This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Tuberculosis in prisons'.





 
Public Health England  
Health & Justice report 2014 
 
 
 
 
No health without justice, no justice without health 
 


Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
  
 
About Public Health England 
Public Health England exists to protect and improve the nation's health and wellbeing, 
and reduce health inequalities. It does this through world-class science, knowledge and 
intelligence, advocacy, partnerships and the delivery of specialist public health services. 
PHE is an operationally autonomous executive agency of the Department of Health.  
Public Health England 
Wellington House  
133-155 Waterloo Road 
London SE1 8UG 
Tel: 020 7654 8000 
www.gov.uk/phe 
Twitter: @PHE_uk 
Facebook: www.facebook.com/PublicHealthEngland  
 
For queries relating to this document, please contact: health&xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx  
 
© Crown copyright 2015 
You may re-use this information (excluding logos) free of charge in any format or 
medium, under the terms of the Open Government Licence v3.0. To view this licence, 
visit OGL or email xxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx.xxx.xx. Where we have identified any third 
party copyright information you will need to obtain permission from the copyright holders 
concerned. Any enquiries regarding this publication should be sent to 
health&xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx  
 
Published June 2015 
PHE publications gateway number: 2015095 
 
This document is available in other formats on request. Please email 
health&xxxxxxx@xxx.xxx.xx   
 


Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Acknowledgements  
 
Authors and contributors  
 
Hilary Guite 
Darren Kristiansen 
Ailith Morrey 
Autilia Newton 
Éamonn O’Moore 
Cathie Railton 
David Sheehan 
Sunita Sturup-Toft 
 
Other contributors 
 
Astrid Aldous 
Rupert Bailie (National Offender Management Service) 
Rachel Campbell 
Max Courtney 
Sam Cox 
Abi Hamoodi 
Susanne Howes 
Andy Hunt 
Dave Jones  
Chris Kelly (NHS England) 
Sam Lattimore 
Andy Liggins 
Kieran Lynch 
Nino Maddalena 
Simon Marshall (National Offender Managmenet Service) 
Magdalene Mbanefo 
Anne Norton  
Jenny Rees 
Jackie Roberts 
Sally Eapen Simon 
Sandra White 
Sue Wright 
Zheng Yin 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


link to page 4 link to page 9 link to page 9 link to page 10 link to page 11 link to page 12 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 15 link to page 17 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 24 link to page 25 link to page 26 link to page 28 link to page 32 link to page 33 link to page 36 link to page 38 link to page 40 link to page 44 link to page 47 link to page 47 link to page 49 link to page 59 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Contents 
About Public Health England 
2 
Foreword 
5 
Executive summary 
8 
1 
Introduction 
9 
1.1 
The national Health & Justice Team 
9 
1.2 
Local and national partnership within PHE Health & Justice 
10 
1.3 
Policy context 
11 
1.4 
Partnership working and governance arrangements 
13 
 
2 
The health of people in detention and in contact with the criminal justice system 
15 
2.1 
Why address the health needs of people in criminal justice system? 
15 
2.2 
People in detention and in contact with the criminal justice system are an ‘under-
served’ population 

15 
2.3 
Population demographics 
1
 
3 
Partnership work 
24 
3.1 
Health and justice indicators of performance (HJIPs) 
24 
3.2 
Working with local government  
24 
3.3 
Health needs assessments  
25 
3.4 
Mental health 
26 
3.5 
Continuity of care 
2
3.6 
Substance misuse 
29 
3.7 
Tobacco control 
31 
3.8 
Public Health Intelligence in Prisons and Secure Settings Service 
32 
3.9 
Opt-out BBV testing in prisons 
33 
3.10 
Tuberculosis 
36 
3.11 
Oral health 
38 
 
4 
International engagement in health and justice work 
39 
 
5 
Conclusions and looking forward 
43 
 
Data sources 
46 
Glossary of abbreviations 
47 
Appendix A: PHIPS data outputs 
48 
References 
58 
 



Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Foreword 
 
The opportunity of change for health and justice                              
 
 Public Health England (PHE) was created on 1 April 2013  
 to bring together public health professionals from more 
 than 70 organisations into a single public health service. 
 
 Our mission is to protect and improve the nation’s health 
 and to address inequalities. 
 
 
 
 
PHE works in partnership with health and social care commissioners, criminal justice 
partners, service providers, academic and third sector organisations, international partners 
and prisoners/detainees to identify and meet the health and social care needs of people in 
prisons and other prescribed places of detention (PPDs), as well as those in contact with the 
criminal justice system (CJS) in the community.  
 
PHE aims to reduce health inequalities, support people in living healthier lives, and ensure 
the continuity of care in the community. 
 
Our Principles: 
 
Equivalence:
 People in prison and other PPDs are entitled to care equivalent to that 
available to people in the wider community. 
 
Evidence-based care: Care should be commissioned and provided according to needs, 
informed by rigorous health needs assessment approach, including collection and 
interpretation of data, and must be evidence-based. 
 
Patient-focussed:
 People delivering care to people in PPDs are healthcare staff whose 
primary loyalty is to the health and wellbeing of their patients. 
 
Quality: Healthcare staff should be appropriately trained and accredited, participate in 
continuing professional development programmes, and work within a clear clinical 
governance structure. 
 
Patient voices: Prisoners and detainees and those in contact with the CJS should know their 
rights, should have their voices heard in designing and delivering healthcare services, and 
should know how to complain if unhappy with the level of service they receive. 
 
Partnership: Working in partnership is essential; we advocate ‘co-production’ with partner 
organisations. 
 
Continuity of Care: Our role does not stop at the prison gate – we must support care 
pathways beyond the prison walls. 
 


link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Wider than prison impact: Prison health is everyone’s business; addressing the needs of 
‘under-served’ groups in prison has a ‘ripple effect’ into the wider community. 
 
Health and justice: Health and healthcare is part of the problem and part of the solution – no 
health without justice, no justice without health. 
 
The Health and Social Care Act 2012 led to major changes within the NHS generally as well 
as local public health systems. Since April 2013, NHS England assumed responsibility for 
commissioning health services for persons who are detained in prison or in other secure 
accommodation. ‘Securing excellence in commissioning for offender healthi’ was developed 
collaboratively with stakeholders with the ambition of supporting commissioners in a 
consistent, high quality approach to the delivery of services that secure the best outcomes for 
people in prisons and other secure settings. The development of a ‘single operating model’ 
provides the opportunity to implement nationally consistent evidence-based commissioning 
specifications and quality standards appropriate to the patient population and integrated in 
community-based services. 
 
In addition to the changes within the NHS there have been developments within the justice 
system under the coalition government’s ‘Transforming Rehabilitation’ reforms. From 1 May 
2015, the nationwide ‘Through the Gate’ (TTG) resettlement service, under which offenders 
including those serving sentences of less than 12 months will be offered a range of support in 
custody and through the gate into the community went live.   
Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) are delivering this service to virtually all 
prisoners, including remand prisoners. There are 21 CRCs across England and Wales, each 
serving their own specific region. The National Probation Service continue to oversee the 
rehabilitation and management of high-risk offenders. 
As part of TTG, a network of 89 resettlement prisons has been set up to provide localised 
resettlement provision for prisoners returning to their home area. CRCs working in resettlement 
prisons create an individual resettlement plan for each prisoner to meet their immediate needs 
upon entering custody and work with them in the 12 weeks prior to their release to help deliver 
the resettlement plan and associated services. At a minimum, CRCs are delivering the 
following to prisoners prior to their release: 
•  help finding, or retaining, somewhere to live  
•  help finding, or retaining, a job 
•  advice on money and debt 
•  help and advice for sex workers and those who have been subjected to domestic 
violence and abuse 
CRCs may also choose to offer additional services that they believe may assist offenders and 
reduce their reoffending. 
 
The aim of these reforms is to reduce reoffending rates through changes in how prison and 
probation services are delivered. The creation of resettlement prisons will ensure that those 
over the age of 21 serving less than 12 months and those within the last 3 months of their 
sentence are released from a prison close to their home address. This can in turn support 
better integration between health providers, both in custody and in the community, and 
providers of resettlement services.  



Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Work is also ongoing, led by the Youth Justice Board (YJB) to improve the resettlement 
outcomes of young offenders under the age of 18 years, following their release from young 
people specific secure settings. 
 
These changes provide us with opportunities to better address the health needs of offenders, 
in custody or in the community, by improving local integration of the health and justice 
systems. Moreover, these changes allow us to address more effectively issues around health 
inequalities and health-related drivers of offending behaviour which will have positive impacts 
not only on people directly in contact with the CJS but also among much wider peer-groups 
and social networks often described as ‘under-served’. 
 
This report will be of interest to directors of public health (DsPH) and public health 
professionals at local and national level, local authorities, NHS England  commissioners and 
specialised commissioners, clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), police and crime 
commissioners, police services, probation services, the Ministry of Justice (MoJ), the 
National Offender Management Service (NOMS), the Home Office, voluntary sector 
organisations and those representing the patient voice in the justice system. The report will 
also be of interest to international colleagues working in health and justice systems in the 
World Health Organization (WHO) European region and globally. The report captures a 
broad range of activity led by the national Health & Justice Team in PHE working both across 
our own organisation and with a broad range of partners internationally, nationally and locally 
across all the domains of public health practice.  
 
 
Dr Éamonn O’Moore FFPH, 
National Lead for Health & Justice, PHE and Director of the UK Collaborating Centre 
for WHO Health in Prisons Programme (European Region) 
 

 


Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Executive Summary 
 
This report provides details of key changes in the health and justice system and discusses 
the public health needs of people in Prescribed Places of Detention (PPDs). In addition to 
demographic details of people in detained settings the report explores some of the key public 
health initiatives developed in partnership with NHS England, NOMS, the Home Office and 
the Youth Justice Board.  
 
People in the CJS often come from marginalised and underserved communities in the 
wider population and by tackling health inequalities in this population we can address 
wider health inequalities which  benefits not only those in prisons but wider society. 
There is a co-dependency between partners to tackle inequalities and reduce re-
offending and we have already seen the benefits of working in partnership to respond to 
these health inequalities.  
 
Over the past 10 years investment in criminal justice based substance misuse 
interventions have made a marked contribution to reducing drug and alcohol related 
crime and improving health outcomes. During 2014 significant progress on tackling a 
range of health issues within the prescribed estate has been achieved. This includes 
improving the data and intelligence about people in PPDs through the introduction of 
Health & Justice Indicators of Performance (HJIPs) as well as improving the reporting of 
infectious diseases.  Initiating workstreams with partners to directly confront  health 
inequalities include the introduction of the opt-out testing for blood-borne viruses (BBVs) 
which aims to increase the diagnosis and treatment of people in prison for infection with 
a BBV. This is producing  benefits with preliminary data indicating a near doubling of 
BBV testing following the introduction of the opt-out testing policy.  
 
Progress in our international work has seen a number of developments since PHE took 
over the leadership function of the World Health Organization Health in Prisons 
Programme 
(WHO HIPP) from 1 April 2014. The focus of this work is to support the 
development of a European network to share experiences and provide expertise and 
guidance to address the health issues facing people in prison in Europe. In October 
2014 PHE in partnership with the WHO and Irish Prison Service hosted a 2 day 
international conference in Portlaoise, the Republic of Ireland which addressed two 
distinct themes: prisoner empowerment and improving lives in the community. 
 
Finally, information on infectious diseases within prisons in detailed in appendix A. PHE 
provides data from a range of sources which facilitates a better  understanding of the health 
protection issues facing this population as well as  how to manage such need. This is a vital 
task as we attempt to measure the impact of new policies such as the introduction of opt-out 
testing for BBVs in all prisons in England. 
 
It is the intention to produce a health and justice report every year to detail the public health 
needs of people in PPDs and discuss the initiatives being undertaken to address their needs.  
 
 
 
 


link to page 9 link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
1  Introduction 
The scope of our work in health and justice covers all three dimensions of public health, ie 
health protection, health improvement and healthcare public health. PPDs1 included in our 
remit are: 
•  prisons (public and privately managed) (116)  
•  immigration removal centres (IRCs) (9) 
•  children and young people’s secure estate (CYPSE) (young offender institutions (4), 
secure training centres (3) and secure children’s homes (14)) 
•  police custody suites (40  separate police forces in England, 39 territorial forces and 
British Transport Police)  
•  liaison and diversion services which are designed to identify offenders who have 
mental health, learning disability or substance misuse vulnerabilities when they first 
come into contact with the CJS. Identified individuals are then either supported 
through the CJS pathway or they are diverted into a more appropriate service such as 
a treatment programme or a social care service which are designed to reduce re-
offending and identify vulnerabilities earlier 
 
Our remit also includes those in contact with the CJS in the wider community and therefore 
addresses much broader issues than custodial settings. The overwhelming majority of 
offenders will spend most of their time in the community and the average length of time 
served in prison in England and Wales, including time on remand, is 9.7 months for those 
released from determinate sentencesii.  
 
This report discusses the key health issues faced by people in contact with the CJS in 
custody or in the community and provides examples of how such issues can be addressed. It 
examines the current health and justice landscape and also looks at the imminent changes. 
We are faced with many new challenges but this report will help guide DsPH and other 
professionals working within the public health system locally and nationally with information 
about how to best meet the needs of this local population.  
 
