This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Full Approval for Norwich NDR'.


 

 
 
Norfolk County Council 
 
 
Extraordinary Meeting 
 
 
 
Date:   
Wednesday 2 September 2015 
 
 
 
Time:   
10.00 a.m 
 
 
 
Venue: 
Council Chamber, County Hall, Norwich 
 
Persons attending the meeting are requested to turn off mobile phones. 
 
This meeting may be recorded for subsequent publication via the Council’s internet 
site – at the start of the meeting the Chairman will confirm if all or part of the meeting 
is being recorded. You should be aware that the Council is a Data Controller under 
the Data Protection Act. Data collected during this recording will be retained in 
accordance with the Council’s Records Management Policy.  
 
 
Under the Council’s protocol on the use of media equipment at meetings held 
in public, this meeting may be filmed, recorded or photographed. Anyone who 
wishes to do so must inform the Chairman and ensure that it is done in a 
manner clearly visible to anyone present. The wishes of any individual not to be 
recorded or filmed must be appropriately respected. 
 
 
 
Prayers 
To Call the Roll 

AGENDA 
 
1. 
To receive any announcements from the Chairman 
 
 
 
2. 
Members to Declare any Interests 
 
 
 
 
 
If you have a Disclosable Pecuniary Interest in a matter to be 
 
 
considered at the meeting and that interest is on your Register 
 
 
of Interests you must not speak or vote on the matter.  It is 
 
 
recommended that you declare that interest but it is not a legal 
 
 
requirement. 
 
1


 
 
 
 
 
If you have a Disclosable Pecuniary Interest in a matter to be 
 
 
considered at the meeting and that interest is not on your 
 
 
Register of Interests you must declare that interest at the 
 
 
meeting and not speak or vote on the matter.   
 
 
 
 
 
In either case you may remain in the room where the meeting is 
 
 
taking place.  If you consider that it would be inappropriate in 
 
 
the circumstances to remain in the room, you may leave the 
 
 
room while the matter is dealt with.   
 
 
 
 
 
If you do not have a Disclosable Pecuniary Interest you may 
 
 
nevertheless have an Other Interest in a matter to be discussed 
 
 
if it affects: 
 
 
 
 
 
- your well being or financial position 
 
 
- that of your family or close friends 
 
 
- that of a club or society in which you have a management role 
 
 
- that of another public body of which you are a member to a 
 
 
greater extent than others in your ward.  
 
 
 
 
 
If that is the case then you must declare such an interest but 
 
 
can speak and vote on the matter. 
 
 
 
 
3. 
Norwich Northern Distributor Road Budget 
 
 
 
 
 
Report of the Executive Director of Communities and 
Page 3 
 
Environmental Services and the Executive Director of Finance 
 
 
 
Chris Walton 
Head of Democratic Services 
County Hall 
Martineau Lane 
Norwich 
NR1 2DH 
 
Date Agenda Published:  24 August 2015 
 
 
For further details and general enquiries about this Agenda please contact the 
Assistant Head of Democratic Services:  Greg Insull on 01603 223100 or email 
xxxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
 
 
If you need this agenda in large print, audio, Braille, alternative 
format or in a different language please contact Greg Insull: Tel: 
01603 223100. Minicom 01603 223833 or Email: 
  xxxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xx and we will do our best to help 
 
 
 
2

 
County Council 
Item No 3 
 
Report title: 
Norwich Northern Distributor Road Budget 
Date of meeting: 
02 September 2015  
Responsible Chief 
Tom McCabe (Executive Director CES) 
Officer: 
Simon George (Executive Director Finance) 
Strategic impact  
 
The Northern Distributor Road (NDR) is an essential piece of transport infrastructure that 
releases an estimated £1bn of economic benefits for Norwich and Norfolk by reducing 
congestion and offering new access to key strategic employment and growth locations.  
 
This report updates Members on the final target cost for the scheme and asks Members 
to approve a mechanism to fund a budget shortfall of £29.9m. 
 
 
Executive summary 
The NDR is an important opportunity for NCC to deliver on its aspiration of good 
infrastructure that enables growth through housing and jobs that will be a powerful boost 
for the economy of Norfolk.  It draws on significant funding from Government and from 
pooled Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) contributions from district partners in 
recognition of the economic benefits to the area.  However the scale of the project is such 
that this still represents a heavy capital investment for NCC. 
The final target cost process has resulted in a shortfall in funds of £29.9m.   
The Department for Transport (DfT) and the New Anglia Local Enterprise Partnership 
(LEP) have both indicated their intent to contribute £10m each, leaving the County 
Council to find up to £10m to enable the project to commence, as planned, this autumn. 
Recommendations: 
Members are asked to: 
 
1. 
Accept the funding proposals from DfT and the LEP and confirm an NCC 
contribution of up to £9.9m to meet the budget shortfall; 

2. 
Approve the funding mechanism set out in paragraph 2.8 to deliver the 
additional funds of up to £9.9m to support the NDR and approve an 
adjustment to the 2015-18 capital programme to reflect the additional budget 
requirement and funding as set out in this report. 

3. 
Subject to the approval by DfT of the NDR ‘full approval’ submission, the 
Council confirms the award of the Stage 2 construction works to Balfour 
Beatty, to set the project in motion for an anticipated October 2015 start. 

 
 
3

1.  
Funding position  
 
1.1 
The NDR has completed the statutory processes necessary for the construction 
phase to commence, subject to finalising funding. The background to the recent 
NDR statutory processes and the strategic importance of delivering the NDR are 
included in Appendix A.  This report sets out the budget required to deliver the 
NDR and options to consider the funding shortfall. 
 
