This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'Municipal waste incinerator annual reports for 2014'.






 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SELCHP Energy Recovery Facility 
 
 
 
 
Annual Performance Report: 2014 
 
 
Environmental Permit: NP3738SY 
 
Veolia ES SELCHP 
Landmann Way, 
Deptford 
London 
SE15 1AL 
 

 



 
 
 
1. 
Introduction: 
 
Back in 1986, faced with the increasing scarcity and environmental problems of 
landfill, the London Boroughs of Lewisham, Southwark and Greenwich came 
together to search for a realistic alternative. In 1988, they formed a Consortium - 
South East London Combined Heat and Power - from which SELCHP now takes 
its name. 
 
Bringing together a cross-section of public and private interests, SELCHP's 
members included not only the London Boroughs of Lewisham and Greenwich, 
but also the Regional Electricity Company and Energy from Waste design, 
construction and operation specialists. 
 
From the outset, their approach to the project was based on consultation and co-
operation. The first step was an in-depth feasibility study into the viability of an 
Energy Recovery Facility, followed by an Environmental Impact Assessment for 
the local community. Addressing concerns over atmospheric emissions, noise, 
traffic and visual impact, the E.I.A. was independently assessed on behalf of local 
residents, with favourable results. 
 
Conditional Planning Permission was granted in 1990, and required further 
studies into noise, landscaping, architecture and traffic in order to satisfy 
planner's detailed requirements. 
 
In 1991 site clearance began. A Design and Construct contract was awarded to 
Martin Engineering Systems Ltd. 
During the winter of 1991/2 SELCHP prepared and publicly registered an 
application for an Authorisation under the Integrated Pollution Control 
provisions of the Environmental Protection Act, 1990. SELCHP was the first 
Energy from Waste scheme in the UK to hold this Authorisation. Also during 
1992, SELCHP was awarded an Electricity Generation Licence by the Office of 
Electricity Regulation 
 
The plant was commissioned in December 1993 and was officially opened by 
HRH the Prince of Wales on 29th November 1994. 
 
Today, SELCHP remains committed to understanding and meeting the needs of 
the locality. 
 
 

 





 
 
 
2. 
How SELCHP works 
 
SELCHP receives waste from households and some businesses. Waste is tipped 
into a bunker, where a crane grabs it and places it into the feed hopper. It then 
drops down a feed chute onto a sloped grate, where it is constantly turned to 
allow all combustion phases (such as drying, ignition and combustion itself) to 
happen simultaneously and a constant high temperature to be maintained. 
 
Ash from the burning process is transferred by an ash discharger and residue 
handling system to the ash pit. During the transfer, ferrous metals are removed 
for recycling and the remaining ash is sent for reprocessing, where further 
ferrous metal and non-ferrous metal extraction takes place, the remaining 
aggregate material is recycled into material for road building or construction 
use. 
 
Hot gases produced in the combustion process pass 
through a water tube boiler where they are cooled; the 
heated water is transformed into steam. A turbo-
generator uses the steam to produce electricity for export 
to the National Grid. 
 
The gases from the boiler go through a complex flue gas cleaning process, 
involving the injection of dilute ammonia solution to reduce nitrogen oxides to 
nitrogen and water; lime milk to neutralise acid gases and activated carbon to 
absorb heavy metals and any remaining dioxins. 
 
Finally the particulate matter dust is removed from the gas stream by a bag filter 
before the cleaned gas is released to air. The resultant material known as Air 
Pollution Control Residue (APC residue) is sent for disposal at a licensed 
hazardous waste site. 
 
How the power is generated 
Steam leaves the boilers at a temperature of 395°C and 
pressure of 46 bar, and is fed directly into a single 35 MW 
steam turbine generator. The turbine rotates the 
generator to produce electricity. Steam from the turbine is 
also used to pre-heat the combustion air for the waste 
burning process. 
 
A bank of air cooled condensers condenses the exhaust steam from the turbine 
and recycles the water back into the process. Electricity is generated at 11kV and 
transformed up to 132kV for export to the London Electricity system which 
passes very close to the SELCHP facility. 
 

 



 
 
During normal operation, no supplementary fuel is required to maintain 
combustion, just refuse and controlled addition of air. 
 
District Heating 
In 2013 construction of a District heating network was completed at SELCHP. 
Over 5 km of underground insulated piping has been laid out of SELCHP into the 
neighbouring borough of Southwark. Connected to four boiler houses, fitted with 
multiple heat exchangers, supplying 16 residential blocks and 2,500 residents. 
Circulating pumps send water in a loop from heat exchangers at SELCHP, heated 
by bled steam from the turbine, to each of the boiler houses on the network. This 
system is backed up by pre-existing gas boilers located at Clements road boiler 
house. Export of heat from SELCHP began in February 2014 and is expected to be 
expanded in the coming years.   
3.  Summary of Plant Operations 
 
SELCHP consists of two incineration lines, each capable of processing 
approximately 29 tonnes per hour, allowing for a nominal refuse throughput of 
420,000 tonnes per year, but this is dependent on two factors: actual operating 
hours and calorific value of the waste being burnt. 
The average calorific value of mixed municipal waste for 2014 was ~9226 kJ/Kg. 
 
Plant Operational details for 2014 are included in the table below. 
 
 
Operating Hours (2 lines) 
15,841 
Hours 
Waste Incinerated 
438,578 
Tonnes 
Electricity Produced 
246,094 
MWh  
Metals Recovered 
8,634 
Tonnes 
Incinerator Bottom Ash 
92,739 
Tonnes 
APC residues 
13,554 
Tonnes 
 
 
Ash residues (known as Incinerator Bottom Ash or IBA) are currently 
transported to a processing plant where further ferrous and non-ferrous metal is 
recovered and the screened IBA prepared as a substitute aggregate for building 
roads and car parks. Only a small percentage is unusable and requires landfilling. 
Ferrous metal removed from the IBA is sent to a steel manufacturer for recycling. 
 