 
1.1 The national Health & Justice Team 
The national Health & Justice Team is part of the Health and Wellbeing directorate within 
PHE which takes the lead in promoting healthier lifestyles, chronic disease prevention, 
national health marketing and health equity programmes. This saves lives, promotes 
wellbeing and helps create environments where individuals, families, and communities are 
better informed, more empowered, healthier and happier. The national team is part of the 
Population Healthcare division which aims to improve population health outcomes and 
reduce health inequalities through providing expertise and system leadership to improve the 
quality of healthcare delivered in a broad range of settings. The division also includes teams 
from Dental Public Health, Allied Health Professionals, Pharmacy & Health Care Public 
Health. 
                                            
 
1 Note: All data in the report refers to adults (18+) in England unless otherwise stated 


link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
The national Health & Justice Team works to deliver PHE’s mission statement on health and 
justice. Our roles include: 
•  gathering and providing evidence and intelligence to inform and support the work of 
local and national commissioners and service providers 
•  providing expertise at local and national level on a broad range of health protection, 
health promotion and disease prevention activities working in close partnership with 
local commissioners and service providers 
•  supporting partners, including commissioners and providers of health and social care, 
in the development of care pathways which account for the movement of people 
around the detention estate and between prescribed detention settings and the 
community 
•  developing the evidence-base to support commissioning and service provision through 
primary research, audit, collection and analysis of data, publication and dissemination 
of information, reports and research studies 
•  identifying emerging health threats to detainees and staff working in PPDs and 
providing advice on their management or mitigation 
•  supporting both NOMS and NHS England in the performance of their statutory 
functions as appropriate 
•  supporting NHS England in relation to its Section 7a responsibilities in commissioning 
high quality health services in secure and detained settings 
•  supporting NOMS and NHS England to deliver on shared priorities in the  National 
Partnership Agreementiii with PHE through the Prison Healthcare Board for England 
•  supporting the Home Office and NHS England in delivering on shared priorities for the 
health & wellbeing of detainees in the immigration removal estate as outlined in the  
National Partnership Agreement  
•  supporting YJB and NHS England to deliver on shared priorities as detailed in the 
document ‘Improving Health and Well Being services for children placed in the 
Children and Young People’s Secure Estate Agreement 2014-16’ 

•  leading international engagement on prison health through its work as the UK 
Collaborating Centre to the WHO HIPP (Europe) 
•  supporting collaborative working for health across the devolved administrations of the 
UK and with the Republic of Ireland through the Five Nations’ Health & Justice 
Collaboration 

  
While PHE has a key role in providing expert public health advice guidance and support tools 
to NOMS and NHS England which supports commissioning in the context of this agreement, 
it does not have any direct responsibility for commissioning or performance management of 
healthcare services in secure and detained settings, nationally or locally. 
 
 
1.2 Local and national partnership within PHE Health & Justice 
PHE is structured into a national centre, 4 regions and 8 centres plus London, which is an 
integrated region-centre (see figure 1). The national Health & Justice Team works with  health 
and justice public health specialists based in PHE centres who support implementation of the 
national business programme as well as meeting local needs in relation to health and justice 
including integration of this work with wider work programmes of their centres. PHE centres 
are the front door to the organisation, providing direct advice and support to the local public 
health system as well as supporting the implementation of nationally developed policies at a 
10 


Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
local level. The national Health & Justice 
network is composed of representatives 
from the devolved administrations, the 
national team and the public health 
specialists in the PHE centres and works to 
gather intelligence, share good practice and 
provide opportunities for collaboration 
across England and with Scotland and 
Wales. The national team also leads 
international engagement on prison health 
through its work as the UK Collaborating 
Centre (UKCC) to the WHO HIPP (Europe).  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Figure 1:
 PHE regions and centres 
 
1.3 Policy context  
Detention settings are a requirement of a functioning CJS. The health and wellbeing of 
people in PPDs is a particular responsibility of the state. There is great variety in both the 
nature of detained populations and the detention settings, which adds a level of complexity. 
Some detention settings are the responsibility of MoJ, others of the Home Office; some 
detention settings are publicly owned whereas others are privately managed under contract. 
NHS England is responsible for commissioning healthcare in PPDs but CCGs, local 
authorities and social care commissioners need to ensure health and care for vulnerable 
populations in contact with the CJS in the community as part of the services for the general 
population. 
 
Section 15 of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 gives the Secretary of State the power to 
require NHS England to commission certain services outside of CCGs who are responsible 
for the commissioning of healthcare services in the community. These include ‘services or 
facilities for persons who are detained in a prison or other accommodation of a prescribed 
description’.  
 
The 2014 Offender Rehabilitation Act made changes to the sentencing and release 
framework to extend supervision after release to offenders serving short sentences. It also 
created greater flexibility in the delivery of sentences served in the community. The Act 
provides a range of provisions that affect the local delivery landscape.  
 
With the implementation of the Care Act (DH 2014) from April 2015, local authorities are now 
required to assess and meet the eligible social care and support needs of prisoners as well 
as residents in approved premises and those in bail accomodation, and there are 
opportunities to work with local authorities to broaden the scope of a joint health needs 
assessment to include the social care needs of prisoners and offenders in these settings.  
 
11 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
The Care Act 2014 clarifies that local authorities are responsible for assessing and meeting 
the eligible social care needs of people in prison or resident in bail accommodation or 
approved premises.  
 
There have been a number of recent policy drivers in England that relate to the needs of 
people within the health and justice system. The NHS Outcomes Framework 2014 to 2015 
and the Public Health Outcomes Framework 2013 to 2016 have led to a change in the way 
we work together to improve public health within the youth and adult justice system. 
 
The NHS Outcomes Framework 2014 to 2015 sets out the outcomes and corresponding 
indicators that are used to hold NHS England to account for improvements in health 
outcomes, as part of the government’s mandate to NHS England. It acts as a catalyst for 
driving up quality throughout the NHS by encouraging a change in culture and behaviour.  
 
The Public Health Outcomes Framework 2013 to 2016 has a number of relevant indicators 
related to people in contact with the CJS: 
 
•  self-harm (2.10) 
•  smoking prevalence – adults (over 18s, 2.14) 
•  successful completion of drug treatment (2.15) 
•  people entering prison with substance dependence issues who are not previously 
known to community treatment (2.16) 
•  alcohol related admissions to hospital (2.18) 
•  self-reported wellbeing (2.23) 
•  people presenting with HIV  at a late stage of infection (3.4) 
•  treatment completion for Tuberculosis (TB, 3.5) 
•  mortality rate from causes considered preventable (4.3) 
•  under 75 mortality rate from liver disease (4.6) 
•  under 75 mortality rate from respiratory diseases (4.7) 
•  mortality rate from infectious and parasitic diseases (4.8) 
•  excess under 75 mortality rate in adults with serious mental illness (4.9) 
•  suicide rate (4.10) 
 
 
 
 
 
12 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
1.4 Partnership working and governance arrangements 
National partners 
Effective working at both national and local level is essential to address the health needs of 
people in contact with the CJS. At a national level there are a number of strategic groups 
established to oversee health provision for people in contact with the CJS including:   
 
•  Cross Government Health & Justice Partnership Board, a multi-agency board chaired 
by the Department of Health (DH) and comprising representation from PHE, MoJ, 
NOMS, the Home Office, the police, NHS England, YJB and a range of non-statutory 
organisations and is responsible for overseeing health service provision for people in 
contact with the CJS 
•  the Prison Healthcare Board (England) co-chaired by NOMS and NHS England and 
includes representatives from PHE  
•  the Children and Young Peoples Secure Estate Assurance Group co-chaired by YJB 
and NHS England is responsible for overseeing the National Partnership Agreement 
‘Improving Health and Wellbeing services for children placed in the Children and 
Young People’s Secure Estate’ 
and includes representatives from the YJB, PHE and 
NHS England 
•  Immigration Removal Centre Assurance Group  which supports the Home Office and 
NHS England in delivering on shared priorities for the health and wellbeing of 
detainees in the immigration removal estate outlined in the National Partnership 
Agreement 
 
Such partnership working facilitates national agreements, stimulates joint action and allows 
for the co-ordination of priorities, while clearly defining roles and responsibilities of relevant 
bodies. 
 
The Prison Healthcare Board (England) oversees the National Partnership Agreement between 
the NOMS, NHS England and PHE for the co-commissioning and delivery of healthcare 
services in prisons in England. The Agreement sets out the shared strategic intentions, joint 
corporate commitments and mutually agreed developmental priorities for NOMS, NHS England 
and PHE in relation to commissioning and delivering healthcare services in adult prisons in 
England during 2015 to 2016.  
 
The Health & Justice Children’s Assurance Group oversees the National Partnership 
Agreement 
between PHE, the YJB and NHS England ‘Improving health and wellbeing services 
for children placed in the children and young people’s secure estate 2015 to 2016. 
 
The National Assurance Group is responsible for overseeing the National Partnership 
Agreement 
between NHS England, Home Office Immigration Enforcement and PHE 2015 to 
2017. 
 
Local partners 
At a local level slightly more than a third of top-tier local authorities in England have prisons 
within their boundaries. However all local authorities have a responsibility for people living in 
13 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
the community who are in contact with the CJS. The key partnerships and agencies that 
should have an interest in the health needs of those held in the CJS include: 
•  CCGs 
•  health and wellbeing boards (HWBs) 
•  PHE centres 
•  DsPH 
•  directors of children’s services 
•  directors of adult services  
•  directors of social services  
•  National Probation Service 
•  CRCs 
•  youth offending teams  
•  prison healthcare providers  
•  health providers in the CYPSE 
•  other healthcare providers in prisons who often provide in-reach services such as 
substance misuse teams and mental health services 
•  local healthwatch 
•  police and crime commissioners  
 
 
 
 
 
 
14 

link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
2  The health of people in detention and in 
contact with the criminal justice system 
2.1 Why address the health needs of people in the criminal justice system? 
Poor health is often interlinked with offending and reoffending behaviour. Offenders suffer 
from multiple and complex health issues which are often exacerbated by the difficulties they 
experience in accessing the full range of health and social care services available in the local 
community. It is recognised that this leads to high usage of costly emergency services by this 
groupiv.  
 
People in PPDs often experience higher mortality ratesv, a higher burden of disease 
(including infectious diseases, chronic illnesses and mental health problems), poorer access 
to treatment and prevention programmes, and problems with substance misuse (including 
drugs, alcohol and cigarette smoking) than their peers in the community. (Singleton, Meltzer, 
Gatward, Coid & Deasy 1998)vi. Health issues affecting this population are varied; some of 
the more prevalent ones are further explored below.  
 
Addressing the health needs of people in contact with the CJS plays a key element of 
delivering the government ambitions for cutting crime, reducing reoffending and tackling 
health inequalities.  
 
People in prison and other detainees often come from marginalised and underserved 
communities in the wider community. These prison-contact wider social networks and peer 
groups contribute disproportionately to wider health inequalities. Addressing health 
inequalities among detained populations may therefore address wider health inequalities and 
benefit not only those in prisons but wider society, we described this as the ‘community 
dividend’. Therefore, issues relating to health and justice directly affect all local authorities, all 
CCGs, all NHS and social care commissioners and all communities.  
 
2.2 People in detention and in contact with the CJS are an ‘under-served’ 
populations 
People in prescribed detention are often depicted as belonging to ‘hard-to-reach’ populations 
which is misleading. They are more accurately described as ‘under-served’ both in detention 
and in the community as health services often fail to map well to their needs.vii The 
community dividend model suggests that by addressing needs of those in contact with the 
CJS we can have an impact on the wider population and different segments of this population 
are different in size, ease of identification and access. The current standing prison population 
in England and Wales is around 85,000 with about 100,000 unique admissions per year; a 
further 220,000 are currently under supervision of probation services in the community (and 
this number may rise in 2015 with the implementation of the Offender Rehabilitation Act 2014  
which means offenders leaving prisons will be supervised by CRCs or the NPS), and 
between 1-2 million people per year are captured by the police national computer system 
following contact with the police. This provides a large network of people defined in some 
15 

link to page 62
Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
way as being in contact with the CJS. These same people are often members of the same 
communities and social networks who are disproportionately affected by health inequalities. 
Therefore, working with these people is a way to engage effectively with wider parts of the 
community often described as ‘hard-to-reach’ or marginalised populations.  
 
The health inequalities experienced by people in prison are not only evident when in prison 
but also continue to have an effect beyond the prison walls; people in prison and ‘at or near 
prison social networks and communities’ contribute disproportionately to wider societal health 
and social inequalities. 
 
People entering prisons have often experience a ‘care deficit’ which prison healthcare 
systems have to strive to address. There is evidence that people in prisons are higher 
consumers of healthcare services than peers in the community, particulary older prisonersviii
So prisons can and do impact positively on healthcare needs of people they manage but this 
effect is often contingent on being in prison: a return to the community often results in 
‘flipping’ of previous health gains including access to health services especially preventive 
health services like screening and immunisation and chronic care.  
 
Figure 2: 
Community dividend for public health interventions in prison populations 
 
 
 
 
 
Developing and delivering health interventions in prisons not only benefits prisoners but it 
also delivers a ‘community dividend’ in addressing issues in under-served populations by 
having beneficial impacts on wider health and offending behaviour. Delivering effective 
healthcare to people in prison is not only the right thing to do but also the wise thing to do. 
 
16 

link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62
Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Figure 3: Public health model for health and justice
 
 
Offenders are likely to reside in areas of multiple deprivation and often live chaotic and 
disordered lives. A studyix into the background and circumstances of 200 sentenced young 
people within the secure estate found that 51% come from deprived or unsuitable 
accommodation. In addition, the surveying prison crime reduction (SPCR) survey provided an 
analysis of the pre-custody employment, training and education status of 1,435 newly 
sentenced prisoners (in 2005 and 2006). It stated that that 15% of prisoners reported being 
homeless before custody, including 9% who were sleeping rough. If the beneficial effects of 
detention are not to be reversed the future accommodation needs and other wrap-around 
services like employment need to be strengthened. Many adult offenders have a lack of basic 
level education, with 47% of prisoners sampled by the Prison Reform Trust holding no 
academic qualifications. The SPCR survey also showed that only one-third of prisoners 
reported being in paid employment in the 4 weeks before custody and 13% of prisoners 
surveyed reported never being in paid employment. 
 
Figure 3 suggests a public health model for health and justice that looks downstream to the 
healthcare challenges and upstream to better prevention efforts to begin to address some of 
the health drivers of criminogenic behaviour. Research indicates that 59% of prisoners 
reported regularly playing truant, 63% had been temporarily excluded from school, and 42% 
permanently excludedx. This has implications for managing behaviour at an earlier age and 
the role that school has in addressing conduct that we know can influence the life chances of 
children.  
 