1.2 
The construction cost of the NDR has been developed with Balfour Beatty Civils 
Ltd (BB), the main contractor already appointed.  The contract is a two stage 
contract, with Stage 2 only awarded if approval is given to the ‘target cost’ 
developed for the works. 
 
1.3 
The original budget figures for the NDR construction costs were provided by the 
contractor in 2013 and used during the Examination in Public (EiP) process.  
Since completion of the EiP in December 2014, continued and more detailed 
work has been undertaken to finalise the ultimate design and develop the 
construction ‘target cost’ for the project with BB. The previously reported budget 
is shown at Appendix B.  The target cost process for the project was concluded 
with BB on Thursday 6 August 2015 and details were then reported to Members 
during w/c Monday 10 August 2015. 
 
1.4 
The final target cost of the NDR construction work is now £26.4m more than 
expected, a significant part of an overall budget increase of £29.9m. The main 
reason for this is high construction inflation in the last two years, a direct result of 
the two-year delay to reconfirm approval of the scheme (in December 2011).  
 
 
1.5 
There are also some additional items that have arisen during the Development 
Consent process and higher specifications that must be met for drainage and 
other items including wildlife and environmental measures.  Many of these were 
as a consequence of agreeing details with the statutory environmental 
organisations.  These have all increased the cost of the work required and details 
are set out in section 2 of this report. 
 
 
1.6 
Since the shortfall emerged, officers have been working to find a solution which 
included discussions with the DfT and the New Anglia LEP.  As a result, both 
DFT and the LEP have indicated intention to each provide a £10m contribution.  
This collaborative approach to resolve the shortfall is very welcome and much 
appreciated, and clear recognition of the strategic importance of the project to the 
East Anglia region.  
 
 
1.7 
However, this means there is up to a £10m shortfall.  The County Council now 
needs to determine how to deal with the shortfall, on the assumption that 
Members are committed to the project. 
 
4

 
 
 
2.  

Financial Implications 
 
2.1 
Key changes to the project costs have emerged following further work on 
developing the target cost since completion of the Examination in Public, with a 
resulting increase of £29.9m.  These are set out in more detail in Appendix C
but are summarised in this table: 
 
  
2013 
2015 
Notes 
(£m) 
(£m) 
Construction Cost  77.8 
104.2 
These figures represent the budget pricing 
provided by Balfour Beatty (BB), and include 
significant value engineering.  The £104.2m 
figure is based on final target cost details 
from BB. 
 
Statutory 
8.7 
8.3 
Further detailed work has enabled a reduced 
Undertakers 
budget allocation for utility diversion works. 
 
Land Cost 
16.2 
17.2 
Land costs have increased as a 
consequence of additional project timescales 
and an increase in development which has 
inflated land values. 
 
Preparation, Risk 
18.0 
19.75 
This includes fees, risk and contingency 
and Contingency 
allowances.  It includes an increase due to 
additional fees associated with the DCO 
process. 
 
Supervision Cost 
1.1 
1.3 
Slightly increased costs following a review 
and allowing for laboratory staffing. 
 
Total NDR Budget 
121.85  150.75   
 
Postwick Hub 
26.7 
27.7 
£1.0m cost increase due to additional work 
largely due to specification/ legislative 
changes.  This is the out-turn cost expected 
at completion of works. 
 
Total Budget 
148.55  178.45   
 
 
2.2 
The significant reasons for the change in construction costs are provided in the 
following table: 
5

 
Change 
Comments 
Road Construction 
A major upturn in the construction sector and increase in the 
Inflation 
prices received in 2015 from the supply chain compared 
 
with the budget figures developed late 2012/early 2013.  
£16.4m 
Independent analysis, discussed in more detail below, 
indicates inflation impacts in this period could be up to 20%.  
The BB target price reflects a construction cost increase of 
around 18.7%. 
 
Design Development 
Includes additional items not within the original BB 2013 
 
costs, developed in the period ahead of and during the 
£5m 
examination in public.  These include offline junction details, 
archaeological investigation, environmental works and 
supervision, additional fencing and access tracks to reach 
agreement with landowners, and signing and lighting details. 
 
Design Standards 
Includes extensive changes to include: 
 
-  Higher specification bat gantries and bat houses 
£5m 
required to gain permissions through the DCO process 
 
(£1m)   
-  Additional construction constraints (notably at the airport) 
built in as ‘requirements’ in the DCO, resulting in more 
night working and restricted working hours and practices 
(£1.9m) 
-  Increased landscaping areas and landscaping provision 
developed to off-set concerns regarding the 
environmental impact of the NDR (£2m) 
-  Changes to the bridge structures as a result of detailed 
design development (£1m) 
-  Extensive changes to the drainage design as a result of 
further detailed design development and to meet 
Environment Agency requirements (£2m) 
The above equate to £8m, however these costs have been 
part of an extensive ‘value engineering’ process with BB that 
has reduced this to the £5m total shown. 
 
 
 
Construction Inflation 
 
2.3 
The primary reason for the increase in construction cost, not including the design 
changes set out above, is as a result of a major increase in road construction 
industry inflation.  Details setting out the implications of this inflation are included 
in Appendix D.  This includes reference to an independent assessment of 
inflation. 
 
