This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Business case for the Queensway Gateway road'.



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
 

Economic Case 
4. Benefit Cost Ratio – assessment of the value for money 
 
4.1 Context 
 
This section outlines the history of, and explains the procedures used in, the economic assessment of 
the  Queensway  Gateway  Road  scheme  and  summarises  the  results  obtained  from  the  analysis, 
providing reference points to more detailed reports where this is relevant.  
 
The  existing  local  road  network  comprises  a  complex  system  of  roads  and  junctions  set  out  in  a 
relatively  compact  area  with  steep  north-  and  south-facing  inclines  across  a  prominent  east-west 
ridge.  The  speed  limit  varies  from  30mph  on  the  B2093  The  Ridge  (East),  40mph  on  the  A21 
Sedlescombe Road North and National Speed Limit on the B2092 Queensway. In addition to providing 
site  access,  the  proposed  Queensway  Gateway  Road  (QGR)  will  also  function  as  a  new  or  re-
assignment route for traffic travelling between the Link Road, the A28, the A2100 and the A21. 
  
4.2 Options appraised 
 
The  options  to  address  the  scheme  objectives  have  developed  over  a  number  of  years,  starting 
initially  in  2000  with  the  Access  to  Hastings  Multi  Modal  Study  (MMS),  through  different  governance 
arrangements  (including  the  winding  up  of  the  Regional  Transport  Board  following  the  2010  General 
Election), using slightly different appraisal guidance, and under different scheme sponsors.  
 
The case for a new link road between Bexhill and Hastings is driven by the need to support economic 
growth across East Sussex through opening up access to land for housing, business developments and 
employment opportunities.  
 
The most recent Position Statement produced for ESCC, most clearly sets out the chronology of option 
development  (also  referred  to  in  the  Options  section  of  the  Strategic  Case)  and  the  consultation 
process undertaken (also referred to in the Consultation section of the Strategic Case) throughout the 
life  of  the  project  6.  In  2004,  the  Highways  Agency  used  ESCC’s  consultation  on  Link  Road  route 
options  to  display,  for  public  reaction,  options  for  the  Baldslow  junction  improvement.  Nearly  80% 
favoured  an  improvement,  with  a  variation  of  the  southern  route  being  the  most  popular.  In 
September 2005, a stakeholder workshop was held which looked at three options – a northern route 
(1), a southern route with a bridge (2A), and a southern route with an embankment (2B).  
 
From 2005 to 2007,  Hyder Consulting UK Ltd, on behalf of the Highways Agency (HA)7, investigated 
ways to resolve congestion at the junction of the A21, A28 and the A2100 (The Ridge) in the north of 
Hastings.  The  scheme,  known  as  the  A21  Baldslow  Junction-Queensway  Link  Road,  or  Baldslow  Link 
Road  (BLR),  included  a  link  between  the  B2092  Queensway  and  the  A21  to  facilitate  movement  of 
traffic between the BHLR and the A21. This is now referred to as the QGR. 
 
A  total  of  six  options  were  developed  and  three  of  them  were  consulted  on  with  stakeholders.  The 
proposed QGR was to complement the BHLR by accommodating increased traffic flows from the BHLR 
accessing the town via the B2092 Queensway, the A21, the A28 and the A2100 The Ridge.  
 
                                                          
6 Report for East Sussex County Council - Baldslow Improvement Position Statement May 2013 (Paul Adams) 
7 A21 South of Pembury Study – A21 Baldslow Junction Improvements – TAR December 2007 (Hyder) 
                                                               
Page 15 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
In September 2007 a second workshop was held. This time, six options were considered: 
•   Options 1A/1B - two northern variants (the same link with differing junction arrangements);  
•  Options 2A/2B  - two southern variants (2A with a bridge, 2A without);  
•  Option 3 – a hybrid on-line/off-line route; and  
•  Option 4 – On-line improvements. 
 
The  aim  was,  from  these,  to  arrive  at  a  Preferred  Route  to  recommend  to  the  Minister  to  be  taken 
forward to publishing Orders.   
 
