Mae hwn yn fersiwn HTML o atodiad i'r cais Rhyddid Gwybodaeth 'Town and Country Planning Act 1990 section 215'.

Manchester City Council 
 
Item 8 
Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny Committee 
8 March 2011 
 
Manchester City Council 
Report for Information 
 
Report to: 

Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny 
Committee – 8 March 2011 
 
Subject:
 
Planning Enforcement Action to Prevent Deterioration of Listed 
Buildings  
 
Report of:   
Head of Planning 
 
 
Summary 
 
Listed Buildings are a designated heritage asset and have statutory protection. This 
report sets out the background and various powers available under current legislation 
as well as the significant financial implications and consequences of their use.  
 
Recommendations 
 
Members are recommended to note the report and its content. 
 
 
 
Wards Affected: 
 
All 
 
 
Contact Officers: 
 
Name: Peter Babb   
 
        Name: Paul Mason 
 
Position: Head of Planning                    Position: Design & Conservation Manager 
Telephone: 0161 234 4501 
        Telephone: 0161 234 4585 
E-mail: x.xxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx     E-mail: x.xxxxx@xxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xx  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Background documents (available for public inspection): 
 
The following documents disclose important facts on which the report is based and 
have been relied upon in preparing the report.  Copies of the background documents 
are available up to 4 years after the date of the meeting.  If you would like a copy 
please contact one of the contact officers above. 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
47 

Manchester City Council 
 
Item 8 
Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny Committee 
8 March 2011 
 
1.0 
Introduction 
 
1.1     Manchester has 889 listed buildings across the City, many of which are in use 
and maintained by occupiers and owners. The approach by Planning and 
Building Control officers has been to work proactively with owners and/or 
developers to help bring vacant buildings back into use. This can involve 
introducing creative and innovative solutions, including new uses, to ensure 
that they continue to contribute to the City’s well being.   
 
1.2 
Under planning legislation, listed buildings are designated heritage assets and 
afforded statutory protection.  Although there are powers available to Local 
Planning Authorities, which can help to protect the historic environment, these 
are not straight forward. These powers, in the form of statutory notices, are 
intended to assist where negotiation is unlikely to deliver a satisfactory 
outcome. However, there are significant financial implications in pursuing such 
routes which limits this type of formal action from being taken (and therefore 
reserved for exceptional circumstances) and emphasises the importance of 
continuing to work with owners, where possible, to bring buildings back into 
use .  
 
1.3 
Whether formal or informal action is considered appropriate, the key objective 
is to try to intervene at an early stage. Keeping historic buildings in sustainable 
use is clearly important as when they become vacant or are underused, 
without proper maintenance they can very quickly fall into disrepair.. Once 
they become vacant, they are vulnerable to the weather and vandalism, and 
deterioration can be rapid, resulting in escalating costs for their repair and 
reuse.  
 
1.4 
Securing a new use for a listed building can present a challenge and the cost 
of implementing a scheme can increase dramatically if the building is left to 
deteriorate, the result is a significant effect on economic viability. Therefore, it 
is important that efforts are made to make buildings secure and weather-tight 
in order that they can be protected until a new and viable use can be 
developed and implemented.  
 
1.5 
Some progress has already been made in identifying and monitoring the 
condition of Manchester’s listed buildings and categorising them in terms of 
risk. This report outlines the background to this approach in addition to the 
formal enforcement actions available to the City Council through the Planning 
and Building legislation.   
 
 
2.0 
Background 
 
2.1 
The Planning Service, in partnership with English Heritage, has adopted a 
collaborative approach to ‘buildings at risk’. This is shorthand for ‘historic 
building at risk through neglect and decay’ as defined in English Heritage’s 
own strategy. This term originated over twenty years ago and risk is defined 
by occupancy and condition. 
 
 
48 

Manchester City Council 
 
Item 8 
Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny Committee 
8 March 2011 
 
2.2 
In recent years, as a result of proactive action, the number of buildings at risk 
within Manchester has reduced and is reflected in the number of buildings on 
the  English  Heritage  National  ‘At  Risk  Register’.  The  2001  National  Register 
had 21 entries for Manchester compared with 15 on the 2006 Register. On the 
most recently published Heritage at Risk Register (which identifies both Grade 
1 and Grade 11* listed buildings) there are just 7 for Manchester.    
 
2.3 
In addition, a register is held internally of Grade II listed buildings at risk and, 
as  these  make  up  the  majority  of  the  City’s  listed  building  stock  (circa  790 
entries); the number of buildings at risk is higher in this group. Currently there 
are 20 such buildings identified and these are monitored on a quarterly basis. 
 