2.3 Population demographics  
Adult prisons 
While the prison population has grown during most years since World War II, between 1993 
and 2008 the growth rate increased from an average of 2.5% to 4% per yearxi. Between 2008 
and 2012 the MoJ reports that the total population remained relatively stable, however the 
public disorder of 6 to 9 August 2011 had an immediate impact on the prison population.  
 
 
17 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Figure 4: Standing prison population 1990 to 2014 
 100,000
 90,000
 80,000
 70,000
 60,000
 50,000
 40,000
 30,000
 20,000
 10,000
 -
 
Source: Ministry of Justice statistics in England and Wales, all age groups 
https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-january-
to-march-2014 
 
Two factors caused the increase in the prison population of England and Wales from 1993 to 
2012: increasing use of custodial sentences in sentencing guidelines provided to courts, and 
a more serious mix of offence groups coming before the courts. 
 
As of 31 March 2015 the prison population in England and Wales was 85,664. In terms of 
annual comparison, in England and Wales in March 2015, the adult prison population stood 
at 85,265, an increase of under 1%. The relative size of the female prison population has 
remained stable, at just under 5% of the total.  
 
The MoJ published ‘Prison Population Projections 2014– 2020 England and Wales’ which 
usefully presents projections of the prison population in England and Wales from November 
2014 to December 2020. The ‘central scenario’ estimates that the prison population will 
increase from the current position to 87,700 by June 2015. By the end of June 2020 the prison 
population is projected to be 90,200. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

18 


Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Figure 5: Projected prison population 
 
 
 
Source: Ministry of Justice https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-population-
projections-ns 
 
 
In terms of proportions, the vast majority of offenders sentenced at court receive a non-
custodial sentence, (8% of those sentenced in 2014 were sentenced to custody) meaning 
there are a far greater proportion of people (over 90%) of offenders  in the community 
compared to being in custody. This shows the need to address the health of all people in 
contact with the CJS and not just those in prison. 
 
For those in custody, figure 6 shows the majority of individuals will only serve a sentence of 6 
months or less which means that prisoner’s healthcare needs must be met in a short space 
of time and effective continuity of care set up before their release. 
 
Figure 6
: Length of sentences in England and Wales given to year ending June 2014 
 
19 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
60,000
 
n
e

50,000
iv
 g
rs

  40,000
e
n
o

ces
ris
30,000
ten
f p
sen
r o
20,000
e
b
m
u

10,000
N
-
Up to and including Over 6 months and Over 5 years and
6 months
including 5 years
up to and including
life
 
 
Source: Ministry of Justice statistics for England and Wales Criminal justice system statistics 
quarterly: December 2014 
 
 
Understanding the demographics of people in prisons is important if we wish to appreciate 
their health needs. A  report from the House of Commons Justice committee into the needs 
of older prisoners found that older prisoners are the fastest growing group within the prison 
population. The latest statistics show the number of those aged over 60 and those aged 50 to 
59 have grown significantly between 2002 and 2014. 
 
Figure 7:
 The rise in the older prisoner population on 30 June, 2002 – 2014  
8,000
10

 
n
e

9
n
7,000
o
ti

m
h

8
la
6,000
u
lis
7
p
b
o
5,000
ta
6
 p
s
n
 e 4,000
5
o
n
o

4
ris
3,000
ris
3
l p
 p
ta
2,000
n
 i

2
f to
1,000
o
1
 o
ti
e
g

la
0
0
u
ta
p
2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
n
o
e
rc

l p
50-59 yrs
e
ta
P
o
T

60yrs and over
Percentage of prison population 50-59 yrs
Percentage of prison population 60 yrs and over
 
Source: MoJ Annual Prison Population Statistics 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/339036/prison-population-2014.xls  
 
 
20 

link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
This has led to a developing awareness among prison staff and prisoners of the difficulties 
faced by older people and a greater understanding that the response is often inadequate, 
and prisons ill-equipped, to meet their needsxii. Now that local social services are responsible 
for commissioning care and support services for prisoners, there are opportunities to develop 
improved responses to the needs of this growing and vulnerable population.  
 
The children and young people’s secure estate (CYPSE) 
Data from YJB shows that from April 2013 to March 2014 in England and Wales the average 
population in custody (under 18) was 1,216, down by 21% from an average of 1,544 in the 
previous 12 months. From April 2013 to March 2014, most (68%) young people (under 18) 
held in custody were in young offenders institutions, 22% were in secure training centres and 
the remaining 11% in secure children’s homes. 
 
The average length of time spent in custody was 90 days which limits the opportunities to 
fully address any identified health need. This means continuity of care is crucial in addressing 
this population’s needs. Such issues require both attention in any local joint strategic needs 
assessment (JSNA) and integration into any health and wellbeing strategy. 
The health and wellbeing needs of children and young people tend to be particularly severe 
by the time they are at risk of receiving a community sentence, and even more so when they 
receive a custodial sentence. This presents particular challenges to those addressing their 
health and social care needs. Although fewer than 1% of all children in England are in carexiii
looked-after children make up 33% of boys and 61% of girls in custodyxiv. Research carried 
out for YJB among children and young people in the secure estate (age 12 to 18) found that 
their rates of smoking, drinking and use of illegal drugs before entering custody were 
substantially higher than among young people who do not offendxv 
 
The Healthy Children, Safer Communities strategy states that over three-quarters of 
individuals in the CYPSE have serious difficulties with literacy and numeracy and over half 
have difficulties with speech, language and communication. Furthermore, over a third has a 
diagnosed mental health disorder. 
 
For many children and young people their experience of a secure setting brings them into 
sustained and meaningful contact with health services for the first time. The placement 
provides opportunities for the routine identification and subsequent treatment of health 
(including mental health and wellbeing) or issues of disability through the provision of 
enhanced support and tailored responses. 
 
The National Partnership Agreement ‘Improving health and wellbeing services for children 
placed in the children and young people’s secure estate for the commissioning and delivery of 
healthcare services in the CYPSE in England between NHS England, the YJB and PHE 2015 
to 2016 aims to ensure that through partnership working on operational and strategic issues to 
enable children and young people held in secure accommodation1 to access and receive the 
same quality and range of healthcare services as provided in the wider community.  
 
 
 
21 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Immigration removal centres (IRCs) 
As of 30 September 2014 there were 3,202 individuals in detention in an IRC in England, a 
10% increase compared with 12 months previously.  
 
The majority of immigrants in detention on 30 September 2014 were from South Asia, making 
up 40% of the IRC population, closely followed by individuals from sub-Saharan Africa (22%). 
Understanding the makeup of the detainee population helps differentiate the health 
requirements of IRCs from prisons due to the specific health issues faced by both groups.  
 
Figure 8: Proportion of people in detention on 30 September 2014 by place of birth  
Others
19% 
Middle East
3% 
Europe other
5% 
Africa other
9% 
China
2% 
Vietnam
3% 
Sri Lanka
4% 
Afghanistan
4% 
Albania
4% 
Jamaica
4% 
Bangladesh
7% 
Nigeria
10% 
India
12% 
Pakistan
17% 
0%
2%
4%
6%
8%
10%
12%
14%
16%
18%
20%
 
Source: Home Office https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/immigration-statistics-july-to-
september-2014-data-tables,
 all age groups 
 
NHS England commissioned a Health and Wellbeing Health Needs Assessment Programme 
Immigration Removal Centres and Residential Short Term Holding Facilities during 2014. 
They found that there are no national data on the prevalence of long-term health conditions 
amongst detainees. However, some ethnic groups are known to have higher prevalence 
rates of certain chronic conditions eg diabetes is found twice as often amongst Caribbean 
and South Asian communities in the UK compared to the British population as a whole. The 
report states that whilst there are no known prevalence figures for mental health problems 
amongst detainee populations there are certain common mental health conditions, especially 
those that are related to stress and depression.  These are likely to be high because of the 
factors affecting this population, for example experience of trauma, stress related to 
22 

link to page 49 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
immigration status and a likely return to a home country where conditions and circumstances 
may be challenging. 
 
This population is more likely to be susceptible to certain outbreaks of infectious diseases 
due to lack of immunisation in their home countries. Also, due to low prevalence of some 
infections outside the UK such as chickenpox, there is little chance of infection in childhood 
so they remain vulnerable as adults when they come to the UK and this makes infection more 
serious. Three out of the 4 chickenpox cases reported to PHIPS during 2014 were from IRCs 
and the chickenpox outbreak reported in Appendix 1 was at an IRC. 
  
Police custody suites 
There are 40 separate police forces in England, (39 territorial forces and British Transport 
Police) all of which are currently responsible for the healthcare of individuals whilst they are 
in police custody. From 1 April 2016 commissioning responsibilities for healthcare will 
transfer to NHS England.  
 
Home Office data shows that there were nearly 1.1million arrests between 1 April 2012 and 
31 March 2013 with men making up almost 85% of all arrests and over 75% of both male and 
female arrestees were aged 21 or over. Unlike with other detained settings we do not 
currently have a national system to monitor the health issues faced by this population, 
however we do know from health needs assessments recently carried out that the most 
common health issues affecting individuals that are arrested are substance misuse and 
mental health. With the transfer of commissioning over to NHS England from 2016 and the 
development of a health needs assessment (HNA) toolkit for police custody (due for 
publication during quarter 2 2015/16) we will soon be able to explore in more detail the public 
health issues affecting this population. 
 
 
 
23 

link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
3  National and local partnership work 
During 2014, the national Health & Justice Team have taken forward and supported a wide 
range of initiatives to improve health outcomes in detained populations to reduce reoffending 
and cut crime at both national and local levels working in partnership at local, national and 
international levels. Some of these initiatives are detailed in this chapter. 
 
3.1 Health and justice indicators of performance (HJIPs)xvi.  
 
Up to March 2014, a broad set of indicators, known as the prison health performance quality 
indicators (PHPQIs) have been used to monitor the quality of healthcare in prisons and 
young offender institutions accommodating under 18s, as well as the performance of other 
contributing health and prison services. However, the PHPQIs were not outcome focused 
and were qualitative measures that largely relied on self-assessment by local healthcare 
teams. Given this, and the recent changes in the commissioning of healthcare services in 
places of detention, it was widely agreed that the PHPQIs needed reviewing and updating to:  
•  support effective commissioning of healthcare services in places of detention 
•  enable national and local monitoring of the quality and performance of healthcare in 
the secure estate 
•  provide a tool for providers to review their performance and identify areas that need 
improvement 
•  provide data for local HNAs 
•  provide assurance to commissioners and partners, including NOMS, that healthcare 
delivery in prisons is fit for purpose 
•  provide information for the Care Quality Commission and the HM Inspectorate of 
Prisons to support their inspection work 
 
A new set of indicators were introduced in 2014 developed by PHE, NOMS and NHS 
England called HJIPs. Guidance was circulated to assist stakeholders and a series of 
workshops were held. The indicators are quantifiable where possible and cover a broad 
range of health themes. The focus during 2014 was the development of the indicators and 
the introduction of them to the system. NHS England have also been addressing data quality 
and supporting prisons to input their activity correctly. 
 
A separate set of HJIPs are being developed for the CYPSE, the IRC estate and police 
custody suites.  
 
 
3.2 Working with local government and local public health system 
 
Since April 2015 local authorities are responsible for assessing and meeting the social care 
needs of adult prisoners (not just on discharge from prison but also while they are in 
custody). This change in legislation affects those local authorities in England which have 
prisons within their boundaries. All prisoners within those prisons will now be treated as if 
they are resident in that area for purposes of the Care Act for as long as they reside in that 
24 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
prison. In 2015 the Health & Justice network will work with NOMS, NHS England and the 
Local Government Association to support the implementation of this legislation. 
 
Local authorities that do not have a prison within its boundaries also have a key role to play 
in delivering a ‘community dividend’ by addressing health issues in under-served populations. 
It is therefore important that JSNAs have clear references to health and justice. 
 
During September 2014 health and justice public health specialists based in the centres 
surveyed electronically published JSNAs from 147 local authorities in England. The survey 
identified any references to the CJS in these documents. Findings indicated 73 (49%) had 
direct references to health and justice within their published JSNA documents and a further 
71 (48%) had indirect references.  
 
Given that the vast majority of people in contact with the CJS reside in the community and 
not in custodial settings, it is important that all JSNAs make clear and explicit reference to 
health and justice. These populations also tend to be dynamic: around 45,000 people in 
prison serve less than12 months and some 34% IRC detainees are returned to the 
community and not deported. Further work is required to improve the level of engagement by 
local authorities, HWBs and DsPH. This will build on the work of PHE and its partners 
(including non-government organisations) who published a resource for DsPH in October 
2013 (‘Balancing Act’).  
 
 
Promising practice: 
 
Thames Valley: Working with local government 
 
A year-long project has resulted in the needs of people in contact with the CJS to be 
considered in local commissioning plans and to raise their profile as a population with 
considerable health needs in the community. In doing so, commissioners can now give 
thought to supporting the health needs of people across the criminal justice pathway, thereby 
reducing health inequalities.  
 
In March 2014, the Thames Valley Criminal Justice Board launched a document on the 
health needs of people in contact with the CJS. PHE supported the development of the 
document through the local health and justice public health specialist and provided the 
keynote speaker for the launch event. The event saw partners from the 8 local authorities 
across Thames Valley, CCGs, probation services and the police and as a result there is an 
agreed dataset shared annually from probation services to local authorities for inclusion in 
local JSNAs. 
 
 
3.3 Health needs assessments (HNAs) 
In order to meet the changing needs of the prison population, a toolkit has been produced by 
the Health & Justice PPDs HNA Working Group with representation from PHE, NHS 
England, NOMS, YJB and Public Health Wales. The Health & Justice HNA toolkit provides a 
consistent approach for producing a HNA, which can inform regional or national views of 
need across places of detention. It reflects the diverse health needs of different populations 
25 

link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
within PPDs for example women, older prisoners, young people, those with a learning 
disability and those with a physical disability.  
 
We have published the parts 1 and 2 of the Health & Justice HNA Toolkit for PPDs which 
describes the template for HNA for adult prisons. The second template for police custody is 
due for publication during quarter 2 2015-16. 
 