2.4 
Appendix D also sets out the assessment by NCC of the target price provided 
by BB.  It also includes a high level comparison between the A11 dual 
carriageway project (Elveden to 5-ways Roundabout) and the NDR.  This 
provides an indication that the cost per mile for the A11 project was £13.7m, and 
the cost per mile for the NDR is £12.5m. 
6

 
Original Budget 
 
2.5 
The total budget of £148.55m has previously been reported to Cabinet and 
Committee, the details of which are provided in Appendix B.  The existing 
County Council contribution of £20.34m is funded from capital receipts. 
 
2.6 
The Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) is a levy on development.  As part of 
the City Deal, Broadland, Norwich and South Norfolk councils, working with the 
County Council through the Greater Norwich Growth Board, are pooling the 
majority of CIL revenues. At the 17 March 2011 Greater Norwich Development 
Partnership Policy Group meeting it was agreed to use a significant proportion of 
future CIL revenues to establish a shared investment fund to support delivery of 
priority 1 key infrastructure projects and this includes up to £40m of local 
investment for the delivery of the NDR and related measures. 
 
2.7 
In March 2014 the Greater Norwich Growth Board (GNGB) agreed to pool its CIL 
income (not including the neighbourhood element or the proportion retained to 
cover its administrative costs) across greater Norwich to pay for strategic 
infrastructure.  A formal legal agreement is currently being drafted to agree the 
terms of the funding contribution from CIL between the GNGB partners. Further 
details in relation to CIL are shown in Appendix G
 
Consequences for additional funding for NCC 
 
2.8 
The additional £9.9m funding required from NCC to meet the extra cost of the 
NDR project can be provided by contributions from within the Highways and 
Transport Service, made up from the following sources: 
 
-  Funding from 2015/16 can be provided (i.e. in year) to cover the additional 
£1m cost of the Postwick Hub junction works.  This has primarily been made 
available by deferring a large bridge maintenance project to future years.   
-  Funding from reserves previously developed within the Highways Service to 
deliver revenue savings.  £2m can be diverted to support delivery of the NDR. 
-  Funding from a £1.9m per annum contribution from the Highways Capital 
Programme for the next 3 years (£5.7m), and a £1.2m contribution in year 4, 
totalling £6.9m over the period.  
 
2.9 
Officers have explored other options for funding the £9.9m shortfall: 
a) 
Use of un-earmarked capital receipts: There are currently none available. 
The bulk of recent capital receipts have already been hypothecated to the 
existing Council contribution to the NDR (paragraph 2.5 above). 
b) 
Borrowing: Assuming an asset life of 40 years, and the current PWLB 40 
year rate of 3.2%, the annual revenue cost of borrowing £9.9m would be 
£0.564m. This would be an additional cost that would need to be found on 
top of the council’s existing £111m savings target. 
 
2.10  A summary of the cost contributions, based on the revised total project cost is 
provided in the following table: 
 
 
7

 
 
Funding Source 
Total Contribution 
Percentage of Total 
DfT (including additional £10m 
£96.49m 
54.1% 
and £19m Postwick Hub) 
Community Infrastructure Levy 
£40.00m 
22.4% 
(underwritten by NCC) 
NCC (direct funding contribution 
£30.25m 
17.0% 
including additional £9.9m) 
New Anglia LEP (underwritten by 
£10.00m 
5.6% 
NCC) 
Growth Point funds to facilitate 
£ 1.71m 
0.9% 
accelerated housing (previous 
2012 provision) 
Total 
£178.45m 
100% 
 
 
2.11  There are impacts of moving funding from the Highways and Transport capital 
programme and these are set out and discussed in Appendix E.  Whilst it is not 
an ideal situation, officers have worked up options that, on balance are 
considered reasonable given the scale of our continued investment in the 
highway asset. 
 
3.  
Issues and risk management  
 
3.1 
The contract for the NDR was originally awarded in 2009 to Birse Civils Ltd, part 
of the Balfour Beatty parent company.  The BB Majors team were the contract 
leads responsible for delivering the A11 Elveden to 5-ways roundabout Dual 
Carriageway project.  This was delivered on time and to budget. 
 
3.2 
NCC is not obliged to enter into the construction phase of the NDR contract with 
BB.  The contract is structured so there are two stages, with stage 1 being Early 
Contractor Involvement.  Stage 2 is only progressed if both parties can agree a 
target price for the works.  This has been used for the Postwick Hub works. 
 
3.3 
The contract target cost is not a ‘fixed price’ and it can go up or down during the 
construction period.  However the contract is heavily incentivised as both parties 
share the savings if the project is below the target price.  A further incentive is 
being written into the NDR contract to provide a share of any savings made by 
completing the project below the overall budget allocation. 
 
3.4 
Key risks for the project delivery through construction have been identified and 
assessed as part of the development of the target cost and will be assessed by 
DfT as part of their full approval processes.  The NCC budget includes provision 
for around 5% (just over £5m) in construction phase risk and contingency.  This 
compares with the Postwick project, which has seen an increase of £1m (from 
£26.7m to £27.7m), which equates to a 3.75% overall budget increase. 
 
 
3.5 
There has also been significant learning from the delivery of the Postwick Hub 
project.  In planning the delivery of the NDR project, the experience from this is 
being applied and includes the early delivery of utility diversion works, advance 
8


works for archaeology and environmental mitigation, all ahead of the main 
construction works commencing, so that these are not delayed (which adds to 
costs). 
 
