This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Board meeting 25 November'.


Natural England Board   
 
 
Meeting: 
48 
Date:       
26 November 2014 
 
 
 
Paper No:     NEB P48 02 C 
 
Title: 

Approval for Defra submission of the Falmouth Bay to St Austell 
Bay potential Special Protection Area (pSPA) 

 
Sponsor: 

Andrew Wood - Executive Director, Science and Evidence 
 
 
1. 
Purpose 
 
1.1.  
The purpose of this paper is to seek Natural England Board approval for 
Natural England’s final recommendations to Government, following formal 
consultation, for the Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay potential Special 
Protection Area (pSPA). 
 
2. 
Recommendations 
 
2.1.  
It is recommended that the Board: 
 
•  considers the evidence and consultation responses and confirms that it 
is satisfied with the recommendations; and 
 

•  confirms that Natural England should submit the recommendation to 
Defra that the site should be classified as per the consultation. 
 
3. 
Background: 
 
3.1. 
The Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay potential Special Protection Area (pSPA) 
qualifies for SPA classification under Article 4 of the Birds Directive 
(2009/147/EC). 
 
3.2 
The site regularly supports more than 1% of the Great Britain wintering 
population estimate of three Annex I species: black-throated diver, Gavia 
arctica
; great northern diver, G. immer; and Slavonian grebe, Podiceps 
auritus
. The total area of the site is 29403.26 ha. (See discussion of ‘regularity 
of use’ in table 2). 
 
3.3 
Article 4 of the Birds Directive (2009/147/EC) requires that Member states 
classify the most suitable territories for defined species (those listed in Annex 
I (Article 4.1)) and regularly occurring migratory species (Article 4.2) in the 
geographical sea and land area covered by the Directive. 
 
3.4 
There are already over 108 SPAs with marine components designated within 
UK inshore waters and, currently, three fully marine SPAs. The UK is 
committed to identifying SPAs in the marine environment, and classifying as 
many as possible of the recommended sites by 2015 in order to fulfil the 

 

requirements of the Birds Directive, and thereby reduce the risk of infraction 
proceedings. 
 
3.5 
These cases constitute Natural England’s advice to Defra. The Secretary of 
State is the final decision-maker. The Non-Financial Scheme of Delegation 
currently states the following for international site designation cases: 
 
Table 1: Delegation 
 
 
Function 
Delegation 

Approval to submit formal advice (Departmental 
Chief Executive 
Brief1 or Selection Assessment Document2) to 
 
Secretary of State on the selection of a pSAC, 
pSPA or pRamsar site or proposed amendments 
to an existing cSAC, SCI, SAC, SPA or Ramsar 
site. 

Following the consultation, approval of final 
 
advice, with or without modifications, and report 
on the consultation, where: 
 
a) objections or representations are unresolved 
Board or Chairman on 
behalf of the Board 
 
b) there are no outstanding objections or 
Appropriate Director 
representations (i.e. where no objections or 
 
representations were made, or where 
representations or objections were withdrawn or 
resolved) 
1Departmental Briefs (for Special Protection Areas and Ramsar sites) 
2Selection Assessment Documents (for Special Conservation Areas) 
 
Part A – In the first instance the scientific case is developed and presented to the 
Chief Executive (and the Executive Board) who discuss the case and 
approve sign off as Natural England’s formal scientific advice to Defra.  
Defra then seek Ministerial approval for Natural England to consult on these 
proposals on behalf of Government. 
 
Part B – Once the formal consultation process has completed, Natural England 
considers any scientific objections to the proposals and endeavours to 
resolve any issues or concerns raised by stakeholders during the 
consultation.  If, after a reasonable process of liaison with stakeholders, 
there are outstanding issues that cannot be resolved Natural England 
finalises the report on the consultation for Defra and sets out its final advice 
on the case in the report.  There may be changes proposed as a result of 
the consultation and outstanding issues for Defra’s consideration. 
 
i)   Where there are no outstanding objections, representations or issues 
with respect to the proposals the relevant Director can approve the 
consultation report for submission to Defra. 
 
ii)  Where there are outstanding issues which it has not been possible to 
resolve the responsibility for approval of the consultation report falls to 
Board, or Chairman on behalf of the Board. 
 
3.6 
See Annex 1 for the citation. The scientific case for the designation was set 
out in the Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay Departmental Brief. Annex 2 
provides a summary of issues following formal consultation; this annex 

 

includes a map of the boundary options as discussed in the Departmental 
Brief (figure 1) and the proposed boundary map as included in the formal 
consultation (figure 2). 
 
4. 
Consultation process 
 
 
4.1 
Natural England’s Executive Board approved the site for submission to Defra 
for formal consultation in December 2013.  Approval was given by 
Government to proceed with formal consultation on the site in January 2014.  
The consultation included the Departmental Brief (which explained the 
scientific basis for site selection) and Impact Assessment.  
 
4.2 
The formal consultation on the proposals ran for a period of 26 weeks from 20 
January – 21 July 2014. In total, 207 owners and occupiers of the site and 
514 other consultees were formally consulted. In addition, the proposals and 
associated documents in full were available to view on Defra’s and Natural 
England’s websites. 
 
4.3 
54 responses were received to the consultation, and 35 required detailed 
consideration. These responses have been reviewed and responded to, 
jointly with the JNCC as appropriate. Work locally to try to resolve any 
outstanding objections continued up until the date of submission of papers to 
this meeting. The Consultation Report outlines any representations or 
objections that were made and in each case sets out Natural England’s 
response and recommendation to Defra.  
 
4.3 
16 stakeholders were supportive of the proposals, 18 objected in principle to 
the proposals with 20 stakeholders neither supporting nor objecting to the 
recommendations. Four stakeholder representations remain unresolved. Five 
points of concern remain unresolved and considered as outstanding 
objections for Defra’s consideration. A further 14 stakeholders have not 
explicitly stated their concerns as outstanding although consultees may 
consider their concerns as current and unresolved.  
 
4.4 
Natural England will provide Defra with a full consultation package to include 
copies of all consultation responses received and Natural England’s response 
to the points raised. 
 
5. 
Outstanding objections: 
 
5.1 
Stakeholders who have communicated to Natural England that their concerns 
are outstanding and for Defra’s consideration include Falmouth Harbour 
Commissioners, A&P/FDEC and the Falmouth Docks relevant authority, 
Baker Consultants, and Chris Bean (Cadgwith & Helford Fishermen’s 
Association representative).  
 
5.2 
A summary of the outstanding objections and how Natural England 
responded to these concerns is provided in the table below. Further detail is 
provided in Annex 2 and in the Consultation Report. 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
Table 2: key remaining concerns (see also paragraphs 5.3-5.12 below) 
 
Concern raised 
Natural England’s response 
 
1.  Survey data is not considered to 
Demonstrated that the scientific evidence 
meet with SPA guidelines by 
indicates the site has been regularly used 
demonstrating “regularity of use” 
for a period of at least 20 years by the 
qualifying features and that Natural 
England’s recommendations are 
consistent with guidance on marine SPA 
classification. Natural England maintains 
that there are more than the required 
three years of surveys for the site as a 
whole, as outlined in marine SPA 
guidelines.  Systematic shore-based 
count data exists for four winters with two 
of these survey winters more than ten 
years ago. Though the SPA guidance 
suggests greater priority should be given 
to newer data, we believe it allows for 
consideration of data more than 10 years 
old. 
2.  Slavonian grebe as a qualifying 
Demonstrated that the number of 
feature is not considered justified 
Slavonian grebe populations within the 
with reference to the “minimum 50” 
site qualify under Stage 1.1 of the SPA 
guideline.   
selection guidelines with regularity of use 
displayed with data from the Wetland Bird 
Survey (WeBS). Outlined that preliminary 
outputs from the ongoing SPA review, 
and consequent decisions from the SPA 
and Ramsar Scientific Working Group, 
identified that an insufficient proportion of 
the population of Slavonian grebe were 
included within the SPA network and the 
“minimum 50” guideline should be 
relaxed for this species. 
3.  The exclusion of aerial survey data 
Demonstrated that while other data 
is considered unjustified 
demonstrates the qualifying criteria, the 
aerial survey observations were 
insufficient to input to the model for 
determining the seaward boundary. 
 
4.  The landward boundary 
Demonstrated that the decision to draw 
recommendation is considered not 
the landward boundary to mean high 
supported by scientific evidence 
water (MHW) is consistent with marine 
SPA guidelines and supported by 
observational data on diver behaviour. 
Marine SPA guidelines indicate that 
unless ‘there is evidence that the 
qualifying species make no use of the 
intertidal region at high water’ landward 
boundaries should be set at MHW. 
5.  The method for defining the 
Clarified that the existing aerial survey 

 

seaward boundary, having rejected 
data could not be used, and explained 
the aerial survey data, is 
the rationale behind the seaward 
considered unscientific and 
boundary option being based on generic 
unprecedented 
habitat (depth) preferences of the 
recommended features. Demonstrated 
that the use of generic habitat data for 
individual sites is not unprecedented.  
 
 
5.3 
The justification of ‘regular use’ was questioned in the consultation responses. 
The qualifying numbers in annex 1 were drawn from 2 years of data within the 
last decade, and were supported by 2 additional years’ data which was more 
than a decade old. The guidelines state that ‘…For selecting sites that qualify 
at stages 1.1 to 1.3 of the UK SPA selection guidelines it would be prudent to 
set an age limit to the data used in this process…Priority should be accorded 
to data collected within the past 10 years’.  Our interpretation of this has been 
that while ideally 3 years data from within the past decade should be used, it 
does not rule out using older data where there is a relatively few number of 
years of new data.  
 
5.4  
In ongoing dialogue with one consultee we provided additional, newer 
Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) data which we believe backed up our original 
assessment of qualifying numbers. This information is quoted in annex 3 of 
the consultation report but it is important to note that it was has not been used 
in our assessment of the qualifying bird numbers. 
 
5.5 
Some consultees argued against the adoption of Mean High Water level as 
the landward boundary, which is normal practice in England unless the 
qualifying features make no use of the inter-tidal area. One study found only 
relatively little use, and by only one of the 3 qualifying species (Great 
Northern Diver). However, we have written communications to the effect that 
one of the JNCC surveyors observed the 2 diver species in the inter-tidal 
area. Taken together, our view is that we do not have a case to alter the 
boundary from Mean High Water level. 
 
5.6 
The outstanding objection requiring particular consideration concerns the 
exclusion of aerial survey data to define the seaward boundary and the use of 
generic (non-site specific) data in defining the seaward boundary. It is 
recognised that a relatively restricted number of aerial surveys were 
undertaken in the south Cornwall Coast Area of Search (AoS) when 
compared with other SPA recommendations (e.g. Outer Thames Estuary, 
Liverpool Bay) for similar species. Three aerial surveys (two in 2007 and one 
in 2009) were carried out for the Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay pSPA, 
whereas the Outer Thames Estuary (OTE) comprised some 43 surveys (1989 
– 2006/07) and Liverpool Bay approximately 20 surveys (2001/02 – 2006/07. 
It should be noted that both OTE and Liverpool Bay were strategic areas for 
offshore wind development and received significant survey coverage as a 
consequence.   
 