Templates supporting the creation of health and wellbeing needs assessments for CYPSE for 
ages 10 to 17 year olds are available on the  Child and Maternal Health Intelligence Network 
(CHIMAT) website.
 
 
 
Promising practice: 
 
West Midlands: Health needs of older prisoners, rapid health impact 
assessment, HMP Stafford 
 
NOMS’ redesign of the prison estate resulted in HMP Stafford (a victorian prison) being re-
rolled to accommodate primarily sex offenders. This allowed the completion of a rapid health 
impact assessment to explore the impact of that decision, to review information, evidence 
and intelligence and to identify key issues that could be managed through local planning and 
engagement with work partners. 
 
The work was undertaken as part of the health and justice programme for the west Midlands 
centre with partnership input from west Midlands stakeholders including NHS England NOMS 
and the Staffordshire local authority, as well as full engagement from HMP Stafford. The work 
took 4 months with the final report being published in July 2014.  
 
The project resulted in 68 recommendations for the prison and other stakeholders. These 
recommendations support the change process, inform local planning and are used to open 
local discussions on what work is needed to improve health and social care.  
 
 
 
3.4 Mental health 
Mental health needs among those in contact with CJS are often complex, with comorbidity 
the norm among this group. In a survey of prisoners carried out in 1997 on behalf of the DH, 
72% of male and 71% of female sentenced prisoners were found to suffer from 2 or more 
mental disorders (including personality disorder, psychosis, neurosis, alcohol misuse and 
drug dependence)xvii. The provision of effective mental health services across the custodial 
estate is a vital element of rehabilitative support provided to individuals.  
 
 
It is important to recognise that not all people who come into contact with CJS who require 
support with their mental health have committed a criminal offence. Police officers can be 
called to a scene where there are concerns for a person’s safety. Sections 135 and 136 of 
the Mental Health Act (1983) empower the police to detain an individual in need of immediate 
care and control, and take them to a place of safety for an assessment under the Act.  
26 

link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Figures published in 2014 by the Health and Social Care Information Centre on detentions 
under Section 136(3) of the Mental Health Act 1983 show that the reported number of place 
of safety orders made where an individual was taken to a police station has decreased by 
24%, from 7,900 between April 2012 and March 2013 to 6,000 in the following 12 months. 
The government is keen to continue to address this issue and ensure that the most 
vulnerable people in local communities are being supported by the most appropriate service 
and have asked local commissioners and providers to sign up to the Mental Health Crisis 
Care Concordat. 
 
 
Liaison and diversion schemes 
 
Liaison and diversion services are intended to improve the health and criminal justice 
outcomes for adults and children who come into contact with the criminal justice 
system where a range of complex needs are identified as factors in their offending 
behaviour.Ten liaison and diversion trial schemes set up across England in 2014 which are 
delivering an all age approach. A new wave of implementation was started in April 2015 for a 
further 13 sites, giving a total population coverage of 53%xviii. The initial trial schemes show that 
of those people entering liaison and diversion schemes, 58% of cases were identified by the 
police, 65% of adults were already known to mental health services and 45% of children were 
known to children’s services. At least 50% of adults in the schemes had comorbid conditions. 
 
The DH is funding street triage pilot schemes, managed by 9 police forces, in partnership 
with local NHS organisations. In these street triage schemes mental health professionals 
provide on the spot advice to police officers who are dealing with people with possible mental 
health problems. Further information on street triage will be made available as the pilot 
schemes roll out. 
 
Deaths in custody 
 
MoJ statistics in figure 9 indicate an increase in  the number of self-inflicted deaths in prisons 
over the last 3 years. A better understanding of these cases and a broader approach to 
tackling mental health in prisons is required.  
 
27 

link to page 62
Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
 Figure 9:  Numbers and rate of deaths in prison custody from 2005 to 2014
 
Source: Ministry of Justice England and Wales, all age groups, 
https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/safety-in-custody-statistics 
 
More recent data shows that in the 12 months to March 2015 there were 239 deaths in prison 
custodyxix – an increase of 14 deaths compared to the 12 months ending March 2014. Of the 
239 deaths, 76 were self-inflicted (a reduction  from 88 deaths in the same period in 2014), 144 
from natural causes, 4 homicides and 15 categorised as ‘'awaiting further information'’ 
(including accidental and other difficult to classify deaths). A small proportion of the most recent 
figures from the last two years is expected to be reclassified as natural causes. In 2014 there 
were 25,775 reported incidents of self-harm, an increase of 2,545 incidents (11%) from 2013.  
 
In attempting to reduce self-inflicted deaths, the mental health of those in prison needs to be 
reflected on in context. People are often entering prison with certain vulnerabilities, into a 
stressful environment and without their usual social and family supports. Therefore, best 
practice for treatment of mental ill-health needs to be applied as well as consideration of 
broader environmental factors such as increased awareness of staff of mental health and 
creating facilitative and enabling environments to increase overall positive wellbeing.  
 
To this end, PHE has been supporting the MoJ on a review of mental health service provision 
in prisons and the development of a potential model of mental health services that could take 
these issues into account. PHE is also working with NHS England around unclassified deaths 
to improve practise and reduce the incidence of these going forward. 
 
3.5 Continuity of care 
As with all health issues, the concept of continuity of care is vital to ensure continual 
improvement of health and the potential to reduce future reoffending. The offender 
management community cohort study 
(OMCCS) is a longitudinal cohort study of adult 
offenders who started community orders between October 2009 and December 2010. The 
OMCCS estimated that nearly one-third of offenders on community orders reported that they 
28 

link to page 62 link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
had mental health conditions (29%); these were particularly prevalent among women (46%) 
and older offenders (40% of those aged 40 and over). 
PHE and NHS England are committed to ensuring continuity of care not only around the 
estate but also on release into the community. The prison primary care information system 
(SystmOne) enables information on health issues to be transferred with a prisoner when 
moved to another prison and generates a care summary record for their GP and other care 
providers on release into the community. The National Probation Services and CRCs can 
support healthcare providers and drug treatment providers in planning and providing 
continuity of care to ensure that social and healthcare needs are identified and addressed for 
prisoners prior to release. Drug and alcohol service providers will also work effectively with 
prisoners in preparation for release to ensure seamless transition of care from custody to 
community settings. Healthcare needs are also supported by ensuring prisoners leaving 
prison have access to appropriate medication through issuing of an FP10 prescription which 
can be used to access medication required immediately on release. 
DsPH have an important role in raising the issue of continuity of care locally with their CCGs 
to consider the needs of people in contact with CJS in commissioning community services. 
There is also scope for the involvement of CRCs as new partners in the local stakeholder 
landscape. The transforming youth custody programme led by the MoJ and the YJB, has 
presented an opportunity to embed a consideration of health and substance misuse need in 
all planning for improved resettlement and an associated reduction in the rate of reoffending 
of this cohort. CCGs play an important role in ensuring local pathways are in place to support 
timely access to a range of health services on release from secure settings.  
 
3.6 Substance misuse 
 
The economic burden that illicit drug use imposes on NHS England and the CJS is significant 
– see Table 1 belowxx. Drug users are estimated to be responsible for between a third and a 
half of acquisitive crime and treatment can cut the level of crime they commit by about half.xxi 
 
Table 1: The economic and social costs of Class A drug use 
% of total 
 
£m  
cost 
Drug-related crime 
Fraud 
£4,866 
32% 
Burglary 
£4,070 
26% 
Robbery 
£2,467 
16% 
Shoplifting 
£1,917 
12% 
Drug arrests 
£535 
3% 
Health costs 
Inpatient care 
£198 
1.2% 
Inpatient mental health 
£88 
0.6% 
A&E 
£81 
0.5% 
Community mental health 
£61 
0.4% 
Primary care – GP visits 
£32 
0.2% 
Neonatal effects 
£3 
0.1% 
Infectious diseases 
£25 
0.1% 
29 

link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Drug-related deaths 
£923 
6.0% 
Social care 
£69 
0.4% 
Total 
£15,337m 
99% 
Source: Home Office 
 
There is also a strong link between alcohol, and crime, disorder and anti-social behaviour, 
with alcohol being a factor in an estimated 47% of violent crime.xxii   
 
Young people in custody also have disproportionately high levels of substance use.xxiii In the 
audit commission’s report ‘Misspent Youth: Young People and Crime’, 15% of young 
offenders had a drug problem of some kind. However, for persistent offenders this figure 
increased to 37%.xxiv 
 
Over the past 10 years, targeted investment in criminal justice based substance misuse 
interventions, both in community and custodial settings have made a significant contribution 
in reducing drug and alcohol related crime and improving health outcomes and building safer 
more resilient communities. Since drug interventions programme began in 2003, recorded 
acquisitive crime – to which drug-related crime makes a substantial contribution – has fallen 
by 39% across England and Walesxxv. It is believed that the improved availability and quality 
of drug treatment during the same period has played a key part in this fall. To continue to 
build on this success, it is essential that we ensure that commissioners maintain appropriate 
levels of funding in drug treatment services. 
 
Recognising the increasing pressure on local authority, public health and police and crime 
commissioners budgets, PHE has released a series of reports that show local estimates of 
the prevalence of opiate and/or crack cocaine use, key national data for comparison and in 
addition to data from the national drug treatment monitoring system (NDTMS), estimates on 
crimes prevented from PHE’s local value for money analysis and conviction data produced 
through analysis of police national computer and NDTMS combined datasets. These reports 
will assist local commissioners by providing information that can inform local JSNAs and 
support the argument for continued investment in drug and alcohol treatment as an effective 
means of achieving better crime reduction and health improvement outcomes, as well as 
supporting interventions with drug misusing offenders that local authorities directly 
commission. 
 
The reports also provide data identifying the numbers of prisoners with substance misuse 
needs returning to each local authority area and the main prisons that they are being 
released from. This information should not only assist with meeting the needs of this 
particularly vulnerable group but also encourage greater dialogue and joint planning between 
local authority, police and crime commissioners and NHS England health and justice 
commissioners. These reports are available via the local PHE centre alcohol and drug 
manager 
and local authority joint commissioning managers. 
 
In terms of alcohol, NDTMS records that there were 15,123 primary alcohol new treatment 
entries across the adult prison estate in England between April 2013 and March 2014. Of 
these, 8,963 completed a clinical detoxification intervention having been assessed as alcohol 
dependent. It is acknowledged that the majority of alcohol related crimes are committed by 
individuals whose drinking patterns are assessed as harmful or hazardous but who are not 
alcohol dependent. These individuals are often not identified on entry to prisons either 
because they decide not to disclose their alcohol problems or because of ineffective 
30 

link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
assessment/screening processes. Even where problems are identified, the limited availability 
of psychosocial interventions and treatment programmes for alcohol users in prison will often 
mean that they are unable to access the help they need.  
 
In preparation for the introduction of Through the Gate services in all prisons from May 2015, 
PHE has been working in partnership with NOMS, NHS England and prisons to test a new 
approach to working with alcohol misusing offenders in prisons and follow up in the 
community with offenders. The model is based on brief interventions (BI), an approach that 
has a robust evidence base in primary care and has been used successfully in community 
based criminal justice settings. The project has been testing whether BI reduces drinking 
levels among higher and increasing-risk drinkers (non-dependent) and assess the longer-
term impact in terms of offending and health outcomes. The new licence conditions that will 
apply to all sentenced prisoners on release offers the opportunity to engage both prison 
based providers and the new CRCs who will be responsible for supervising these individuals. 
 
 
The emergence of novel psychoactive substances (NPS) within detention settings in 
England is supported by much anecdotal and significant media comment. Since these 
substances are deigned to mimick existing illicit drugs, stimulating or depressing the central 
nervous system, and/or causing a state of dependence, they pose public health risks 
including fatalities. The Home Office expert panel’s NPS review defines NPS as 
“psychoactive drugs, newly available in the UK, which are not prohibited by the United 
Nations Drug Conventions but which may pose a public health threat comparable to that 
posed by substances listed in these conventions”.  
 
In response to these issues PHE published a new NPS toolkit. The toolkit has been produced 
in response to a demand from local authorities for a NPS resource, and it was developed in 
consultation with local substance misuse commissioners and other professionals working in 
the drug prevention and treatment sector, as well as the Home Office, NOMS and NHS 
England. The toolkit helps set the scene on NPS and covers key topics such as prevention, 
information sharing, responding to acute NPS problems, treatment, workforce and prisons. 
 
3.7 Tobacco control 
Approximately four times as many people in prisons smoke than in the general population, 
with similarly high levels of smoking found among those in police custody and probationxxvi
These extraordinarily high rates of smoking damage health, and, when compared with the 
general population, cause marked health inequalities for offenders. Given the high rates of 
smoking, exposure to second-hand smoke is extensive across CJS and damaging to health 
of smoking and non-smoking offenders, visitors and staff. Stop smoking service provision is 
variable across the whole of the prison estate and is not joined-up between CJS settings or 
between CJS and the community. In 2007 a comprehensive national smoke-free policy was 
introduced in England. Adult prisons were the only setting exempted allowing prisoners to 
smoke in their own cells and nowhere else in the prison. 
 
The Health & Justice Team have supported PHE’s tobacco control team in working alongside 
NHS England and NOMS to reduce the levels of smoking in adult prisons. We recognise that 
this is a difficult journey and one which must be made in partnership, balancing the tensions 
that exist in the system, with the need to ensure that people are protected from the damaging 
effects of second-hand smoke. PHE has developed guidance for the management of 
31 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
smoking and nicotine withdrawal, which has been published on the gov.uk website. We are 
also working with NHS England to explore how the availability of prisons services to support 
people in stopping smoking can be matched to those available in the wider community. In 
moving towards a smokefree estate we will support NOMS and NHS England to reduce the 
number of people who currently smoke whist detained, so that the transition to smokefree will 
affect as few people as possible. 
 
