded.
Across government, most expenditure is not planned or allocated on a regional basis. 
Social security payments, for example, are paid to eligible individuals irrespective of 
where they live. Expenditure on other programmes is allocated by looking at how all 
the projects across the Department’s area of responsibility, usually England, compare. So 
the analyses show the regional outcome of spending decisions that on the whole have 
not been made primarily on a regional basis.
The functional analyses of spending in Table 9 are based on the United Nations 
Classification of the Functions of Government (COFOG), the international standard. The 
presentations of spending by function are consistent with those used in chapter 9 of PESA 
2009. These are not the same as the strategic priorities shown elsewhere in the report.

230 Departmental Report 2009
Table 7: Defra’s identifiable expenditure on services, by country and region
£ million
2003/04
2004/05
2005/06
2006/07
2007/08
2008‑09
2009/10 2010/11
Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn
Plans
Plans
Plans
North East
273.6
287.1
301.2
296.1
274.0
302.4
298.4
292.4
North West
558.8
581.6
603.2
602.2
601.0
628.6
626.1
604.7
Yorkshire and The Humber
540.5
605.3
610.9
594.7
562.0
600.1
609.2
594.3
East Midlands
640.1
693.4
737.2
656.0
573.5
611.0
609.8
604.5
West Midlands
437.8
481.7
528.7
530.9
494.8
523.3
541.3
527.3
East
594.7
687.1
700.4
699.8
715.5
730.6
721.7
723.7
London
318.5
412.5
228.6
241.5
211.5
250.3
283.8
307.4
South East
514.9
553.6
541.8
544.8
573.2
621.6
622.4
623.7
South West
852.8
933.8
1,077.3
975.1
921.4
984.7
994.0
993.5
Total England
4,731.7
5,236.2
5,329.2
5,141.1
4,926.9
5,252.4
5,306.7
5,271.3
Scotland
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Wales
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Northern Ireland
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total UK identifiable expenditure
4,731.7
5,236.2
5,329.2
5,141.1
4,926.9
5,252.4
5,306.7
5,271.3
Outside UK
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total identifiable expenditure
4,731.7
5,236.2
5,329.2
5,141.1
4,926.9
5,252.4
5,306.7
5,271.3
Non-identifiable expenditure
118.8
98.3
129.1
211.4
208.3
280.0
279.4
278.6
Total expenditure on services
4,850.5
5,334.5
5,458.3
5,352.5
5,135.2
5,532.4
5,586.2
5,549.9

 
Annex

231
Table 8: Defra’s identifiable expenditure on services, by country and region, per head
£’s per head
2003/04
2004/05
2005/06
2006/07
2007/08
2008/09
2009/10
2010/11
Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn Outturn
Plans
Plans
Plans
North East
108
113
118
116
107
118
116
113
North West
82
85
88
88
88
91
90
87
Yorkshire and The Humber
108
120
120
116
109
115
115
112
East Midlands
150
162
170
150
130
137
136
133
West Midlands
82
90
99
99
92
97
99
96
East
109
125
126
125
126
128
125
124
London
43
56
31
32
28
33
37
40
South East
64
68
66
66
69
74
74
74
South West
170
185
212
190
178
189
189
187
Total England
95
104
106
101
96
102
102
101
Scotland
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Wales
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Northern Ireland
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total UK identifiable expenditure
79
87
88
85
81
86
86
85

