This is an HTML version of an attachment to the Freedom of Information request 'ALL EBM Protocols'.

Medical Services  
 
 
 
 
 
 

OSTEOARTHRITIS SHOULDER 
 
 

                                              Version 2b draft 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  1 
 

Medical Services  
 
Document control 
 
Version history 
Version 
Date 
Comments 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2b (draft) 
 
Initial Draft 
 
 
 
Changes since last version 
 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  2 
 


Medical Services  
 
Description 
The shoulder joint is particularly vulnerable to the development of pain and 
restriction of movement because of its wide range of movement and the complex 
interrelationships of the muscles, tendons and bursae. 
 
There is considerable confusion regarding the nomenclature of shoulder joint 
disease with different authorities referring to a single clinical presentation in 
different ways. 
 
Anatomical,  pathological  and  symptom  complex  have  all  been  used  to  describe 
 
 
In  this  protocol,  the  terms  used  are  those  employed  by  the  Arthritis  and 
Rhematism Council for Research. (ARC). 
 
The complexity of the shoulder joint both in the arrangement and the number of 
its components and their interplay during the large range of movement can sreate 
problems in correctly interpreting the clinical findings. 
 
Four areas of the shoulder joint are important clinically: -  
 
1.  The glenohumeral joint, frequently referred to as the shoulder joint. 
2.  The acromioclavicular joint to which is linked the scapula 
3.  The sternoclavicular joint 
4.  The  shoulder/rotato  cuff,  consisting  of  almost  a  complete  annulus  of 
tissye comprising the fusion of the joint capsule with the musculotendinous 
insertions  of  subscapularis  (front),  supraspinatus  (above)  and  teres 
minor/infraspinatous  (behind)  and  intimately  associated  with  the  biceps 
tendon. 
 
Osteoarthritis can affect areas 1-3. 
 
A  combination  of  unhampered  movements  of  the  articular  joints  (the 
glenohumeral  joint,  acromioclavicular  joint,  sternoclavicular  joint,  subacromial 
joint and the sub-scapulothoracic articulations) and the periarticular (rotator cuff, 
subacromial  bursa  and  biceps  muscle)  structures  is  necessary  for  the  accurate 
positioning of the arm and hand.  
 
Aetiology 
 
The  pathophysiology  of  OA  of  the  shoulder  involves  both  soft  tissue  and  bony 
structures.  Soft  tissue  defects  can  result  in  instability  while  cartilage  and  bone 
loss  result  in  incongruity  with  altered  mechanics  abnormal  movement  and 
progressive joint destruction. 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  3 
 

Medical Services  
 
Despite  a  relative  increase  in  degenerative  changes  with  ages,  most  shoulder 
pain  in  the  absence  of  inflammation  is  nonarticular  and  is  often  caused  by 
mechanical impingement and tendinitis. 
 
A  south  eastern  United  States  study  of  degenerative  joint  disease  in  1991 
showed  that  arthritis  of  the  shoulder,  elbow  (and  knee)  were  the  most  common 
sites in hunter-gatherers and agriculturists (1). 
 
Athletes appear to have an increased prevalence of arthrosis of lower limb joints 
but a decreased prevalence in the neck and shoulder (2). 
 
Prevalence 
 
Until  the  1960s,  epidemiological  studies  in  the  USA  (3)  examining  specific  joint 
involvement often did not include the shoulder joint as part of the evaluation. 
 
Painful shoulder disorders are common and have an estimated prevalence of 8% 
(4). 
 
No specific figures are generally available for the prevalence off osteoarthritis of 
the various joints of the shoulder but in one American radiological study 1 in 1000 
people  (average  age  79  years)  were  said  to  have  ‘primary’  osteoarthritis  of  the 
shoulder based on joint space narrowing (5).  
    
 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  4 
 

Medical Services  
 
Diagnosis 
 
 
The natural history of osteoarthritis of the shoulder is unpredictable and therefore 
signs and symptoms vary mainly because of the diversity of conditions leading to 
secondary OA in this joint. 
Classification 
 
Osteoarthritis in the shoulder joint is generally classified as primary (idiopathic) or 
secondary (conditions known to be associated with its aetiology). 
 