A HA Technical Appraisal Report (TAR) was produced in December 20072 which brought together the 
findings  of  the  workshop  with  other  work  on  environmental  assessment,  traffic  forecasting  and 
modelling, and economic appraisal which had already been carried out. The report concluded that: 
•  Option 4 did not offer a positive return on investment nor any strategic improvement; 
•  Option 3 did not offer  a positive return on investment and increased  travel distance and had 
some environmental impact; 
•  Options  2A  and  2B  offered  positive  returns  with  BCRs  of  2.33  and  2.73  respectively.  They 
offered  strategic  improvements  but  had  environmental  impact  on  the  Hollington  Valley 
especially the embankment option (2B) (Each rated adverse for land-use policy and moderately 
adverse  biodiversity;  bridge:  slight  adverse  and  embankment  moderate  adverse  for 
landscape); and  
•  Options 1A and 1B offered best returns of 5.12 and 4.22 BCR respectively. They provided the 
best  strategic  improvement  but  were  the  only  options  with  significant  encroachment  into  the 
AONB  (rated  adverse  for  land-use  policy  and  moderately  adverse  for  landscape  and 
biodiversity).  
 
Soon  after  this,  the  HA’s  original  consultants,  Hyder,  were  replaced  by  Mott  MacDonald.  They  were 
asked  to  review  work  carried  out  by  Hyder  (engineering  design,  cost  estimates  and  new  on  line 
options)  and  among  other  things  concluded  some  additional  environmental  assessment  work  in 
January 20098 which concluded that the Option 2 routes scored the most strongly and remained the 
preferred option due to them having the least impact for the majority of the specialist environmental 
topics. 
 
Even  with  the  Southern  Routes  (2A/B)    performing  best  consistently  through  the  number  of 
assessments completed, it was concluded they would only be worth pursuing if a way could be found 
to deliver it at substantially less than previous estimates have indicated (c £20m).  The stated priority 
(in  the  2013  Position  Statement)  was  to  look  for  a  solution  which  can  be  implemented  within  a 
realistic timetable taking into account deliverability and affordability.  
 
4.2 Base Model Development 
 
Full  detail  of  the  appraisal  process  is  incorporated  in  the  Hyder  2007  TAR,  including  a  number  of 
supporting documents produced by Hyder: 
•  Traffic Forecasting Report – GD00496/RT/100/Rev B1 
•  Local Model Validation Report – GD00496/RT/098/Rev A2  
•  Economic Appraisal Report – GD00496/RT/101/Rev D 
•  Scheme Cost Estimate Report – GD00496/RT/088/Rev D 
 
 
 
                                                          
8 A21 Bal dslow Link Road – HA Commission 2007-2009 Technical Information – 2009 (Mott Macdonald)  
                                                               
Page 16 of 46 




SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
The base year traffic model was developed using a combination of two existing models: 
•  The East Sussex County Council Model (developed to assess the impact of opening the Bexhill 
– Hastings Link Road); and 
•  The A21 South of Pembury Model developed for the Highways Agency 
 
The A21 model and the ESCC model were both developed using SATURN 10.3, which was compatible 
with the current version (at the time of model development) of   10.6.14. SATURN (version   10.6.14)   
has   been   used   for   the scheme model development as it was a well-established package widely 
used for this type of study. 
 
The matrices from the two source models also had to be merged. As the matrices from these models 
had already been established with the traffic flows calibrated and validated, it meant having to update 
them with the latest survey data after their merger. 
 
The validation for the model for 2006 traffic flows is described in detail in the LMVR identified above. 
Traffic data used to form the base year model included: 
•  Automatic Traffic Counts during 2005 and 2006 at six sites relevant to the scheme; 
•  Journey Time Surveys over 8 key journey sections; and  
•  Manual Classified Counts for all turning movements over a 12 hour period (07:00 until 19:00) 
by vehicle class, at three junctions on the A21 and A2100. 
 
The base year model was developed to provide a traffic forecasting model, with forecast years of 2012 
and  2027,  incorporating  developments  expected  to  be  brought  forward  during  those  periods. 
Development trips have been distributed using a gravity model to estimate their likely impact on the 
A21 Baldslow schemes in the forecast years.  
 
A  variable  demand  approach  was  taken  using  DIADEM  (Version  2.1),  which  alters  demand  response 
according  to  varying levels  of  congestion  on  the  network  in  accordance  with  WebTAG  3.10.1.  This is 
due  primarily  to  the  opening  the  Bexhill  Hastings  Link  Road  and  new  development  of  up  to  6,000 
dwellings impacting significantly on levels of demand and resultant travel costs. 
 