3.8 Public Health Intelligence in Prisons and Secure Settings Service (PHIPS)  
Originally established in 2002, the then Prison Infection Prevention Team was set up within 
the Health Protection Agency to monitor the coverage of hepatitis B vaccinations within the 
prison population. The team is now called PHIPS and is based within the national Health & 
Justice Team. It has recently been re-branded to reflect the increasing role that the team has 
in gathering evidence and intelligence to improve the health of people in prisons and other 
PPDs. This includes: 
•  data to support HNAs 
•  HJIPs 
•  MMR and seasonal flu vaccine coverage 
 
PHIPS works closely with the national Health & Justice (Health Protection) Network to 
receive reports of communicable diseases and develop national guidance for stakeholders 
within the field. The Network has published a range of materials to support stakeholders in 
health protection and also collect reports of infectious diseases throughout the estate. 
 
Communicable diseases often affect a larger proportion of those in the CJS than the general 
population. Appendix A provides details of all communicable diseases reported to the Public 
Health Intelligence in Prisons and other Secure Settings Service 
during 2014. It also 
references other PHE data sources and makes comparisons between the prevalence of 
diseases in prisons compared to the community. For example Table 2 shows a higher 
incidence of infection such as hepatitis C amongst the prison population (8%) than in general 
primary care (2%). 
  
Table 2: Trends in individuals tested for HBsAg, anti-HCV and HIV by service, 2014 
Number/ 
Number/ 
Number/ 
Number  
percentage 
Tested 
percentage 
Number 
percentage 
Service type  
tested for 
of positive 
for Hep 
of positive 
tested for 
of positive 
hep B  
Hep B 

Hep C 
HIV  
HIV results 
results 
results 
Drug services 
1,103 
12/1.1% 
1,136 
106/9.3% 
524 
2/0.4% 
Prison 
3,301 
49/1.5 
4,089 
327/8.0% 
2,834 
16/0.6% 
services  
All primary 
135,372 
1,898/1.4 
113,367 
2,263/2.0% 
226,264 
1,860/0.8% 
care  
Source: PHE sentinel surveillance of blood-borne virus testing in England, all age groups 
 
Prisons and other detention settings are at risk of outbreaks of infectious diseases due to the 
population being at higher risk of infections and also living at close quarters to each other 
creating an elevated opportunity for transmission of disease. It is important that clear 
arrangements are in place to address this which is why PHE, in partnership with NOMS and 
32 

link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
NHS England have published a suite of guidance. Appendix A usefully explores the 
outbreaks reported to the PHIPS service during 2014 and addresses the trend of outbreaks 
throughout the year. 
 
In light of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, PHE Health & Justice Team organised and led a 
table-top event, Exercise Cerberus, for IRCs on the effective management of an incident of 
suspected Ebola virus with the aim of improving resilience within the IRC estate. The event 
was co-sponsored by NHS England and the Home Office. In addition to this we have led on 
the development of bespoke guidance on Ebola in PPDs. 
 
3.9 Opt-out blood-borne virus testing  
It has been evidenced that rates of illegal drug use amongst prisoners are higher than that of 
the general populationxxvii. Injecting drug use is the main risk factor in the transmission of 
blood borne virus (BBV) for hepatitis C infection in the UK with over 90% of new infections 
acquired in this wayxxviii 
 
PHE has data from several different sources which measure and report the prevalence of 
infection among people in prison; however, all these data sources also show significant 
under-testing of prisoners. Influenced by the evidence of impact of switching to an opt-out 
policy in antenatal testing for HIV in the UK in the 1990s, and recognising that people in 
prison were missing an opportunity for testing and treatment, PHE in consultation with its 
partners including NHS England and the NOMS as well as patient advocates such as the 
Hepatitis C Trust and the National AIDS Trust, advocated for the introduction of an ‘opt-out’ 
testing policy for BBV for people in prisons. This was agreed and published as a joint 
developmental priority in the National Partnership Agreement between PHE, NHS England 
and NOMS in October 2013xxix. This commitment has continued through to the revised 
National Partnership Agreement 2015/16 identifying a commitment in priority 3 to ‘Improve 
the proactive detection, surveillance and management of infectious diseases in prison and 
improve capability to detect and respond to outbreaks & incidents’’ and will continue to 
implement an ‘opt-out’ policy and build on best practice for testing for BBVs and development 
of care pathways for those found to be infected.  
 
The key aim of the policy is to increase the diagnosis and treatment of people in prison for 
infection with BBVs, namely hepatitis C, hepatitis B and HIV, through the introduction of an 
opt-out testing policy across all prisons in England. Already this is seen to have had results 
with an increase in hepatitis C tests performed since April 2010, rising steadily from just 4% 
of new receptions between April and June 2010 to 10% between January and March 2014xxx
 
Figure 10:
 % of hepatitis C tests performed by quarter on new prison receptions from Apr 
2010 to Mar 2014 
33 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
12%

 fo
d

10%
te
s
 te
s
n

8%
o
ti
p
e

  
c
 C
p

6%
 re
e
w
h
e
n

 o

4%
e
g
ta
n
e

2%
rc
e
P

0%
2010/11
2011/12
2012/13
2013/14
Jan-Mar 2014
 
Source: PHPQI data, all age groups 
 
Work during 2014 included a national event held which was held in Birmingham on 1 May 
2014 to launch the work. A number of local events have also taken place for example in 
Yorkshire and the Humber and west Midlands and a range of supporting guidance has been 
developed to support the opt-out BBV testing programme. 
 
Eleven initial ‘pathfinder’ prisons introduced the policy as part of the first phase of the 
programme and these have been evaluated by the national task and finish group to enable 
lessons to be learned from their experiences across the estate. The key findings from the 
report are as follows: 
 
•  preliminary data suggests a near doubling of BBV testing following the 
introduction of the opt-out testing policy 
•  the proportion of those testing positive for the three BBVs has remained stable 
from before the policy was implemented to after 
•  when asked, 8/11 respondents believe that they have identified people who 
would otherwise have remained undiagnosed 
•  numbers being referred for hepatitis C treatment have increased significantly 
since the introduction of the opt-out testing policy 
•  almost all pathfinders (10/11) provided hepatitis C treatment as an in-reach 
model except one which is done in-house as part of a wider multi-disciplinary 
team 
•  of those being referred for hepatitis C treatment, around 1 in 3 (69/226) 
commenced treatment in the 12 month period before the opt-out policy was 
introduced and around 1 in 4 (42/185) in the 6 month period after 
 
 
There are now an additional eleven prisons implementing the policy as part of the 
second phase of the programme. All these prisons will also be evaluated after 6 months 
of implementation later in 2015. There are also an additional 32 prisons that are not part 
34 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
of the pathfinder programme but who report they are either implementing or well on their 
way to implementing the policy. 
 
A second national event took place on 21 May 2015 in Birmingham to support stakeholders 
in implementing the work through learning lessons from the initial pathfinders. Also, working 
in partnership with the Hepatitis C Trust, a series of roadshows are being held during 2015 
which will focus on hepatitis C generally but also serve to raise awareness about opt-out BBV 
testing in prisons. The first of these was held in Liverpool on 6 March and the second one is 
planned in London on 26 June 2015. 
 
Promising practice: 
 
East Midlands: Introduction of dried blood spot testing (DBST) in 12 
prisons 
 
As part of BBV opt-out programme, the east Midlands prisons have introduced DBST into its 
12 prisons. DBST removes the need for venepuncture therefore is ideal for patients with 
damaged peripheral veins such as through drug use and it can be performed by any trained 
healthcare worker.  
 
The programme was implemented in partnership with the NHS England area team, the 4 
county hepatologists, providers and prison healthcare staff. An agreement with the local 
empath laboratory enables the tests to be conducted at a local NHS laboratory. Each sample 
is tested for hepatitis B surface antigen, hepatitis C antibody and PCR and HIV antibody and 
antigen. Any patient testing positive receives a venous blood test and is referred to 
secondary care as necessary.  
 
The phased implementation of the programme has been successful enabling good practice to 
be replicated and any issues to be addressed. The method of testing is preferred by staff and 
prisoners and, as the method is quicker, clinics are able to offer testing to more prisoners. 
The programme has not required additional funding and more prisoners are accessing 
testing, the programme has not resulted in a large increase in testing requiring additional 
clinics or resources. Some prisons receiving from local prisons have noticed an increased 
amount of prisoners at reception having already had BBV testing.  
 
 
Promising practice: 
 
Yorkshire and the Humber:  Local planning for opt-out BBV testing  
 
Local partnership planning to implement opt-out BBV testing in prisons was achieved in two 
ways. Firstly an event was held in May at HMP Askham Grange which involved key 
stakeholders from across the region to look at how BBV work can be implemented locally. 
The session consisted of presentations from NHS England, PHE national Health & Justice 
Team and clinicians providing treatment for hepatitis C in local prisons. In addition to this 
participants were asked to attend workshops to map out any local issues regarding 
implementing the pathway. 
 
35 

link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Secondly NHS England recruited a project manager to lead on the implementation of opt-out 
BBV testing in prisons. They are working in close partnership with the PHE health and justice 
public health specialist overseen by a multi-agency working group. Quarterly bulletins are 
also being circulated to stakeholders to inform them of progress. 
 
 
3.10 Tuberculosis 
TB infection is also higher amongst people in prison compared to the community. Prisoners, 
their social networks, and those who ‘rotate’ between prison and the community have long 
been recognised as being at risk of TB, due to the over-representation amongst them of risk 
factors including homelessness, drug use and alcohol misuse. Some forms of TB, particularly 
those affecting the lungs or larynx, can be transmitted to other prisoners and to staff. The most 
recent figures estimate that in the general population there were a total of 7,892 cases of TB 
notified in the UK in 2013, an incidence of 12.3/100,000 populationxxxi. Places of detention 
report a higher incidence of TB, and using the standing prison population from the MoJ as a 
denominator and PHIPS reports there were 100.9 cases per 100,000 in 2013 and 64.3 in 2014. 
Figure 3 details reports of TB in prisons in England which showed an increase from 46 reported 
cases in 2007 to 85 cases in 2013. This may be partially attributable to a change in the 
reporting of TB cases which is further explored in Appendix A. During 2014 there were fewer 
cases reported (55) and during 2015 we will be monitoring this closely to see if there is a 
sustained reduction in comparison to previous years.  
 
 
 
Figure 11: 
The number of TB cases in PPDs in England reported by year 2007 to 2014 
95
90
84 
85 
85
80
74 
75
70
65
60
55 
 
55
51 
50
46 
Single
45
f cases
cases
40
 o
36 
Outbreaks
35
er
b

29 
30
m
u
25
N
20
15
10
5



0
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Year 
 
Source: PHE, PHIPS data, all age groups 
 
36 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Prisons were identified as a key setting for TB control in the Chief Medical Officer’s action 
plan for England,
 published in 2004. Also, PHE and NHS England have now published the 
Collaborative tuberculosis strategy for England: 2015 to 2020 in January 2015 which looks at 
building on the assets already in the NHS and the public health system, to support and 
strengthen local services in tackling TB. This includes tackling TB in under-served 
populations such as those in CJS.  
 
PHE, NHS England and NOMS are committed to improving the detection and management 
of TB among prisoners at or near reception and will ensure that all fixed digital X-ray 
machines are fully operational and being used as part of an active care pathway in those 
prisons where they are currently installed. Work is ongoing in sites that have a digital X-ray 
machine installed in a local prison to improve the detection of TB on reception to prison. 
These prisons are HMP Holme House (north-east England), HMP Manchester (Greater 
Manchester), HMP Birmingham (west Midlands) and  London prisons, HMP Wandsworth, 
HMP Belmarsh, HMP Wormwood Scrubs, HMP Pentonville, HMP Thameside and HMP 
Brixton. There has been delivery of a series of TB awareness and health promotion events in 
some prisons across London, Greater Manchester and west Yorkshire which has been led by 
PHE health protection staff with the support of other key local partners. Furthermore a 
London TB improvement strategy was agreed by NHS England London (health and justice) 
and PHE (London). 
 
 
37 

link to page 62 link to page 62 link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Whilst there has been progress across the estate to address TB we are still faced with 
challenges and there are currently only 2 out of the 8 digital X-ray machines in use. Work is 
ongoing to address this and addressing this is included in the National Partnership 
Agreement 
for 2015 to 2016. 
 
Promising practice: 
 
London: Development of a London TB service improvement plan for 
prisons and IRCs 
 
Following a TB service audit across all prisons and IRCs in London by NHS England and 
PHE, a plan was developed to help improve local TB services. The plan was designed and 
agreed over a 2 month period and included specific recommendations for each of the 
prisons/IRCs. Key themes include: 
 
- regular TB review at contract management meetings: NHS England will regularly review TB 
services at each establishment contract management meetings with providers 
- enhanced support where necessary: Further advisory support will be available to prisons 
and IRCs where need is identified 
- facilitating improvements by sharing good practice: PHE has started work on building good 
practice case studies around ways to improve TB identification and management in relevant 
detention settings 
 
 
 
 

3.11 Oral health 
The prison population generally has poor oral health, with reports of periodontal disease 
and/or decayed, missing or filled teeth scores around 4 times higher than the general 
populationxxxiiStudies have shown that oral health is poorer in a population of criminally 
xxxiii
convicted individuals before entering prison
. Despite the increased need for treatment, 
xxxiv
evidence suggests that people in prison infrequently seek dental care
Shortcomings in 
dental care have been attributed to both infrequent clinical sessions and poorly equipped 
clinical services. This problem is exacerbated by the rising numbers of people in prison, as 
well as an aging prison population, which has increased the strain on all healthcare provision 
in prisons. 
 
In partnership with NHS England, NOMS, Public Health Wales and the National Association 
of Prison Dentistry UK, a national survey was published in 2014 which looked at the 
variations in dental health services located within prisons in England and Wales and provides 
recommendations for future planning. A national multi agency working group focusing on 
dental public health in PPDs has now been developed led by PHE’s dental public health team 
and is tasked with responding to the introduction of the recommendations in the report. 
 