5.7 
The shore-based counts confirm qualifying numbers of the recommended 
species utilise the site whilst also indicating aerial surveys undercounted 
populations in the inshore area. There is no available evidence to make a 
similar conjecture regarding estimates of offshore populations. Aerial surveys 
carried out in January and March 2007 for the site returned estimates of 28 
and 51 divers of all species (based upon observations of 10 and 11 

 

individuals) in the area as a whole (i.e. the entire Area of Search as outlined 
in the Department Brief).  
 
5.8 
The established approach for defining a seaward boundary incorporates 
Maximum Curvature Analysis (explained in annex 3), a mathematical 
technique which defines the point of diminishing returns, where the rate of 
increase of bird numbers changes in relation to the variable measured (sea 
depth, area etc.) The observed bird numbers from the aerial survey data were 
insufficient to apply the established approach based on this as input data. 
Alternative options to the seaward boundary are discussed in the 
Departmental Brief, with the proposed boundary recommendation based on a 
habitat characteristic (i.e. sea depth) instead of the observed bird numbers.  
 
5.9 
The seaward boundary is defined by the habitat requirements for great 
northern divers. The specific application of data on great northern diver 
habitat preferences (water depth) in parts of the UK to a site elsewhere in the 
UK is novel, although the principle of applying generic data to SPA boundary 
setting is not unprecedented.  Natural England contends that the seaward 
boundary is appropriate to define the outer limit of the distribution of the 
qualifying features, based on a scientific analysis of their ecological 
requirements.  The approach recommended by JNCC was based on the 
maximum curvature analysis which estimated that 96% of great northern 
divers were within the 48.6m depth contour (noting that an average of 17% 
had been filtered out in an earlier stage of the process). based on 
surveys elsewhere in the UK (1,000 observations in 11 sites in Scotland – see 
annex 3 for more detail).  
 
5.10 
Certain respondents felt that if the aerial survey data could not be used, which 
they contested, then different approaches to define the boundary should be 
used such as the visible limit from shore as a proxy for the outer limit of bird 
observations from shore based counts (eg 2km as an estimate), or a 
boundary replicating the seaward boundary of the Important Bird Area ((IBA) - 
see annex 2 for further explanation). Natural England’s view is that the 
approach we took, recommended by JNCC, has a stronger scientific basis 
than either of these 2 recommendations. 
 
5.11 
In principle an alternative approach would be to choose a different depth 
contour for the boundary (e.g. one that is closer to shore), but the maximum 
curvature method has a clearer mathematical basis for choosing the specific 
boundary, and has precedents in use in designating other sites e.g. the 
existing Liverpool Bay SPA and Outer Thames Estuary SPA. 
 
5.12   Certain consultees recommended collection of more aerial survey data. If 
Government decided against the recommended seaward boundary, an 
alternative option might be to collect further aerial survey data, but to retain 
site protection in the meantime, either through pSPA status or full designation 
with potential alteration to the seaward boundary. Further data collection 
would require digital aerial survey, a more recent and accurate method than 
visual aerial. Natural England estimates this would require two or three years 
of digital aerial surveys at a cost of approximately £375,000. 
 
5.13   The boundary and site designation is, therefore, recommended for approval 
unchanged following formal consultation. Despite the outstanding objections it 

 

is recommended that the site should be classified as per the consultation 
because: 
 
5.13.1  The data is sufficient to demonstrate the importance of the site in terms of the 
qualifying criteria.  
 
5.13.2  Although it is unclear how much the inter-tidal area is used by the qualifying 
species, the birds appear to make some use of this area when inundated, 
therefore we cannot safely deviate from the guidelines which is to recommend 
to Mean High Water (MHW) level; and 
 
5.13.3  Given the insufficient aerial survey data, the proposed approach to setting the 
seaward boundary, based on generic habitat characteristics, is appropriate 
given the data available, allowing designation of the site in the near future and 
providing certainty for stakeholders. 
  
 
 

 

link to page 8 link to page 8 link to page 8 Annex 1: Citation for the Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay potential Special 
Protection Area 
 
EC Directive 2009/147/EC on the Conservation of Wild Birds Special Protection 
Area (SPA) 
 
Name: Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay potential Special Protection Area (pSPA) 
 
Counties/Unitary Authorities:  The pSPA covers the area below mean high water 
between Nare Point and east of Gribbin Head, including intertidal parts of the Helford 
River and Fal complex. Its marine extension lies entirely in UK territorial waters 
meaning the entirety of the site is within or adjacent to the county of Cornwall. 
 
Boundary of the pSPA: See pSPA map. The landward boundary of the pSPA is set 
at Mean High Water, except for where the intertidal branches of the Fal complex do 
not support interest features; here the boundary spans the river or creek at its widest 
extent. The seaward boundary traces the 49 m depth contour of the seabed, 
meaning it extends approximately between 4 and 13 km from the landward boundary 
into the marine environment. The entire site is approximately bounded by Nare Point 
in the west and Gribbin Head in the east.  
 
Size of pSPA: The pSPA covers an area of 29403.26 hectares.  
 
Site description:  Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay pSPA is on the south coast of 
Cornwall, covering the marine environment incorporating five shallow, sandy bays; 
Falmouth Bay, Gerrans Bay, Veryan Bay, Mevagissey Bay and St Austell Bay. It also 
includes Carrick Roads, an estuarine area which meets the sea between Falmouth 
and St Mawes, and part of the tidal Helford River. The river complex areas are part of 
a ria system, typified by steep sides and slow tidal currents, with subtidal rocky 
shores and exposed intertidal mud on creeks and river branches. The diversity of 
marine habitats is reflected in existing statutory protected area designations, some of 
which overlap or abut the pSPA. 
Qualifying species: The site qualifies under Article 4.1 of the Directive 
(2009/147/EC) as it is used regularly by 1% or more of the Great Britain population of 
the following species listed in Annex I 
in any season: 
 
 
 
 
Table3: bird counts 
Species 
Count (period) 
% of subspecies or  Interest type 
population (pairs) 

Black-throated diver 
115 – wintering (2009/10 
20.5% Great Britain2 
Annex I 
Gavia arctica 
– 2010/11)1 
Great northern diver  74 individuals – 
Gavia immer 
wintering (2009/10 – 
3.0% Great Britain2 
Annex I 
2010/11)1 
Slavonian grebe 
15 individuals – 
Podiceps auritus 
wintering (2007/08 – 
1.4% Great Britain2 
Annex I 
2011/12)
 
                                                 
1O’Brien, S.H., Win, I., Parsons, M., Allcock, Z. & Reid, J.B. (2012).The numbers and distribution of inshore 
waterbirds along the south Cornwall coast during winter
. JNCC Report to Natural England  
2 Great Britain population cited in: Musgrove, A.J., Austin, G.E., Hearn, R.D., Holt, C.A., Stroud, D.A. & Wotton, S.R. 
(2011). Overwinter population estimates of British waterbirds. British Birds 104, 364-397 
3 Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) http://www.bto.org/volunteer-surveys/webs  

 

Annex 2 – Scientific Justification – summary of key concerns from 
consultation 
 
No new data were  submitted for this site following the consultation.  A  number of 
objections were raised in relation to the proposed boundaries, and the analysis and 
method applied. A summary of the outstanding concerns raised and other 
observations  are outlined below;  further detail may be found in the Consultation 
Report.  
 
Outstanding Objections 
 
1.1 Baker Consultants 
 
Baker Consultants submitted a number of concerns relating to the scientific 
methodology and process. Baker Consultants submitted a response on behalf of an 
undisclosed client which is linked to the Freeth Cartwright Solicitors/Freeths Solicitors 
challenge outlined below. They contest that: the exclusion of aerial survey data is 
unjustified; methods used in defining the seaward boundary are unscientific and 
unprecedented; survey data show species do not meet SPA selection guidelines;  the 
recommendation for Slavonian grebe as a qualifying feature is unjustified; reported 
data for this species is inconsistent; the landward boundary recommendation is not 
supported by scientific data; and the recommendation not being underpinned by a 
Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) is unsound. Natural England responded to 
these concerns and a further meeting between Natural England Advisers and Baker 
Consultants was held on the 14th October 2014. During this engagement, Natural 
England provided the following to address the concerns raised by Baker Consultants; 
 
i. 
Further analysis of supporting evidence to justify the exclusion of aerial 
survey population estimates which demonstrated that the aerial surveys, 
when compared with shore-based counts, underestimated the number of 
birds present; 
 
ii. 
Explained existing aerial survey data could not be used, and demonstrated 
the seaward boundary option is based on generic habitat (depth) preferences 
of the recommended features, using established scientific techniques for SPA 
boundary setting. The use of generic data for individual sites is not 
unprecedented. The option presented is not considered to be over-
precautionary as divers have been recorded outside of the seaward 
boundary;  
 
 
iii. 
Demonstrated where the scientific evidence indicated the site has been 
regularly used for a period of at least 20 years by the qualifying features and 
that Natural England’s recommendations are consistent with guidance on 
marine SPA classification; 
 
iv. 
Outlined that preliminary outputs from the ongoing SPA review and 
consequent decisions from the SPA and Ramsar Scientific Working Group 
identified that an insufficient proportion of the population of Slavonian grebe 

 

link to page 10 were included within the SPA network. Natural England’s justification 
demonstrated that the number of Slavonian grebe within the site qualify under 
Stage 1.1 of the SPA selection guidelines and regularity of use is 
demonstrated by data from the Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) (2007/08 - 
2011/12); 
 
v. 
Demonstrated that the decision to draw the landward boundary to mean high 
water (MHW) is consistent with marine SPA guidelines and supported by 
observational data on diver behaviour; and 

vi. 
Demonstrated that there is no policy or legal requirement to underpin SPA 
with SSSI. 
 
During the meeting, consensus was not reached regarding all points of concern as 
outlined in the Baker Consultants consultation response (with the exception of the 
SSSI issue). The main outstanding objection concerns the exclusion of aerial survey 
data to define the seaward boundary and the use of generic (non-site specific) data 
in defining the seaward boundary. Alternative approaches were discussed during the 
meeting which included a boundary following a generic visible limit (from shore) 
resulting in a seaward boundary approximately 2km offshore (2km distance is 
recognised as the maximum distance for identification to species level). Natural 
England maintains, as it did when making original recommendations to Defra that 
such an approach would not be scientifically supported and would result in an 
arbitrary, unmeasurable boundary which ignores the presence of populations of birds 
further offshore. The same rationale may be applied to a boundary replicating the 
seaward boundary of the International Bird Area (IBA)4. Neither Birdlife International 
nor RSPB have been able to verify the basis for defining the seaward limit of the IBA 
and therefore the approach cannot be scientifically evidenced. A further alternative 
suggestion was made by Baker Consultants to collect more data i.e. via digital aerial 
survey. Natural England maintain the recommended boundary option presents the 
most scientific option available at this time and the site qualifies for classification 
under the UK SPA guidelines.  
 
