This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Number of computers running Windows XP'.


   B McGhee 
KILO 
MoJ Technology  
   
 
5.11, 102 Petty France 
London SW1H 9AJ 
 
E 
xxxxxxxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
www.justice.gov.uk  
  
Mr N Heath 
  
e-mail: request-266713-
  
xxxxxxxx@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.xxx 
 
  
 
   
 
Our Reference: FOI 97492 
May 2015 
   
 
Freedom of Information Request  
 
 
Dear Mr Heath, 
  
Thank you for your email dated 5 May 2015 in which you asked for the following 
information from the Ministry of Justice (MoJ): 
 
In your department: 
1.  How many computers are still running Windows XP? 
2.  When do you anticipate you will transition all of these XP machines to a 

new operating system?  
3. Which operating system are you switching these machines to? 
4. What parts of the department are these machines mainly used in? 
5. How are you securing the XP machines in the interim period before their 
operating system is replaced? 
6. Have you taken out an Extended Support deal with Microsoft to update 
these XP machines? 
7. What is the cost of this Extended Support deal? 
8. When does this Extended Support deal expire? 

 
 
Your request is being handled under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA). 
 
I can confirm that the MoJ does hold the information, but that we are not obliged to 
provide the information if its release would prejudice law enforcement. By releasing this 
information we believe that disclosure may make MoJ systems vulnerable to interference 
and potentially assist criminal activity. 
 
As a result, I am withholding release of this information under section 31(1) a (prevention 
of crime) of FOIA (please see explanatory notes at the end of this letter).   
 
We have considered whether it would be in the public interest for us to disclose the 
information. In this case, we have concluded that the public interest favours not 
disclosing. When assessing whether or not it was in the public interest to disclose, we 
took into consideration the following arguments: 
 
Public interest considerations in favour of disclosure – s.31:  
UNCLASSIFIED 
 

 
• 
Disclosure of the information would be consistent with policies for greater 
transparency about the uses of, and accountability for, public expenditure.  
 
• 
It is also in the public interest to know that a public authority has measures in 
place to protect information in their possession. 
 
 
Public interest considerations against disclosure – s.31:  
 
• 
Disclosure of this information could provide information which can be used 
maliciously in a targeted electronic attack against our systems.  
 
• 
Disclosure of information may make MoJ systems vulnerable to interference and 
potentially assist criminal activity.  
 
• 
Attempts to breach the security of Government IT systems could lead to a loss of 
confidentiality, integrity and potential availability of information on an ICT system. 
Consequences of potential security breaches may include some or all of the following: 
  malfunction of software 
  breaches of physical security arrangements;  
  theft or loss of software;  
  misuse of software;  
  use of unauthorised or unlicensed software; 
  uncontrolled system changes;  
  theft or loss of data; 
  malicious software (e.g. computer virus); 
  wilful damage to information;  
  loss of service;  
  system malfunctions or overloads;  
  unauthorised use of a computer; 
  unauthorised amendment of information or software held on a computer;  
  unauthorised disclosure of information; 
  non-compliance with policies or guidelines; 
 
 
You can find out more about information held for the purposes of the Act by reading 
some guidance points we consider when processing a request for information, attached 
at the end of this letter.  
 
You can also find more information by reading the full text of the Act, available at 
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/36/contents.  
 
You have the right to appeal our decision if you think it is incorrect. Details can be found 
in the ‘How to Appeal’ section attached at the end of this letter. 
 
 
Disclosure Log 
 
You can also view information that the Ministry of Justice has disclosed in response to 
previous Freedom of Information requests. Responses are anonymised and published 
on our on-line disclosure log which can be found on the MoJ website: 
 
UNCLASSIFIED 
 

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/ministry-of-justice/series/freedom-of-
information-disclosure-log 
 
  
Yours sincerely 
 
B McGhee 
KILO 
MoJ Technology 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
UNCLASSIFIED 
 

How to Appeal 
 
Internal Review 
If you are not satisfied with this response, you have the right to an internal review. The 
handling of your request will be looked at by someone who was not responsible for the 
original case, and they will make a decision as to whether we answered your request 
correctly. 
 