As previously outlined (see general introduction to OA) the secondary conditions 
can be :  
 
(i)  anatomical such as avascular necrosis/bone dysplasias. 
 
(ii) metabolic such as endocrine disorders including acromegaly and  
 
(iii) hyperthyroidism 
and 
systemic 
metabolic 
diseases 
such 
as 
haemachromatoses. 
 
(iv) traumatic such as fractures etc, 
 
(v) inflammatory such as crystal deposition diseases and rheumatoid arthritis. 
 
 
1.  Glenohumeral  osteoarthritis  is  usually  symptomless  although  some  crepitus 
with a minor ache may be present for many years. Symptoms can then arise with 
relatively minor trauma to the joint after a brief period of immobility. 
 
Radiographically,  there  is  joint  space  narrowing,  humeral  head  flattening  and 
osteophyte  formation  at  the  inferior  margin.  There  may  be  subarticular  cyst 
formation in the superior aspect of the head of the humerus[6]. 
 
The glenoid may also show flattening with sclerosis and in advanced cases some 
posterior erosion. 
 
Interestingly,  the  rotator  cuff  is  usually  intact  in  osteoarthritis  probably  because 
only an intact rotator cuff would provide the necessary muscle forces to produce 
these deformities [7]. 
 
This is in contrast to the findings in rheumatoid arthritis where there are greater 
erosive changes, soft tissue changes and a torn rotator cuff in up to one third of 
cases.  
 
Muscular compression across the glenohumeral joint is essential to centralise the 
head  of the  humerus  within  the  glenoid  cavity  and  prevent  abnormal  translation 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  5 
 

Medical Services  
 
usually upwards. 
 
The compressive force at the glenohumeral joint is maximal at 90° of abduction. 
 
2.  The  acromioclavicular  joint  is  formed  by  the  articulation  of  the  distal  clavicle 
with  the  acromium.  The  thin,  fragile  articular  disc  between  the  joint  space 
frequently  undergoes  degenerative  changes  after  the  second  decade  of  life  [8]. 
Isolated involvement of the AC joint in osteoarthritis is unusual. Usually it is part 
of a global shoulder dysfunction with glenohumeral arthritis or impingement. 
 
3.  The  sternoclavicular  joint  provides  the  only  bony  articulation  between  the 
shoulder  girdle  and  trunk  and  the  intra-articular  disc  is  larger  and  stronger  than 
that  of  the  AC  joint.  OA  is  usually  due  to  trauma  although  asymptomatic 
degenerative changes do occur without a history of trauma in the third and fourth 
decades of life [5]. 
 
Pain  and  movement  limitation  are  common.  Patients  with  primary  OA  usually 
experience a gradual increase in pain over months or years. The pain is usually 
described as diffuse and aggravated by movement. 
 
A  grinding  crepitus  on  the  glenohumeral  joint  is  often  present.  Secondary  soft 
tissue  contracture  due  to  restricted  movement  often  occurs  although  a 
satisfactory range of movement can be maintained, despite marked degenerative 
changes on x-ray, because of compensatory scapulothoracic movement. 
 
Slight tenderness may be present over the anterior glenohumeral joint, the rotator 
cuff  or  the  biceps  tendon.  It  has  been  stated  [9]  that  tenderness  along  the 
posterior joint line is the most important sign indicating osteoarthritis of this joint. 
 
Physical  findings  in  OA  of  the  AC  and  SC  joints  are  limited.  The  AC  joint  is 
usually  grossly  normal  to  inspection  and  tenderness  over  the  joint  is  the  only 
consistent  finding.  Degenerative  changes  of  the  SC  joint  can  present  with  joint 
swelling and local tenderness. 
 
Radiographic assessment of the shoulder is usually confined to plain x-rays with 
specific views for particular conditions. 
 
As with OA in general, radiographic evidence does not correlate well with clinical 
findings because degenerative changes are frequently asymptomatic. 
 
Arthrography and ultrasound together with MRI and CT scanning are not normally 
required in the diagnosis of OA of the shoulder although they can be very helpful 
when the diagnosis is questionable. 
 
Differential Diagnosis 
 
Shoulder inflammation and pain occur in many rheumatic disorders. 
 