The concerns raised by Baker Consultants may be considered as outstanding and for 
Defra’s consideration.  
 
1.2 Freeth Cartwright Solicitors/Freeths Solicitors 
 
Freeth Cartwright Solicitors presented legal challenge to Natural England on behalf 
of an undisclosed client during February 2014. The challenge indicated the formal 
consultation was premature, unlawful and without legal effect specifically regarding 
the process for formal consultation. Natural England sufficiently addressed the 
process concerns raised and provided an additional period for public consultation of 
                                                 
4 The south Cornwall IBA extends up to 6km out to sea, and was selected by BirdLife International for its 
numbers of black-throated divers, great northern divers and Slavonian grebe. The IBA provides no 
statutory protection for the pSPA species and basing SPAs on IBAs is not performed as a matter of 
policy in the UK. 
10 
 

14 weeks. Freeths Solicitors (note recent change in organisation name from Freeth 
Cartwright Solicitors to “Freeths Solicitors”) presented further challenge related to 
Natural England’s response to Baker Consultants consultation response. Freeths 
concerns related to the presentation of new scientific data as referenced by Natural 
England in response to the Baker Consultants consultation response. Natural 
England responded to clarify that the new evidence emerged following the 
preparation of the scientific recommendations (Departmental Brief) and was 
referenced to corroborate the existing evidence as outlined in the Departmental Brief. 
 
1.3 Falmouth Harbour Commissioners/FabTest/A&P/FDEC/Falmouth Docks 
 
Falmouth Harbour Commissioners (FHC), the FabTest Renewable Test Site and the 
Falmouth Port Operators (A&P/FDEC and Falmouth Docks competent authority) 
requested that the Falmouth Harbour Port Limits be excluded from the 
recommendations. Natural England demonstrated the evidence of use of these areas 
and that removal would affect site integrity as well as representing a departure from 
the UK SPA guidelines. 
 
Falmouth Harbour Commissioners and the FabTest Renewables Test Site raised 
concerns regarding the scientific validity of the data applied to determine the seaward 
boundary being based on a modelled approach and use of generic non site-specific 
data; and the lack of evidence presented regarding the diving depths of great 
northern diver on the south Cornwall coast specifically where the habitat preference 
of this species is used to define the seaward boundary. Natural England provided a 
comprehensive response which dealt with all queries and offered further meetings. 
Natural England provided justification around the methodology applied to define the 
seaward boundary and why the use of generic data from a different site was 
appropriate. Additionally, Natural England demonstrated that divers were identified 
outside of the proposed boundary and therefore the recommended boundary option 
should not be considered over-precautionary. Natural England provided examples 
from scientific literature where the cited diving depth of great northern diver was 
comparable with the proposed seaward boundary (49m contour) for south Cornwall. 
Agreement was not reached and FHC/FabTest stated that all issues raised during 
the consultation should remain current, unaddressed and for Defra’s consideration. 
 
1.4 CHADFISH 
 
The Cadgwith and Helford Fishermen’s Association (CHADFISH) requested the 
exclusion of the Falmouth Bay area. Natural England clarified the evidence indicating 
regular use for the area and that removal of the Falmouth Bay would affect site 
integrity as well as representing a departure from Marine SPA guidelines. Further 
communication was received by Chris Bean indicating the concerns raised should be 
considered as outstanding. 
 
Other Observations 
 
The environmental Non-Government  Organisations, plus a number of supporters, 
stated their strong support for the designation, but requested that further species be 
protected. Following discussions with the RSPB in 2013 and 2014, Natural England 
referred to steer from the SPA and Ramsar  Scientific Working Group  (SPARSWG) 
regarding the exclusion of black-necked grebe and the inclusion of Slavonian grebe. 
Outputs from the imminent SPA review performed by the SPARSWG indicated that 
11 
 

the non-breeding (overwintering) SPA suite for Slavonian grebe in the UK was 
'insufficient'. We therefore considered it appropriate to seek to identify whether there 
are additional most suitable territories for this species. Numbers of Slavonian grebes 
at the pSPA qualify under Stage 1.1 of the SPA selection guidelines, and regularity of 
use is shown from WeBS data.  
 
 
Consultation responses specific to this site: Consultation Report Falmouth Bay to St 
Austell Bay pSPA
12 
 


Figure 1: Map displaying boundary options as discussed in the Departmental Brief 
 
 
13 
 

Option 1: Visible Limit 
 
Boundary follows a “visible limit” approach as a 2km boundary running parallel to the coast. 2km from land is considered to be a maximum 
distance to detect diver species and identify them with confidence (but may differ from site to site). A boundary 2km from the coast includes all 
the sea area searched during the systematic shore-based counts. Boundary option does not encompass offshore observations. 
 
Option 2: Recommended Boundary 
 
Boundary option as recommended which follows the 49m contour and is based on the habitat preferences (diving depth) of great northern 
divers. 
 
Option 3: Polygon Boundary 
 
A polygon was drawn around all diver observations made from aerial surveys. The polygon boundary method was the only option available to 
JNCC with the low number of aerial survey observations available. The boundary does not encompass Veryan Bay, which was shown to be 
important for black-throated divers and great northern divers during shore-based counts. This boundary option also does not encompass 
Carrick Roads which is regularly used by at least two of the qualifying features. 
 
14 
 


Figure 2: Boundary map as included in the formal consultation 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
15 
 

link to page 16 Annex 3: Maximum Curvature Analysis and boundary setting for marine SPAs 
 
O’Brien et al. (2012)5 illustrate an approach developed by JNCC to define boundaries for two UK marine SPAs (Outer Thames Estuary and 
Liverpool Bay) classified for red-throated divers and common scoters. Effectively this is a three step process: 
 
1.  Collecting observational data samples of bird densities at sea, from visual aerial survey (VAS);  
2.  Using a Density Estimation (DE) method to make predictions about bird densities across the entire study area; and  
3.  Using maximum curvature (MC) to define the point of diminishing returns for boundary limits. 
 
Density Estimation (DE) 
 
Visual Aerial Survey (VAS) samples are typically transects: observers record bird detections as the aircraft travels along pre-defined survey 
lines. The extent of these transects defines the study area, within which density of birds is estimated. DE takes the spatial location of bird 
observations and interpolates between them, in order to create a ‘density surface’ of 1 km grid cells across the entire study area. This density 
surface describes relative density (i.e. which areas are more or less important for birds). As abundances are estimated in a different way, the 
density surfaces are then scaled to the abundance estimate, such that the sum of the 1 km cells equals the abundance estimate for the survey. 
 
A separate DE surface is generated for each survey. Values in 1 km grid cells are then summed across all surveys and divided by survey effort 
to generate mean bird density surfaces for the study area. 
 
Maximum Curvature (MC) 
 
Once the mean density surface is created, it is necessary to assess which parts of the surface contain sufficient bird densities to warrant 
inclusion within a SPA boundary. MC is the technique which does this, using repeatable, mathematical methods to identify the threshold at 
which densities are either contained within or excluded from the boundary. 
 
                                                 
5O’Brien, S.H., Webb, A., Brewer, M.J. & Reid, J.B. (2012). Use of kernel density estimation and maximum curvature to set Marine Protected Area boundaries: Identifying a 
Special Protection Area for wintering red-throated divers in the UK. Biological Conservation 156, 15-21. 
 
16 
 

MC is based upon the cumulative analysis of variables such as area (or sea depth) and bird density. As the area or depth increases, so more of 
the total numbers of birds are included. MC identifies the point of greatest change in the relationship between cumulative bird numbers and 
cumulative area (or depth). At this threshold point, the addition of further habitat yields diminishing returns of bird densities. Specifically, the 
habitat units (eg 1km squares) or depth units (eg contour lines) area ranked by bird density. The MC technique includes all the units in the 
boundary until a point is reached where adding in extra area yields diminishing extra bird numbers. The logic follows that 1 km grid cells falling 
below this threshold are then excluded from SPA boundary definition, as including these grid cells would not proportionately increase 
protection. Conversely, those above the threshold are included as their contribution ensures the boundary incorporates the highest densities. 
 
Application of Maximum Curvature Analysis to Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay pSPA 
 
In the absence of sufficient VAS data, it was not possible to follow the DE step in defining the seaward boundary for the Falmouth Bay to St 
Austell Bay pSPA. However, it has been possible to analyse data from Area of Search sites for Great Northern Diver in Scotland.  Having 
analysed 1,000 VAS observations in 11 Scottish sites for consideration as pSPAs, JNCC modelled the relationship between bird densities and 
sea depth at these sites; and this sea depth data was used as the input variable for determining the seaward boundary, using the MC method, 
at Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay pSPA. This is based on the fact that there is an established relationship between sea depth and great 
northern diver distribution. 
 
Independent peer reviewers queried the applicability of a relationship between sea depth and great northern diver distribution. It is possible that 
other environmental covariates would have explained more variability in diver density: for example, sediment, or hydrodynamic variables. JNCC 
were unable to source data on these variables (or found that they did not vary sufficiently to be of use in the case of sediment), and so sea 
depth was the only covariate available for analysis. Similarly, little was available from the literature to enhance understanding of which 
covariates were likely to be of importance. However, JNCC did establish a relationship between sea depth and diver density from the data at 
their disposal, meaning the analysis was founded on the best available information. Specifically, the data from the Scottish sites showed that 
divers were present in both high, medium and low densities in shallower water, whereas in deeper waters diver numbers are low and variability 
in bird numbers declines markedly. There is also some evidence from the ecological literature that divers (especially great northern divers) 
make some use of deeper waters offshore (e.g. a study of by-catch of birds by depth indicated significant numbers of great northern diver were 
recovered from depths greater than 15 m, including some records deeper than 35 m). 
 
 
At the point on the line of maximum curvature for the site, 96% of great northern divers were in water depths shallower than 48.6m (noting that 
an average of 17% had been filtered out in an earlier stage of the process). It could be argued that a cut-off could be set at a lower point. 
17 
 

However, the MC method has a more consistent mathematical basis so is repeatable as well as having precedents (i.e. through Liverpool Bay 
and Outer Thames Estuary SPAs). 
 
MC analysis relies upon fitting a mathematical model to the data available, and so the MC point will differ from site to site, based on differences 
in habitat use and distribution of birds. For comparison, the MC plots for other SPAs are 78% (red-throated divers, Outer Thames Estuary 
SPA); 85% (red throated divers and common scoters, Liverpool Bay SPA).  
 