2.4 
Activity  has  focussed  on  attempting  to  safeguard  those  at  high  risk  and  this 
has been most effective  where this has involved: working  with other services 
within the Council; working with private owners and developers; and, working 
with other public organisations and partners such as English Heritage. 
 
2.5        In  this  context  the  use  of  enforcement  powers  is  considered  to  be  only  one 
element of the strategy for dealing with neglected buildings and consideration 
is reserved to exceptional circumstances where there is deliberate neglect and 
unwillingness by owners to carry out necessary repair works.  
 
2.6 
The  process  of  dealing  with  listed  buildings  that  have  been  neglected  is 
unfortunately not instant especially where they have been neglected for some 
considerable  time.  As  such,  enforcement  powers  may  be  considered  as  an 
interim  measure  until  a  new  and  /  or  willing  owner  comes  forward  or  a 
successful reuse can be found or be negotiated. 
 
 
3.0 
Enforcement Powers Available 
 
3.1 
The  following  section  outlines  the  powers  available  to  local  authorities 
established to assist where buildings are falling into disrepair or deemed to be 
dangerous.. As already noted the use of these powers are not straightforward 
and as there are financial implications caution is required before embarking on 
such action. 
 
 
Planning (Listed Building & Conservation Area) Act 1990 - Sections 48 & 
54 

 
3.2      Where  reasonable  steps  are  not  being  taken  to  properly  preserve  a  listed 
building, S47 of the Act authorises the local authority to compulsorily purchase 
the  building  but  not  until  at  least  two  months  after  service  of  a  section  48 
Repair  Notice.  The  Notice  served  on  the  owner  of  a  listed  building  must 
specify  works,  which  it  considers  reasonably  necessary  for  the  proper 
preservation of the building. 
 
3.3       If  the  building  has  not  been  repaired  in  accordance  with  the  notice  and 
compulsory  purchase  procedures  are  commenced,  the  owner  may  apply  to 
the  Magistrates’  Court  to  suspend  the  compulsory  purchase  if  reasonable 
 
49 

Manchester City Council 
 
Item 8 
Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny Committee 
8 March 2011 
 
steps  have  been  taken  for  preserving  the  building.  If  the  Council  disagrees 
with  any  order  suspending  the  CPO,  it  would  need  to  appeal  to  the  Crown 
Court in order to restart the CPO procedure.  
 
3.4      There are clear implications for an authority seeking to acquire a listed building 
who  may  simply  inherit  a  problem.  The  CPO  process  is  very  resource 
intensive  and  it  is  also  noted  that  this  is  very  different  process  to  other  CPO 
procedures which do not include an owner’s right to apply to the Magistrates’ 
Court. S47 CPOs are in themselves therefore more risky than other CPOs in 
terms of potential cost and delay. 
 
3.5 
A  section  54  Urgent  Works  Notice,  by  virtue  of  the  same  Act,  enables  the 
Council  to  execute  works  which  appear  to  the  Council  to  be  urgently 
necessary  for  the  preservation  of  the  building,  including  works  of  temporary 
support or shelter for the building. The notice may not be served on occupied 
building or require works in parts of the building that are occupied. Service of 
such a notice is essentially a statement of intent in that the local authority will 
carry out these works (as described in a schedule) within a reasonable period 
of  time,  not  less  than  7  days  if  the  owner  does  not  undertake  the  necessary 
repairs and that he will be charged for doing so. The major drawback with this 
notice is that if works are carried out in default and the Council serves notice 
of the amount due, the building owner may trigger a public inquiry into whether 
the expenses should be recovered. The grounds for challenging the Council’s 
right to recover the costs are: 
•  Some or all of the works were unnecessary for the preservation 
of the building 
•  Temporary  works  of  shelter  or  support  have  continued  for  an 
unreasonable time 
•  The amount paid for the works is unreasonable 
•  Recovery  of  the  amount  paid  would  cause  the  building  owner 
hardship 
If the amount due is confirmed after a public inquiry, then it must be recovered 
as a civil debt 
 
3.6 
Sometimes alteration or demolition may be carried out to listed buildings which   
harms their special architectural or historic interest. If this occurs without listed 
building  consent  then  the  Council  has  powers  under  S38  of  the  Act  to  serve 
listed building enforcement notices requiring the owner to restore the building 
to its former state giving at least 28 days notice of the need to start work. The 
cost  of  works  carried out by  the  Council  in default  of  the owner’s  action may 
be recovered as a local land charge. 
 