Pain  in  the  shoulder  can  frequently  be  referred  and  therefore  can  be  the  initial 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  6 
 

Medical Services  
 
presentation  of  several  disorders  including  cervical  spinal  problems  (both 
mechanical  and  neurological),  thoracic  outlet  syndrome,  apical  tumours  of  the 
lung (Pancoast), diaphragmatic irritation and ischaemic heart disease. 
 
Rheumatoid  arthritis  :  Rheumatoid  arthritis  can  quite  commonly  involve  the 
glenohumeral joint, the subacromial space and the rotator cuff itself can become 
damaged. 
 
Cervical  spondylosis  :  This  may  present  with  shoulder  pain  but  there  is  usually 
pain  in  areas  outside  those  of  a  C4  and  C5  dermatomal  distribution.  There  is 
usually a painless arc of shoulder movement while neck rotation or compression 
may trigger the pain. 
 
Capsulitis  :  Primary  as  in  rotator  cuff  syndrome  where  pain  has  a  vague 
distribution and may be exacerbated by movement or lying on the affected side. 
None  of  these  symptoms  are  paricularly  distinguishing  features  and  this  was 
demonstrated  by  a  study  in  1992  which  found  that  in  many  cases  arthroscopic 
evaluation  was  sometimes  the  only  way  of  distinguishing  between  an 
impingement syndrome and/or glenohumeral degenerative disease. 
 
Systemic  lupus  erythematosus  :  SLE  can  involve  the  shoulder.  Anti-nuclear 
antibodies  will  be  found  in  96%  to  99%  of  cases.  There  may  also  be  the 
appearance of the malar flush (butterfly rash), though this is only present in 30% 
of cases. 
 
Gout  :  Gout  is  not  uncommon  in  the  shoulder  joint,  although  pseudogout  with 
calcium pyrophosphate crystals is rarer. 
 
Synovial  osteochondromatosis  :  This  condition  can  generate  multiple  loose 
bodies which may be seen in the joint and give rise to impingement syndrome. 
 
Haemarthrosis  :  Patients  on  anti-coagulant  therapy  can  present  with  tender 
shoulder  joint  swellings  and  global  restriction  of  movement.  They  require 
drainage and review of anticoagulant medication. Shoulder effusions are rare and 
require further investigation. 
 
Immobilisation : hemiplegia and prolonged strapping after dislocation are causes 
of shoulder pain associated with limitation of movement. The history is normally 
diagnostic. 
 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  7 
 

Medical Services  
 
Main Disabling Effects 
 
Generally shoulder dysfunction is unusual in osteoarthritis 
 
Assessment  of  disability  specific  for  the  shoulder  joint  (SPADI)  has  been 
described (11) in addition to generic disability questionnaires such as the Health 
Assessment  Questionnaire  (12).  All  are  subjective  in  that  they  require  self 
completion by the patient and none relate only to osteoarthritis. 
 
In  1994  a  study  comparing  patients  in  the  community  (a  cross-sectional 
population  survey)  with  a  group  attending  general  practitioners  in  Manchester 
found  that  the  frequency  with  which  a  range  of  disabilities  was  reported 
correlated well with the objective measurement of restricted shoulder movement 
(13). 
 
The  most  commonly  reported  problem  was  sleep  disturbance.  Arm  and  hand 
movement  was  reported  as  difficult  and  this  affected  the  speed  of  dressing  and 
particularly pulling a garment over the head. 
 
Abduction  of  the  shoulder  and  placing  the  thumb  on  the  spine  were  the  most 
restricted movements. 
 
Up  to  27%  questioned  reported  no  restriction  in  these  everyday  activities 
because of their shoulder symptoms (13). 
 
A  study  funded  by  the  Arthritis  and  Rheumatism  Council  in  1996  (14)  gave 
broadly  similar  results.  Again  sleeping  and  dressing,  where  clothing  had  to  be 
pulled over the head or fastened at the back, caused most problems.  
 
 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  8 
 

Medical Services  
 
Prognosis 
 
 
 
  OA of the shoulder usually responds to conservative treatment  
 
  Patients with primary OA usually experience a  gradual increase in pain over 
months or years. 
 
  Generally shoulder dysfunction is unusual in osteoarthritis. 
 
