This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'NHB Consultation'.



 
 
 
 
 
 New Homes Bonus Community Fund Review 
 Consultation Results 
 
 February 2016 
 
 
Background 
In 2012, Cheshire West and Chester Council (CWAC) made a decision to pay 20% of its New 
Homes Bonus funding directly to its town and parish councils and to create a funding pot for 
unparished areas which could be called upon through an application process. In light of the 
significant financial challenges the council is facing, it is proposing to cease this discretionary 
payment from April 2016.  Therefore the council consulted with its town and parish councils, 
ward Members and residents to seek their views.  Views could be sent in via an online survey, 
paper questionnaire, email or letter.  The consultation closed on 5 February 2016 and this report 
summarises the results of all responses which will inform the decision on this matter. 
 
Key Messages 
  116 people completed the online survey; 87% said they were local residents and 28% town 
and parish councillors. A further 27 specific town and parish council questionnaires were 
received, along with 39 comments by letter, email or telephone.  In total, 54 town and parish 
councils took part in the consultation along with 7 other organisations 
  The majority of respondents (94%) disagreed with the proposal to cease the discretionary 
payment of 20% of New Homes Bonus (NHB) to town and parish councils from April 2016 
  The main reasons for disagreement: 
  A strong feeling that communities who have to live through the disruption of new building 
and increased demand on local services, should benefit from the NHB to meet their 
increased needs.  They object to the centralisation of funding as they feel ‘locals know 
best’ and that the needs of rural areas are often overlooked even though they suffer 
deprivation too 
  Many town and parish councils said that removing the discretionary NHB funding 
contradicts the purpose and intent of the NHB which is to “improve the quality of life for 
the community” 
  That parishes which have approved new build on the assumption that they would get the 
NHB feel let down and so it could negatively impact on future relationships with CWAC 
  That it’s a small amount in the context of the CWAC budget but a big loss for towns and 
parishes, some of whom had made financial commitments, some with CWAC, on the 
assumption of retaining the NHB over the next few years  
  Some raised matched funding with it, which could well be lost as a result of withdrawing 
the NHB and so felt it is a false economy 
 
 
 


 
  The main reasons for agreement (6%) were that CWAC needed to make savings wherever it 
could and that it had a better overview of where funds needed targeting across the borough 
  Many felt they were not in informed enough to make suggestions for other ways of 
addressing the budget deficit.  However some suggested increasing council tax, reducing 
expenditure on councillors, reviewing the salaries of higher paid staff and looking for further 
efficiencies such as amalgamating with other local authorities.  Some of these were already 
being considered as part of the council’s wider Let’sTalk consultation 
  A few suggested that if the NHB was withdrawn it should be done in a phased manner, or 
alternatively, the percentage given could be reduced rather than withdrawn completely 
  There was strong support for CWAC to work in partnership with town and parish councils, 
but many wanted better communication and engagement between them so that the views of 
local people were listened to. There was some support for the idea of district/area 
committees and working in partnership with relevant agencies. 
 
1: Detailed Results  
1.1: Views about ceasing the discretionary New Homes Bonus 
 
116 people completed the online survey or the paper equivalent.  27 specific town and parish 
council questionnaires, which were sent to all town and parish councils in the borough, were 
received, along with 39 comments by letter, email or telephone.   
 
Respondents were asked for their views about ceasing the discretionary payment of 20% of the 
New Homes Bonus to town and parish councils and to unparished areas from April 2016.  This 
had been proposed by Cheshire West and Chester Council (CWAC) as one way to address its 
current financial challenges. 
 
Figure 1.1: Percentage of respondents who agreed or disagreed with the proposal 
 
 

% who agree or disagree with ceasing the 
 
 
discretionary New Homes Bonus from 2016-17 
 
 
 
Disagree
94% 
 
 
 
 
Agree
6% 
 
 
 
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
 
Base for %: 170  
    
 
 
 
 
 



 
  The chart above shows that the majority of respondents (94%) disagreed with the proposal 
to cease the discretionary payment of 20% of the New Homes Bonus (NHB) from April 2016.  
 