Figure 5 – Model Structure and Overall Approach  
 
 
 
                                                               
Page 17 of 46 




SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
The  detailed  comparisons  of  modelled  and  observed  flows  for  the  AM,  Inter  and  PM  Peak  hours  are 
shown in Tables A.1, A.2 and A.3 within the LMVR. They show that the modelled results for AM, Inter 
and  PM  Peak  hours  satisfy  the  DMRB  criteria  and  are  acceptable.  Table  1  below  summarises  the 
validation  results  and  shows  that  for  all  three    time    periods,    more    than    the    minimum    85%    of  
links satisfy the flow criteria as well as the GEH criteria.  
 
Table 1 – Summary of GEH Statistics 
 
 
 
Hyder  demonstrated  in  the  LMVR    that  the  validation  results  for  the  three  time  periods  showed  a 
statistically  good    correlation    between    observed    and    modelled    link    flows,    turning    flows  and  
journey  times,  meeting  the  requirements  set  out  in  DMRB  Volume  12. The validated model was 
therefore regarded as sufficiently robust to forecast the future traffic  growth and  evaluate the traffic 
impacts of proposed improvement schemes.   
 
4.3 Future Forecasting  
 
The  impacts  of  the  proposed  A21  Baldslow  Junction  Improvements  scheme  have  been  assessed  for 
both  Do-Minimum  and  Do-Something  networks.  The  forecast  assignments  were  carried  out  on  the 
basis of a planned scheme opening of 2012 and a design year 15 years after the scheme opening in 
2027. 
 
Do-Minimum  networks  were  also  used  in  the  analysis  based  on  the  following  improvement 
assumptions that were valid at the time: 
•  Do-Minimum 2012 – Includes the propose Bexhill to Hastings Link Road to relieve congestion 
on the A259 
•  Do-Minimum  2027  –  As  Do-Min  2012  plus  the  inclusion  of  an  off  line  dual  carriageway  from 
Kipping’s  Cross  to  Lamberhurst  and  improvements  to  the  A21  between  Flimwell  and 
Robertsbridge.  (These  schemes  were  both  subsequently  dropped  in  the  2010  Comprehensive  
Spending Review). 
 
The new signalised junctions were initially optimised within SATURN.  Following the demand modelling  
and  assignment  process,  the  signal  settings  were  optimised  using  LINSIG  and  incorporated  in  the 
network coding for the final demand modelling and assignment process. 
 
A  total  of  108  assignment  runs  were  undertaken,  corresponding  to  the  various  combinations  of 
forecast years, Time Periods, traffic growth assumptions, and network scenarios. The forecast models 
were  produced  in  accordance  with  DMRB  Volume  12a  and  WebTAG  Guidance  Unit  3.10  valid  at  the 
time of model production. 
   
Detailed  forecast  results  for  the  scenarios  are  included  in  section  4.3.1  of  the  2007  Hyder  Report. 
Journey  times  were  analysed  on  the  routes  between  the  A21  and  Queensway,  along  the  A21,  along 
the A28-A21 at Focus Junction and The Ridge. The analysis indicated that journey times on the routes 
increases appreciably between the base year and do-minimum adding to the congestion experienced 
                                                               
Page 18 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
in the base year.  
 
With the schemes, the journey times drop substantially for routes between the ridge and A21, whilst 
they increase marginally on the A21 and The Ridge. The increase in journey times is primarily due to 
the  increase  in  flow  drawn  in  by  the  scheme  as  well  as  signalising  junctions  on  the  A21  that  cause 
inherent delays.  
 
4.4 Main Assumptions  
 
The main assumptions are: 
•  Modelled  time  periods  for  the  forecast  are  an  AM  Peak  Hour  (08:00  to  09:00),  an  average 
Inter-Peak Hour  and a PM Peak Hour (17:00-18:00);  
•   Future year networks were prepared for each of these assessment years:  

A planned scheme opening year of 2012; and  

A design year 15 years after the scheme opening year, i.e. 2027 
•  TEMPRO  (version  5.3)  was  used  as  the  source  for  the  calculation  of  forecast  traffic  growth 
factors for cars; 
•  The  central  growth rates from TEMPRO were used to account for the factors of income growth 
and fuel cost change in the traffic forecasting process;  
•  New  developments  were  modelled  separately  but  controlled  to  total  trips determined  by  
TEMPRO  forecast  rates;  
•  The  most  likely  development  scenario,  as  agreed  by  ESCC    Planning    on    6th    September  
2006,    was    used    as    the    basis    for  comparing  the  development  schedule  for  the  forecast 
model; and    
•  Goods vehicle forecasts were developed from the National Road Traffic Forecasts (NRTF 1997). 
 