232 Departmental Report 2009
Table 9: Defra’s identifiable expenditure on services by function, country and region,  
for 2007/08
North East
North 
Yorkshire  
East 
West 
East
London
South East
South  England
Scotland
Wales Northern 
UK  OUTSIDE 
Total 
Not 
£’s 
West
and   Midlands Midlands
West
Ireland
Identifiable 
UK
Identifiable  Identifiable Millions Totals
The Humber
expenditure
expenditure
ENVIRONMENT, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS
Economic affairs
General economic, commercial and labour affairs
6.7
8.2
9.7
8.2
6.0
6.7
1.5
9.0
18.7
74.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
74.9
0.0
74.9
0.0
74.9
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
169.6
318.1
378.5
422.5
340.3
556.4
21.8
429.8
671.0
3,307.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
3,307.9
0.0
3,307.9
–1.2
3,306.6
of which: market support under CAP
123.7
220.1
268.1
312.4
230.8
389.8
4.0
329.8
444.3
2,323.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
2,323.0
0.0
2,323.0
0.6
2,323.6
of which: other agriculture, food and 
43.2
92.6
104.4
102.1
103.6
157.5
17.1
92.0
216.6
929.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
929.2
0.0
929.2
0.0
929.2
fisheries policy
of which:
 forestry
2.7
5.4
6.0
7.9
5.8
9.1
0.6
7.9
10.1
55.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
55.6
0.0
55.6
–1.8
53.8
R&D economic affairs
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1
1.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
1.3
0.0
1.3
11.1
12.4
Total economic affairs
176.4
326.5
388.4
430.8
346.4
563.3
23.5
438.9
689.8
3,384.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
3,384.0
0.0
3,384.0
9.9
3,393.9
Environment protection
Waste management
6.6
18.1
17.9
15.9
19.7
14.0
25.4
24.7
21.0
163.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
163.2
0.0
163.2
0.0
163.2
Waste water management
–0.7
–1.9
–2.1
–2.5
–1.9
–3.2
–0.8
–2.3
–2.7
–18.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
–18.0
0.0
–18.0
0.0
–18.0
Pollution abatement
25.9
42.2
16.6
7.4
5.6
5.4
8.8
6.1
25.4
143.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
143.3
0.0
143.3
0.0
143.3
Protection of biodiversity and landscape
4.5
13.0
15.0
18.6
13.7
23.4
4.2
15.8
19.5
127.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
127.5
0.0
127.5
198.4
325.9
Environment protection n.e.c.
61.7
204.3
127.0
103.9
112.2
113.4
151.6
91.1
169.1
1,134.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
1,134.3
0.0
1,134.3
0.0
1,134.3
Total environment protection
98.0
275.5
174.3
143.3
149.2
153.0
189.3
135.5
232.3
1,550.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
1,550.3
0.0
1,550.3
198.4
1,748.7
Housing and community amenities
Water supply
–0.4
–1.1
–0.8
–0.7
–0.8
–0.9
–1.2
–1.3
–0.8
–7.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
–7.9
0.0
–7.9
0.0
–7.9
Total housing and Community amenities
–0.4
–1.1
–0.8
–0.7
–0.8
–0.9
–1.2
–1.3
–0.8
–7.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
–7.9
0.0
–7.9
0.0
–7.9
Education (includes training)
Pre-primary and Primary education
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.5
Total education (includes training)
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.5
TOTAL FOR ENVIRONMENT, FOOD AND 
274.0
601.0
562.0
573.5
494.8
715.5
211.5
573.2
921.4
4,926.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
4,926.9
0.0
4,926.9
208.3
5,135.2
RURAL AFFAIRS