 
 
 
 
18 
 

link to page 20 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 21 link to page 22 link to page 22 link to page 23 link to page 24 link to page 27 link to page 27 link to page 28 link to page 28 link to page 29 link to page 34 link to page 46 link to page 49 link to page 50 link to page 51 link to page 51 link to page 52  
 
Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay potential Special Protection Area 
(pSPA) 
 
Report of Consultation by Natural England 
 

Contents 
 
Version Control ................................................................................................................... 20 
Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 21 
Table 1: Summary of responses ................................................................................... 21 
Background ......................................................................................................................... 21 
The Consultation Process ................................................................................................... 22 
Raising awareness of the consultation .......................................................................... 22 
Consultation Responses ..................................................................................................... 23 
Consultation Conclusion ..................................................................................................... 25 
Detail of Consultation Responses ....................................................................................... 27 
Table 2: Response categories ...................................................................................... 27 
Table 3: Consultation responses .................................................................................. 28 
A.  Owners and occupiers .......................................................................................... 28 
B.  Local authorities/other competent authorities ........................................................ 29 
C.  Interested Parties/Organisations ........................................................................... 34 
D.  Members of the public and unsolicited responses ................................................. 46 
Annex 1: Non-Financial Scheme of Delegation ................................................................... 49 
Annex 2: Consultation Questions ........................................................................................ 50 
Annex 3: Additional Evidence .............................................................................................. 51 
Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) data ................................................................................ 51 
Wintering Divers and Grebes Foraging Ecology Report, 2014 ...................................... 52 
 
19 

 
 
 
Version Control 
 
Version & 
Drafted by 
Issued to 
Comments by 
Date 
V1 
Richard Cook – Lead 
Alex Banks (Senior Specialist, 
FM, SA, AB 
 
Marine Adviser 
Marine Ornithology,); 
20/10/2014 
 
Sarah Anthony  (Senior Adviser, 
International Site Designations); 
 
Fiona Markwick (Senior Adviser, 
SPA Program Project Manager);  
 
Rhiannon Pipkin (Senior Adviser) 
V2 
Richard Cook – Lead 
John Holmes (Area Manager, 
JH 
 
Marine Adviser 
Devon, Cornwall & Isles of Scilly) 
20/10/2014 
V3 
Richard Cook – Lead 
Jonathon Burney (Marine Director 
JB 
 
Marine Adviser 
23/10/2014 
V4 
Richard Cook – Lead 
Andrew Wood (Executive Director,  AW 
 
Marine Adviser 
Science and Evidence 
24/10/2014 
 
20 

link to page 21  
 
 
Introduction 
 
The purpose of this Consultation Report is to clearly set out all correspondence received by 
Natural England and the associated responses during the Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay 
potential Special Protection Area (pSPA) formal consultation which ran from 20th January to 
21st July 2014.  
Table 1: Summary of responses 
 
Site Name 
Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay 
pSPA 

Formal consultation period (26 weeks) 
20th January 2014 –                  
21st July 2014 
 
 
Total number of stakeholder responses 
54 
Organisations 
37 
Individuals/Unsolicited 
17 
            Relevant/competent authorities 
13 
 
 
Number of supporting responses 
16 
Number of responses supportive of the proposals      
 

but objecting to/raising specific issues 
Number of general enquiries/neutral responses 
20 
Number of objections 
18 
Scientific concerns/queries 
18 
Socio-economic concerns/queries 
27 
Both scientific and socio-economic concerns/queries 
17 
 
 
Number of consultees with outstanding objections 
46 
 
 
Details of Natural England’s Non-Financial Scheme of Delegation (NFSoD) can be found in 
Annex 1. 
 
 
Background 
 
Natural England works as the Government’s statutory adviser to identify and recommend 
Special Protection Areas (SPAs)  and Special Areas of Conservation (SACs)  in England to 
meet the requirements of the European Birds and Habitats Directives.  
 
The Birds and Habitats Directives require the creation of a network of protected areas for 
important or threatened wildlife habitats across the European Union known as ‘Natura 2000’ 
sites. Once sites are identified as proposed SPAs or possible SACs, they are recommended 
                                                 
6Please refer to the Consultation Conclusion heading on page 5 for further details. 
21 

link to page 22  
 
to government for approval to carry out a formal public consultation. Government decides 
which sites are put forward to the European Commission for inclusion in the Natura 2000 
network.  
 
Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay pSPA consultation 
 
The Falmouth Bay to St Austell Bay pSPA is located off the South Cornwall Coast, extending 
from mean high water to a maximum of approximately 7nm (13 km) offshore. The pSPA 
covers the marine environment between Nare Point in the west and Southground point in the 
east, including intertidal parts of the Helford River and Fal Estuary complex. 
 
The Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) identified 45 Areas of Search (AoS) that 
were suspected to support important aggregations of wintering divers, seaduck and grebes 
that might warrant protection in SPAs. One of these AoS was the sea area adjacent to the 
coast of south Cornwall.  
 
A review of inshore waterbird distribution data spanning the period 1979 to 1991 in south-west 
England was undertaken by RSPB and revealed two areas of “particular importance”. These included 
Hartland Point in north Devon, and Veryan Bay, Gerrans Bay, Falmouth Bay and Carrick Roads in 
Cornwall. Following the review, systematic surveys of the areas identified confirmed that 
internationally important aggregations of divers and grebes existed within the Carrick Roads and 
Veryan  /  Gerrans  /  Falmouth Bays. The area was subsequently proposed as an Important Bird Area 
(IBA)7, whose status was later confirmed by systematic surveys which highlighted the suitability of 
the site for SPA classification for overwintering black-throated diver  (Gavia artica), great northern 
diver (Gavia immer) and Slavonian grebe (Podiceps auritus). 
 
The Consultation Process 
 
There was a 12 week formal consultation carried out on the site proposals from 20th January 
2014 to 14 April 2014. An additional 14 week period for consultation was provided from 14 
April to 21 July 2014 in response to feedback from stakeholders that it would be helpful to 
make the 2013 Vulnerability Assessment which informs the Impact Assessment for the site 
available to everyone to help inform contributions to the current consultation. 
 
The purpose of this consultation was to seek the views of all interested parties on:  
 
•  the scientific case for the classification of the pSPA; and  
•  the assessment of the likely economic, environmental and social impacts of the 
designation of the site, as set out in the Impact Assessment.  
Raising awareness of the consultation 
 
Natural England contacted all major stakeholders and known  owner-occupiers  with  an 
interest in the area being designated as an SPA. Nearly 700 stakeholders were contacted in 
                                                 
7The south Cornwall IBA extends up to 6km out to sea, and was selected by BirdLife International for its numbers of black-
throated divers, great northern divers and Slavonian grebe. The IBA provides no statutory protection for the pSPA species 
and basing SPAs on IBAs is not performed as a matter of policy in the UK. 
22 

 
 
total, by email or post, announcing the submission and the start of formal consultation.  Each 
stakeholder was provided with a covering letter and a consultation document which provided 
links to site recommendations and supporting documentation. In the event stakeholders 
were unable to access the worldwide web, hard copies were provided on request.  In 
addition, informal dialogue was carried out with relevant individuals and organisations before 
the formal consultation period.  
 
During the consultation Natural England staff led stakeholder engagement,  which took the 
form of individual conversations with stakeholders and attendance at a number of meetings 
including presentations to provide briefings on site recommendations. An interview on local 
BBC radio was provided as well as a number of press releases in local media. A drop-in 
session was held for all interested parties to discuss the proposals, during which Natural 
England staff were available to answer questions and concerns. Port visits were also carried 
out to engage with fisheries stakeholders. Natural England has made every effort to be 
available to talk to via telephone or email, and any further documentation has been made 
readily available on request. 
 
Four  weeks before the end of the formal consultation period  Natural England issued a 
reminder to stakeholders through  e-mail and via  press  and social media notifications, to 
encourage a response before the closing date. The consultation questions related to the 
scientific evidence can be found in Annex 2. 
 
Consultation Responses 
 
NE was contacted by fifty four stakeholders during the formal consultation via email, letter, 
Smart Survey or telephone. Thirty five of the consultation responses required detailed 
consideration, with eighteen  of  these concerning the scientific evidence supporting the 
recommendations. Sixteen stakeholders were supportive of the proposals with two supportive 
of the proposals but raising concerns about certain aspects of the recommendations. Eighteen 
of the stakeholders objected to the proposals, with twenty stakeholders neither supporting nor 
objecting to the recommendations. Concerns expressed by four  stakeholders may be 
considered outstanding and for Defra’s consideration. 
 
Of the thirteen local authorities and other competent authorities contacted, five  objected to 
the proposals,  two  supported the proposals, with six  neither supporting nor opposing the 
proposals. 
 
Eight  stakeholders objected to the seaward boundary of the pSPA, either questioning or 
requesting clarification regarding the methodology and data defining the boundary 
recommendation.  Five  stakeholders queried the landward boundary, three  stakeholders 
questioned the east-west boundary and a further seven stakeholders raised concerns regarding 
the scientific methodology applied or species recommended. Twenty seven  stakeholders 
(eight  local authorities/other competent authorities, fourteen  organisations and five 
individuals) raised specific concerns relating to the socio-economic impact of the designation. 
One stakeholder raised concerns regarding the consultation process.  
23 

 
 
 
24 

 
 
 
Consultation Conclusion  
 
Natural England notes concerns raised by a number of stakeholders regarding the 
assessment of qualifying features and the definition of the landward and seaward 
boundaries.   
 
In relation to the seaward boundary, it notes the alternative suggestions that have been 
made, for example, amongst others, a boundary which relates to the maximum line of sight 
from the shoreline observations, or investing in further aerial survey work.  
 
However, despite the outstanding objections it is recommended that the site should be 
classified as per the consultation because: 
  
•  The data is sufficient to demonstrate the importance of the site in terms of the qualifying criteria.  
•  Although it is unclear how much the inter-tidal area is used by the qualifying species, the birds 
appear to make some use of this area when inundated, therefore we cannot safely deviate from the 
guidelines which is to recommend to Mean High Water (MHW) level; and 
•  The proposed approach to setting the seaward boundary, based on generic habitat characteristics, 
is appropriate given the data available, allowing designation of the site in the near future and 
providing certainty for stakeholders. 
 
Natural England would like to highlight for Defra’s consideration the issues raised by 
Falmouth Harbour Commissioners with respect to the methodology for defining the 
seaward boundary. Natural England responded in writing to clarify the points raised. For a 
summary of these issues and how Natural England responded to the concerns raised, please 
refer to page 13 in the Detail of Consultation Responses chapter. Further communication was 
received from FHC stating all issues raised during the consultation should remain current, 
unaddressed and for Defra’s consideration. 
 
Natural England would like to highlight for Defra’s consideration the issues raised by the 
FabTest Marine Renewables Test Site. FabTest’s consultation response queried the 
methodology used in defining the seaward boundary and use of non-site specific data rather 
than evidence of habitat use at the south Cornwall site; the lack of evidence presented 
regarding the diving depths of great northern diver on the south Cornwall coast; and 
requested clarification as to why the Important Bird Area (IBA) boundary should not be 
adopted. Natural England responded in writing to clarify the points raised. For a summary of 
these issues and how Natural England responded to the concerns raised, please refer to pages 
21 & 22 in the Detail of Consultation Responses chapter. 
 