The  checks  undertaken  by  Hyder  demonstrate  the  model  displays  a  high  degree  of  convergence,  in 
conformance  with  DMRB  requirements,  for  over  95%  of  the  runs  carried  out.  This  indicates  that 
differences  between  the  Do-Minimum  and  Do-Something  scenarios  have  not  been  distorted  by 
oscillations in the model. 
 
4.5 Scheme Parameters 
 
The Scheme parameters are largely determined by the parameters used in the forecasting model, i.e.  
•  First Year      
2012 (scheme opening year)  
•  Horizon Year          2071 (60-year appraisal period)  
•  Modelled Years     
2012 (scheme opening year); and 2027 (design year)  
•  Current year           2007 (for appraisal purposes)   
•  Traffic  growth  has  been  accounted  for  within  TUBA  up  to  the  year  2027  by  automatic 
interpolation  between  modelled  years.  After  2027,  no  further  traffic  growth  is  assumed,  and 
the economic results are based on constant annual traffic figures from this year. 
 
4.6 Sensitivity Tests 
 
Sensitivity tests were carried out on the model with improved convergence parameters to assess the 
impact  on  link  flows  around  the  scheme  area.  A  comparison  in  link  flows  between  the  models    for 
2027 AM and PM indicate insignificant variation in flows in both the AM and PM models demonstrating  
the    model  is  robust  in  its  results;  and  varying    the  convergence  parameters  does  not  alter  the 
assignment results around the scheme. 
 
It    was  therefore  concluded    that    the    forecast    model    provided    a    suitable    basis    to  undertake 
environmental, economic and operational assessments. 
                                                               
Page 19 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
5. Economic Appraisal 
 
5.1 Introduction 
 
The appraisal of schemes set out in the Forecasting Report was undertaken in line with guidance set 
out  in  WebTAG  3,  following  the  principles  of  the  New  Approach  to  Appraisal  (NATA)  in  place  at  the 
time of assessment, incorporating a conventional cost-benefit analysis. 
 
Transport  Economic  Efficiency  Analysis  was  undertaken  using  the  latest  version  of  TUBA  (which  was 
version  1.7a  at  the  time).  TUBA  does  not  calculate  benefits  due  to  changes  in  accident  savings  and 
this element of scheme benefits and costs has been assessed separately, using COBA software. 
 
The  trip  matrices,  along  with  the  corresponding  time  and  distance  skim  matrices  (comprising  the  
weighted averages   of   times  and  distances   for   each   route  used  for  trips  between  origin and 
destination  pairs)  are  used  as  traffic  data  inputs  to  TUBA.  The  matrices  were  output  from  the  traffic 
models using the software functions designed for this purpose. 
 
The TUBA Standard Economics File was used in the analysis, without alteration. A copy is included in 
Appendix  B  of  the  Hyder  EAR9  for  reference.  The  benefits/dis-benefits  calculated  by  TUBA  are 
converted into an estimate of annual benefits/dis-benefits using annualisation factors. 
 
5.2 Scheme Costs 
 
 
 
 
  
  
  
 
  
  
 
 
   
 
   
 
  
  
 
  
 
 
 
 
   
  
 
 
 
 
 
                                                          
9 Hyder Economic Appraisal Report – GD00496/RT/101/Rev D 
10 Hyder Scheme Cost Estimate Report – GD00496/RT/088/Rev D 
                                                               
Page 20 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
 
5.3 TUBA Results and Analysis 
 
A  summary  of  the  economic  performance  of  the  preferred  A21  scheme  options  in  the  ‘Most  Likely’ 
traffic growth scenario is presented in Tables 3-5 below 
 
The TEE table (Table 3) shows the user benefits/dis-benefits expected as a result of constructing the 
preferred scheme option compared to retaining existing A21 and other associated roads at Baldslow. 
The  total  of  the  items  shown  in  this  table  constitute  the  Present  Value  of  Benefits  (PVB)  of  the 
scheme.  
 