 
Annex

233
Table 9: Defra’s identifiable expenditure on services by function, country and region,  
for 2007/08
North East
North 
Yorkshire  
East 
West 
East
London
South East
South  England
Scotland
Wales Northern 
UK  OUTSIDE 
Total 
Not 
£’s 
West
and   Midlands Midlands
West
Ireland
Identifiable 
UK
Identifiable  Identifiable Millions Totals
The Humber
expenditure
expenditure
ENVIRONMENT, FOOD AND RURAL AFFAIRS
Economic affairs
General economic, commercial and labour affairs
6.7
8.2
9.7
8.2
6.0
6.7
1.5
9.0
18.7
74.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
74.9
0.0
74.9
0.0
74.9
Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting
169.6
318.1
378.5
422.5
340.3
556.4
21.8
429.8
671.0
3,307.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
3,307.9
0.0
3,307.9
–1.2
3,306.6
of which: market support under CAP
123.7
220.1
268.1
312.4
230.8
389.8
4.0
329.8
444.3
2,323.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
2,323.0
0.0
2,323.0
0.6
2,323.6
of which: other agriculture, food and 
43.2
92.6
104.4
102.1
103.6
157.5
17.1
92.0
216.6
929.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
929.2
0.0
929.2
0.0
929.2
fisheries policy
of which:
 forestry
2.7
5.4
6.0
7.9
5.8
9.1
0.6
7.9
10.1
55.6
0.0
0.0
0.0
55.6
0.0
55.6
–1.8
53.8
R&D economic affairs
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1
1.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
1.3
0.0
1.3
11.1
12.4
Total economic affairs
176.4
326.5
388.4
430.8
346.4
563.3
23.5
438.9
689.8
3,384.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
3,384.0
0.0
3,384.0
9.9
3,393.9
Environment protection
Waste management
6.6
18.1
17.9
15.9
19.7
14.0
25.4
24.7
21.0
163.2
0.0
0.0
0.0
163.2
0.0
163.2
0.0
163.2
Waste water management
–0.7
–1.9
–2.1
–2.5
–1.9
–3.2
–0.8
–2.3
–2.7
–18.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
–18.0
0.0
–18.0
0.0
–18.0
Pollution abatement
25.9
42.2
16.6
7.4
5.6
5.4
8.8
6.1
25.4
143.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
143.3
0.0
143.3
0.0
143.3
Protection of biodiversity and landscape
4.5
13.0
15.0
18.6
13.7
23.4
4.2
15.8
19.5
127.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
127.5
0.0
127.5
198.4
325.9
Environment protection n.e.c.
61.7
204.3
127.0
103.9
112.2
113.4
151.6
91.1
169.1
1,134.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
1,134.3
0.0
1,134.3
0.0
1,134.3
Total environment protection
98.0
275.5
174.3
143.3
149.2
153.0
189.3
135.5
232.3
1,550.3
0.0
0.0
0.0
1,550.3
0.0
1,550.3
198.4
1,748.7
Housing and community amenities
Water supply
–0.4
–1.1
–0.8
–0.7
–0.8
–0.9
–1.2
–1.3
–0.8
–7.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
–7.9
0.0
–7.9
0.0
–7.9
Total housing and Community amenities
–0.4
–1.1
–0.8
–0.7
–0.8
–0.9
–1.2
–1.3
–0.8
–7.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
–7.9
0.0
–7.9
0.0
–7.9
Education (includes training)
Pre-primary and Primary education
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.5
Total education (includes training)
0.0
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.0
0.1
0.1
0.5
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.5
0.0
0.5
TOTAL FOR ENVIRONMENT, FOOD AND 
274.0
601.0
562.0
573.5
494.8
715.5
211.5
573.2
921.4
4,926.9
0.0
0.0
0.0
4,926.9
0.0
4,926.9
208.3
5,135.2
RURAL AFFAIRS
Printed in the UK by The Stationery Office Limited
on behalf of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office
ID6031854    06/09
Printed on Paper containing 75% recycled fibre content minimum.




Nobel House
17 Smith Square
London SW1P 3JR

www.defra.gov.uk
Defra Departmental Report 2009
Departmental Report
2009
Published by TSO (The Stationery Office) and available from:
Online
www.tsoshop.co.uk

Mail, Telephone Fax & E-Mail
TSO
PO Box 29, Norwich, NR3 1GN
Telephone orders/General enquiries 0870 600 5522
Order through the Parliamentary Hotline Lo-Call 0845 7 023474
To secure a healthy environment in which we and future generations can prosper
Fax orders: 0870 600 5533
E-mail: [email address]
Textphone: 0870 240 3701
www.defra.gov.uk
The Parliamentary Bookshop
12 Bridge Street, Parliament Square,
London SW1A 2JX
Telephone orders/General enquiries 020 7219 3890
Fax orders: 020 7219 3866
Email: [email address]
ISBN 978-0-10-175992-2
Internet: http://www.bookshop.parliament.uk
TSO@Blackwell and other Accredited Agents
Customers can also order publications from
TSO Ireland
16 Arthur Street, Belfast BT1 4GD
9 780101 759922
028 9023 8451 Fax 028 9023 5401