Reasons given for disagreeing with the proposal: 
o  There was strong feeling that the NHB is money that should be kept locally for local 
projects and improvements and for the communities directly affected by the building of 
houses (and not spread across the borough).  Many of the town and parish councils who 
responded said that removing the NHB funding contradicts the purpose and intent of the 
NHB which is to “improve the quality of life for the community” 
o  Many claimed that house building had been disruptive, stressful and noisy and that the 
NHB was compensation for this. Some plans had only been supported because of the 
incentive of the NHB.  Withdrawing the NHB was seen as unfair and an unwelcome 
attempt to solve the council’s financial problems by taking money from parishes.  Some 
stressed that town and parish councils had funding issues too 
o  Many respondents said that as a result of the influx of residents and new home building, 
there was an increased need for infrastructure and facilities. Therefore the NHB helps to 
fund this and vital improvements and projects. Some people did not feel that CWAC had 
put sufficient infrastructure in place for the new homes 
o  Many felt that town and parish councils are better placed to know where the money 
should be allocated, as they have local knowledge and are aware of the issues or vision 
for their area.  Many had produced Parish Plans or Neighbourhood Plans and were using 
the NHB to achieve their aims. They can also use NHB to attract matched funding for 
projects which brings more money into the area 
o  Some said that CWAC is taking money from local communities and adding it to the ‘big 
pot’. There is opposition to the perceived ‘centralisation’ and administration of funding.  
They also felt that the loss of the NHB would have a significant effect on parishes but a 
miniscule effect on balancing the CWAC budget 
o  Some stressed that it is important that communities feel they have a voice and are 
listened to. They felt that the needs of rural communities, including deprivation, were 
often overlooked  
o  The NHB has come to be relied upon and future plans have been made based on 
communities receiving it. Some said that without the NHB many projects would not have 
been completed and two parish councils said that they had loans from CWAC based on 
the assumption that NHB funds could be used to pay them back. There were also 
concerns that without the NHB, updating current resources would not be possible as they 
could not afford the upkeep. 
 
  6% of respondents agreed with the proposal and their reasons were:   
o  CWAC needs to make significant savings 
o  The NHB needs to be centralised so that it can be targeted towards the most vulnerable 
communities across the borough and not just to areas where there are opportunities for 
development. 
 
 
 



 
1.2: Suggestions about other ways that Cheshire West and Chester Council 
could make savings 

Respondents who had disagreed with the proposal were asked for their suggestions as to how 
CWAC could make savings to the value of the discretionary aspect of the NHB (estimated to be 
£1.4m).  These suggestions would need to be in excess of those already detailed in the 
council’s Let’s Talk consultation which was running at a similar time to this consultation. 
Comments included: 
o  Many said they could not make any suggestions because they were not in full 
possession of the facts about finances to make an informed decision.  They thought that  
CWAC was ‘passing the buck’ trying to get the public to find a solution to the financial 
issues, when the responsibility for this lies with CWAC 
o  Some respondents requested a rise in council tax to provide the shortfall 
o  A number of respondents suggested reducing the number of councillors and reviewing 
their expenses and basic allowances. Two suggested reducing expenditure on mayors 
o  A broad range of other measures were identified , mainly relating to efficiencies – for 
example, cutting staff, salary reductions for senior managers and more efficient working 
practices 
o  A range of other solutions were suggested: amalgamating the Cheshire local authorities, 
lobbying the government for more money, devolving more services to local communities, 
outsourcing, boosting tourism and selling assets.  One suggested that the Community 
Infrastructure Levy (CIL) could bring in more funding than the NHB 
o  There were some calls for more consultation with communities and the importance of 
publicising the proposal to remove NHB more widely before any decision is made 
o  Some asked for a compromise and reluctantly suggested reducing the percentage of 
NHB to10% or 5% instead of withdrawing it altogether; or possibly phasing in the 
proposal over time to give town and parish councils time to amend their future plans. 
 