Table 3 – Transport Economic Efficiency (TEE) Table (Most Likely Traffic Growth Scenario) 
 
 
Consumers 
ALL MODES 
User benefits 
TOTAL 
 
Travel time 
£33,900 
 
Vehicle operating costs 
£494 
 
User charges 
£0 
 
During Construction & Maintenance 
£0 
NET CONSUMER BENEFITS 
£34,394 
 
 
Business 
 
User benefits 
 
 
Travel time 
£30,241 
 
Vehicle operating costs 
£1,900 
 
User charges 
£0 
 
During Construction & Maintenance 
£0 
 
Subtotal 
£32,141 
 
 
 
 
Private sector provider impacts 
 
Revenue 
£0 
 
Operating costs 
£0 
 
Investments costs 
£0 
 
Grant/subsidy 
£0 
 
Subtotal 
£0 
 
 
Other business impact 
 
 
Developer contributions 
£0 
NET BUSINESS IMPACT 
£32,141 
 
 
TOTAL 
 
Present Value of Transport Economic Efficiency Benefits (PVB) 
£65,535 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                               
Page 21 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
The detail of how monetised benefits are calculated are set out in the Hyder EAR11 as follows: 
•  Section 2 – User Benefits; 
•  Section 3 – Accident Benefits; 
•  Section 4 – Impacts of Construction; and 
•  Section 5 – Noise Assessment. 
 
Public   sector   costs   and   revenues, split between local and central government, are presented in 
the Public Accounts (Table 4). The total of the items shown in this table constitute the Present Value 
of Cost (PVC).  
 
The  TEE  and  Public  Accounts  tables  are  brought  together  in  the  Analysis  of  Monetised  Costs  and 
Benefits  (AMCB)  table.    Other  monetised  costs  and  benefits  included  are  those  of  accident  savings, 
monetised value of carbon emissions analysis, and the result of the noise assessment.   
 
Table 4 – Public Accounts (PA) Table (Most Likely Traffic Growth Scenario) 

 
 
 
ALL MODES 
Local Government Funding 
TOTAL 
 
Revenue 
£0 
 
Operating costs 
£0 
 
Investment costs 
£0 
 
Developer and Other Contributions 
£0 
 
Grant/Subsidy Payments 
£0 
 
NET IMPACT 
£0 
 
 
Central Government Funding 
 
 
Revenue 
£0 
 
Operating costs 
£0 
 
Investment costs 
£25,689 
 
Developer and Other Contributions 
£0 
 
Grant/Subsidy Payments 
£0 
 
Indirect Tax Revenues 
£287 
 
NET IMPACT 
£25,976 
 
 
TOTAL Present Value of Cost 
£25,976 
 
 
The AMCB table (Table 5) presents the results of the calculations of Net Present Value (NPV) and 
Benefit-Cost Ratio (BCR) for the improvement scheme 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

                                                          
11 Hyder Economic Appraisal Report – GD00496/RT/101/Rev D 
                                                               
Page 22 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
Table 5 – Analysis of Monetised Costs (AMCB) and Benefits (Most Likely Traffic Growth Scenario) 
 
 
Non-Exchequer Impacts 
 
 
Consumer User Benefits 
£34,394 
 
Business User Benefits 
£32,141 
 
Private Sector Provider Impacts 
£0 
 
Other Business Impacts 
£0 
 
 
Accident Benefits 
£3,801 
 
 
Carbon Benefits 
£25 
 
 
Noise Benefits 
£315 
 
 
Net Present Value of Benefits (PVB) 
£70,361 
 
Local Government Funding 
£0 
Central Government Funding 
£25,976 
 
 
Net Present Value of Costs (PVC) 
£25,976 
 
 
OVERALL IMPACTS 
 
 
Net Present Value (NPV) 
£44,385 
 
Indicative Benefits to Cost Ratio 
2.70 
 
 
Appraisal Period 
2012 to 2071 
 
5.4 Other TAG Sub Objectives 
 
Reliability
  
 
Travellers on highway networks are expected to be aware of the average journey time for their chosen 
journey,  which  includes  variations  such  as  different  traffic  conditions  at  different  times  of  the  day. 
However,  it  is  not  always  feasible  to  derive  a  monetised  benefit  value  for  road  schemes  where  the 
network reliability suffers high level of day to day unpredictability, as in the case of this study, rather 
than incident occurrence.  
 