  Secondary  soft  tissue  contracture  due  to  restricted  movement  often  occurs, 
although  a  satisfactory  range  of  movement  can  be  maintained  despite  marked 
degenerative changes on x-ray. 
 
  Although  effective,  the  results  of  injection  of  corticosteroid  and/or  local 
anaesthetic preparations to the AC joint are after short lasting. 
 
  The  primary  indication  for  surgery  is  pain  unresponsive  t  medical 
management.  The  results  of  shoulder  arthroplasty  are  good  to  excellent  in  86-
94% of patients. 
 
 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  9 
 

Medical Services  
 
Treatment 
Following  assessment  and  diagnosis,  the  treatment  for  osteoarthritis  of  the 
shoulder follows that for osteoarthritis in any joint.  
 
Non-pharmacological : Physiotherapy utilises mainly mobilisation of the joint  but 
where they are not sufficient NSAIDs are often given in place of, or in addition to, 
simple analgesics.  
 
Joint  Injection  :  the  AC  joint  is  readily  accessible  to  injection  of  corticosteroid 
and/or  local  anaesthetic  preparations.  Although  effective,  the  results  are  often 
shortlasting. 
 
Surgery : OA of the shoulder usually responds to conservative treatment. 
 
The  primary  indication  for  surgery  therefore  is  pain  unresponsive  to  medical 
management. 
 
The  procedure  of  choice  for  degenerative  changes  in  the  glenohumeral  joint  is 
hemiarthroplasty or total shoulder replacement depending on the condition of the 
glenoid.  The results of shoulder arthroplasty are good to excellent in 86-94%  of 
patients.  
 
 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  10 
 

Medical Services  
 
References 
 
[1] Bridges PS.  
Degenerative joint disease in hunter-gathers and agriculturists from 
the South-eastern United States. Am J Phys Anthropol. 1991; 85(4): 
379-91 
 
[2] Vingard E, Sandmark H & Alfredsson L.  
Musculoskeletal disorders in former athletes. 
Acta Orthop Scand. 1995; 66(3): 289-91 - Medline summary. 
 
[3] Lawrence JS, Bremmer JM & Bier F. 
Osteoarthritis: Prevalence in the population and relationship between 
symptoms and x-ray changes. 
Ann Rheum Dis 1966; 25: 1 
 
[4] Croft P et al. 
Measurement of shoulder related disability: results of a validation 
study. 
Annals of rheum dis. 1994; 53: 525-528 
 
[5] WC Phillips & SV Kattapuram. 
Osteoarthritis: with emphasis on Primary osteoarthritis of the shoulder. 
Del Med Jrl 1991; 63(10): 609-613. 
 
[6] Boyd AD & Thornhill TS. 
Surgical treatment of osteoarthritis of the shoulder.  
1988 
 
[7] Neer II CS, Watson KC, Stanton FJ. 
Recent experience in total shoulder replacement. 
J Bone Joint Surg. 1982; 64A: 319. 
 
[8] DePalma AF.  
1959 The role of the discs of the sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular 
joints.  
Clin Orthop 1959; 13: 222 
 
[9] Neer II  
CS Degenerative lesions of the proximal head articular surface. 
Clin Orthop. 1961; 20: 116 
 
[10] Ellman H, Harris E & Kay SP.  
Early degenerative joint disease simulating impingement syndrome: 
arthroscopic findings. 
Arthroscopy. 1992; 8(4): 482-7 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  11 
 

Medical Services  
 
[11] Roach KE et al  
Development of shoulder pain and disability index.  
Arthritis Care Res. 1991; 4: 143-9 
 
[12] Fries JF et al.  
Measurement of patient outcome in arthritis.  
Arthritis and Rheum.1980; 23: 137-45 
 
[13] Croft P et al.  
Measurement of shoulder related disability: results of a validation 
study. 
Annals Rheum Dis. 1994; 53: 525-528 
 
[14] Croft P, Pope D & Silman A.  
The clinical course of shoulder pain: prospective cohort study in 
primary care. 
BMJ 1966; 313: 601 
 
 
EBM Osteoarthritis Shoulder 
Version: 2b draft 
MED S2 CMEP~0049(e) 
 
 
 
Page  12