1.3: Suggestions about how CWAC and Town and Parish Councils can work 
together in future 

The questionnaire that was sent directly to town and parish councils had an extra question that 
asked for their views on how they and CWAC can continue to work together for the benefit of 
communities. Comments included: 
o  The need to build upon the close relationships with local councillors.  Some emphasised 
the importance of listening to local communities and town and parish councils and the 
need to consult these parties more extensively before decisions are made. Some 
claimed that local people and parish councils were best placed to know the ambitions of 
residents and therefore where money is best spent  
o  Some support for the idea of district/area committees and working in partnership with 
relevant agencies. A suggestion was made for regular liaison sessions to take place for 
appropriate parties to consider what functions could be better provided by alternative 
bodies 
 
 



 
o  That CWAC should assist in resolving local issues flagged up by parishes. CWAC should 
provide support to help local parishes meet the needs of their individual and unique 
communities and give full recognition to Neighbourhood Plans 
o  A variety of other proposals and ideas ranging from financial issues (ensuring processes 
were inclusive and transparent, raising precepts, etc.) through to ensuring more practical 
support (advice regarding planning, website templates, etc.). 
 
1.4: General comments 
Respondents were asked if they had any other comments about the proposal. 
Comments from respondents who disagreed with the proposal: 
o  Most of the comments re-emphasised the opinions they had already expressed 
o  Many restated concerns that local communities would be significantly and negatively 
impacted by the removal of the NHB. They felt that withdrawing the NHB would alienate 
parishes and reinforce the view that rural areas are overlooked.  They felt that CWAC 
should be working more closely with local communities 
o  Some respondents re-emphasised how the NHB had helped fund projects in their 
community and parishes, citing specific examples. There was concern that without the 
continued funding the NHB provides, certain enterprises risk being unsustainable in 
future. There was fear that further cuts to services would reduce the quality of life for 
residents and felt withdrawal of the NHB was a false economy 
o  Some respondents said that the council needed to find other ways of addressing their 
budget issues such as raising council tax or making savings as detailed in section 1.2. 
 
Comments from the respondents who agreed with the proposal: 
o  One said that parish councils are free to raise their precept if they can justify it 
o  One commented that the cuts were the result of central government decisions made in 
the recent past. 
 
 
1.5: E-petition 
The Council recognises that there is an ongoing e-petition in place in relation to this subject 
matter. As of 5 February 2016, when the consultation closed, 1,039 people had signed the e-
petition. The results of the e-petition will of course be considered, however, given the other 
opportunities people have had to respond, the Council does not believe this will have a material 
impact on its final decision. 
 
 
 



 
2: Profile of Respondents 
116 respondents completed the online survey.  They were asked in what capacity they had 
responded and the chart below shows the responses of the 104 respondents who answered this 
question.  They could choose more than one option. 
 
Figure 2.1: Type of respondent 
 
 
Type of respondent 
 
 
A local resident
87% 
 
 
A local business person
4% 
 
 
Employee of CWAC
3% 
 
 
Elected Member of CWAC
3% 
 
 
Elected Town and Parish Councillor
28% 
 
Member of voluntary/community
20% 
 
organisation
 
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Base for %: 104  
 
   
 
 
 
              Please note that the % will sum to more than 100% as more than one option could be selected 
 
 
  Most (87%) of the respondents said they were local residents 
  Over a quarter (28%) said they were an elected town or parish councillor and they were 
asked to name their parish if they were replying on its behalf 
  A fifth (20%) of respondents said they were a member of a voluntary and community 
organisation and they were asked to name it if they were replying on its behalf 
  Through all the different methods that people could use, a total of 54 town and parish 
councils took part in the consultation and seven other organisations were also represented. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 





 
Figure 2.2: Postcodes of respondents 
 
Almost 100 respondents to the online survey detailed their home postcode and these are shown 
on the map below.  As can be seen, respondents came from across the borough. The purple 
dots represent those who disagreed with the proposal and the green dots are those who agreed 
with it.     
  
 
3: Next steps 
The information from this report will be used to inform the council’s decision on this proposal. 
 
 







 
 
Accessing Cheshire West and Chester Council  
information and services. 
 
Council information is also available in audio, braille, 
large print or other formats. If you would like a copy 
in a different format, in another language or require 
a British Sign Language interpreter, please email us 
at: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
 
Telephone: 0300 123 8 123 
Textphone: 18001 01606 867 670 
Email: xxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
Web: www.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk 
If you would like further information about this report or other JSNA products,  
please contact Strategic Intelligence 
 
Telephone:  01244 972176 
Email: xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
Strategic Intelligence, HQ, 58 Nicholas Street, Chester CH1 2NP 
 
Access JSNA products onlinwww.cheshirewestandchester.gov.uk/jsna