In  accordance  with  WebTAG  Unit  3.5.712,  a  measure  of  such  (un)reliability  is  thus  indicated  by  the 
“stress” on links, or link saturations (volume/capacity), when reliability of journey times is considered 
to decline with flows approaching capacity 
 
The  assessment  was  conducted  on  the  A21  south  of  The  Ridge  as  old  route  and  the  new  route  as 
provided by the scheme options in the ‘Most  Likely’ traffic growth scenario, for year 2012. The overall 
assessment results show there is a marginally positive effect on reliability from Option 2B. However, 
the values are very small and the effect on reliability should be considered neutral.  
 
 
 
                                                          
12 TAG Unit 3.5.7: The Reliability Sub-Objective, DfT, June 2003 
 
                                                               
Page 23 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
5.5 Sensitivity Testing 
 
Low/High Traffic Growth
 - Sensitivity Tests have been carried out for the six scheme options using 
Low  and  High  traffic  growth  rates.  The    key    figures    summarising    the    economic    performance    of  
the six scheme  options  in  the  Low  traffic  growth  scenario  are  presented  in the Hyder EAR7 at 
Tables  2.11  and  2.12.  As  the  schemes  themselves  are  unchanged  in  each  of  the  growth  sensitivity 
tests, as could be expected, the corresponding benefits/disbenefits are either lower in the low growth 
or  higher  in  the  high  growth  scenario.  A  change  in  the  Present  Value  of  Costs  (PVC)  is  experienced 
due to the change in indirect taxation revenue (i.e. not a change in scheme cost).  
 
In essence, the impact on the indicative BCR in each of the sensitivity tests is shown below in Table 6. 
For ease of comparison this displays the non-adjusted BCR (i.e. without wider benefits such as noise 
and  accidents).  It  demonstrates  that  should  higher  levels  of  traffic  growth  occur  the  benefits  would 
improve, providing a higher BCR.  
 
Table 6 – High and Low Growth Sensitivity Tests (Impact on indicative BCR) 
 

 
PVB 
PVC 
NPV 
Non 
Adjusted 
Indicative 
BCR 

Low Growth 
42,775 
25,970 
16,805 
1.65 
Scenario 
Likely Growth 
65,535 
25,976 
39,559 
2.52 
Scenario 
High Growth 
75,585 
25,990 
49,595 
2.91 
Scenario 
 
Closure of Maplehurst Road
 - Maplehurst Road is currently used as an alternative route to access 
The Ridge from A21 avoiding Junction Road. To avoid ‘rat running’ on Maplehurst Road, all proposed 
‘Do Something’ options have Maplehurst Road closed to through traffic. Therefore, for road users who 
are  using  Maplehurst  Road  in  the  ‘Do  Minimum’  scenario  will  experience  dis-benefits  if  the  road  is 
closed.  
 
Sensitivity tests have been undertaken, using the Most Likely traffic growth scenario, on Option 2B to 
assess the impact of closing Maplehurst Road. This was done by comparing Option 2B with a revised 
‘Do Minimum’ model where Maplehurst Road is closed to through traffic. The analysis13 showed that if 
Maplehurst Road were to be closed in the Do Minimum scenario, the Present Value of TEE Benefits for 
Option 2B would increase to £114.7m from £66.5m. 
 
5.6 User Benefit Profiles 
 
The  user  benefits,  which  are  summed  up  in  the  TEE  Tables,  are  derived  throughout  the  60  year 
economic appraisal period. The benefit stream begins with the completion of the A21 improvement in 
the  opening  year  and  continues  through  to  2071  (in  the  current  appraisal  period).  The  profile  of  the 
user benefits for the preferred option is shown in Figure 6. 
 
The  profiles  show  that  benefits  rise  after  opening  until  the  final  modelled  year  of  2027.  From  2027 
onwards  the  analysis  assumes  constant  traffic  levels.  The  decline  in  benefit  being  solely  due  to  the 
                                                          
13 Section 2.5.5: Hyder Economic Appraisal Report – GD00496/RT/101/Rev D 
                                                               
Page 24 of 46 




SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
effect  of  discounting,  the  effect  of  which  reduces  the  NPV  of  the  benefits  the  further  into  the  future  
that these are assessed. The percentage of benefits arising in the modelled period (2012 to 2027) is 
around 30%.  
 