Buildings Act 1984 - Sections 77, 78 & 79 
 
3.7 
Section 56 of the Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas Act 1990 limits the 
applicability of the Building Act 1984 to listed buildings and requires the 
Council must to consider whether its urgent works or repairs notice powers 
would be more appropriate than the powers available under the Building Act. 
 
 
50 

Manchester City Council 
 
Item 8 
Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny Committee 
8 March 2011 
 
3.8  
Under the Buildings Act, a section 77 notice enables the local authority to 
apply to the Magistrates Court to make a building safe. Following non-
compliance the local authority can execute the works in default. A section 79 
Notice works in a similar manner to a section 77 Notice, however, there is no 
need to apply to the Magistrate, although the owner is made aware that their 
building is a ruinous and dilapidated condition and that works are required to 
improve its condition subject to planning requirements.  
 
3.9 
A section 78 notice relates to imminently dangerous buildings. There is a need 
to exercise caution when using this notice as buildings subject to these notices 
are  an  imminent  danger  to  the  public.  There  may  be  ways  of  removing  the 
‘danger’  and  this  can  give  time  for  negotiations  with  an  owner  about  the 
optimum solution. However, there is not always an opportunity to do this and 
works  will  need  to  be  carried  out  to  make  the  building  safe  by  removing  the 
danger which can mean significant works, for example, taking the roof off. The 
primary objective of the legislation is that the danger is to be removed, yet this 
does not mean that wholesale demolition is acceptable but is purely to remove 
the danger and is used to make the building in question as safe as possible.  
 
Town & Country Planning Act 1990 - Section 215 
 
3.10  This notice enables a local authority to serve notice on the owner/occupier of 
land whose condition is adversely affecting the amenity of an area. The notice 
specifies  the  works  necessary  to  remedy  the  condition  of  the  land  (including 
the exterior of buildings). Following non-compliance after a set timescale, the 
works  can  be  carried  out  in  default.  There  is  a  right  of  appeal  against  the 
serving of a section 215 Notice which takes place in the Magistrates Court.  
 
Recovery of Monies 
 

3.11  The  implications  of  pursuing  a  Section  47  Notice  have  already  been  set  out 
above and would require an authority to seek to acquire a building where an 
owner  fails  to  undertake  the  necessary  work.  The  responsibility  for  the 
building,  would,  if  successful  through  CPO,  fall  to  the  acquiring  body.  In 
addition, works carried out in default under a Section 54 Urgent Works Notice 
cannot be dealt with as a land charge, only as a civil debt between the Council 
and  the  building  owner.  The  section  54  Notice  is  unlike  other  notices  for 
maintenance  of  land  (section  215  Notices  under  the  1990  Town  &  Country 
Planning  Act)  and  dangerous  buildings  (sections  77,  78  &  79  of  the  1984 
Building  Act)  where  costs  can  be  sought  through  a  charge  on  the 
land/property. 
 
3.12  The issue with section 54 notices requiring civil debt recovery has been raised 
in  evidence  to  past  Select  Committees  on  the  historic  environment  and  it  is 
hoped that changes will be made to provide local authorities with a regime that 
is more supportive in keeping with the City’s duty of stewardship to protect the 
historic environment through notice service. 
 
3.13  A  Draft  Heritage  Bill  was  published  in  April  2008  and  there  are  provisions 
would place a much stronger duty on the owner of a heritage asset to maintain 
 
51 

Manchester City Council 
 
Item 8 
Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny Committee 
8 March 2011 
 
and  protect  it.  Unfortunately  the  Draft  Bill  has  not  progressed  and  there  is 
some uncertainty about if and when it will be enacted.  
 
 
4.0  
Implementation   
 
4.1 
The  key  to  securing  repairs  and  the  reuse  of  listed  buildings  at  risk  is  to 
pursue a number of potential actions, on a case by case basis, including the 
following. 
 
Partnership 
 
 
Liaise  and  build  links  with  Building  Preservation  Trusts,  English 
Heritage,  other  agencies  such  as the Architectural  Heritage  Fund,  and 
community groups. 
 
Link the strategy  with other strategies or initiatives including Corporate 
Property’s  Heritage  Asset  Strategy  and  link  in  with  regeneration  led 
schemes or initiatives. 
 
Contribute  toward  securing  the  future  of  those  buildings  on  the 
Buildings at Risk Register. 
 
Actively promote the repair, refurbishment and reuse of buildings at risk 
in partnership with property owners and developers. 
 