 
38 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Promising practice: 
 
 
Yorkshire and Humber:  Collaborative working between NHS England and 
PHE to improve the delivery of integrated dental services in PPDs 
 
Previously dental contracts were not fully in place with inadequate service specifications in 
some prisons and concerns were raised around quality of services, waiting lists, ‘did not  
attends’/cancelled sessions and lack of integration with healthcare. 
 
The Yorkshire and Humber PHE centre health and justice public health specialist and dental 
public health lead worked closely with NHS England to support the procurement of 
healthcare provision, including dental services in the Humber cluster (3  prisons)  between 
February and November 2014. This included a comprehensive review of dental services and 
support is currently extending into the contract mobilisation period. A similar approach is 
being adopted to support a larger procurement of healthcare services across west Yorkshire, 
planned for 2015.  
 
Through collaborative working with NHS England, dental public health expertise has 
contributed to the effective commissioning of prison dental services, to ensure that high 
quality and evidence based services meet the needs of the prisoners providing  improved 
health including oral health outcomes. 
 
 
 
 
39 


 
Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
4  International engagement in health and 
justice work   
 
 
 
 
 
WHO Health in Prisons Programme Collaborating Centre (WHO HIPP CC) 
 
In 1995, the World Health Organization (European Region) and the UK established a network 
for the exchange of experience in tackling health problems in prisons. From this network 
emerged the WHO Health in Prisons Programme (WHO HIPP), which includes member 
states in the European region. The purpose of the network is to exchange experience in 
tackling the health issues facing prisoners and prisons and to produce consensual 
statements of advice.    
 The aim of the programme is promoting 
 health in prisons as part of the overall 
 public health agenda. The European 
 Network for Prisons and Health currently 
 
includes most of the 53 member states of 
 the WHO European Region. The WHO 
 pages contain further information.  
    
On April 1 2014, PHE took over the 
 
function of the WHO HIPP Collaborating 
 
Centre from the University of Central 
 
Lancashire, who had previously been 
 
contracted by the Department of Health to 
 
deliver this function. This change heralded 
 
the integration of the function of the WHO 
 
HIPP CC into the wider work of PHE and 
 
aligned the structure of the WHO HIPP CC 
 
with other WHO Collaborating Centres 
 
 
hosted by PHE. 
 
 
    
The UK Collaborating Centre   
 
 
  
 
 
The work of the WHO HIPP CC is unique in that it is not mirrored in other WHO regions. Its 
focus on prison populations makes a significant contribution to taking forward work on the 
WHO European health policy framework, Health 2020, which aims to improve public health 
and reducing health inequalities. The framework views social values such as human rights 
and equity as key to good governance for health. As such, when a state detains people it 
must guarantee their right to health and provide them with the best possible care. While great 
strides are being made to improve the health of prisoners in the European Region, many 
member states in the European region still do not fully meet their responsibility to protect the 
health of their prisoners. An expert group advising the WHO Office (Europe) on the 
organisation of prison health concluded that: 
 
40 

link to page 62
Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
•  the management and co-ordination of all relevant agencies and resources contributing 
to the health and well-being of prisoners is a whole-of-government responsibility 
•  health ministries should provide and be accountable for health care services in prisons 
and advocate healthy prison conditionsxxxv 
 
The focus of the collaborating centre is to support the development of a European network to 
exchange experience, expert advice and promote innovation in addressing health and 
healthcare challenges facing prisoners and prisons. This can be achieved by promoting 
health in prisons as part of the overall public health agenda and, crucially, advocating that 
Health Ministries should be responsible for commissioning prison healthcare as opposed to 
Justice Departments/Ministries – see figure 13 below. Outlined below are some of the key 
achievements of the WHO HIPP CC work in 2014 which have underpinned the approach. 
 
Figure 13: European Ministries responsible for commissioning prison healthcare 
 
 
Key achievements:  
 
In February 2014, the WHO HIPP CC founded, with other member states, the Five 
Nations’ Health & Justice Collaboration with England, Northern Ireland, the Republic of 
Ireland, Scotland and Wales and held the first meeting in London which agreed 
membership, terms of reference and to rotate the host and chair of the meeting across 
member states with three meetings planned for 2014. 
At this same meeting, the WHO HIPP CC secured the support of both the Irish Prison 
Service and the WHO Regional Office to hold the next WHO HIPP European network 
meeting in the Republic of Ireland with an associated two day international conference on 
41 


Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
prison health. PHE agreed to co-produce the conference with the Irish Prison Service 
(IPS). 
In May 2014, the Director of the WHO HIPP CC attended an expert meeting on prison 
health in Strasbourg sponsored by the Council of Europe and presented PHE’s vision for 
health and justice and some of the achievements to date of the WHO HIPP CC. The 
director of the WHO HIPP CC attended a meeting of the European Network the next day 
to review the organisation of the network and to seek assurance of WHO regional office in 
Europe and its director to the continuation of the work of the WHO HIPP CC. PHE also 
pledged to support the WHO HIPP CC function following the departure of staff sponsored 
by the Swiss government. PHE would deliver this by appointing an interim public health 
lead to work across England and Copenhagen. 
In June 2014, PHE created the post of public health specialist to support the work of the 
WHO HIPP and the WHO HIPP CC.  
In June 2014, the WHO HIPP CC supported the IPS in hosting the second meeting of the 
Five Nations’ Health & Justice Collaboration in Dublin, which was also attended by Dr 
Lars Møller, programme manager alcohol and illicit drugs and prison health programmes 
in the Division of Non-communicable diseases and Promoting Health through the Life-
course, WHO Regional Office for Europe. This meeting agreed an outlined work 
programme for the collaboration and discussed details about the next network meeting 
and international conference on prison health which was held in Portlaoise in October 
2014. 
During summer 2014, the WHO HIPP CC worked with the IPS to organise the second 
annual prison health conference in Portlaoise, the Republic of Ireland. The event was 
aimed at all 53 member states in the European region, particularly staff working in 
prisons, in partner organisations, including commissioners and providers of health and 
social care, and others that work to meet the health needs of people in prisons, as well as 
people in contact with CJS in the community. Over 2 days presentations addressed 2 
themes: prisoner empowerment and improving lives in the community. The Prisoner 
empowerment theme detailed the highly successful and influential work from the Irish 
Prison Service, the Irish Red Cross and Education and Training Boards Ireland.
 In 
addition to highlighting the WHO document ‘Prisons and Health’, launched earlier in 2014, 
the conference received an update of ‘Prevention of acute drug-related mortality in prison 
populations during the immediate post-release period.’
 
The WHO HIPP CC has also supported collaboration with international partners on 
research and development of prison health systems in both Europe 
and North America. 
 
Future plans 
 
The third annual Prison Health Conference will be held in October 
2015 in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. The programme and theme will be 
developed by a steering group during the spring 2015. 
42 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
The WHO HIPP CC will continue to support the development of Health without Barriers 
and its associated projects. 
The European Federation for Prison Health has promoted the collection of information 
from member states on: the statutory responsibility for the health of prisoners in each 
country; estate and demographic profile and prevalence of major infections, such as 
BBVs, amongst the prison population in each of the 6 state members. The results of this 
survey will help inform the work priorities of the working groups in the short and medium 
term. 
Leadership and resources to support the Five Nations’ Health & Justice Collaboration 
across the countries and devolved administrations of the UK and the Republic of Ireland 
will also be part of the WHO HIPP CC work programme. There is also a plan and deliver 
an annual meeting of the WHO HIPP Network and a wider international conference on 
health and justice within the jurisdiction of the Five Nations. 
Finally, the WHO HIPP CC will be working closely with colleagues in Copenhagen to take 
forward proposals to develop a minimum data set for health indicators in prisons that 
could be adopted by all member states. This will be supported by a web-based platform to 
assist ease of access. The WHO HIPP CC will be assisting in the development of the 
minimum data set variables. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
43 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
5  Conclusions and looking forward 
The legislative and structural changes to the health and justice landscape in the financial 
year 2014 to 2015 have created new opportunities to address the health inequalities faced by 
people in prescribed detention. However, the overwhelming majority of people in contact with 
the CJS will live most of their lives in the community which means that the needs of this 
population need to be addressed by a wide range of stakeholders. We know that addressing 
the health needs of people in contact with CJS plays a key role in cutting crime, reducing 
reoffending and tackling health inequalities and this delivers a community dividend in tackling 
wider health issues in under-served populations.  
 
In order to really have an impact on the health needs of this population and the wider 
community we need to also improve prevention efforts to begin to address some of the 
determinants of health affecting this population. 
 
 
The needs of people in detained settings vary widely depending on the type of setting and 
the demographics of the individuals within it. Our understanding of need is improving all the 
time with the introduction of the HJIPs, the development of a second generation IT system 
(Health & Justice Information Service) which will enable records to be shared across 
detained settings and with the community and the availability of guidance to assess the 
needs of people in the various settings through HNAs. We have started already to make 
progress on some of the key issues affecting this population by introducing preventative 
measures such as vaccination and screening programmes and the imminent introduction of 
health checks in prisons. Furthermore, Chapter 3 provides examples of ways we are 
addressing health needs such as the introduction of the opt-out BBV testing policy. 
 
The WHO HIPP CC will continue to develop its work programme across the 53 member 
states promoting the benefits of healthcare being commissioned by health ministries. 
 
 
The WHO HIPP annual conference for 2015 will take place in October in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 
and will continue to promote a range of good practice initiatives with a diverse international 
audience. This will build on the work that has been highlighted in our London and Portlaoise 
conferences rallying efforts to introduce and implement work designed to have a significant 
impact on the health and healthcare or prisoners across the European region.  
 
In 2015 we also intend to embark on new initiatives with European partners to create a 
minimum dataset for comprehensive, consistent and reliable public health data on the prison 
populations across the WHO European region which would allow both in-country assessment 
of health needs as well as comparisons between countries and their respective prison 
populations. 
 
The focus in 2015 will ensuring that the key public health issues affecting this population are 
being identified and sufficiently robust plans are being developed to meet them at various 
levels across those stakeholder organisations described in this report.  
 
44 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
 
Some of the key areas we will be working on with partners as part of the National Partnership 
Agreements during 2015 include: 
 
Adult Prisons 
 
 
1.  Review and align NHS England and NOMS’ commissioning systems and strategies 
to ensure quality services which support health and justice outcomes. 
2.  Strengthen integration of services and continuity of care between custody and the 
community, including through development of liaison and diversion services. 
3.  Improve the proactive detection, surveillance and management of infectious 
diseases in prison and improve capability to detect and respond to outbreaks and 
incidents. 
4.  Reduce levels of smoking amongst prisoners. 
5.  Review the management of medicines and the impact of NPS in prisons to address 
risk of misuse and resultant harms. 
6.  Strengthen multi-agency approaches to managing prisoners and learning from 
services and pathways at serious risk of harm and further embed shared learning to 
continuously improve practice. 
7.  Undertake joint priority services reviews to ensure that best practice is being 
adopted and promoted. 
8.  Introduce integrated health and social care services for prisoners in line with the 
Care Act 2014. 
 
Children and Young People 
 
1.  Improve the quality and delivery of health care services to children in the CYPSE 
appropriate to need and informed by rigorous formal assessment of health needs, 
including improving access to appropriate screening and immunisation 
programmes. 
2.  Work collaboratively to support the commissioning of clinical management for 
substance misuse. 
3.  Work collaboratively to support the commissioning of assessment and intervention 
services for children and young people who exhibit sexually harmful behaviour. 
4.  Develop liaison and diversion services at the point of arrest that are suitable to meet 
the needs of children and young people. 
 
IRCs 
 
1.  Development and delivery of a consistent and recognised approach to mental health 
assessment and appropriate treatment for detainees. 
2.  Improve the pro-active detection, surveillance and management of infectious 
diseases in IRCs and improve capability to detect and respond to outbreaks and 
incidents. 
3.  Improve access to treatment for chronic infectious diseases. 
4.  Strengthen multi-agency approaches to managing detainees at serious risk of harm 
and further embed shared learning to continuously improve practice including 
lessons learned from serious untoward incidents and deaths in detention. 
45 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
5.  Align NHS England and Home Office Immigration Enforcement commissioning 
systems and strategies to ensure quality services which support health and Home 
Office outcomes. 
 