The  traffic  growth  after  2027  is  assumed  to  be  zero  and  therefore  any  benefits  (and  disbenefits) 
arising from further growth cannot be captured in this analysis. This would imply an underestimate of 
benefits for the scheme that shows a positive benefit profile. 
 
Figure 6 – User benefit Profiles (Scheme Option 2B) 
 

 
 
6. Value for Money / Recommended option 
 
6.1 Introduction 
 
The proposed scheme has been selected as the preferred option on the basis of delivery and value for 
money  considerations. Options to the north of The Ridge were  rejected on grounds of impact on the 
AONB  while  on  line  improvement  options  were  considered  to  sub-optimal  in  terms  of  transport 
performance  benefits  and  inability  to  unlock  the  employment  sites.  The  BCR  in  terms  of  transport 
benefits was confirmed in the Hyder / Mott Macdonald studies as a ratio of 2.7:1 based on the most 
likely traffic forecasts.  
 
In  2013  Seachange  Sussex  reviewed  the  previous  Hyder  and  Mott  MacDonald  designs  and  costs  for 
the Baldslow scheme and believed that a southern route, which would open up the ‘North Queensway’ 
employment sites, could be constructed at much lower cost than the previous estimates. 
 
Over  the  last  18  months,  Seachange  Sussex  has  re-examined  the  previous  designs  for  the  Baldslow 
southern  route  options  in  order  to  develop  an  alignment  for  the  Queensway  Gateway  Road  which 
would open up these allocated employment sites but, in doing so, minimised the cost and reduced the 
impact on the landscape.   
 
                                                               
Page 25 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
In  rationalising  the  design  for  the  Queensway  Gateway  Road  and  seeking  to  deliver  a  cost  effective 
and affordable solution, the previous option 2A design was seen as an unnecessarily expensive way of 
crossing the valley as its alignment ran against the contours rather than with them – necessitating a 
very expensive viaduct. 
 
Therefore,  by  refining  the  previously  developed  Option  2B  design  (which  put  the  road  on 
embankment) to provide a more sweeping alignment from Queensway which uses the contours of the 
land (as Queensway itself begins to climb steeply towards The Ridge) removed the need for a viaduct 
and minimised the amount of embankment works required . 
 
6.2 Recommended Option 
 
As  identified  in  section  2.4,  a  refined  version  of  Hyder’s/Mott  MacDonald’s  Option  2B  for  the  former 
Baldslow  scheme  is  the  recommended  option.    This  refined  design  for  the  now  known  Queensway 
Gateway  Road  was  the  subject  of  a  planning  permission  (HS/14/0832)  given  by  Hastings  Borough 
Council  on  4  February  2015.  With  reduced  capital  costs  for  the  scheme  at  £15m  and  with  the 
prospects  for  higher  traffic  growth  following  the  opening  of  the  BHLR,  this  BCR  (which  the  Hyder  / 
Mott MacDonald studies identified as 2.7:1 based on most likely traffic forecasts and a higher scheme 
cost)  will  improve  significantly.  This  suggests  that  the  scheme  offers  the  potential  for  good 
value for money in transport terms alone

 
The  preferred  option  is  forecast  to  bring  savings  in  journey  times  and  vehicle  operating  costs.  In 
transport  economic  terms,  the  proposed  scheme  would  contribute  benefits  in  excess  of  their  costs, 
and hence provide positive impact to the economic efficiency sub-objectives.  
 
The preferred scheme option is anticipated to deliver net accident savings over the 60-year evaluation 
period.    The  preferred  scheme  option  is  forecast  to  generate  positive  impact  on  the  environmental 
noise objective.  
 