 
Legislation & Negotiation 
 
 
Use  Urgent  Works  and  Repairs  Notices  (sections  54  and  48 
respectively)  action  particularly  where  the  required  works  can  be 
secured  without  committing  the  Council  to  irrecoverable  expenditure 
where prospective new users can meet the cost. 
 
Work  with  Building  Control  (following  service  of  section  77,  78  &  79 
notices) in line with the policy on dangerous buildings that are listed or 
within conservation  areas. 
 
Consider  the  possibility  of  using  section  215  Notices  in  specific 
circumstances where such action can be justified as being economically 
viable.  
 
Use  enforcement  action  and  prosecution  where  it  is  necessary  to 
protect the City’s built heritage. 
 
Adopt  a  pro-active  approach  aimed  at  encouraging  owners  to 
undertake  repairs  before  the  onset  of  decay;  endorsing  the  approach 
that prevention is not only better than cure but also more economical in 
the  long  term.  (In  the  first  instance  this  is  to  be  achieved  through 
negotiation rather than resorting to service of notices). 
 
Resources 
 
 
Secure  financial  support  from  grants  or  other  funding  agencies  where 
these  have a conservation or regeneration focus.  
 
4.2 
There are several examples which can be used to demonstrate the 
approaches outlined above. 
 
52 

Manchester City Council 
 
Item 8 
Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny Committee 
8 March 2011 
 
 
Ancoats Dispensary – the City Council have engaged with the owners, 
English Heritage and a building preservation trust, ‘Heritage Works’ to try and 
secure repairs and re-use of this Grade II listed building. This includes 
supporting an application to the Architectural Heritage Fund for feasibility work 
to secure a new use. 
 
White Lion, Withington – Shortly after becoming vacant this Grade II listed 
building became derelict, suffering from vandalism as well as theft of lead from 
the roof resulting in water ingress. After much discussion with the owner 
including reference to notices) they agreed to undertake some urgent repairs 
and mothballing works. Officers worked closely with the owner to secure a 
new use and, following planning permission and listed building consent; works 
are now on site to convert the building into a supermarket.  
 
All Souls Church, Every Street – Building Control became involved with this 
property as a consequence of a rear retaining wall being in a very poor 
condition. As part of investigations an issue was also identified with the rear 
boundary treatment as an original wall had been replaced with an 
unauthorised palisade fence. Dangerous building legislation was used to 
repair the building’s retaining wall and also to remove the unauthorised fence 
and reinstate the boundary wall. 
 
384 Cheetham Hill Road (former Snooker Hall) - Following various 
environment health notices and the threat of a planning enforcement notice 
because of an unauthorised use, the owner applied for planning permission 
and  listed building consent to change the building’s use to storage for an 
adjacent supermarket business. The work also included repair and recovery of 
original features.   
 
23-25 Shude Hill – This property was brought to the attention of Building 
Control as a potentially dangerous building. Although not a listed building it is 
of some historic value and is in a conservation area.  The building was 
monitored and following significant concerns a section 78 notice was served. 
As a consequence the owners applied for planning permission and 
conservation area consent to rebuild the front elevation and carry out 
complementary remedial works. The ground floor shops are now back in use 
and the upper floors are used for residential accommodation.  
 
 
5.0 
Conclusion 
 
5.1 
Addressing the deterioration of listed buildings is not a straightforward matter, 
but there are informal approaches and some legal mechanisms that can be 
used to try and safeguard their future. Whilst it is believed negotiation has 
delivered successful Outcomes in relation to listed buildings, formal action 
cannot be taken lightly as there are implications in terms of cost recovery and 
an authority having to take on the responsibility of the asset. 
 
 
6.0 
Key Policies and Considerations 
 
53 

Manchester City Council 
 
Item 8 
Communities and Neighbourhoods Overview and Scrutiny Committee 
8 March 2011 
 
 
(a) Equal Opportunities 
 
6.1 
Action in respect of enforcing repairs to historic buildings has no known impact 
on equal opportunities. 
 
(b) Risk Management 
 
6.2 
The main risk in allowing buildings to deteriorate is that they become unsightly 
and a much greater problem in terms of securing a new use as well as the 
increased cost associated with their repair. There is also a risk in terms of their 
affect on the wider regeneration of an area, as redundant, poorly maintained 
buildings can have a negative effect on the environment. In addition there are 
also risks associated with reclaiming the monies following enforcement action 
as outlined in this report.  
 
(c) Legal Considerations 
 
6.3 
Legal advice will be required on enforcement cases that involve the serving of 
enforcement notices including Urgent Works and Repair Notices due to the 
need to give significant details of the works and to assess the risk of non 
recovery of the costs of each case. 
 
 
 
54