Natural England would like to highlight for Defra’s consideration, a number of concerns 
raised by Baker Consultants relating to the scientific methodology and process. Baker 
Consultants submitted a response on behalf of an undisclosed client which is linked to the 
Freeth Cartwright challenge outlined below. They contest that: the exclusion of aerial survey 
data is unjustified; methods used in defining the seaward boundary are unscientific and 
unprecedented; survey data show species do not meet SPA selection guidelines;  the 
25 

 
 
recommendation for Slavonian grebe as a qualifying feature is unjustified; reported data for 
this species is inconsistent; the landward boundary recommendation is not supported by 
scientific data; and the recommendation not being underpinned by a Site of Special Scientific 
Interest (SSSI) is unsound. Natural England responded in writing to address the points raised 
and a meeting between Natural England and Baker Consultants was held on the 14th October 
2014. During the meeting, a number of alternative boundary options were discussed which 
included a visible 2km limit (from shore) approach as well as a boundary replicating the 
existing Important Bird Area (IBA). For a summary of the issues raised and how Natural 
England responded to these concerns, please refer to pages 15 – 17 inclusive in the Detail of 
Consultation Responses chapter. Consensus regarding all points of concern as outlined in 
their consultation response was not reached during the meeting. Therefore, all points raised 
by Baker Consultants may be considered as outstanding and for Defra’s consideration.  
 
Freeth Cartwright Solicitors
 presented legal challenge to Natural England on behalf of an 
undisclosed client during February 2014. The challenge was that the process for formal 
consultation was premature, unlawful and without legal effect. Natural England addressed the 
concerns raised and provided an additional period for public consultation of 14 weeks. 
Freeths Solicitors (note recent change in organisation name from Freeth Cartwright Solicitors 
to “Freeths Solicitors”) presented further challenge related to Natural England’s response to 
Baker Consultants consultation response. Freeths Solicitors concerns related to the 
presentation of new scientific data as referenced by Natural England in response to the Baker 
Consultants consultation response. Natural England responded to clarify that the new data 
emerged following the preparation of the scientific recommendations (Departmental Brief) 
and was referenced to corroborate the existing evidence as outlined in the Departmental 
Brief. For further details on the issues raised and how Natural England responded to these 
concerns, please refer to page 22 in the Detail of Consultation Responses Chapter. Annex 3 
provides further detail regarding the emerging scientific evidence. 
 
Natural England would like to highlight for Defra’s consideration, a number of concerns 
raised by CHADFISH (Cadgwith and Helford Fishermen’s Association) representative Chris 
Bean. Chris Bean raised concerns regarding the apparent arbitrary nature of the proposed 
boundaries, the methodology of establishing bird counts and the appropriateness of the 
seaward boundary approximately following the 49m contour. Furthermore the consultation 
response requested for removal of the Falmouth Bay area from the recommendations. Natural 
England held several meetings with Mr Bean and a number of written communications were 
provided to address the points raised. For a summary of these issues and how Natural 
England responded to the concerns, please refer to page 18 in the Detail of Consultation 
Responses chapter. Further communication was received from Chris Bean indicating the 
issues raised should be considered outstanding and for Defra’s consideration. 
 
 
 
 
26 

 
 
 
Detail of Consultation Responses 
Table 2: Response categories 
 
Categories of Responses 
 
Number  Type  
 
1.   
Simple acknowledgement/neutral response 
 
2.   
Support 
 
3.   
Do not understand the implications/request clarification/general views 
 
4.   
Objection in principle to designation 
 
5.   
Objection on scientific grounds to the boundary (seaward, landward or 
 
east-west) 
6.   
 
Objection on scientific grounds regarding species or surveys 
7.   
 
Objection on other scientific grounds 
8.   
 
Objection on socio-economic grounds  
9.   
 
Objection – other 
 
 
The stakeholder’s representation is outlined together with Natural England’s response and 
recommendation to Defra in Table 3, below. Natural England will provide Defra with a full 
consultation package to include copies of all consultation responses received and Natural 
England’s response to the points raised. 
 
Consultees are categorised as follows: 
 
A - Owner/Occupiers 
B - Local authorities/other competent authorities 
C - Interested parties/Organisations 
D - Members of the public and unsolicited responses 
 
 
 
27 

 
 
Table 3: Consultation responses 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

A. 
Owners and occupiers 
Mr Brown 
Supportive of the proposals 

Acknowledgement provided. 
None raised 
Mr Wilde 
Supportive of the proposals 

Acknowledgement provided. 
None raised 
Anon 
Supportive of the proposals. Requested 

Acknowledgement and provided  
None raised 
clarification of 
 
 
1.  Clarification that the decision to draw 
1.  The impact of the designation to 
the landward boundary to mean high 
landowners in terms of the MHW 
water (MHW) is consistent with SPA 
landward boundary. 
guidelines and supported by 
observational data on diver behaviour. 
Provided clarity regarding the potential 
impacts to landowners should the site 
proceed to classification. 
28 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

B. 
Local authorities/other competent authorities 
A&P, Falmouth 
Opposed to the proposals. Raised a 
3/4/5/6/
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Docks & 
number of concerns as follows:   

response sent providing justification for 
consultee may consider 
Engineering Co 
 
 
the seaward boundary: 
their issues to be current. 
Ltd & the 
1.  Scientific validity of the data applied to 
 
Falmouth Docks 
determine the seaward boundary being 
1.  Clarified the methodology applied to 
based on a modelled approach and the 
competent 
define the seaward boundary and 
use of Scottish data (i.e. non-site specific 
justification regarding the use of generic 
authority 
data);  
data from a different site. Additionally, 
2.  Concerns regarding the diving depths of 
displayed that divers were identified 
great northern diver on the south 
outside of the proposed boundary and 
Cornwall coast (habitat; preference of 
therefore the recommended boundary 
this species is used to define the seaward 
option should not be considered over-
boundary); 
precautionary; 
3.  Concerns around the type of 
2.  Cited examples from scientific literature 
(supporting) data referenced; 
where diving depths of great northern 
4.  Queried the survey methodology where 
divers was comparable with water depths 
it states “ideally more than one method 
of the proposed seaward boundary for 
should be used” and guidelines in terms 
south Cornwall; 
of the aerial and shore-based surveys; 
3.  Clarified the supporting data referenced in 
5.  Requested assurances regarding  the 
the Departmental Brief; 
survey methodology in terms of the 
likelihood of “double counting” birds; 
29 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

A&P, Falmouth 
6.  Concerns that black-throated diver were 
 
4.  Explained why aerial survey data were not 
 
Docks & 
not recorded during the surveys in the 
found to be representative of density 
Falmouth Bay and great northern divers 
estimates and evidence supporting this 
Engineering Co 
were recorded in low numbers; 
conclusion. 
Ltd & the 
7.  Concerns that no option was made of a 
Provided assurances regarding 
Falmouth Docks 
boundary between Gerrans bay & St 
quality standards of both JNCC 
competent 
Austell Bay (including the northern area 
and Natural England. Provided 
authority 
of Carrick roads). 
clarification regarding 
(continued) 
 
methodology for calculating 
qualifying numbers and 
demonstrated evidence of use; 
5.  Demonstrated the evidence of use 
indicates great northern divers and 
Slavonian grebe are present in the 
contended areas in numbers exceeding 
defined threshold values. Added that 
recent survey data (Annex 3) indicates the 
contended areas are used by all three 
species; 
6.  Demonstrated that out of the 35 shore-
based count sectors, 29 were used at 
numbers exceeding the species-specific 
thresholds by at least one of the 
recommended species. Displayed 
consistency with the UK SPA guidelines 
by including sectors with low or zero 
threshold counts that are delimited by 
sectors with counts equal to or exceeding 
the threshold values. 
7.  Explained as per Point 6. 
 
 
30 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Cornwall 
Neutral to the proposals. Raised 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
Inshore 
queries/concerns relating to the 
response regarding the vulnerability 
Fisheries and 
vulnerability assessment which underpins 
assessment. 
Conservation 
the Impact Assessment.  
Authority 
(CIFCA) 
Cornwall 
Opposed to the proposals. Concerns  3/4/6/8 
Acknowledgment provided. Meeting 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Council 
raised include: 
arranged for Oct 2014 for further 
consultee may consider 
Harbour Board 
 
discussion. Provided written clarification 
their issue to be current. 
1.  Lack of verification of the evidence 
as follows: 
base. 
 
1.  Demonstrated that all data 
collection/analysis/application was 
performed in accordance with the JNCC 
UK SPA guidelines. 
Cornwall 
Neutral to the proposals. Outlined a 

Acknowledgement sent 
None raised 
Council 
number of socio-economic concerns. 
Planning 
Department 
Crown Estate 
Neutral to the proposals. Outlined a 

Acknowledgement sent 
None raised 
number of socio-economic concerns. 
Environment 
Supportive of the proposals. Outlined a 

Acknowledgement sent 
None raised 
Agency 
number of management views. 
31 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Falmouth Town 
Opposed to the proposals in principle. 
4/8/9 
Acknowledgement and presentation 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Council 
Raised a number of concerns (primarily 
provided.  
consultee may consider 
socio-economic) and 
 
their issue to be current. 
 