In  conclusion,  the  transport  analysis  suggests  that  the  preferred  option  would  successfully 
achieve the Government’s Economic and Safety objectives

 
6.3 Economic growth & regeneration benefits 
 
Given  that  a  key  objective  of  the  scheme  is  to  contribute  to  the  Growth  Corridor,  significant  weight 
should  be  given  to  the  wider  economic  impacts  associated  with  the  indirect  jobs  generated  on  the 
identified employment sites – these benefits would not be realised without the road  on the currently 
proposed  alignment  and  thus  the  delivery  of  the  Growth  Corridor  as  part  of  the  SEP  would  be 
compromised.    While  accepting  that  these  indirect  employment  benefits  are  dependent  on  private 
sector  investment  coming  forward  to  develop  the  sites  and  take  up  occupation  of  completed 
floorspace, it is nevertheless a critical benefit of the scheme and should be factored into the BCR / VfM 
assessment. 
 
Queensway Gateway Road will provide access into sites allocated for employment development in the 
Hastings  Local  Plan  Development  Management  Plan.    In  combination  these  sites  have  an  identified 
capacity  for  up  to  12,000sqm  of  employment  floorspace  to  be  delivered  by  private  investment. 
Potential  employment  effects  from  the  road  arise  in  terms  of  direct  construction  jobs  during  the 
construction  contract  period,  and  indirect  employment  arising  from  the  construction  of  employment 
floorspace  and  the  business  occupancy  of  that  floorspace  delivered  through  future  private  sector 
investment in the identified employment sites.  
 
                                                               
Page 26 of 46 



SE LEP Business Case – Queensway Gateway Road 
 
 
Based  on  published  BIS  statistics  for  turnover  per  employee  in  the  construction  sector,  the  road 
construction  cost  of  £15m  could  support  an  estimated  12  FTE  construction  jobs
  (based  on 
120 job years and 10 job years per FTE). 
 
The  indirect  levered  private  sector  investment  in  the  construction  of  new  employment  floorspace, 
based  on  an  estimate  of  £40m  of  construction  expenditure,  could  support  a  further  30  FTE 
construction jobs. 
 
The  indirect  jobs  arising  from  occupation  of  the  new  12,000sqm  of  employment  floorspace  is 
estimated on the basis of established floorspace per job benchmarks (Homes & Communities Agency, 
2010)  for  the  proposed  floorspace  use  class.  Based  on  12,000sqm  of  B1a  office  floorspace,  the 
estimated  employment  capacity  of  the  sites  unlocked  by  the  Queensway  Gateway  Road  is 
860  gross  jobs.  Allowing  for  adjustments  for  leakage,  displacement  and  multiplier  effects, 
the estimated net additional employment effects are 900 jobs

 
The monetisation of the employment benefits has been modelled based on estimates of GVA per job 
(derived  from  ONS  national  GVA  estimates)  profiled  over  an  assumed  floorspace  build-out  and 
occupation profile by the private sector. A prudent build-out profile has been assumed, from 2018/19 
–  2024/25.  This  profile  reflects  market  expectations  for  private  sector  investment  into  the  sites 
following public sector investment in the Queensway Gateway Road. It is anticipated that this delivery 
profile could be accelerated but is adopted for the jobs and GVA impact model at this stage to present 
a robust assessment of likely economic benefits.  
 
GVA benefits of the estimated 900 net additional job impacts are measured on the basis of a 10 year 
job persistence factor and discounted to net present value at the Treasury discount rate of 3.5%.  This 
methodology has been applied in a wide range of recent business case submissions and was accepted 
by DfT in submissions supporting the case for the BHLR. Based on this methodology, the net present 
value  of  GVA  generated  by  the  employment  benefits  unlocked  by  the  Queensway  Gateway 
Road  has  been  estimated  at  £296m
.  Set  against  a  capital  cost  for  the  project  of  £15m,  the  BCR 
from an economic development perspective would be 20:1
 
6.4 Strategic Added Value 
 
This project will deliver a critical piece of infrastructure for the Hastings-Bexhill Link Road contributing 
directly to the delivery of a key objective of the SELEP Strategic Economic Plan.  The Strategic Added 
Value  of  the  project  relates  to  the  significant  impact  of  the  project  in  unlocking  employment 
generating  development  potential in  the  Growth  Corridor  at  identified sites  north  of  Hastings  as  well 
as employment and housing growth sites in North Bexhill.  The project is critical to enabling the BHLR 
to perform its intended function in relieving congestion and improving connectivity across the Growth 
Corridor to the A21 and thus enabling the intended growth outcomes from the BHLR to be delivered. 
 
 
                                                               
Page 27 of 46