Fine particulate matter, known as Air Pollution Control (APC) residue, removed 
from the flue gases by the fabric filter is collected and sent to specialised 
treatment works where it is used to treat spent acid wastes prior to disposal at a 
licensed landfill site. 

 




 
 
 
4.  Summary of Plant Emissions 
 
4.1.  Emissions to air 

 
Point Source Emissions 
Al  emissions to air from the 100m high chimney are controlled to meet the 
emission limits included in the PPC Permit. The flue gases released into the 
atmosphere are continuously monitored. 
 
The following bar chart shows the average annual emissions from Selchp 
expressed as average of the Emission Limit Value. 
 
 
The monitoring equipment was in service during 2014 for 100% of the plant 
operating time, with the exception of one day of invalid data for VOC on line 2. 
This year operator emission displays were altered to plot negative values in 
order to highlight any zero or span check failures. This equipment is stringently 
monitored with routine calibration checks and is standardised to BS EN14181 
with a full range of standby equipment available should an unexpected failure 
occur. 
Bi-annual monitoring checks of these emissions are carried out by approved 
contractors using independent extractive reference methods. Emissions of 

 



 
 
metals, dioxins and other substances are also monitored quarterly. Table 1 
below shows the pollutants monitored and its frequency. 
 
  Table 1: Emissions monitoring at Selchp and frequency 
 
Pollutant 
Monitoring 
frequency 
Particulate matter 
Continuously 
Hydrogen chloride 
Continuously 
Oxides of nitrogen  
Continuously 
Carbon monoxide  
Continuously 
Sulphur dioxide 
Continuously 
Total VOCs 
Continuously 
Ammonia  
Continuously 
Arsenic 
Quarterly  
Cadmium  
Quarterly  
Chromium  
Quarterly  
Copper 
Quarterly  
Mercury  
Quarterly  
Nickel  
Quarterly  
Manganese  
Quarterly  
Antimony 
Quarterly  
Lead 
Quarterly  
Thallium  
Quarterly  
Hydrogen fluoride 
Bi-annually 

 



 
 
Nitrous oxide  
Bi-annually 
Dioxins and Furans 
Bi-annually 
Dioxin-like PCBs 
Bi-annually 
PAHs 
Bi-annually  
 
 
Fugitive Emissions 
All waste processing takes place under cover within buildings to assist in 
preventing fugitive emissions of dust and particulates. All operational areas are 
fitted with fast acting doors and segregated from processing equipment by 
means of floor to ceiling fabric curtains. 
The waste bunker is maintained at a negative pressure to prevent odour or dust 
from escaping  SELCHP’s site perimeter. 
 
4.2.  Emissions to Controlled Waters 
 
The on-site drainage has been designed within parameters that take into account 
requirements of the Local Planning Authority and the Environment Agency.  
Accordingly, the design implemented at SELCHP aims to recycle within the 
process as much water as possible. 
The gas scrubbing system installed at Selchp does not result in a liquid effluent 
and therefore waste water originates only from domestic and cleaning 
operations and from the regeneration of the water softener and de-ionising 
water treatment plant. 
The installation of an evaporative condenser in 2010 resulted in a significant 
increase on effluent discharged to sewer during the summer months. 
All water entering the SELCHP’s drainage system is collected on a series of 
decantation pits, with the aim of reducing solids contents before discharge to the 
sewerage system for further treatment. 
Monthly samples of effluent are collected and send for analysis to ensure 
contamination levels remain within the parameters specified by Thames Water 
in the Trade Effluent Discharge Consent. Thames Water also collects samples 
independently to verify the quality of the effluent from Selchp. 
 
 


 



 
 
 
5.  Complaints and queries 

 
The operator maintains a complaints log and any complaint received are 
recorded and investigated. Procedure SYS07 of the Veolia Business Management 
System (BMS) details the actions to be taken upon receipt of a complaint. 
 
During 2014 a total of four complaints were received. One was received directly 
from a member of the public. Three were passed onto site by the Environment 
Agency’s PPC Inspector. Three complaints related to odour all of which were 
unsubstantiated, it was concluded that the odours reported must originate from 
one of the many waste operations in the area and excavations under the railway 
arches neighbouring the site. One complaint was regarding a contractors HGV 
leaking effluent whilst parked outside the site, said contractors management was 
contacted and the issue resolved.   
 
6.  Environmental Compliance 
 
Veolia Environmental Services takes great diligence to ensure compliance with 
all the conditions of the Environmental Permit at our facilities. 
 
This is achieved through constant monitoring of the process during all of the 
stages, with detailed procedures in place to enable trained staff to carry out their 
work in an environmentally responsible manner. The plant operates within a 
Quality, Health and Safety and Environmental Management System compliant 
with ISO 9001, OHSAS 18001 and ISO 14001 and it is independently audited. 
 
During 2014 there were four exceedance of permitted Emission Limit Values 
(ELVs) for Carbon Monoxide (CO), caused by a two separate incidents, the failure 
of the grate PLC and the simultaneous blockage of two waste feeder rams.   
 
7.  Plant Improvements 
 
During 2014 the district heating network, associated heat exchangers, flow 
pumps and auxiliary system. The system is presently undergoing a 
commissioning programme that is now in its final phases. It is expected that the 
supply of useful heat to local residents will improve the efficiency of the plant 
from 25% to 35% when the system is fully commissioned. Planning is now 
underway to increase the capacity of the system in the coming years to further 
increase SELCHP’s energy efficiency.     
 
 
 
 
End of the Report