Clarified the obligations of EU member 
Queried the need for the designation 
states under the Birds Directive to protect 
considering the pSPA birds have been 
suitable territories for birds listed under 
frequenting the area for a number of 
Annex I of the directive 
years. 
Falmouth 
Opposed to the proposals. Concerns 
3/4/5/8 
Acknowledgement provided. Detailed 
Falmouth Harbour 
Harbour 
raised as follows: 
response provided as follows: 
Commissioners explicitly 
Commissioners 
 
 
stated that all issues raised 
1.  Scientific validity of the data applied to 
1.  Referred to previous correspondence 
during the consultation 
determine the seaward boundary being 
from Natural England regarding the 
should remain current, 
based on a modelled approach and the 
seaward boundary. Provided 
unaddressed and for Defra’s 
use of Scottish data (i.e. non-site specific 
clarification around the methodology 
data);  
applied to define the seaward boundary 
consideration.  
2.  lack of evidence presented regarding the 
and justification as to why the use of 
diving depths of great northern diver on 
generic data from a different site was 
the south Cornwall coast (habitat 
appropriate. Additionally, displayed that 
preference of this species is used to 
divers were identified outside of the 
define the seaward boundary); 
proposed boundary and therefore the 
3.  indicated agreement with concerns 
recommended boundary option should 
regarding the seaward boundary  made 
not be considered over-precautionary; 
by the Expert Independent Reviewers, 
2.  Provided examples from scientific 
and that the best of a poor selection of 
literature where the cited diving depth of 
options is not an encouraging approach 
great northern diver was comparable 
with the proposed seaward boundary 
(49m contour) for south Cornwall. 
3.  Demonstrated the appropriateness of the 
boundary method selected and that it did 
not represent an entirely unprecedented 
approach 
32 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Maritime & 
Neutral to the proposals. Requested 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
Coastguard 
clarification regarding potential 
response 
Agency 
implications to MCA activities. 
Marine 
Neutral to the proposals. Raised a 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
Management 
number of points regarding fishery 
response 
Organisation 
management in the pSPA. 
Ministry of 
Neutral to the proposals. Provided 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided and meeting 
None raised 
Defence 
information regarding naval activities 
held 
and potential impacts within the pSPA. 
St Mawes Pier 
Neutral to the proposals. Raised a 
3/4/8 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
& Harbour Co. 
number of socio-economic queries as 
response as follows: 
well as scientific queries as follows: 
 
 
1.  Provided clarification of the difference 
1.  Whether the SPA recommendation is an 
between SPAs and SACs and that the 
extension of the existing Fal & Helford 
SPA recommendation is designed to 
Special Area of Conservation; and 
protect wintering waterbirds as a result 
2.  Whether the recommended features are 
of EU member states requirement to 
wintering or passing through. 
create a network of protected wildlife 
areas, known as the Natura 2000 
network. Clarified this was not an 
extension of the existing SAC; and 
2.  Provided clarification that the site is 
being recommended for wintering 
waterbirds and the obligation to protect 
suitable territories for Annex I species 
under the Birds Directive. 
Trinity House 
Neutral response. Requested clarification 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
of duties as a relevant authority and 
response 
assurances in terms of traditional 
practices and customary rights. 
33 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

C. 
Interested Parties/Organisations 
Angling School 
Supportive of the proposals. Indicated 

Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
CIC 
support for any net bans in estuaries and 
response 
along the 10m depth contour. 
Baker 
Opposed to the Proposals. Concerns 
3/5/6/7/
Acknowledgement sent and detailed 
Baker Consultants indicated 
Consultants 
raised include: 
8/9 
response: 
at the face-to-face meeting 
(related to the 
 
 
that Points 1-5 inclusive 
Freeth 
1.  Unwarranted exclusion of the aerial 
1.  Provision of supporting evidence to justify 
should remain as 
Cartwright 
survey data; 
the exclusion of aerial survey population 
outstanding and for Defra’s 
2.  insufficient survey data which did not 
estimates which demonstrated that the 
challenge) 
consideration.  
demonstrate regularity of use within 
aerial surveys, when compared with 
 
marine SPA guidelines; 
shore-based counts, underestimated the 
 
Note: further 
3.  unscientific and unprecedented methods 
number of birds present;  
face-to-face 
used in defining the seaward boundary;  
2.  Outlined that the scientific evidence 
discussion 
4.  Slavonian grebe not present in sufficient 
indicates the site has been regularly used 
numbers to warrant inclusion, with 
for a period of at least 20 years by the 
occurred on the 
reference to ‘minimum 50’ guideline;  
qualifying features and that Natural 
14th October 
5.  the landward boundary is not justified by 
England’s recommendations are 
2014. Further 
scientific data;  
consistent with guidance on marine SPA 
communication 
6.  the recommendation is not underpinned 
classification; 
was sent by 
by SSSI;  
 
7.  inconsistencies in the WeBS data reported 
Natural England 
for Slavonian grebe;  
clarifying Points 
7 and 8 
34 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Baker 
8.  Alternative approaches were discussed 
 
3.  Explained existing aerial survey data 
 
Consultants 
during the Oct 2014 meeting which 
could not be used, and demonstrated the 
included a generic visible limit (from 
seaward boundary option is based on 
(continued) 
shore) approach to the seaward boundary 
generic habitat (depth) preferences of the 
and a boundary following the existing 
recommended features, using established 
IBA seaward limit. The visible limit 
scientific techniques for SPA boundary 
approach would effectively result in a 
setting. The use of generic data for 
seaward boundary approximately 2km 
individual sites is not unprecedented. The 
offshore (2km distance is recognised as 
option presented is not considered to be 
the maximum distance for identification to 
over-precautionary as divers have been 
species level) and a boundary following 
recorded outside of the seaward boundary;  
the IBA seaward boundary would result in 
4.  Outlined that preliminary outputs from the 
a boundary up to 6km offshore.; and 
ongoing SPA review and consequent 
9.  Further suggestion was made to collect 
decisions from SPA and Ramsar Scientific 
more data to inform a seaward boundary 
Working Group identified that an 
recommendation. 
insufficient proportion of the population 
of Slavonian grebe were included within 
the SPA network. Natural England’s 
justification demonstrated that the number 
of Slavonian grebe within the site qualify 
under Stage 1.1 of the SPA selection 
guidelines and regularity of use is 
demonstrated by data from the Wetland 
Bird Survey (WeBS) (2007/08 - 2011/12) 
(note: recent update of WeBS counts 
available);  
35 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Baker 
 
 
5.  Demonstrated that the decision to draw 
 
Consultants 
the landward boundary to mean high 
water (MHW) is consistent with marine 
(continued) 
SPA guidelines and supported by 
observational data on diver behaviour;  
6.  Demonstrated that there is no policy or 
legal requirement to underpin SPA with 
SSSI;  
7.  Inconsistencies in reported WeBS data 
clarified with BTO. See Annex 3; 
8.  Explained the 2km visible boundary 
approach would result in an arbitrary, 
unmeasurable boundary which ignores the 
presence of populations of birds further 
offshore. Neither Birdlife International 
nor RSPB have been able to verify the 
basis for defining the seaward limit of the 
IBA and therefore the approach cannot be 
scientifically evidenced; and 
9.  Natural England maintained the 
recommended boundary option presents 
the most scientific option available and 
the site qualifies for classification under 
the UK SPA guidelines. 
36 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

CHADFISH 
Opposed to the proposals. 
3/4/5/8 
Acknowledgement provided and meeting 
Further correspondence 
(Helford and 
Concerns/suggestions raised include: 
held. Detailed response provided as 
from Chris Bean indicates 
Cadgwith 
 
follows: 
all points of concern are for 
Fishermen’s 
1.  Removal of the Falmouth Bay area from 
 
Defra’s consideration. 
Society) 
the proposals as a key area for the fixed-
1.  Demonstrated the importance of the 
net fishery; 
representative 
Falmouth Bay area in terms of the 
2.  The boundary lines appear to be 
evidence of use; 
Chris Bean. 
arbitrary; 
2.  Clarified the methodology used to define 
3.  Sceptical of the methodology used to 
the boundaries (landward, east-west and 
establish the bird counts especially those 
seaward) 
observed via aerial survey; 
3.  Demonstrated that the aerial surveys were 
4.  The seaward boundary not accurately 
not utilised to demonstrate qualifying 
following the 49m contour which in 
numbers, and how the shore-based 
places, sits over water depths of 60m. 
surveys and supporting evidence was used 
to demonstrate evidence of use; 
4.  Cornwall Inshore Fisheries and 
Conservation Authority (CIFCA) involved 
in discussions with Natural England 
advisers to outline the justification for the 
seaward boundary in-line with UK SPA 
guidelines and also the practicalities of 
management to follow “straight lines” by 
“approximately” following the 49m 
contour. 
Cornwall 
Supportive of the proposals. Outlined a 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
Councillor for 
number of socio-economic concerns. 
response regarding socio-economic 
St Austell Bay 
concerns. 
(Tom French) 
37 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Country Land &  Opposed to the proposals. Concerns 
4/5/6/8 
Acknowledgement and detailed response 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Business 
raised as follows: 
sent which addressed the concerns as 
consultee may consider 
Association 
 
follows: 
their issue to be current. 
(CLA) 
1.  The data-set which the recommendation 
 
is based are not sufficiently current nor 
1.  Demonstrated that the data 
of long enough duration to justify the 
collection/analysis/application complied 
designation; 
with the JNCC UK SPA guidelines 
2.  justification for the landward boundary 
regarding age of data and period of 
is inadequate; 
collection. Furthermore Natural England’s 
3.  disregarding the aerial survey data is 
response outlined the historical data 
unjustified and selective; and 
spanning several decades which supports 
4.  the recommendation is not underpinned 
the evidence of use; 
by a SSSI 
2.  Demonstrated the decision to draw the 
landward boundary to mean high water 
(MHW) is consistent with SPA guidelines 
and supported by observational data on 
diver behaviour;  
3.  Demonstrated that the aerial surveys when 
compared with shore-based counts, 
underestimated the number of birds 
present; and 
4.  Clarified there is no legal or policy 
requirement to underpin SPA with SSSI 
Cornwall 
Supportive of the proposals. Outlined a 

Acknowledgement sent 
None Raised 
Wildlife Trust 
number of socio-economic and 
management views. 
Department for 
No comments offered in response to the 

Acknowledgement sent 
None Raised 
Communities & 
consultation 
Local 
Government 
38 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Duchy of 
Neutral response. Requested clarification 
1,3 
Acknowledgement provided and  
None Raised 
Cornwall 
around the following: 
 
 
1.  Explained the decision to draw the 
1.  Justification for the landward boundary 
landward boundary to mean high water 
to be set at MWH. 
(MHW) is consistent with SPA 
guidelines and supported by 
observational data on diver behaviour. 
Eco-Bos 
Opposed to the proposals. Concerns 
4/5/6/8 
Acknowledgement and detailed response 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Development 
raised as follows: 
sent which addressed the concerns as 
consultee may consider 
 
follows: 
their issue to be current. 
1.  The data-set which the recommendation 
 
is based are not sufficiently current nor 
1.  Demonstrated that the data 
of long enough duration to justify the 
collection/analysis/application complied 
designation; 
with the JNCC UK SPA guidelines 
2.  disregarding the aerial survey data is 
regarding age of data and period of 
unjustified and selective; 
collection. Furthermore, response outlined 
3.  justification for the landward boundary 
the historical data spanning several 
is inadequate 
decades which supports the evidence of 
4.  if the area is so important why has it not 
use; 
been designated as a SSSI prior to the 
2.  demonstrated that the aerial surveys when 
pSPA recommendation; and 
compared with shore-based counts, 
5.  the recommendations focusses heavily 
underestimated the number of birds 
on the western area (Falmouth) of the 
present; 
site. 
 