Within PHE Health & Justice we will be taking the lead on the following priorities: 
 
1.  Improving the proactive detection, surveillance and management of infectious 
diseases in prison and improve capability to detect and respond to outbreaks and 
incidents. 
2.  Increasing the identification of people with HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C and 
increasing access to treatment. 
3.  Protecting the detention estate from flu outbreaks. The final flu vaccine coverage 
figures for April 2014 to March 2015 show only 48% of all those at risk in prisons 
have been vaccinated. This is insufficient to protect the detention estate from flu 
outbreaks and there is work to be undertaken during 2015 before next season’s flu 
season to improve coverage. 
4.  Supporting local authorities to ensure that all JSNAs capture the needs of offenders 
in detention and in the community. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
46 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Data sources 
Ministry of Justice 
Safety in custody statistics 
Offender Management Statistics Quarterly 
Publications:
 
 
January to March 2014  
 
 
 
 
 
 
April to June 2014 
 
 
 
 
 
 
July to September 2014 
 
 
 
 
 
 
December 2014 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Home Office  
Immigration statistics quarterly release  
  
Youth Justice Board 
Youth custody data  
 
PHE 
 
 
PHIPS data 
GUMCAD 
Sentinel Surveillance of BBV Testing 
SOPHID 
 
ImmForm 
 
 
Flu vaccine coverage in prisons 
 
NOMS 
Flu vaccine coverage of staff working in prisons 
 
NHS Trust Development Authority 
PHPQI data   
 
 
 
 
 
47 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Glossary of abbreviations 
BBV    
 
Blood-borne virus 
BI 
 
 
Brief interventions 
CYPSE  
 
Children and young people’s secure estate 
CCGs  
 
Clinical commissioning groups 
CHIMAT  
 
Child and Maternal Health Intelligence Network 
CJS    
 
Criminal justice system 
CRCs  
 
Community rehabilitation companies 
DBST  
 
Dry blood spot testing 
DsPH  
 
Directors of public health 
GI  
 
 
Gastrointestinal  
GUM    
 
Genitourinary medicine 
GUMCAD  
 
Genitourinary medicine clinic activity dataset v2 
HJIPs  
 
Health and justice indicators of performance 
HNAs  
 
Health needs assessments 
IPS 
 
 
Irish Prison Service 
IRC    
 
Immigration removal centre 
JSNAs  
 
Joint strategic needs assessments 
MoJ   
 
Ministry of Justice 
NOMS  
 
National Offender Management Service 
NPS   
 
Novel psychoactive substances 
OMCCS 
 
Offender management community cohort study 
PCR    
 
Polymerase chain reaction (shows active infection of hepatitis C) 
PHIPS  
 
Public Health Intelligence for Prisons and Secure Settings Service 
PHPQIs  
 
Prison health performance and quality Indicators 
PPDs   
 
Prescribed places of detention 
PVL    
 
Panton-valentine leukocidin 
SOPHID  
 
Survey of prevalent HIV infections diagnosed 
SPCR  
 
Surveying prisoner crime reduction 
STI    
 
Sexually transmitted infection 
TB  
 
 
Tuberculosis 
WHO HIPP CC 
Collaborating Centre for World Health Organization Health in   
Prison’s Programme based in PHE          
YJB    
 
Youth Justice Board 
 
 
Ages of detainees in PPDs 
Secure children’s home 
 
Generally under 15 
Secure training centre 
 
Generally up to 18 
Young offender institution   
Generally 15 to 20 
Adult prisons  
 
 
Generally 21 and over 
IRCs   
 
 
 
All age groups 
 
Some women’s prisons have specific areas for young offenders, so generally only 17 year 
old women will be held in young offender institutions with other age groups being held in 
SCHs, STCs or women’s prisons. 
48 

link to page 51 link to page 51 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Appendix A: PHIPS data outputs2 
As discussed above the PHIPS service within PHE’s Health & Justice Team collects 
information on communicable disease in PPDs in England for all age groups although the 
data mainly represents adults. In addition to this there are also other useful data sources 
within PHE which capture information on diseases in this setting. 
 
This appendix provides national and local data on the incidence of single incidents as well as 
outbreaks reported over 2014 and earlier. 
 
A. PHIPS reports, 2014 
 
A1. Single reports to PHIPS 
 
The number of single reports made to PHIPS has doubled since the publication of our last 
report when there were 549 made to us during 2011 compared to 1,268 during 2014. This is 
due to the improvement made on the number of chronic hepatitis B and C cases now being 
reported, which account for the majority of cases (1,174/1,268). The other noticeable 
differences are the decrease in cases of PVL reducing from 6 in 2011 to less than 5 in 2014 
and flu which had 6 cases reported in 2011 compared to just 1 in 2014. 
 
Table 1a: 
Single reports made to PHIPS in 2014 
Infection 
2014 
2011 
Campylobacter 
<5 

E Coli 0157 
<5 
<5 
Food poisoning 
<5 

Giardia 
<5 
<5 
H1N1 
<5 

Hep B and C chronic 
<5 

Hep B acute 
<5 
<5 
Hep B acute and hep C PCR+ve 
<5 

Hep B chronic 
104 
45 
Hep B chronic and Hep C 
<5 

Hep C acute 
<5 
<5 
Hep C antibody+ve 
526 
2893 
Hep C antibody+ve / PCR-ve 
63 

Hep C PCR+ve 
477 
89 
Herpes zoster (Shingles) 


Invasive group A streptococcus (IGAS) 
<5 
<5 
                                            
 
2 Numbers under 5 have been suppressed to ensure that a breach of 
confidentiality does not occur.  
3 2011 data did not specify if hep c was antibody +ve with PCR -ve 
 
49 

link to page 62 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Infection 
2014 
2011 
Meningitis 
<5 

Mumps 
<5 
<5 
Methicillin-sensitive staphylococcus 
<5 
<5 
Salmonellosis (Salmonella enterica)  
<5 

Scabies 


Staphylococcus aureus / PVL  
<5 

TB (site not specified) 
<5 

TB incident (pulmonary) 
43 
39 
TB single case (non-pulmonary) 
10 
15 
Varicella (chickenpox) 
<5 

Other 
 
25 
Grand Total 
1,268 
549 
Source: PHE, PHIPS  
 
A2. Outbreaks 
 
In total there were 29 outbreaks reported in 2014, 26 of which were due to gastrointestinal 
(GI) illness. This number is similar to the number reported in 2011 (28 outbreaks reported). 
 
Figure 1a: Outbreaks reported 2014 
  14
12
rte
10
p
e

8
 r
s
k

6
a
re

4
tb
2
u
o

0
V
s
r
y
r o
te
not
ox
e
D&
iru
 (
ting
tor
p
b
ov
tion
bac
d)
ra
en
m
or
lo
itis
omi
pi
ec
k
u
c
N
V
N
ter
ifie
es
inf
hi
mpy
R
C
a
pec
C
troen
s
as
G
 
Source: PHE, PHIPS  
 
Each year the majority of GI outbreaks occur over the summer and autumn months. However 
this was not the case during 2014 where the reports were spread across each of the months 
(see Figure 2a). PHIPS data on GI outbreaks in prisons and other secure settings has been 
analysed over the last 3 years (2011 to 2014) to identify any patterns and trends and 
compare these with data from the national PHE norovirus surveillance for the same 
periodxxxvi. It was found that the number of outbreaks in PPDs shows less fluctuation than 
that in hospitals, indicating that although certainly not “immune” from GI outbreaks, prisons 
might be less subject to the marked epidemiological variation registered in hospitals and the 
community.  
 
 
50 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Figure 2a: Number of GI outbreaks reported by month, 2014 
 
 
 
6
  
5
k
Vomiting outbreak
a
re 
4
tb
GI outbreak
u
f o 
3
Gastroenteritis, suspected
r o
e

norovirus
2
m
Gastroenteritis outbreak (no
u
1
certain identified organism)
Campylobacter outbreak
0
y
y
t
ril
y
y
s
r
er
er
er
ar
ar
rch
p
Norovirus outbreak
une
ul
J
b
b
ru
a
A
Ma
J
ugu
mb
tobe
anu
M
e
c
em
em
J
eb
A
F
O
D & V Outbreak
ept
ov
ec
S
N
D
Month
 
 
Source: PHE, PHIPS, all age groups  
 
A3. TB reports 
 
2014 saw a drop in the number of TB reports made to PHIPS in comparison to recent years. 
As shown in Figure 3a there has been a steady rise in the number of cases reported until 
2013 with a large increase between 2010 (51 cases) and 2011 (74 cases). However, the data 
shows a decrease in 2014 where we have received 55 reports.  
 
There has been 1 outbreak (ie evidence of transmission within the prison) each year between 
2010 and 2012. In 2010 and 2012 these were in the south-east area (affecting different 
prisons) and in 2011 the east Midlands. There has been no TB outbreak reported during 
2014.  
 
The rise in single TB cases since 2011 may partly be due to the work that has taken place 
with both the PHE Enhanced TB Surveillance Team and the London TB Register Team to 
ensure that all cases are cross-referenced and that correct numbers can be accurately 
reflected. Furthermore, PHIPS has worked closely with the PHE Health and Justice Health 
Protection Network to improve the reporting of all infectious diseases locally and health 
protection teams throughout England have been very proactive in improving reporting of 
infectious diseases from their prisons, which may also account for some of the increase in 
numbers. 
  
Figure 3a: The number of TB cases reported by year 2007 to 2014 
 
51 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
95
90
84 
85 
85
80
74 
75
70
65
60
55 
  55
51 
50
46 
Single
f cases 45
cases
 o 40
36 
er
Outbreaks
35
mb
29 
30
N
25
20
15
10
5



0
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
Year 
 
Source: PHE, PHIPS, all age groups  
 
Table 2a and Figure 4a below both show the number of TB reports made by site and PHE 
Centre. London has considerably more cases of TB (20/55) than anywhere else in the 
country accounting for 36% of all reports. Lincolnshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire and 
Derbyshire received 9/55 reports making up 16% of all cases. 
 
Table 2a: TB reports by PHE Centre, 2014 
TB (site 
TB single 
PHE Centre 
Total single 
TB incident 
reports 
not 
case (non-
specified) 
(pulmonary) 
pulmonary) 
Anglia and Essex 
<5 

<5 
<5 
Avon, Gloucs and Wilts 




Cheshire and Merseyside 
<5 

<5 

Cumbria and Lancs 
<5 

<5 

Devon, Cornwall and S’set 
<5 

<5 

Greater Manchester 
<5 

<5 

Lincs, Leics, Notts and D'shire 

<5 


London 
20 

15 

North east 




S Mids and Herts 
<5 


<5 
Surrey, Sussex and Kent 
<5 

<5 

Thames Valley 
<5 

<5 
<5 
Unknown 
<5 

<5 

Wessex 
<5 

<5 
<5 
 West Midlands 
<5 

<5 

Yorkshire and Humber 
<5 

<5 
<5 
Grand Total 
55 
<5 
43 
10 
Source: PHE, PHIPS 
52 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
 
The vast majority of reports made to PHIPS are pulmonary making up 78% of the cases.  
 
Figure 4a: TB reports by site in 2014 

10 
TB (site not specified)
TB incident (pulmonary)
TB single case (non-
pulmonary)
43 
 
Source: PHE, PHIPS Service 
 
 
B.  Other surveillance systems 
 
There are a number of other useful data sources available which provides us with additional 
information about infectious diseases in prisons. These are detailed below. 
 
B1. Flu vaccine coverage in prisons 
During the ‘flu season’, data is collected from ImmForm (a system used to record data in 
relation to uptake against immunisation programmes). This data is extracted from SystmOne 
and circulated to stakeholders nationally on a weekly basis.  
 
Every year PHE publishes guidance for PPDs on responding to cases or outbreaks of 
seasonal flu and this year, in partnership with NHS England, the document set an ambition of 
75% flu vaccine coverage in PPDs. 
 
Table 3a below shows the vaccine coverage in prisons using the final flu vaccination data 
collected from week ending 30 November 2014 to week ending 25 January 2015. Some 
prisons have reached the ambition of 75% coverage; however the total England coverage is 
only 48% which is not sufficient coverage to protect the estate from outbreaks. PHIPS is 
liaising with prisons who have managed to achieve 75% plus coverage to share lessons 
across the estate and help other prisons achieve this during the next flu season. 
 
Table 3a: Flu vaccine coverage in prisons, week 4, week ending 25 January 2015 
Total 
Total number 
Vaccine 
Number 
Number of 
number of 
of patients 
Uptake 
of 
patients 
Commissioning 
at risk 
within A that 
(%) 
patients 
already 
Region & Area Team 
patients 
have received 
calculate
refused/ 
vaccinated 
registered 
the Flu 
d by the 
declined 
at another 
53 

link to page 56 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
on day of 
vaccine since 
system 
vaccine 
site 
extraction  
1 September 
2014 
North 
 
 
 
 
 
Durham, Darlington 
 1,016 
 615 
 60.5 
 167 
 83 
and Tees 
Lancashire 
 1,927 
 915 
 47.5 
 164 
 157 
West Yorkshire 
 1,836 
 918 
 50 
 399 
 109 
Midlands and east 
  
  
  
  
  
of England 
Derbyshire and 
 1,972 
 978 
 49.6 
 191 
 135 
Nottinghamshire 
East Anglia 
 1,850 
 1,004 
 54.3 
 193 
 118 
Shropshire and 
 1,790 
 792 
 44.2 
 105 
 89 
Staffordshire 
London 
  
  
  
  
  
London 
 1,470 
 417 
 28.4 
 125 
 91 
South 
  
  
  
  
  
Bristol, north 
Somerset, 
Somerset and 
 931 
 447 
 48 
 88 
 58 
south 
Gloucestershire  
Kent and Medway 
 1,732 
 760 
 43.9 
 125 
 137 
Thames Valley 
 1,076 
 643 
 59.8 
 185 
 77 
England Total 
 15,600 
 7,489 
 48.0 
 1,742 
 1,054 
Source: ImmForm 
 
Data is also collected on the number of staff receiving a vaccination working in NOMS 
commissioned PPDs. Table 3b below shows that of the 105 establishments that provided data 
21% of all staff in the prison were vaccinated4.  
 
Table 3b: Flu vaccine coverage in prisons amongst staff in England 2014/15 
Number of 
Number of 
Number of flu 
Number of employees 
Vaccine Uptake 
establishments 
staff in post 
clinics held 
vaccinated 
as at 30 
September 
2014 
105 
32936 
265 
6866 
21% 
Source: NOMS 
 
B2. Prison Health Performance Quality Indicators (PHPQIs) 
As discussed above the PHPQIs were replaced with HJIPs in April 2014. For the reporting 
period April 2013 to March 2014 PHPQI data is used.  
 
                                            
 
4 Note this percentage calculates all staff in the prison and not the percentage of those eligible for it (ie those in 
frontline prisoner facing roles only). Those eligible would account for just over half the staff in each prison. 
54 

link to page 57 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
Figure 5a below shows the number of new receptions for the year amounting to a total of 
204,941 for England5. This provides a useful picture of how many prisoners and detainees 
are moving through the system in each area. 
 
Figure 5a: 
Total receptions during April 2013 to March 2014 by area 
40,000
 
35,000
n
o
ti 
30,000
p
e
25,000
20,000
f r
r o 
15,000
e
10,000
m
u

5,000
N
0
 
Source: NHS Trust Development Authority, ages 18+ 
 
Figure 6a shows the percentage of new receptions protected against hepatitis B and the 
percentage of new receptions being tested for hepatitis C during the reporting period April 
2013 to 2014. In England, 56% of new receptions were protected against hepatitis B but only 
8.6% of new receptions were tested for hepatitis C. However Figure 7a below shows a 
national increase in hepatitis C tests being performed since April 2010 rising steadily from 
just 4% of new receptions between April and June 2010 to 10% in between January to March 
2014. This is likely to be largely attributable for the introduction of opt-out BBV testing across 
the estate.  
 