Land Compensation Act (1973) 
 
3.6 
Under Part 1 of the Act, compensation can be sought by people who own and 
also occupy certain property that has been reduced in value by physical factors 
caused by the use of a new or altered road but have not had any land acquired 
for the scheme itself.  Details and cost implications of this are included in 
Appendix F.   
 
4.  
Alternatives considered  
 
4.1 
It would be possible for the County Council to re-tender the works to try and 
reduce costs or to decide to stop the scheme. 
4.2 
Given that the NDR is at the point of being able to be delivered, with all statutory 
processes completed and a viable funding package assembled, neither of these 
are considered sensible. 
4.3 
There would be a six month delay with re-tendering and with a high risk that even 
higher costs would be obtained. 
4.4 
Delivery of the NDR will also signal that Norfolk is open for business and is 
investing in the infrastructure necessary to support good jobs, good transport and 
good housing provision, which is fundamental to supporting one of our strategic 
priorities of “putting people first” in everything we do, to improve opportunities 
and wellbeing. All underpinned by our priorities for Norfolk: excellence in 
education, real jobs, good infrastructure and supporting vulnerable people. 
 
Officer Contact 
If you have any questions about matters contained or want to see copies of any 
assessments, eg equality impact assessment, please get in touch with:  
 
If you have any questions about matters contained in this paper please get in touch 
with:  
 
Officer Name: David Allfrey  
Tel No: 01603 223292 
 
Email address: xxxxx.xxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xx 
 
If you need this report in large print, audio, Braille, 
alternative format or in a different language please 
contact 0344 800 8020 or 0344 800 8011 
 
(textphone) and we will do our best to help. 
 
9

 
Appendices 
 


Background and Strategic Implications 

NDR Project Budget from April 2014 Cabinet Report 

NDR Project Cost Comparison 2013 to 2015 

Construction Inflation 

Highways Capital Programme Impacts 

Land Compensation Act (1973) 

CIL Receipts and Draft GNGB Legal Agreement Details 

FAQ’s 
10

Appendix A 
 
Background and Strategic Implications 
 

The baseline budget cost for the project was updated after the 2010 government 
spending review as part of the 2011 DfT ‘Development Pool’ funding process.  
Following NCC’s Development Pool submission in September 2011, DfT 
committed £86.5m overall for the NDR (which included a £19m contribution for 
Postwick Hub, which has already been drawn down from DfT as part of the 
ongoing construction works). 
 

The total project cost figure was set out in the April 2012 Cabinet report as 
£141.5m.  That report included details of the DfT Development Pool submission, 
including costs for an NDR to the A140 junction only, as required by DfT as the 
element of the project they are contributing to.   
 

The project costs also included a budget allocation of £26.7m for Postwick Hub, 
including a £3m NCC contribution toward the access improvements necessary to 
the Park and Ride site, which has been absorbed in the overall NDR budget.  
The £141.5m figure also included a high-level estimate of £40m for a dual 
carriageway from the A140 to the A1067.  
 

The construction costs were checked again during late 2012 by BB, based on 
supply chain pricing.  A budget submission for construction of the NDR to the 
A1067 was £77.8m (not including Postwick), which was consistent with the 
figures in the April 2012 Cabinet Report.  This was received from BB in early 
2013 and was used for the DCO application. 
 

The valuations above were the basis of figures used in the budget profile 
(Appendix B below) that was reported to Cabinet in April 2014, ahead of the 
examination in public.  This included other project changes since April 2012 that 
were also reported to Cabinet and that increased the budget to £148.55m. 
 

The NDR has now completed the statutory processes following an examination in 
public during 2014 and the subsequent approval of the necessary Development 
Consent Order (DCO) by the Secretary of State in June 2015.  The examination 
was conducted by three Inspectors appointed by the Planning Inspectorate on 
behalf of the Secretary of State for Transport.  All aspects of the project were 
thoroughly tested by the Inspectors during the examination, including assessing 
all the key issues raised by objectors to the scheme and all land owners 
impacted by it.  
 

In 2012 Cabinet decided to follow the Nationally Significant Infrastructure Project 
route for approval to provide a fast-track decision making process including a 
single consent – the Development Consent Order.  Whilst there has been some 
increased fee costs (see table in section 3 below) associated with this process, 
which has been very intensive (more than anticipated at the time), this decision 
has been vindicated on the basis that there is now an approved DCO from the 
Secretary of State broadly complete to the timescales set out in 2012. 
 

The evidence base for the NDR has been thoroughly tested during the 
examination in public, with expansive documentation published as part of that 
11

process.  Ultimately the Planning Inspectors, and then the Secretary of State, 
have accepted that the case for the NDR is sound and the DCO has been 
approved as a consequence. 
 

Alternative options to the NDR were also explored, assessed and discussed 
during the examination in public.  The case for the NDR outweighed all 
alternatives that have been considered, which is part of the fundamental test 
undertaken by the Inspectors.  It therefore remains the best overall solution to 
deliver the transport improvements for Norwich that will support the planned for 
growth in housing and employment and provide a link from the trunk road 
network to Norwich airport.  It also provides improved access to north and east 
Norfolk.   
 