39 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Eco-Bos 
 
 
3.  the decision to draw the landward 

Development 
boundary to mean high water (MHW) is 
consistent with SPA guidelines and 
(continued) 
supported by observational data on diver 
behaviour;  
4.  provided clarification around the drivers 
for various designations; and 
5.  provided clarification that the survey 
effort was equal across the site and 
justification for the inclusion of the areas 
discussed (St Austell Bay)  
FabTest 
Opposed to the proposals. Concerns 
3/4/5/8 
Acknowledgement provided. Detailed 
Falmouth Harbour 
(Falmouth Bay 
raised as follows: 
response provided as follows: 
Commissioners manage the 
Test Site, 
 
 
FabTest facility and have 
Marine 
1.  methodology used in defining the 
1. 
Referred to previous correspondence with 
explicitly stated the issues 
Renewables 
[modelled] seaward boundary being 
Falmouth Harbour Commissioners (FHC) 
raised should be considered 
based on the application of data from a 
regarding the seaward boundary. Provided 
Test Site) 
current, unaddressed and for 
different geographical location 
clarification around the methodology 
(Scotland) rather than evidence of 
applied to define the seaward boundary 
Defra’s consideration. 
habitat use at the south Cornwall site;  
and justification as to why the use of 
2.  lack of evidence presented regarding the 
generic data from a different site was 
diving depths of great northern diver on 
appropriate. Additionally, displayed that 
the south Cornwall coast (habitat 
divers were identified outside of the 
preference of this species is used to 
proposed boundary and therefore the 
define the seaward boundary); 
recommended boundary option should not 
 
be considered over-precautionary; 
FabTest 
3.  highlighted the Important Bird Area 
 
2. 
Provided examples from scientific 
 
(continued) 
(IBA) as designated in 1996, and 
literature where the cited diving depth of 
requested more evidence as to why the 
great northern diver was comparable with 
IBA boundary should not be adopted. 
the proposed seaward boundary (49m 
contour) for south Cornwall; and 
3. 
Provided clarity that the IBA provides no 
statutory protection for the pSPA species 
and that basing SPAs on IBAs is not 
performed as a matter of policy in the UK. 
40 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Freeth 
Opposed to the proposals. Raised a 

Acknowledgement and detailed response 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Cartwright 
number of legal challenges to the formal 
 
provided. 
consultee may consider 
Solicitors. 
consultation process.  
 
 
their issue to be current. 
 
 
 
 
Freeths 
Opposed to the proposals. Scientific 
4/6 
Detailed response provided as follows: 
Solicitors 
concerns raised as follows: 
 
(directly related 
 
1.  Clarified that the evidence in question 
to the Baker 
Queried the inclusion of new scientific 
(see Annex 3 for details) emerged 
following final preparation of the 
Consultants 
evidence outlined by Natural England in 
scientific recommendations. Further 
consultation 
the response to the Baker Consultants 
explained the new data served only to 
response) 
consultation response. Concerned that 
corroborate the landward boundary 
 
Natural England relied on the new 
decision and support the evidence (as 
evidence to support the case for the 
outlined in the Departmental Brief) 
which alone indicates the site as a 
landward boundary recommendation, and 
suitable territory for Annex I species 
also, to demonstrate the site as a suitable 
under the Birds Directive. 
territory for the recommended species. 
Requested Natural England provide 
further period for public consultation in 
light of the new evidence. 
Friends of the 
Supportive of the proposals. 

Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
Earth 
 
Helford 
Neutral to the proposals. 
1/3 
Meeting held 
None raised 
Property Estates 
41 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Imerys Minerals  Opposed to the proposals. Concerns 
3/4/5/6/
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Limited 
raised as follows: 

response sent which addressed the 
consultee may consider 
 
concerns as follows: 
their issue to be current. 
1.  No evidence of usage of the Par Docks 
 
area in the pSPA boundary  
1. 
Demonstrated that the Par docks are is not 
2.  The data-set which the recommendation 
included in the pSPA boundary 
is based are not sufficiently current nor 
recommendations; 
of long enough duration to justify the 
2. 
Demonstrated the data collection, analysis 
designation; 
and application complied with the JNCC 
3.  justification for the landward boundary 
UK SPA guidelines regarding age of data 
is inadequate; and 
and period of collection. Furthermore, 
4.  indicated there is much data, reporting 
response outlined the historical data 
and assessment of the western area of 
spanning several decades which supports 
the designation (Falmouth) with little 
the evidence of use; 
regard provided to the eastern (St 
3. 
Demonstrated the decision to draw the 
Austell Bay) area. 
landward boundary to mean high water 
(MHW) is consistent with SPA guidelines 
and supported by observational data on 
diver behaviour; and  
4. 
Demonstrated the survey effort from both 
shore-based counts and aerial surveys was 
spread equally across the proposed area 
Maenporth 
Neutral to the proposals. Raised queries 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
Estates 
regarding implications of the designation 
response 
to their business and recreational 
activities 
Mevagissey 
Neutral response. Raised concerns 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
Fishermen’s 
regarding safety aspects of displacing 
Association 
fishermen offshore should restrictions on 
fixed nets be imposed. 
Network Rail 
Neutral response. Requested clarification 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided including 
None raised 
regarding the 5km buffer mentioned in 
clarification of the 5km buffer. 
the IA 
42 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

National 
Neutral response. Indicated a 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided, 
None raised 
Federation of 
reassessment of the SPA guidelines was 
presentation provided and detailed 
Fishermen’s 
required. Raised a number of socio-
response regarding the vulnerability 
Organisations 
economic and safety points regarding 
assessment queries. 
fisheries in the pSPA. Queried a number 
of points in the vulnerability assessment 
which underpins the Impact Assessment. 
Police Wildlife 
Supportive of the proposals. Requested 
2/3 
Acknowledgement provided and 
None raised 
Crimes 
clarification regarding management 
clarification around future management 
provided 
RegenSW 
Opposed to the proposals. Raised a 
3/4/5/8 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
Not explicitly stated, but 
number of socio-economic concerns. 
response as follows  
consultee may consider 
Scientific concerns raised include: 
 
their issue to be current. 
 
1.  Provided clarification around the 
1.  Queried the methodology used to define 
methodology applied to define the 
the [modelled] seaward boundary based 
seaward boundary and justification as to 
on the application of data from a 
why the use of generic data from a 
different geographical location 
different site was appropriate. 
(Scotland) and not correlated with the 
Additionally, displayed that divers were 
south Cornwall site. 
identified outside of the proposed 
 
boundary and therefore the 
recommended boundary option should 
not be considered over-precautionary. 
RNLI 
Neutral to the proposals 

Acknowledgement provided. 
None raised 
UK Chamber of 
Neutral to the proposals. Indicate 

Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
Shipping 
agreement that the harbour areas are not 
response 
used by the pSPA areas 
43 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Royal Cornwall 
Opposed to the proposals. Concerns 
3/4/7/8 
Acknowledgement provided. Detailed 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Yacht Club 
raised include: 
response provided as follows: 
consultee may consider 
 
 
their issue to be current. 
1.  Number of individuals identified are 
1. 
Provided clarity around Article 4 of the 
extremely small and only just above the 
Birds Directive where member states are 
1% GB population threshold (except 
required to classify the most suitable 
black-throated diver) and nowhere near 
territories for defined species under 
the scale of population envisaged; 
Annex I and regularly occurring migratory 
2.  likely that detailed counts of the regional 
species. Placed the pSPA population 
populations would demonstrate larger 
numbers in context with the UK wintering 
overall populations; 
population estimates and outlined the 
3.  the visiting population appears to be 
supporting evidence which demonstrates 
stable already without a designation of 
evidence of regular use spanning several 
this scale; 
decades; 
4.  the proposed area of 294km2 seems 
2. 
Outlined the JNCC area of search (AoS) 
excessive for such a small number of 
survey work and the importance of the 
birds; 
south Cornwall site in this context; 
5.  there are already multiple protection 
3. 
Clarified that SPAs are not recommended 
areas of different types in the area; and 
because particular species are seen as 
6.  a survey of potential impacts such as 
being at risk, rather they are recognised to 
net-drowning should be performed to 
support populations of threatened or 
assess the risks to the birds before a 
declining species or populations as 
designation such as this is proposed. 
defined in the Birds Directive; 
Royal Cornwall 
 
 
4. 
As per Point 1 & Point 2; and 
 
Yacht Club 
5. 
Explained the purpose of other 
designations in the area and that wintering 
(continued) 
waterbirds currently have no protection 
afforded under these designations; and 
6. 
As per Point 1 & 3. 
Royal Cornwall 
Neutral to the proposals.  

Acknowledgement provided.  
None raised 
Yachting 
 
 
Association 
44 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

RSPB 
Supportive of the proposals. Concerns 
2/3 
Acknowledgement provided. Detailed 
Not explicitly stated, but 
raised include: 
response provided as follows: 
consultee may consider 
 
 
their issue to be current. 
1.  Exclusion of black-necked grebe and 
1. 
Referred to previous correspondence with 
red-necked grebe; 
RSPB regarding this matter and steer from 
2.  The Natural England has not clearly 
the SPA Ramsar Scientific Working 
stated [in the Departmental Brief] that 
Group (SPARSWG). Reiterated Natural 
the data used for classification is likely 
England’s position with respect to this 
to represent an underestimation of the 
steer and suggested any outstanding issues 
population numbers, and that the cited 
be channelled via the SPARSWG; 
populations will not be appropriate as 
 
baselines for defining conservation 
objectives; and 
3.  Regarding the use of expert opinion to 
influence the decision to remove the 
creek/river areas in the estuarine areas of 
the site, and that there is a lack of 
understanding regarding the birds 
behaviour in respect of such areas. 
RSPB 
 
 
2. 
Referred to previous communications 
 
(continued) 
regarding this concern. Whilst accepting 
the estimates likely represent an 
underestimation of the population 
numbers on the site, Natural England’s 
role is to present evidence in an 
appropriate and impartial manner with site 
selection based on scientific data and 
assessments performed according to the 
UK SPA selection guidelines; and 
3. 
Outlined the methodology for this 
approach and that the decision for 
exclusion/inclusion of these areas was 
based on evidence of use. 
45 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

D. 
Members of the public and unsolicited responses 
Anon 
Member of the public – Opposed to the 
4/8 
Unable to provide acknowledgement 
None raised 
proposals as the birds have been 
frequenting the area for many years 
without any protection. 
Leanne Block 
Member of the public – supportive of the 

Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
proposals. 
Steve Cox 
Member of the public – supportive of the 

Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
proposals. 
Paul Hobson 
Member of the public – Opposed to the 
3/4/6/8 
Acknowledgement provided. Detailed 
Not explicitly stated, but 
proposals.  
response provided as follows:  
consultee may consider 
 
 
their issue to be current. 
1.  Queried the relatively short period of 
1.  Outlined the survey data and history of 
time the data was collected over and 
regular use spanning several decades. 
whether the pSPA birds would actually 
Clarified the purpose of an SPA and the 
know the area is safe, if classified. 
UK Government’s commitment to the 
Birds Directive to identify and protect 
suitable territories for Annex I species. 
Dr Euan 
Member of the public – supportive of the 

Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
McPhee 
proposals. 
Nick Nomen 
Member of the public – supportive of the 

Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
proposals. 
Chris Oakes 
Member of the public (fisherman) – 
3/4/8 
Acknowledgement provided. Detailed Not explicitly stated, but 
opposed to the proposals.  
response provided as follows; 
consultee may consider 
 
 
their issue to be current. 
1.  Requested justification of why the 
1.  Outlined the numbers of qualifying 
boundaries are being recommended 
species present in the recommended area 
along the south Cornwall coast when the 
and the importance of the site from a 
birds are known to frequent the entire of 
national perspective. 
the SW coastline. 
46 

 
 
CONSULTEE 
REPRESENTATION 
Type * 
Natural England response 
OUTSTANDING ISSUES 
FOR CONSIDERATION 
BY DEFRA 

Martin Scott 
Member of the public – supportive of the 

Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
proposals. 
Jeremy Searle 
Member of the public – supportive of the 

Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
proposals. 
Robert Talbot 
Member of the public – Opposed to the 
3/4/5 
Acknowledgement provided. Detailed  Not explicitly stated, but 
proposals.  
response provided as follows: 
consultee may consider 
 
 
their issue to be current. 
1.  Questioned validity of the inclusion of 
1.  Demonstrated the evidence of use for the 
the Fal River area and where the 
contended area and clarified the 
Departmental Brief states “no counts or 
statement in the departmental brief 
evidence of usage”; 
pertained to the upper Fal River which is 
2.  Indicated it was not clear which areas 
not included in the recommendations. 
were to be excluded from the pSPA; and 
2.  Provided a higher resolution map of the 
3.  Queried the basis for the 
proposed boundary; and 
recommendation of the landward 
3.  Demonstrated the decision to draw the 
boundary to mean high water 
landward boundary to mean high water 
(MHW) is consistent with SPA 
guidelines and supported by 
observational data on diver behaviour. 
Sarah Vandome 
Member of the public – supportive of the 

Acknowledgement provided 
None raised 
proposals. 
Chris 
Member of the public (fisherman) – 
3/4 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
Not explicitly stated, but 
Vinnecombe 
opposed to the proposals in principal 
response as follows: 
consultee may consider 
 
 
their issue to be current. 
1.  Queried the purpose of the designation 
1.  Provided justification for the 
and concerns over potential impact to 
recommendations as per the scientific 
fisheries.  
evidence and historical evidence of use. 
Barney 
Member of the public (fisherman) – 
1/3 
Acknowledgement provided and detailed 
None raised 
Rosewall 
Neutral to the proposals. Raised a 
response. 
number of concerns over potential impact 
to fisheries 
 
47 

 
 
 
48 

 
 
Annex 1: Non-Financial Scheme of Delegation 
 
The Non-Financial Scheme of Delegation currently states the following for international site 
designation cases: 
 
 
Function 
Delegation 

Approval to submit formal advice (Departmental Brief1 
Chief Executive 
or Selection Assessment Document2) to Secretary of 
 
State on the selection of a pSAC, pSPA or pRamsar site 
or proposed amendments to an existing cSAC, SCI, 
SAC, SPA or Ramsar site. 

Following the consultation, approval of final advice, 
 
with or without modifications, and report on the 
consultation, where: 
 
a) objections or representations are unresolved 
Board or Chairman on 
behalf of the Board 
 
b) there are no outstanding objections or representations  Appropriate Director 
(i.e. where no objections or representations were 
 
made, or where representations or objections were 
withdrawn or resolved) 
1Departmental Briefs (for Special Protection Areas and Ramsar sites) 
2Selection Assessment Documents (for Special Conservation Areas) 
 
Part A – In the first instance the scientific case is developed and presented to the Chief Executive 
(and the Executive Board) who discuss the case and approve sign off as Natural England’s formal 
scientific advice to Defra.  Defra then seek Ministerial approval for Natural England to consult on 
these proposals on behalf of Government. 
 
Part B – Once the formal consultation process has completed, Natural England considers any 
scientific objections to the proposals and endeavours to resolve any issues or concerns raised by 
stakeholders during the consultation.  If, after a reasonable process of liaison with stakeholders, there 
are outstanding issues that cannot be resolved Natural England finalises the report on the consultation 
for Defra and sets out its final advice on the case in the report.  There may be changes proposed as a 
result of the consultation and outstanding issues for Defra’s consideration. 
 
i) Where there are no outstanding objections, representations or issues with respect to the proposals 
the relevant Director can approve the consultation report for submission to Defra. 
 
ii) Where there are outstanding issues which it has not been possible to resolve the responsibility for 
approval of the consultation report falls to Board, or Chairman on behalf of the Board. 
49 

 
 
 
Annex 2: Consultation Questions 
 
Scientific Case  
 
Q1: 
Do you accept the scientific basis for the site being put forward in this consultation?  If No, 
then please could you explain why?  
 
Q2: 
Do you have any information additional to that included in the Departmental Brief about the 
distribution and populations of overwintering waterbirds in the Falmouth Bay to St Austell 
Bay areas that you would like to share with Natural England? Yes/No 
 
If Yes, please state if this information has been submitted with your response or how you 
intend to share this information. 
 
Q3: 
Do you have any further comments on the scientific selection of the site as a pSPA?  
 
 
50 

 
 
 
Annex 3: Additional Evidence 
 
Wetland Bird Survey (WeBS) data 
 
Recent WeBS bird count data (2010/11, 2012/13 and 2013/14) from relevant WeBS count sectors within the site (Carrick 
Roads WeBS sector 10421 and Gerrans Bay WeBS Sector 10470) was referenced in Natural England’s response to 
concerns raised in the Baker Consultants consultation response. Natural England’s response to concerns raised by Baker 
Consultants provided a detailed analysis of the existing, publically available WeBS bird count data. Additionally, 
reference was made to bird count data from the aforementioned sectors which had been more recently added to the WeBS 
online database. Natural England’s reference to the WeBS data served to further corroborate the existing scientific 
evidence-base as reported in the Departmental Brief. 
 
It should be noted that WeBS data may be uploaded to the WeBS online database by WeBS volunteer counters either 
directly or paper copy submission for upload by BTO employees. The uploaded data entries are reviewed annually by 
BTO and a Wetland Bird Survey report is produced. 
 
The WeBS data for the three recommended Annex I species under consideration was updated by the British Trust for 
Ornithology as follows: 
 
2010/11 WeBS count data:   Uploaded to the WeBS online database during August 2013. 
Departmental Brief approved for submission to Defra for 
consideration by the Natural England Executive Board on 10th June 
2013. Defra submission to the secretary of State occurred on the 18th 
December. No changes were made to the recommendations during the 
interim period 
 
2012/13 WeBS count data: 
Uploaded to the WeBS online database during August 2014. Data 
became an official government statistic during August 2014 (see 
Tables 1 and 2). 
 
2013/14 WeBS count data: 
Uploaded to the WeBS online database during August 2014. Data will 
become a government statistic during March 2015 (See Tables 1 and 
2).  
 
As reported in the Departmental Brief for the site, an assessment of qualifying numbers for black-
throated diver and great northern diver was made through the Joint Nature Conservation Committee 
(JNCC) shore-based surveys (2009/10 & 2010/11). The assessment of numbers for Slavonian grebe 
was made using WeBS count data. It was noted as a result of discussions with Baker Consultants that 
an apparent inconsistency existed in the reported WeBS count data for the 2009/10 season. WeBS 
data available from the BTO externally-facing website reported a peak mean for the period 2007/08 – 
2011/12 of 12.8. WeBS data sourced from the WeBS master database produce a peak mean of 15 as 
reported in the Departmental Brief, which has been traced to inconsistencies in the March 2010 
records. Natural England requested clarification from British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) who 
manage the database, and has since received paper copy of the WeBS count sector from Gerrans Bay 
which corroborates the values extracted from the master database. The inconsistency has been traced 
to a filter applied to rare species in order to protect confidentiality of breeding sites. This has now 
been rectified by the WeBS team to apply solely to inland (and not coastal / marine) sites, meaning 
the externally-facing data now reflect the master database. 
 
51 

link to page 52 link to page 52  
 
 
Table 1: Displaying the most recent WeBS data and five year peak mean 2007/08 – 2013/14 for 
Slavonian grebes in Carrick Roads and Gerrans Bay count sectors. Data not reported in the 
Departmental Brief is highlighted in red. 
  
Sector 
07/08 
08/09 
09/10 
10/11 
11/12 
12/13 
13/14 
Carrick Roads 







Gerrans Bay 

13 
20 
10 
18 

12 
Sum 

15 
21 
14 
18 

13 
 
Table 2:
 Displaying the five year peak means 2007/08 – 2013/14 for Slavonian grebes in Carrick 
Roads and Gerrans Bay WeBS count sectors.  
 
Five year winter period 
Peak mean 
2007/08 to 2011/12 
14.8 
2008/09 to 2012/13 
15.4 
2009/10 to 2013/14 
15.0 
 
Wintering Divers and Grebes Foraging Ecology Report, 20148 
 
A report commissioned by Natural England in 2014 entitled “Distribution and Ecology of wintering grebes and divers in 
the Falmouth-St. Austell pSPA” was referenced in Natural England’s response to concerns raised in a number of formal 
consultation responses. These included Baker Consultants; CHADFISH; Eco-Bos Development; and member of the 
public Robert Talbot. 
 
The report was also referenced in response to A&P/FDEC and the CHADFISH formal consultation response to 
demonstrate the evidence of use by the recommended features of the area adjacent to the Falmouth Docks (lower Carrick 
Roads) and Falmouth Bay area. 
 
Natural England’s response to the landward boundary recommendation referenced GIS data submitted by the authors of 
the report, which provided corroborating observational evidence of the use of the intertidal areas of the site by the 
recommended features. The landward boundary is recommended to Mean High Water in accordance with the Marine 
SPA Selection Guidelines9 which states that where the distribution of birds is likely to meet land, landward boundaries 
should be set at Mean High Water (MHW) “unless there is evidence that the qualifying species make no use of the 
intertidal region at high water
”. The new evidence serves to corroborate the existing observational records of diver 
behaviour as outlined in the Departmental Brief. 
 
Timeline for delivery of the report as follows: 
 
30th May 2014: 
 Draft report submitted to Natural England; 
13th June 2014
Natural England comments provided to the contractor; 
15th July 2014: 
Final draft report delivered to Natural England; 
Current: 
The report is currently awaiting external peer review, delivery expected Dec 2014 
 
 
                                                 
8 Liley, D., Fearnley, H., Waldon, J. & Jackson, D. (2014). Distribution and Ecology of wintering grebes and divers in the Falmouth-St. Austell pSPA. 
Unpublished report by Footprint Ecology for Natural England. 
9 Webb, A. & Reid, J.B. (2004). Guidelines for the selection of marine SPAs for aggregations of inshore non-breeding waterbirds. Annex B in: 
Johnston, C., Turnbull, C. Reid, J.B. &  
Webb, A. (2004). Marine Natura 2000: Update on progress in Marine Natura
 
52 

Document Outline