Figure 6a: 
Percentage coverage of hepatitis B vaccine and hepatitis C tests performed April 
2013 to March 2014 by local area 
                                            
 
5 Note: The PHPQI data will under-represent the total receptions and those vaccinated against hepatitis B and 
tested for hepatitis C in the areas where not all PPDs submitted their activity. 
55 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
90
80
70
 
e

60
tag
50
cen
40
er
30
P
20
10
0
% hep B vaccine coverage of new receptions
%  hep C tests performed of new receptions
 
Source: NHS Trust Development Authority, ages 18+ 
 
Figure 7a: 
Percentage of hepatitis C tests performed on new prison receptions in England 
12%
 
 C

10%
 for hep
ted 
8%
tions tes
ep 
6%
 rec
ew
f n 
4%
tage o 2%
cen
Per

0%
2010/11
2011/12
2012/13
2013/14
Jan-Mar 2014
 
Source: NHS Trust Development Authority, PHPQI data, ages 18+ 
 
B3. Sentinel surveillance of blood-borne virus testing in England 
This sentinel surveillance study began in 2002 with the aim of gathering information on 
testing for hepatitis C within sentinel laboratory services, to inform local and national 
healthcare planning and help reduce incidence and prevalence. It has since been expanded 
so as to cover all regions and to include hepatitis B and HIV. Approximately a third of the 
prison estate is covered by the scheme. The study collects information on testing carried out 
in participating sentinel centres regardless of test result and therefore can also be used to 
56 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
estimate prevalence in those individuals tested. There are now 24 participating laboratories 
across England. 
 
Table 4a shows the total number of individuals testing for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV in 
different service types and Figure 8a usefully shows the proportion of those tested who are 
positive for a BBV. Not surprisingly the proportion of those testing positive for hepatitis C are 
far greater in the prison services and drug services than in primary care generally. For HIV 
and hepatitis B however the percentage of those testing positive is more consistent with 
primary care generally.  
 
Table 4a: Trends in individuals tested for HBsAg, anti-HCV and HIV by service type, 2013 
and 2014 
Drug Services 
Prison Services 
All Primary Care 
 
2013 
2014 
2013 
2014 
2013 
2014 
Tested for 
1,506 
1,103 
3,477 
3,301 
141,293 
135,372 
hep B 
Positive for 

51 
1,706 
1,898 
12 (1.1%) 
49 (1.5%) 
hep B 
(0.5%) 
(1.5%) 
(1.2%) 
(1.4%) 
Tested for 
1,536 
1,136 
4,242 
4,089 
111,066 
113,367 
hep C 
Positive for 
155 
400 
2,412 
106 (9.3%) 
327 (8%) 
2,263 (2%) 
hep C 
(10.1%) 
(9.4%) 
(2.2%) 
Tested for 
587 
524 
3,627 
2,834 
254,496 
226,264 
HIV 
Positive for 

19 
1,940 
1,860 
2 (0.4%) 
16 (0.6%) 
HIV 
(0.2%) 
(0.5%) 
(0.8%) 
(0.8%) 
Source: PHE sentinel surveillance of BBV testing, all age groups  
 
Figure 8a: Percentage of individuals testing positive for a BBV during 2013 and 2014 
12
10
 
e
tiv

8
si
o

Drug dependency
e p
6
services
tag
Prison services
4
cen
er

Primary care
P
2
0
% +ve % +ve % +ve % +ve % +ve % +ve
hep B hep B hep C hep C
HIV
HIV
2013
2014
2013
2014
2013
2014
 
Source: PHE sentinel surveillance of BBV testing, all age groups 
 
 
 
 
57 

link to page 62 link to page 60 link to page 60 Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
B4. Genito-Urinary Medicine Clinic Activity Dataset (GUMCAD) v2 
 
Research from the US has reported higher rates of STIs among prisoners compared to the 
general population.xxxvii However, until 2011 collection of routine data on the sexual health of 
prisoners was not in place. Since then, GUMCADv2 (a pseudo-anonymised patient-level 
electronic dataset collecting information on diagnoses made and services provided by GUM 
clinics) has been collecting routine data on prisoners. However, it was noted that not all 
testing, diagnoses and treatments for STIs take place in GUM clinics in prisons and therefore 
not all data for STIs in prisons is reported to GUMCAD. Nevertheless, the dataset does 
provide us with a useful picture of new STI diagnoses among prisoners in England. 
 
Table 5a:  Number of new STI diagnoses among prisoners in England, 2011 to 20136 
 
2011 
2012 
2013 
Chlamydia 
114 
183 
163 
Gonorrhoea 
12 
23 
15 
Herpes: anogenital 
11 
10 
14 
herpes (1st 
episode) 
Syphilis: primary, 
<5 

<5 
secondary and 
early latent 
Warts: anogenital 
249 
424 
341 
warts (1st episode) 
Source: GUMCADv2 
 
Total number of new STI diagnoses* among prisoners in England, 2011 to 2013 
 
2011 
2012 
2013 
All new STIs* 
545 
864 
710 
*Includes chancroid / LGV / donovanosis, chlamydia, gonorrhoea, herpes: anogenital herpes (1st episode), HIV: new 
diagnosis, molluscum contagiosum, non-specific genital infection, pelvic inflammatory disease & epididymitis: non-specific, 
scabies / pediculosis pubis, syphilis: primary, secondary & early latent, trichomoniasis, warts: anogenital warts (1st episode) 
Source: GUMCADv2 
 
B5. Survey of Prevalent HIV Infections Diagnosed (SOPHID) 
SOPHID began in 1995 is a cross-sectional survey of all persons with diagnosed HIV 
infection who attend for HIV care at an NHS site in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. 
This data set provides information of the numbers of individuals living with and diagnosed 
with HIV within PPDs. 
 
In 2013, there were 9 adults (aged 15 or above) that were diagnosed with HIV at a prison 
service in the UK. Of the 74,159 adults living in England with a diagnosed HIV infection, 208 
of them were likely to be prisoners. There were also likely to be 22 adults from immigration 
removal centres7. 
                                            
 
6 2011 data are underreported due to the phased introduction of prisoner coding during 2011 
7 The numbers are likely to be under-reported because the recording of prison status is not routine. Prisoners were 
identified if the residential postcode was a prison postcode. Therefore the completeness and accuracy of the 
numbers depends on the clinicians’ reports. Data on patients seen for care at non-NHS funded services are not 
included and those with a short sentence be treated after release and therefore not captured. 
58 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
References 
                                            
 
i NHS England, Securing excellence in commissioning for offender health, March 2013 
http://www.england.nhs.uk/2013/03/07/offender-health/  
 
ii Prison Reform Trust, Prison: the facts. PRT Bromley Briefings Summer 2014 
http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/Portals/0/Documents/Prison%20the%20facts%20May%202
014.pdf 
 
 
iii National Partnership Agreement between the National Offender Management Service, NHS 
England and Public Health England for the co-commissioning and delivery of healthcare 
services in prisons in England, 2015-16 https://www.gov.uk/healthcare-for-offenders 
   
 
 
iv Department of Health (2007) Improving Health, Supporting Justice - a consultation. A strategy 
for improving health and social care services for people subject to the criminal justice system. 
London: Department of Health 
http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20130107105354/http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Consultati
ons/Liveconsultations/DH_080816?IdcService=GET_FILE&dID=154893&Rendition=Web 
 
v Ministry of Justice. (2014) Safety in Custody Statistics England and Wales, Deaths in prison 
custody to December 2014, Assaults and Self-harm to September 2014 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/399071/safety-in-
custody-to-sept-2014.pdf 
 
 
vi Offender Health Research Network, Shaw et al. An evaluation of the reception screening 
process used within prisons in England and Wales. December 2008. Published to OHRN 
website, in electronic PDF format only http://www.ohrn.nhs.uk  
 
vii Identifying and managing tuberculosis among hard-to-reach groups NICE public health 
guidance 37 March 2012 
http://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph37/resources/guidance-identifying-and-managing-
tuberculosis-among-hardtoreach-groups-pdf 
 
viii Senior J, Forsyth K, Walsh E, O'Hara K, Stevenson C, Hayes A, et al. Health and social care 
services 
for older male adults in prison: the identification of current service provision and piloting of an 
assessment and care planning model. Health Serv Deliv Res 2013;1(5).  
http://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0008/76562/FullReport-
hsdr01050.pdf 
 
 
ix Jacobson, J., Bhardwa, B., Gyateng, T., Hunter, G., & Hough, M. (2010) Punishing 
Disadvantage: a profile of children in custody. 
London: Prison Reform Trust 
 
x  Ministry of Justice, Prisoners’ childhood and family backgrounds Results from the Surveying 
Prisoner Crime Reduction (SPCR) longitudinal cohort study of prisoners, 2012 
59 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
                                                                                                                                                        
 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/278837/prisoners
-childhood-family-backgrounds.pdf 
 
xi Ministry of Justice,  Story of the Prison Population: 1993 – 2012 England and Wales 
January 2013 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/218185/story-
prison-population.pdf 
 
 
xii Prison Reform Trust, Bromley Briefings Prison Factfile Autumn 2014 
http://www.prisonreformtrust.org.uk/Portals/0/Documents/Bromley%20Briefings/Factfile%20Aut
umn%202014.pdf 
  
 
xiii Department for Education (2013) Children looked after in England year ending 31 March 
2013, London: DfE, Stats Wales website, and Office for National Statistics (2013) Population 
Estimates Total Persons for England and Wales and Regions - Mid-1971 to Mid-2012, London: 
ONS 
 
xiv Kennedy, E. (2013) Children and Young People in Custody 2012–13, London: HM 
Inspectorate of Prisons and Youth Justice Board 
 
xv Healthy Children, Safer Communities programme (2012) Evidence about the health and well-
being of children and young people in contact with the youth justice system 
 
xvi NHS England, PHE and NOMS, Health and Justice Indicators of Performance (HJIP): Adult 
Secure Estate, User Guide 2014/15 
 
xvii Office for National Statistics, Psychiatric morbidity among prisoners: Summary report, 1997 
http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/psychiatric-morbidity/psychiatric-morbidity-among-
prisoners/psychiatric-morbidity-among-prisoners--summary-report/index.html  
 
 
xviii Presentation to the Health & Justice Clinical Reference Group by Kate Davis, NHS England, 
13th January 2015. 
 
xix Ministry of Justice Statistics bulletin, Safety in Custody Statistics England and Wales,  
Deaths in prison custody to March 2015, Assaults and Self-harm to December 2014 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/425028/safety-in-
custody-dec-2014.pdf 
 
 
xx Economic and social costs of Class A drug use. Available from: 
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/measuring-different-aspects-of-problem-drug-use-
methodological-developments 
 
 
xxi National Treatment Agency (2012). Estimating the crime reduction benefits of drug treatment 
and recovery. Available from: www.nta.nhs.uk/uploads/vfm2012.pdf  
 
xxii Office for National Statistics tables: http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/publications/re-reference-
tables.html?edition=tcm%3A77-296029 
 
 
60 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
                                                                                                                                                        
 
xxiii Galahad SMS Ltd (2004) Substance misuse and juvenile offenders. London: Youth Justice 
Board 
 
xxiv Quoted in Galahad SMS Ltd YJB publication (2004) Available from: 
www.galahad.co.uk/publish/SubstanceMisuseJSEfull.pdf 
 
xxv Drug Interventions Programme (DIP) introducing locally funded drug testing on arrest (and 
associated interventions) a good practice guide Home Office April 2011 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/118047/Introduci
ng-Locally-Funded-DTOA.pdf 
 
xxvi Public Health England, Reducing Smoking in Prisons Management of tobacco use and 
nicotine withdrawal, 2015 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/smoking-in-prisons-
management-of-tobacco-use-and-nicotine-withdrawal 
 
 
xxvii Ministry of Justice, Gender differences in substance misuse and mental health issues 
among prisoners, 2013 https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/gender-differences-in-
substance-misuse-and-mental-health-amongst-prisoners--2 
 
 
xxviii Public Health England, Hepatitis C in the UK, Report 2014  
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/hepatitis-c-in-the-uk  
 
xxix National Partnership Agreement between the National Offender Management Service, NHS 
England and Public Health England for the co-commissioning and delivery of healthcare 
services in prisons in England, 2013 
 
xxx NHS Trust Development  Authority, Prison Health and Performance Quality Indicators 
 
xxxi Public Health England. Tuberculosis in the UK: 2014 report [Internet]. 2014 [cited 2014 Nov 
9]. Available from: 
https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/360335/TB_Ann
ual_report__4_0_300914.pdf 
 
 
xxxii Bolin, K. and Jones, D. (2006), “Oral health needs of adolescents in a juvenile 
detention facility”, Journal of Adolescent HealthVol. 38, pp 755-757. 
Department of Health (2005) “Reforming Prison Dental Services in England – A Guide 
to Good Practice”. , Harvey, S., Anderson, B., Cantore, S., King, E. and Malik, F. 
 
 
xxxiii Osborne, M. Butler,T (2003) Oral Health status of prison inmates - New South 
Wales, Australia. Aust Dent J : 48: 34-38 
 
xxxiv Jones CM, Woods K, Neville J, Whittle JG. (2005). Dental health of prisoners in the 
North West England in 2000: Literature review and dental health survey results. 
Community Dental Health 22: 113-17 
 
xxxv WHO, Prison and health, 2014  
http://www.euro.who.int/en/health-topics/health-determinants/prisons-and-
health/publications/2014/prisons-and-health 
 
 
61 

Public Health England Health & Justice report 2014  
 
                                                                                                                                                        
 
xxxvi PHE, gastrointestinal outbreaks in prisons in England: Three years analysis 
http://www.idrn.org/events/previous/norovirus.php  
 
xxxvii G. Kouyoumdjian, D. Leto, S. John, H. Henein, S. Bondy. A systematic review and meta-
analysis of the prevalence of Chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis in incarcerated persons. Int J 
STD AIDS April 2012 23: 248-254 
 
62 

Document Outline