10 
A summary of the key objectives of the NDR provided in the evidence base is: 
 
•  Reduce traffic levels, and thereby relieve congestion, on the existing road 
network within the urban area and beyond to the north of the city centre. 
•  Facilitate journeys that are already difficult and congested and require traffic 
to use residential and minor roads that are inappropriate for the type and 
volume of traffic that is currently accommodated. 
•  Provide access to and thereby help to deliver planned and potential areas of 
growth, and enable those areas to be free of the need to incorporate 
provision for extraneous through traffic.  
•  Provide improved transport connections between existing and future areas of 
residential and employment development and with the national strategic road 
network as well as improving connections with Norwich International Airport 
and the wider area of North Norfolk. 
•  Increase the opportunities for improving provision for public transport and 
other sustainable forms of transport and for improving traffic management 
within the City Centre, thereby encouraging modal shift. 
•  Improve traffic related environmental conditions for residents in the northern 
suburbs of Norwich and outlying villages, whilst minimising the adverse 
environmental impact of the NDR. 
 
11 
This now paves the way for the NDR to be built and enables the wider Norwich 
Area Transport Strategy (NATS) improvements, called ‘Transport for Norwich’ 
(TfN), to be fully realised over the next 10 to 15 years.  This will see improved 
transport infrastructure for the Greater Norwich Area including bus, walking, 
cycling. 
 
12 
The provision of TfN infrastructure is vital to improve the quality of life of 
residents and visitors while supporting the local economy. TfN also supports the 
growth required within Broadland, Norwich and South Norfolk as part of the 
adopted Joint Core Strategy (JCS) and City Deal.  Significant growth in 
employment and housing in greater Norwich supports the economy across a 
much wider area of Norfolk. The NDR, and the TfN projects it supports, are 
fundamental transport elements within the JCS that will unlock major areas of 
growth, providing new infrastructure that will support the delivery of at least 8000 
new homes, 140ha of employment land and up to 18,000 new jobs.  It is also an 
essential infrastructure improvement underpinning New Anglia LEP’s Strategic 
Economic Plan.  
 
12

13 
The need for the scale of growth proposed, the locations for growth, and the 
infrastructure required to support it, have been developed over a number of years 
through the local plan process by authorities working in partnership, and tested 
by independent inspectors at a series of public examinations. Failure to deliver 
the NDR, or significant delay, would have a very serious impact on the ability to 
deliver planned growth and require the review of the JCS.  
 
14 
Uncertainty around NDR delivery and the local planning strategy can be 
expected to have a negative impact on investor confidence, and delay or prevent 
the delivery of planned houses and jobs. As the overall need for growth would 
remain, reduced delivery of houses and uncertainty around the delivery of sites 
associated with the NDR would lead to a planning “free for all” as it would have a 
significant impact on the districts’ ability to demonstrate a “5 year land supply” for 
housing. In the absence of a demonstrable supply, development on unplanned 
and less sustainable sites is much more likely to be approved on appeal. 
 
15 
Delivering the NDR will unlock around £1bn of economic benefit to Norwich and 
Norfolk, after the costs of the project are allowed for. The transport benefits, 
excluding Postwick Hub and taking account of the current forecast additional 
construction cost, provide a cost/benefit ratio of 6.50. This is 'very high' value for 
money using DfT assessment criteria.  The increase in cost of £29.9m does not 
undermine or change any of the evidence, and the value for money test remains 
sound. 
13

Appendix B 
NDR Project Budget from April 2014 Cabinet Report 
 
Project Delivery - Financial profile for Dual Carriageway NDR including Postwick Hub 
 

 
Financial Year 
Future 
 
2012/13 
2013/14 
2014/15 
2015/16 
2016/17 
2017/18 
Total 
years 
Capital Spend Profile 
with identified funding 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
sources shown below 
DfT 
 
 
5.00 
19.00 
43.50 
 
 
67.50 
Postwick Hub CIF 
 
2.40 
16.60 
 
 
 
 
 
19.00 
Funding 
Growth Point Funding 
1.36 
0.35 
 
 
 
 
 
1.71 
NCC (LA Contribution) 
 
 
– Supported by GNDP 
1.81 
3.95 
8.25 
8.65 
20.00 
16.68 
1.00* 
60.34 
funding up to £40m  
 
(Note 1) 
TOTAL 
3.17  
6.70 
29.85 
27.65 
63.50 
16.68 
1.00 
148.55 
 
Note 1 – Remainder of airport radar funding costs to be spread over years from 18/19 to 21/22. 
 
 
14

 
Appendix C 
NDR Project Cost Comparison 2013 to 2015 
  
2013 Q1 base 
2013 
2015 Q2 
2015 
year estimates  
Summary 
Current 
Summary 
Forecast 
 
£m 
£m 
£m 
£m 
Construction Cost 
 
 
 
 
Base Construction Cost excluding fee 
66.4 
 
93.5 
 
Risk Allowance (Contractor) 
2.4 
 
3.4 
 
Contractor fee 
3.0 
 
4.1 
 
Inflation allowance to outturn 
6.0 
 
3.2 
 
Total Construction Cost 
77.8 
77.8 
104.2 
104.2 
 
 
 
 
 
Statutory Organisations 
 
 
 
 
Statutory undertakers 
7.3 
 
6.3 
 
Airport radar 
1.4 
 
2.0 
 
Total Statutory Organisation Cost 
8.7 
8.7 
8.3 
8.3 
 
 
 
 
 
Land Cost 
 
 
 
 
Land Cost 
14.3 
 
16.2 
 
NPS & NPLaw fees (Agents and Legal 
1.0 
 
1.0 
 
fees for landowners included above) 
Inflation allowance 2013 to outturn 
0.9 
 

 
Total Forecast of Outturn Land Cost  
16.2 
16.2 
17.2 
17.2 
 
 
 
 
 
Supervision Cost During 
 
 
 