If you would like to request a review, please write or send an email within two months 
of the date of this letter 
to the Data Access and Compliance Unit at the following 
address: 
 
Data Access and Compliance Unit (10.34), 
Information & Communications Directorate, 
Ministry of Justice, 
102 Petty France, 
London 
SW1H 9AJ 
 
E-mail: xxxx.xxxxxx@xxxxxxx.xxx.xxx.xx 
 
 
 
Information Commissioner’s Office 
If you remain dissatisfied after an internal review decision, you have the right to apply to 
the Information Commissioner’s Office. The Commissioner is an independent regulator 
who has the power to direct us to respond to your request differently, if he considers that 
we have handled it incorrectly. 
 
You can contact the Information Commissioner’s Office at the following address: 
 
Information Commissioner’s Office, 
Wycliffe House, 
Water Lane, 
Wilmslow, 
Cheshire 
SK9 5AF 
Internet address: http://www.ico.org.uk/ 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
UNCLASSIFIED 
 

EXPLANATION OF FOIA – SECTION 31  
 
We have provided below additional information about Section 31 of the Freedom of 
Information Act. We have included some extracts from the legislation, as well as some of 
the guidance we use when applying it. We hope you find this information useful. 
 
The legislation 
 
Section 1: Right of Access to information held by public authorities 
 
 (1) Any person making a request for information to a public authority is entitled—  
(a) 
to be informed in writing by the public authority whether it holds 
information of the description specified in the request, and  
(b)  
if that is the case, to have that information communicated to him.  
 
Section 31: Law Enforcement  
(1) Information which is not exempt information by virtue of section 30 is exempt 
information if its disclosure under this Act would, or would be likely to, prejudice— 
(a) 
the prevention or detection of crime, 
(b) 
the apprehension or prosecution of offenders, 
(c) 
the administration of justice, 
(d) 
the assessment or collection of any tax or duty or of any imposition of a 
similar nature, 
(e) 
the operation of the immigration controls, 
(f) 
the maintenance of security and good order in prisons or in other 
institutions where persons are lawfully detained, 
(g) 
the exercise by any public authority of its functions for any of the 
purposes specified in subsection (2), 
(h) 
any civil proceedings which are brought by or on behalf of a public 
authority and arise out of an investigation conducted, for any of the purposes 
specified in subsection (2), by or on behalf of the authority by virtue of Her 
Majesty’s prerogative or by virtue of powers conferred by or under an enactment, 
or 
(i) 
any inquiry held under the Fatal Accidents and Sudden Deaths Inquiries 
(Scotland) Act 1976 to the extent that the inquiry arises out of an investigation 
conducted, for any of the purposes specified in subsection (2), by or on behalf of 
the authority by virtue of Her Majesty’s prerogative or by virtue of powers 
conferred by or under an enactment. 
 
(2) The purposes referred to in subsection (1)(g) to (i) are— 
(a) 
the purpose of ascertaining whether any person has failed to comply with 
the law, 
(b) 
the purpose of ascertaining whether any person is responsible for any 
conduct which is improper, 
(c) 
the purpose of ascertaining whether circumstances which would justify 
regulatory action in pursuance of any enactment exist or may arise, 
(d) 
the purpose of ascertaining a person’s fitness or competence in relation o 
the management of bodies corporate or in relation to any profession or other 
activity which he is, or seeks to become, authorised to carry on, 
(e) 
the purpose of ascertaining the cause of an accident, 
(f) 
the purpose of protecting charities against misconduct or 
mismanagement (whether by trustees or other persons) in their administration, 
(g) 
the purpose of protecting the property of charities from loss or 
misapplication, 
UNCLASSIFIED 
 

(h) 
the purpose of recovering the property of charities, 
(i) 
the purpose of securing the health, safety and welfare of persons at work, 
and 
(j) 
the purpose of protecting persons other than persons at work against risk 
to health or safety arising out of or in connection with the actions of persons at 
work. 
 
(3) The duty to confirm or deny does not arise if, or to the extent that, compliance with 
section 1(1)(a) would, or would be likely to, prejudice any of the matters mentioned in 
subsection (1). 
 
Guidance 
 
Section 31 is concerned with protecting a wide range of law enforcement interests and 
its application turns on whether disclosure would be likely to prejudice those interests.  
 
Some interests that are protected by section 31 are drawn quite widely, for example: the 
administration of justice, the prevention or detection of crime and the operation of 
immigration controls. But section 31 also applies where the exercise by any public 
authority of certain specified functions would be prejudiced by disclosure.  
 
 
 

UNCLASSIFIED