 
Construction 
Supervision 

 
1.3 
 
Inflation allowance 2013 to outturn 
0.1 
 

 
Total Forecast Outturn Supervision 
1.1 
1.1 
1.3 
1.3 
Cost 
 
 
 
 
 
NCC Fees, Contingency and Risk 
 
 
 
 
Risk Allowance (NCC) 
2.9 
 
2.1 
 
Fees, Design & other Contingency 
15.1 
 
17.65 
 
Total Risk and Contingency 
18.0 
18.0 
19.75 
19.75 
 
 
 
 
 
Total NDR Budget 
  
121.8 
  
150.75 
Postwick Hub Budget 
 
26.7 
 
27.7 
Total 
 
148.5 
 
178.45 
 
 
15

 
 
Appendix D  
 
Construction Inflation 
 
1. 
The primary reason for the increase in construction cost, not including the design 
changes set out above, is as a result of a major increase in road construction 
industry inflation.  Whilst there could be a view that the original inflation allocation 
for construction was too low, this was thoroughly checked at the time of 
developing the overall construction budget figures, both for the Development 
Pool submission, and again for the early 2013 budget price. 
 
2. 
The inflation allowance in the 2011 Development Pool bid to DfT was set at 2% 
per annum to 2017.  This reflected inflation forecasts at that time in a very 
depressed construction sector, with minimal investment looking likely in the short 
to medium term. 
 
3. 
In order to receive an independent perspective of construction inflation, an 
external report was commissioned to advise the County Council on the target 
cost prepared by BB.  This has provided an assessment of construction industry 
inflation from 2010 to present.  In their assessment they show increases initially 
broadly in line with the low level inflation originally anticipated in the Development 
Pool bid.  However, a significant increase is then evidenced in the period from 
late 2012 to present. 
 
4. 
This impact has enabled an understanding of whether the figures provided by BB 
within their target cost are reflective of market conditions and explain the 
increase compared with the 2013 budget prices that were previously used. 
 
5. 
The report sets out the following: 
 
“….. when discussing different statistics in this report, we have made reference to 
both “Cost” and “Price” indices. To clarify, a “Cost” index reflects changes to 
input costs to the contractor, e.g. labour, materials and plant. A “Price” index 
represents the change in price to the end-user, i.e. the Client, therefore a price 
index will include the contractor input costs plus the associated overhead and 
profit margin.” 
 
“The Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) ROADCON TPI 
(formerly known as the BIS Tender Price Index of Road Construction) measures 
the movement of prices in tenders for road construction contracts in England, 
Scotland and Wales. It includes road contracts for New Construction, Motorway 
Widening and Major Maintenance schemes costing over £100,000. The index is 
now updated and maintained by the BCIS [Building Cost information Service].” 
 
“If we consider the total inflation between the three indices from 1Q2010 to 
1Q2015, the following figures would be achieved: 
•  BCIS All-in TPI  
 
 
+23.4% 
•  BCIS Civil Engineering TPI  
+30.5% 
•  BIS ROADCON TPI  
 
+36.3%” 
 
6. 
Whilst the above details refer to inflation from 2010 to 2015, reviewing the details 
further shows a marked increase since early 2013 to 2015.  The profile for the 
BIS ROADCON TPI shows around 14% increase for the approx. 3 year period 
16

 
from early 2010 to late 2012 and a further 22% for the approx. 2 year period from 
late 2012 to early 2015.   
 
7. 
This compares and aligns with the assessed 18.7% increase in prices set out in 
the tables above when looking at the target cost (based on pricing developed 
from May 2015) vs the budget price (based on pricing from late 2012) that have 
been provided by BB.  It should be noted that this relates to the ‘price’ index as 
defined above, which is a representation of the costs the supply chain are 
providing to clients when setting out their tender proposals.   
 
8. 
The prices provided by BB have been assessed by NCC.  Most of the prices are 
based on submissions from three sub-contract providers, with the lowest prices 
being those included in the target cost.  A high cost area that was not based on 3 
prices was the pavement surfacing.  Pricing for this has been developed with 
Tarmac (formally Lafarge Tarmac) as they are the largest supplier in the region 
for surfacing materials and the only supplier locally with capacity to service a 
project of the scale of the NDR.  
 
9. 
However, these prices have also been assessed by comparisons with the term 
contract that the NCC Highways service already holds with Tarmac.  This has 
demonstrated that the costs provided for the NDR remain slightly lower when 
compared with the term contract.  This is significant, as it demonstrates the effort 
made to secure competitive prices, considering that the Highways term 
maintenance contract was also secured before the increase in construction costs 
since early 2013. 
 
10. 
In addition, a high level assessment has been made of the A11 dual carriageway 
project.  That project was delivered by the Balfour Beatty Major Projects team 
and was delivered on time and to budget.  The cost per mile for that scheme has 
been assessed as £13.7m (this includes an adjustment for inflation).  The 
comparative cost for the NDR based on the latest pricing (and not including 
Postwick Hub which is already in construction) is £12.5m per mile.  There are a 
significant number of variations that need to be considered between the two 
projects, but this assessment does at least give an overall feel for the project 
costs.  
 
17

 
 
Appendix E 
 
Highways Capital Programme Impacts 
 

The implications of removing funding from the Capital Programme are a 
reduction in the scope of structural maintenance works over that period.  This will 
see reductions in the delivery of maintenance projects for surfacing, footway and 
drainage.  The surface dressing programme budget is not being reduced as this 
provides the most cost effective way of trying to maintain the condition of the 
highway network. 
 

The reduction in structural maintenance will see an increase in the maintenance 
backlog over the period (from 2016/17 to the end of 2019/20).  This has been 
assessed as adding approximately £1.5m per annum to the overall backlog, 
based on a reduction in investment on the A and B road network. 
 

In real terms, the reduction in structural maintenance will see a reduction 
primarily in the number of footway maintenance and surfacing schemes delivered 
each year across the county.  As a general guide, comparing with 2015/16 
budgets, this will result in a 10% reduction in footway reconstruction projects 
(down to an annual spend of £2.75m) and a 20% reduction in re-surfacing 
schemes (down to an annual spend of approximately £3.8m). 
 

The Capital Improvement programme has been reduce over recent years to £2m 
per annum.  The LTP allocation to improvement projects is proposed to reduce to 
£1.592m in 16/17 and possibly down to £1.3m thereafter. However, there is 
significantly more external funding available, in particular through successful 
Local Growth Fund and other bids (and also not including developer funding 
beyond that already known). We will seek further external funding opportunities 
via the LGF and engaging constructively with the corporate bidding team.   
 
5. 
There already remains significant investment in capital improvement projects 
over the next 3 years, notably through Local Growth Funding, and in Norwich 
specifically from external funding to deliver Transport for Norwich projects.  The 
Challenge funding provided to NCC will also see significant investment in 
drainage improvements in the north of Norwich over the next 2 years.  Examples 
of funding provided for other projects across the County are: 
 
•  £2m towards improvements at Longwater Junction, Norwich including 
Longwater Lane signals improvement, free flow slip road form Dereham Road 
westbound onto A47 eastbound, part signalisation of the Longwater southern 
dumbbell roundabout, Dereham Road widening to two lanes in each direction 
(west and mid/east sections) and Easton village public transport corridor. 
•  £2m towards the final design stages and planning consent for a new bridge 
crossing of the River Yare to the south of Great Yarmouth, linking the South 
Denes peninsula (containing the port area) to the trunk road network. 
•  £2m for a better transport interchange at Great Yarmouth rail station, 
connections by foot and cycle between the rail station and the Market Place 
contributing to the provision of a well-designed, high quality built environment. 
•  £4.6m for town centre transport improvements at Attleborough including 
sustainable transport measures and maintenance of the main road network to 
support growth in and around Attleborough. 
18

 
•  £2.3m for improvements to Thetford town centre including the Thetford-
Croxton Road cycle link and maintenance of the main road network. 
•  £9m for measures to connect key employment and business sites, maintain 
the existing road network and ease congestion in Great Yarmouth. 
 
 
19

 
 
Appendix F 
 
Land Compensation Act (1973) 
 
1. 
Under Part 1 of the Act compensation can be sought by people who own and 
also occupy certain property that has been reduced in value by physical factors 
caused by the use of a new or altered road but have not had any land acquired 
for the scheme itself.  The physical factors are noise, vibration, smell, fumes, 
smoke and artificial lighting and the discharge on to the property of any solid or 
liquid substance. Other factors such as the loss of view or privacy cannot be 
included in the claim for compensation.  
 
2. 
The DfT process specifically requires that the application for funding excludes 
any budget allowance for potential Part 1 claims and so they are not included in 
the budget figures.  The NDR scheme has been designed to minimise the impact 
of physical factors where possible. For example extensive earth bunding is 
proposed along the route. A low noise road surface is proposed and new road 
lighting has been kept to a minimum. 
 
3. 
Claims can be made after the road has been open to traffic for 1 year and must 
be settled within the six years following the first claim day.  Details will not be 
known until any claims are made.  It is expected that future Highways capital 
budget may need to absorb any costs which could be up to £1m per annum from 
2018/19 to 2024/25 if received. 
 
20

 
Appendix G 
 
Anticipated CIL receipts 
 
CIL receipts are determined by the level of housing and other development.  The Greater Norwich Growth Board is committed to delivering 37,000 
new homes across the Greater Norwich area by 2026.  Total CIL receipts are estimated to total approximately £76m across this period. 
 
 
Summary of the Draft Legal agreement relating to GNGB partner draw-down and borrowing Authorisations  
 
A legal agreement is currently being drafted that contractually confirms the: 
 
•  Greater Norwich Growth Board’s previous written agreement to pool up to 80% of their annual CIL receipts; 
•  GNGB’s agreement to contribute £40m, via borrowing undertaken by the County Council, to the cost of the NDR; and 
•  GNGB’s agreement that the pooled funds will be used to repay loans undertaken by the County Council for the purposes of funding strategic 
transportation infrastructure.  Interest will be charged at the prevailing PWLB Project Rate at the time of commencement of the drawdown of 
funds. 
21

 
 
Appendix H 
Frequently Asked Questions 
Will there be a financial cap written into the contracts relating to either the current 
projected additional spend or any future additional expenditure, and if so what 
will these caps be? 

There are no caps written into the NDR contract.  The contract does however include 
incentives for all parties to aim to complete the works for a figure below the initially 
agreed ‘target cost’.  The contract is following industry best practice and we have 
confidence regarding the pricing for the works and the ability of the contractor (Balfour 
Beatty) to deliver to time and budget based on our current experience of working with 
them on the Postwick Hub junction.  We have also reviewed their delivery of the A11 
Elveden to 5-Ways Roundabout Dual Carriageway project, which was also delivered to 
time and budget in 2013. 
How frequently were the project costs reviewed internally, and if so when was the 
last review? 

The project costs were based on budget pricing provided from the contractor in 2013, 
based on outline details and pricing from the supply chain.  This was completed ahead 
of entering into the process of delivering the Development Consent Order submission 
and going through the associated public examination, completed in December 2014.  It 
has only been since then that the final details of the project have been developed to 
enable the contractor to provide a detailed final target cost for the works, which is a 
significant process to complete.  This work has now concluded and has been the reason 
we have now (in 2015) been able to assess the scale of the budget increase. 
What is the relationship between NATS, the Joint Core Strategy and the NDR? 
NATS illustrates how transport is to be delivered over the coming years, some of which 
will be determined according to growth proposals in the Joint Core Strategy.  The NATS 
implementation plan (Transport for Norwich - TfN) sits alongside the Joint Core 
Strategy, acting as a more detailed transport element.  An essential element of NATS/ 
TfN is the NDR as this releases the opportunity for wider improvements for the city 
centre, bus provision and walking and cycling.  The NDR also provides necessary 
access to key strategic employment and growth locations.  The Joint Core Strategy 
recognises the importance of the NDR to the growth agenda for Norwich and that it is 
fundamental to the delivery of the strategy. 
 
What is the type of contract used for the NDR? 
The conditions of contract for the NDR are the core clauses and the clauses for the 
main Option C (Target Cost) of the NEC3 Engineering and Construction Contract June 
2005 (with amendments June 2006).  Stage 1 of the Contract is Early Contractor 
Involvement (ECI) and Stage 2 is the construction of the works and can be instructed in 
various ‘sections’, Postwick being Section 1 and the NDR would form Section 2. 
 
Couldn’t public transport improvements such as Bus Rapid Transit solve 
existing problems in fringe parishes? 
The scope for significant improvements in public transport is limited without the NDR.  
High-quality services such as Bus Rapid Transit would be difficult or impossible to 
introduce on some routes, including those to the north and east of Norwich, without 
adding to congestion for other road users. 
22

 
 
The NDR provides an alternative route for drivers and by doing so will reduce traffic 
driving through the city centre via radial routes into the city and unsuitable residential 
streets.  The NDR creates capacity that allows significant improvements to public 
transport, walking and cycling, making them more attractive travel choices.  It is 
intended that these sustainable transport modes will become more popular over time as 
they become established as a better alternative to using the car.    
 
What about public transport? Will there be bus lanes?  
 
The NDR will not include separate bus lanes. However, an NDR is included in 
the NATS strategy to free up road space on the existing network for buses and to 
give a choice of transport options.  Public transport is also an important part of 
NATS on its own.  There will be increased levels of bus priority on some of the 
radial routes from the NDR into the city. 
 
Will we replace any trees that have been removed?  
 
Yes. As well as buying land for the road, we will also be purchasing land to 
provide areas for planting and wildlife.  The alignment of the road has also been 
developed in order to minimise the impact to the landscape and trees. 
 
Why aren’t we going under the railway at Rackheath?  
 
This is technically unworkable due to groundwater conditions, most notably 
standing groundwater at road level. There is a high risk of flooding and there 
would need to be a permanent pumping system in place. We are also in the 
hands of Network Rail who have demanded a substantial maintenance sum. All 
these issues would have increased this option by over £10million. 
 
Why is Buxton Road going over the NDR? 
 
This is to reduce the impact of the NDR on residential properties in Spixworth 
and those along Buxton Road.  
 
Why are we going round and not crossing the airport? 
 
There are long term development plans regarding the use of the airport. There 
would also be huge structural and compensatory costs.  
 
Why not invest money into public transport?  
 
We looked at other options and comprehensive schemes would have cost the 
same if not more than building the NDR and benefit less people.  There has also 
already been substantial investment in public transport as part of NATS, 
including the new bus station and an extensive park and ride service.  There 
does remain the need to take further steps to enable more enhancements, such 
as bus rapid transit. 
 
How are we going to drain the road?  
 

23

 
Through a comprehensive sustainable drainage system. The detail of this can be 
seen on the plans in the form of shallow grass channels along the road and 
infiltration ponds. 
What are you doing about landscaping?  
The areas adjacent to the road will be landscaped to minimise the visual intrusion of the 
road. This will include lowering the road in certain places, and using woodland to screen 
the road from nearby residents. The landscaped areas will provide additional habitats 
for birds and other animals and will consist of native plants, shrubs and trees. During 
the landscape design process the character of the Norfolk countryside will be respected, 
and  habitat creation and tree planting will at all times seek to be sympathetic to the 
surrounding countryside. Wildflower and grassland seed mixes will be used to 
encourage insects to provide food for birds and bats. 
When will the NDR be built? 
 
The Postwick Hub junction at the A47 east of Norwich is already being constructed and 
is expected to be completed by December 2015.  
 
The NDR from Postwick to the A1067 is planned to start in October 2015, with initial 
environmental mitigation works and site clearance, archaeological investigations and 
utility apparatus diversions.  The main road construction works are then planned to 
commence in February/March 2016 and the road will be open to traffic by December 
2017.   
Where can I find up-to-date plans and further information on the NDR? 
 
Up-to-date plans and further information can be found on Norfolk County Council’s 
website. 
How do land and property owners find out more about compensation?  
There are a series of booklets published by the Department for Community and 
Local Government which outline your rights for compensation.  
The booklets can be viewed on http://www.highways.gov.uk/aboutus/1445.aspx 
 
24

Document Outline